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MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:18:07 PM

I am going to explain what ninja'd is.

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MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:18:34 PM

And I, someone who is not AHR, is going to do the same thing.

I, Not-AHR, has just been ninja'd.

Basically, when someone posts what you intended to post before you posted it. Or, sometimes people just mean it to be when anyone in general posts in between them seeing posts and posting.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:19:20 PM by MrAHR

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Fancolors I draw stuff. from Land of the Mamelucos
I draw stuff.
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:20:09 PM

It happens whenever someone posts something before you do.

[up] EDIT: Like...this.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:20:33 PM by Fancolors

CrystalGlacia from Cedarpointland
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:21:09 PM

Maybe what I should've said is that I don't realize my own train of thought until I actually jot it all down.

If description and immersion i what you really want, then, fine, I'll switch to the Matt guy who's been mentioned a few times before. He's blind, and I made an effort to learn how to write with him because he's blind. I know him inside and out. I'm comfortable writing with him. But why use him when I could easily switch to another character that I don't know as well and learn about them instead? Do you get it?

If not, I'll elaborate in the Character Development Thread discussion.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:22:15 PM by CrystalGlacia

"Jack, you have debauched my sloth."
MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:22:13 PM

Even blunt and simple characters can take up a paragraph.

You don't need a page of description. If it's so hard, maybe think about what they physically would do as well as mentally.

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CrystalGlacia from Cedarpointland
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:24:11 PM

And that's exactly what I'm trying to learn about my character.

I'm all for the daily post limit, actually. I think I'm more afraid of being ninja'd than anything else.

Leaving for the Character Development Thread discussion.

"Jack, you have debauched my sloth."
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:25:41 PM

Ah, I get it. Thanks, that keeps happening to me.

OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:27:07 PM

[up][up][up] Actually, "at least twelve to fifteen sentences" is a page. Unless. You. Write. Like. This.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:27:22 PM by OhSoIntoCats

QQQQQ from Canada
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:27:53 PM

But Cyrus just isn't like Quon.

He doesn't think very much, he doesn't have a very rich inner life (like me; very little runs through my head most of the time), he's not introspective, and he cares little about his surroundings until they actually mater to him. He's a trained fighter who lives for the moment. He is not empathic, and like most teenagers, he doesn't really have any meaningful motivations driving his actions, aside from the fact that it's what he was trained to do. He doesn't really know what he's like, and it doesn't bother him at the moment.

Ja, he isn't. Cyrus, as you describe him, sounds much an interesting person by himself. An extroverted, in-the-moment person. Contemplating his navel might be one of the last things he'll do naturally. There are other ways a character can become provoked into changing, or at least re-consider his motives a bit. Placing him in a difficult dilemma can be one test of character. So might another character making personal attacks on him.

Now, as I was typing this, I realized something about my narrations- I try to give a greater feel for the character not through extensive description of every thought running through their head- those are buried in the narrative -or even dialogue, but through how they describe the world around them and perceive other people.

I do the same. I consider my writings as stream-of-thought from the viewpoint character; complete with stylistic choices, meandering thoughts, and kittens. You can have a look at Dramatine, my serial for an example. It's good to consider how someone might look at the world around them.

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:28:07 PM

Twelve sentences? What? No. No way. I wish 12 sentences made a page. My essays would become way more easier to do.

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OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:29:50 PM

[up] Are you serious? My pages are about ten sentences long.

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:32:29 PM

Moby Dick opens with a setting all too clear in its message: Death is inevitable and bleak for even the greatest of men. Ishmael, former school teacher and narrator, makes plans to set out on a sea voyage, eager and ready to sail, even as the world around him speaks a very different tone. Deceased whale hunters are brought to shore in coffins, and the very whaling town houses multiple graves to the numerous deaths over the years. While names are given, very few are remembered for any deeds they did while out in the ocean, and there is no possible way to count ships that were lost completely at sea. Even when Ishmael waxes on about his love of the sea, the life of a sailor is shown to be deadly and unsatisfying in death. Ishmael is not alone in this regard. Almost every whaler escapes to the sea for similar reasons, a desire to get away from shore life and a need to escape the day to day hardships that plague them on land, despite the absolutely horrible fates they are destined for at sea. The implications are clear, no matter how hard and painful life on the sea is, it pales in comparison to the bleak life on shore. Subtly, Moby Dick depicts the harsh sea life as the lesser of two evils. While the death of a whaler being painful and pointless gets established quite early on, the actual day-to-day life of a whaler stays a mystery for quite a while. On the boat, it becomes evident that life is just as painful as death – on shore and off shore. To be completely accurate, there is no difference between the boat life and the shore life, the ship, The Pequod serves merely as a vessel to “…[reconstitute] American culture, in the broadest sense of that term, within an aesthetic framework.”(Levine 242). The shore is not merely just as or bleaker than life on a ship, they are one in the same, each one holding its culture and life in similar ways. Herman Melville recreates society on The Pequod and as a result, the experiences on ship and on land are interchangeable, and both equally contributing to the futility of human life. Perth, the ship’s blacksmith, is an example of the pointless and horrific experience of life on land.

Part of my Moby Dick Essay. 14 sentences. 14 very wordy, abnormally long sentences, I might add. Little more than half a page.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:32:54 PM by MrAHR

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OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:34:43 PM

[up] That's weird, it's more than a page on my machine.

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:35:37 PM

You must be using a pretty huge font, then. Or double spaced. Or large margins.

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OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:36:15 PM

[up] If you don't write double-spaced, where do you edit?

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:36:46 PM

What do you mean, "where"?

I don't exactly print these buggerheads out.

Well, an essay I do, and I do print it out double spaced, but last I checked, that really isn't what happens when you write a novel.

I single spaced it to show that it takes up less than a page in this setting.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:38:08 PM by MrAHR

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Apr 25th 2011 at 6:37:18 PM

I thought most professors/teachers ask for papers to be doublespaced.

OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:37:46 PM

You don't print essays for school? Or are you writing about Moby Dick for fun and profit?

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:38:30 PM

See edited post.

Also, the only time 10 sentences make up a full page, even double spaced, is the front page, and that is with the header taking up a quarter of the page.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:41:16 PM by MrAHR

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OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:40:58 PM

[up] Actually, when you submit a novel, you're supposed to double space it (I know, I was horrified by this too, considering printing 70,000 words out @_@). And, typically, when you put them on a page of a book, the pages have fewer words than a single-spaced typed computer page. Your definition of a page is awfully restrictive.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:42:13 PM by OhSoIntoCats

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:44:05 PM

Fine then.

Opened my HP: GOF book to a random page.

Sentence count: 25

That's the UK edition, for the record, so the height isn't as monumental as the US editions are.

Man, JKR writes really long rambly sentences too. She makes a new paragraph for each one and everything. It's kinda weird.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:46:47 PM by MrAHR

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OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:47:50 PM

I may not write the best-formed sentences, but I swear even in 12pt double-spaced, no heading, there's still only ten sentences with the beginning of an eleventh on most pages.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:48:37 PM by OhSoIntoCats

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:49:58 PM

Fine. Here is a full page of my double spaced essay:

life of a sailor is shown to be deadly and unsatisfying in death. Ishmael is not alone in this regard. Almost every whaler escapes to the sea for similar reasons, a desire to get away from shore life and a need to escape the day to day hardships that plague them on land, despite the absolutely horrible fates they are destined for at sea. The implications are clear, no matter how hard and painful life on the sea is, it pales in comparison to the bleak life on shore. Subtly, Moby Dick depicts the harsh sea life as the lesser of two evils. While the death of a whaler being painful and pointless gets established quite early on, the actual day-to-day life of a whaler stays a mystery for quite a while. On the boat, it becomes evident that life is just as painful as death – on shore and off shore. To be completely accurate, there is no difference between the boat life and the shore life, the ship, The Pequod serves merely as a vessel to “…[reconstitute] American culture, in the broadest sense of that term, within an aesthetic framework.”(Levine 242). The shore is not merely just as or bleaker than life on a ship, they are one in the same, each one holding its culture and life in similar ways. Herman Melville recreates society on The Pequod and as a result, the experiences on ship and on land are interchangeable, and both equally contributing to the futility of human life. Perth, the ship’s blacksmith, is an example of the pointless and horrific experience of life on land. He lost the top parts of his feet to frost bite, he had to sell his house when his alcoholism lessened his output and finally, his wife and two of his children died while they were homeless. On the opposite side of things, there are the sailors who have been attacked by Moby Dick, the great whale known for its ferocity and color. Symbolizing almost every form of hardship and terror that could possibly be wreaked on a ship, Moby Dick sinks many of the ships he comes across, leaving only a few tattered survivors behind on occasion. The duality is obvious: hardships and life-enders are present everywhere, on land and on sea. The lives of the nameless whalers killed by Moby Dick and the lives of Perth’s family

I don't know what you're doing with ten sentences, really. I have 18.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:50:51 PM by MrAHR

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OhSoIntoCats from The Sand Wastes Relationship Status: Showing feelings of an almost human nature
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:51:14 PM

Perhaps your definition of a sentence is different than mine.

MrAHR Ahr river from ಠ_ಠ Relationship Status: A cockroach, nothing can kill it.
Ahr river
Apr 25th 2011 at 6:51:53 PM

A sentence is when there is a period to end words, dearie. Usually follows a subject object formula.

edited 25th Apr '11 6:52:09 PM by MrAHR

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