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Alternative Character Interpretation | Awesome Bosses | Base-Breaking Character | Scrappy Mechanic | That One Achievement | That One Attack | That One Boss | That One Level | That One Sidequest | Tier-Induced Scrappy

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    #-B 
  • 8.8:
    • Gamespot's 7/10 rating drew ire because of the reviewer's noted dislike of the genre (and because he'd never finished a Japanese RPG).
    • In general, reviews that dinged the game for mechanical complexity caught blowback, particularly if the outlet didn't express similar complaints about the equally complex previous Xenoblades.
  • Adorkable: Pandoria has the cute nerdy look and is very devoted to Zeke to the point that she cheerfully imitates his poses during their encounters with Rex and the party prior to officially joining them. However, Pandoria still performs a variety of poses with Zeke during idle animation.
  • Accidental Innuendo:
    • The "secret" Nia asks Mythra to keep from the others during the Furo Scene is being a Flesh Eater Blade, but can seem like a case of... something else.
    • "Tora dreamed of tasty sausage the size of Poppi!"
    • Putting in an Art item in Tora's bag makes Poppi QT very excited. Maybe a little too excited. "Meh, meh, MEH! Poppi's heart full!
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Xenoblade Chronicles 2 is very popular in Japan and is widely considered an Even Better Sequel to Xenoblade Chronicles, scoring significantly higher than the first game in a poll of Japan's top 100 games of all time and with Pyra and Mythra being consistently voted the most popular fighters in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. While XC2 is still generally well-received in the West, it is more contentious among fans, with many of them preferring XC1 and seeing XC2 as a disappointment. Reasons include a much more pronounced anime aesthetic with more cutesy character designs, prominent sexual elements such as many of the female Blades' outfits, the potential Squickiness of some story elements such as Pyra/Mythra's relationship with Rex and Tora's maid obsession, the gacha-like system for obtaining Blades, and an English dub with more inconsistent voice direction. Most of these aspects (aside from the English dub) are much more accepted in the game's home country, and issues with the English dub are specific to Western audiences, with the Japanese dub employing a number of well-known and prolific seiyuu. In addition, more than just being accepting of them, many fans (including Occidental Otaku) like the game in part due to the same issues that others find contentious.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Tora avoids being the next Tatsu, and arguably has more impact on this game's story than Riki did his own. In general, the Nopon have received some considerable Character Rerailment from X, as the greedy part of their character trait is now shown in a more negative light (such as with Bana), while making a few Nopon characters far more reserved. He also lacks Riki's weakness of being unable to fight in shallow water.
    • There are no enemies that hide and ambush you, and can be targetted freely, akin to the first game. Even the enemy type that would normally fit perfectly on Mira, the Blants, can still be targetted and engaged (or be bypassed) traditionally even when they're burrowed in the ground.
  • Award Snub: The 2018 Game Awards failed to nominate Xenoblade 2 for any rewards, despite Xenoblade Chronicles X releasing in the same timeframe and getting some nominations.
  • Awesome Ego:
    • The mighty Zeke! Von! Genbu! Sure, he's delusional, self-centered and a very Large Ham, but his amazing swordsmanship and other Hidden Depths more than justify such.
    • Elma's commentary sounds more like H.B. than her original self. It's possible that she's just blowing off steam though, given she still half-thinks she's in a simulation.
    • Zenobia is an Arrogant Kung-Fu Guy and claims that her firepower is better than that of KOS-MOS if you have them on the same driver. She also loves to fight challenging opponents. Fans don't mind though, given that she's one of the strongest Blades in the story, only being outdone by Pneuma, Jin, Mythra and possibly Malos, to the point where against most opponents she has to hold back just to have some fun in battle.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • The (supporting?) protagonist of the story, Rex. Defenders enjoy how in a Thematic Series usually known for the opposite, Rex breaks the trend in being a proper Everyman Unchosen One who does great things with his opportunities. However, detractors of him believe he still feels like a boring Vanilla Protagonist and generic Stock Shōnen Hero who's the subject of unjustified Character Shilling, on top of an unappealing character design compared to past main characters (along with Shulk) and a voice that, while not completely bad, has plenty of moments where his tone doesn't match the moment. A third camp doesn't mind his voice and will point out some characters' questionable deliveries as well, and are willing to accept his weaker points as a protagonist in favor of his optimism and perseverance, but will agree that he gets too much attention throughout the story.
    • Pyra is widely liked due to her genuinely nice personality and wife-like qualities, such as cooking. However, a good number of people will point out how she comes off as generic, and that she is less developed as a character, ultimately serving as a plot device to her other forms, Mythra and Pneuma - to the point of being completely and unfairly being overshadowed in-game by them. In particular, some overzealous Mythra fans tend to sideline and invalidate Pyra to the point of calling her a "plot device" while calling Mythra the "real" character, much to the annoyance of other fans.
    • Mythra is widely praised by fans and reviewers as one of the best and most compelling characters in the game and the series, largely thanks to her character arc throughout both the main game and prequel, and also being a Game-Breaker in both of her main appearances as well as Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. However, prior to Torna ~ The Golden Country, her tsundere tendencies and harshness toward Rex made her more contentious, and even afterwards there are still fans who dislike Mythra for being unnecessarily unpleasant towards others.
      • Both forms of the Aegis are this as a whole, too. While their characterization and growth as one whole character is interesting to watch and relatable, like Rex, some people think they take too much from the main story away, despite being the plot's main driving force.
    • Tora, just like previous Nopon party member Riki. He's either adorable, funny, and surprisingly useful and powerful with his Poppiswap mechanic, or annoying and creepy with his voice/speech patterns and apparent maid fetish that he initially builds Poppi as a vehicle for.
    • Ursula is one of the better healing Blades in the game but the fandom splits on whether or not it's worth going through her long and grindy sidequest.
    • Dagas. His haughty attitude bothers many of his haters, not helped by his sub-par initial affinity chart. His fans argue that he's a beast in combat once his second affinity chart is unlocked after his quest, and that he has an Awesome Ego.
    • Sheba is either a Disc-One Nuke with a unique design, funny mannerisms and outrageous character interactions, or too expensive to acquire and develop, with a personality that's more insulting than funny, and a non-existent character arc, depending on who you ask.
    • Bana is either loved for being a surprisingly threatening Laughably Evil Large Ham of a side villain and a good use of the Capitalism Is Bad trope, or hated for being an annoying waste of time who ruins the tone of the game and clashes with the main villains.
  • Best Level Ever:
    • Uraya is a very, very vast Titan filled with colorful swampland and gorgeous, varied Scenery Porn. It's also the only Titan in the game to have two towns and boasts multiple caves and secret areas, along with many sidequests including Blade Quests.
    • Mor Ardain is another vast Titan to explore, having a multi-layered industrial city in Alba Cavanich along with different environments, hideaways and buildings to discover, including an entire factory. It also boasts some of the funniest story bosses in Chapter 4, and happens to be Mòrag's homeland and where she joins the party.
    • Tantal is a huge Slippy-Slidey Ice World with lots of vertical exploration, including multiple ice slides and ruins. It also has an entire mini-dungeon in Theoscaldia Palace, with its own secrets to discover.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: Pyra, Mythra and some of the optional blades take up so much of the conversation that people unfamiliar with the game can easily mistake what it's actually about. In fact one of the first controversies about the game were if Pyra and Mythra were too sexy.
    • And it only got worse when they were made playable in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate as now a number of their Newbie Boom fans only know them as the broken hot anime girl sword fighters you can swap between without much regard for their story or the base game they come from. Their attractive designs also lend them to lots of fanart as artists who've never played their game can still ensure lots of attention on social media if they draw them, especially after their Smash reveal. Other characters thus tend to get sidelined as a result or remembered as background characters on a Smash stage. Though there are those who also remember Rex, but as Pyra and Mythra's boyfriend only and/or as "the Chrom of Xenoblade 2" without even knowing why they're together.
  • Breather Level:
    • The first half of chapter 5 sees the party trekking through the Leftherian Archipelago and visiting Rex's hometown. The archipelago is fairly linear and none of the monsters are too difficult... if you go left.
    • Kora's Blade Quest has no battles in it and is mostly just a humorous vignette series.
    • The "Leadership Qualities" Rank 4 Mercenary Mission, merely requires Rex to listen to a bunch of interviewees for a position and make a decision to pick which one to hire. Contrast the Rank 3 quest "A Test of Strength," which involved fighting many overpowered enemies.
  • Broken Base:
    • The art style (or rather, the game's hodgepodge of art styles). Some people find it unique and appealing, praising the variety and memorability in character designs, while others lambast it for being inconsistent and unappealing, with a certain sect of fans complaining that it looks "too anime" compared to the first game.
    • The English dub. Some players praise it for its stronger moments and memorable performances, most notably David Menkin as Malos, and are willing to overlook its flaws because of them. Such fans also praise the dub for having a wider variety of accents (mostly British) to define each race and culture. However, other fans criticize the dub for its weaker moments, labeling them as irritating and narmful (most notably Rex's "airplane" screams in the early game), and also criticize the much more noticeable Hong Kong Dub aspect.
    • Was the update removing the repetition of the Ardainian Soldiers saying, "Think you can take me?! Don't forget me! You're done!" an Author's Saving Throw that kept another "You'll pay for your insolence" from happening, or did it remove the most charming aspect of the Ardainian Soldiers, especially with how much of a Fountain of Memes Captain Padraig is?
    • For players who play with the Japanese voices, the English subtitles being of the dubtitle variety and using the English translated names. Some fans claim that it makes sense and there's no real reason to use the Japanese names given how widely-used and -known the English names are (similar to debates for fansubbed versions of Pokémon), and that it would be highly impractical for the game to replace the names of 80% of the characters in subtitles and menus merely for changing the audio language. Others dislike the dissonance between the audible Japanese names and legible English names (and to a lesser extent, the subtitles not accurately conveying the Japanese dialogue) and wish that there were more accurate subtitles keeping the Japanese names and terms while translating the dialogue rather than localizing it. In some sectors of the fandom, casually using the Japanese names for characters will get you tagged as a "pretentious weeb", much like with Pokémon (but to a lesser extent), though nobody has the same reaction to people admitting they play with the original Japanese voices.
    • Chapter 4, which precedes the much better-received second half of the game. Some people love it for Mor Ardain being a Best Level Ever and it being the first chapter where Mythra can be used extensively, along with plot elements such as Tora's character arc, two outrageously funny boss fights being those against Zeke and "Rrrrrrrrosa", and Mòrag pulling a Big Damn Heroes moment and joining the party at the end of the chapter. Others criticize it for being a slog filled with padding, with the pre-Mor Ardain Gormott/Roc portion being widely disliked (even among fans of the chapter) and gating off access to Mythra, and the Old Factory being a confusing chore to get through. Players who dislike Tora and/or Nopon in general are also usually more negatively inclined towards Chapter 4 due to their prominent role, and find that it clashes too much with the rest of the game tonally (including said Rosa boss fight).
    • The ending. Some fans feel that Pyra and Mythra's Disney Death weakens the emotional impact of their Heroic Sacrifice as Pneuma, while others believe that their happy ending is well-deserved after all the shit they've been put through over the years. There's also the issue of whether or not they kept their memories (and whether or not they should have), which brings up heated debates on its own.

    C-E 
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • There's some dark pleasure in releasing weak, unwanted, or hated blades. Hearing their pleas or angry outbursts is just the icing on the cake.
    • For a cross-game example, many would find enjoyment in beating up Tatsu during the challenge This Year's Heropon.
    • As always, defeating Territorial Rotbart and other strong monsters that terrorized you in the early game is sweet, sweet, revenge.
    • A huge example is killing Malos in the main story's final boss battle, after his smug, Holier Than Thou reign of terror across Alrest.
    • Replaying Chapter 7 on New Game+, because Pyra and Mythra stay with you irrespective of story events, and make the frustrating levels and bosses much easier while also providing earlier access to Pneuma. In other words, you get to sic them on Malos as payback for his capture and horrible treatment of Pyra during the previous "cycle".
  • Character Tiers: Just like the first game, all characters are usable but some optimize better than others. A more detailed breakdown can be read here. Notably, because of the variability in Drivers' playstyles depending on the Blades they equip as well as New Game+ allowing Drivers to de-equip their default Blades, most tier lists focus on Blades rather than Drivers. The only generally agreed-upon positions are that Rex, Mòrag and Zeke all have Blades that make them shine in different situations, Tora is underpowered until he gains access to Poppi QTπ at which point he becomes the exact opposite, and Nia is a Crutch Character who always ends up overshadowed by other Drivers when optimized.
  • "Common Knowledge": Pyra and Mythra are only a few inches taller than Rex as best seen when they are introduced to him, but the fact that they frequently spend time around shorter characters like Rex, Nia and Tora causes the fan base to assume they're towering over most people they meet when in reality, the artbook has noted the Aegis sisters are just average for two humanoid girls. Thus, fan art of the Rex x Aegis girl ship has become memetically infamous for exaggerating how tall Pyra and Mythra really are, a situation not unsimilar to how fans of NieR: Automata years earlier assume 2B completely towers over 9S, especially given that it emphasizes the "stoic, but dominant tall sword girl x submissive shorter guy" dynamic that both the Rex/Pyra/Mythra and 9S/2B ship share.
    • However, the release of Pyra and Mythra in Smash Bros. subjected them to Your Size May Vary (much like with Link and Lucina) where they appear to be even taller than they are than in their main game, with Pyra notably having to bend down to happily greet Rex when he's summoned for the up taunt, almost validating a misconception of something that isn't canon in their main game.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • During the main story, most players choose to play as Rex and use the team of him, Nia and Mòrag team from Chapter 5 onwards. All three's base Blades perform all three roles, and Mòrag is a Driver like Rex, Nia, and Zeke therefore they can easily equip Blades of three different elements and can use other Tank, Healer, or Damage weapons. This can cause some problems since there are segments in which Tora's better as a party leader, especially Spirit Crucible Elpys. Even during endgame and postgame content, many players stick with Rex out of habit and because of how popular and useful Pyra and Mythra are.
    • If one isn't using Mórag as the tank, especially for postgame and endgame content? It will be Tora. Tora may have only three blades total, which are Poppi's three forms (and cannot get his third until fairly late in the game, and it's a sidequest meaning it's very easy to miss). Fortunately? All his Blades are very very good, rely little off of RNG to obtain, and are very customisable. He may be locked to only tank and damage dealing roles (even with the various Role Mods that can be equipped to Poppi), but he's very good at it. On Bringer of Chaos difficulty and Challenge Mode, Poppi QTπ in particular becomes absolutely invaluable largely due to her customizability and the "Speedy Sword" art that she gives Tora, which is by far the best Break art in the game and the most reliable way to start Driver/Fusion combos.
    • Art Recharge (usually found on desserts) is by far the strongest pouch item effect in the game, and the base game gives you access to a very strong dessert (Narcipear Jelly, which also provides a small defensive boost) in the first major area, with money serving as the only limiting factor in keeping a full stash (which can be gotten around via salvaging or claiming an Expansion Pass gift).
    • Certain Blades are considered to be just "Better" on specific characters, and some people would rather use overdrive protocols to move them to these characters
      • Boreas is usually assigned to Nia or Mórag. Boreas is a healer blade that makes its wielder surprisingly durable. Being able to have a tank swap to this weapon will give them some needed utility while giving Boreas to Nia will give her some much needed survivability.
      • Because Roc is locked to Rex and has a Smash ability, while Pyra and Mythra gain a Topple ability, a Greataxe weapon is usually considered best on Rex as this will give him access to Topple-Launch-Smash of the Break-Topple-Launch-Smash combo. However, once Zeke joins the party, he's considered the best Greataxe wielder because of his Arts and animations when using the weapon, and getting a Topple art of his own.
      • Shield Hammers are somewhat of a Scrappy Weapon - with the exception of Finch, who is considered to be best given to Mórag as Finch boosts its wielder's agility. The character in question is an agility tank - meaning that it fits them like a glove.
      • Zeke sees use with all of the Guest Fighter Blades except for Fiora. He makes a great Driver for KOS-MOS, T-elos and Shulk due to the Arts that they grant him, and while his Arts with Elma's Dual Swords are far from optimal, she can still be useful for him so that he can manually activate Overdrive as the player character. Shulk also sees frequent use on Mórag because he is an improved Shield Hammer (a Scrappy Weapon class mostly only salvageable on her), while Fiora sees use on both Mórag and Rex due to the DPS capabilities with their Arts (and occasionally on Nia due to her Break art). Elma is almost always used on the player character for the sake of Overdrive (and not having an AI partner switch to her), but is generally considered best on Rex due to her synergy with Mythra.
  • Complete Monster: The egotistical, giggling Dr. Castrofari has children all over Alrest drugged and kidnapped as fodder for his twisted experiments, which aim to forcefully augment his specimens into artificial Blades. When Perun confronts him on his deeds, Castrofari offers to let the children go if Perun surrenders herself as his next subject—only to laugh and confess he'll murder all of the children anyways, giddily announcing his intention to experiment on Perun until she's nothing but a withered husk.
  • Contested Sequel: Compared to the universally-acclaimed first Xenoblade Chronicles, XC2 has divided fans much more sharply, with some labeling it an Even Better Sequel, some considering it a confusing and clichéd disappointment, and some labeling it as a solid game but not as good as the first. Detractors call out the use of modern anime tropes, the game's humor relying on a lot of Cringe Comedy, the story's tone and initially glacial pace, mourn the loss of selectable gear, and rip into the new affinity system and "gacha" mechanics, as well as the incoherent art style peppered with oversexualized female Blade designs. Supporters praise the battle system, the main companions, the subtlety in the story and character interactions, the story's later twists, and especially the very expansive postgame, DLC and amount of content in general even compared to the first Xenoblade Chronicles. This wasn't helped by the Newbie Boom caused by Pyra and Mythra's inclusion in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, bringing in a new cohort of fans who started with Xenoblade Chronicles 2 and used it as their baseline for expectations for the previous games. Both groups, however, largely agree that both games' area design, exploration and music remain up to par; general consensus among fans of both games is that XC2 is a more inconsistent but not necessarily worse experience than XC1 overall, with more pronounced strengths and weaknesses.
  • Crack Pairing:
  • Critical Backlash: On the surface, lots of people are quick to dismiss Rex's English voice. However, more people who played the game to the end are willing to state that Al Weaver's performance as a whole isn't as bad as others make it out to be, and his yells sound better by later chapters. For the former, people cite how Rex manages to sound good when talking in humorous moments, and even crying, such as when Gramps seemingly dies in chapter 2, and when Vandham is Killed Off for Real in chapter 3. For the latter, while the strength of his yells being as strong as Adam Howden's is up to debate, Al Weaver's still capable of pulling off a solid performance even considering the lack of proper voice direction, such as everything leading up to Pyra's capture at the end of chapter 6, his confrontation with Jin in chapter 9, and the mid final boss cutscene.
    • This is further backed up by Rex's appearance in Pyra and Mythra's moveset in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. While he doesn't have that much of them, his lines completely avert the Dull Surprise moments he sometimes had in his home game. Special mention goes to the blade special lines for their Final Smash, as they sound more energized in comparison.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Flying enemies. They're aggressive, can easily spot you, move fast, usually have long-range attacks, are typically higher level than other enemies nearby, and will chase you for very long distances before being shaken off. Taken together, you either die quick or have a grueling battle ahead of you. And in Chapter 9, there are many extremely powerful Super-Persistent Predator flying enemies that will make it impossible to properly fight the Indoline troops and monsters without getting caught up in an extremely deadly pandemonium of dragons, birds of prey and religious zealots out for blood. Have fun!
    • Enemy Drivers, both humans and Unique Monsters with a Blade. They have access to Blade Arts and have extremely high block rates when using Arts, making your Arts hard to charge. Enemy Blade Arts can apply the same status effects as yours, heal, or otherwise make your battle unpleasant.
    • Scouts/Runners. Not tough on their own, they attempt to summon nearby enemies, up to and including Unique Monsters.
    • In Tiger! Tiger!, the red sharks are the only enemy that actively pursue the player. They also take multiple hits to take down (usually two, but the faster ones in later stages take three). If one of these foes get too close, the player is bound to take damage, losing their power up or treasure in the process.
  • Designated Villains: The Tirkin. Every time the people of Alrest come across Tirkin, they're treated as savage beasts, when in reality, they're a fully-developed species that have their own societal rules and ethics that don't stray too far from typical Alrestian behavior. In Kasandra and Finch's quests, they're treated as creatures that can't be reasoned with, when in the former, they were reasonable until their primal instincts kicked in because of fear of Kasandra's notoriously bad luck, and in the latter, they were just searching for their ruler, who had gone missing. Most egregiously, though, is the Fire Dragons, a group of Tirkin chefs known for making exquisite banquets for the governments of Alrest. At first, the party thinks they're plotting to kill Niall by lacing his food with poison, when in reality, they had nothing to do with Bana's assassination attempt whatsoever. Then, when the party comes across the Fire Dragons again later on, who were just proven innocent, what do they do? ...They brandish their weapons, ready to attack the Fire Dragons.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Turters, Zeke's pet turtle, for being both a Team Pet and a Ridiculously Cute Critter. There's even a Twitter account dedicated to him.
    • Thanks to the Ardainian Soldier voicelines, Captain Padraig is loved by fans even though he's a faceless character and stops being important after his boss fight early in the game. It helps that he has a memorably goofy helmet and some funny cutscenes while he's around.
    • Just like Xord in the first game, Bana is well-liked for being a hilariously hammy yet genuinely threatening early-game villain with some memorable lines and a larger-than-life personality and attitude. His lackey Muimui also gets this (having the same English voice actor as Xord, even!) for the "Muimui not very interesting" gag in Mor Ardain and for his hilarious banter with Bana during the first Rosa fight. Muimui's "We not even flinch!" is considered this game's equivalent of "I think a fly bit me!".
    • Poppi QTπ is by far the least plot-important of the Poppi forms, being optional content, but she is also by far the most popular for her incredible power and customizability and for upgrading Poppi into a sleek, badass Ms. Fanservice.
    • Vandham from Xenoblade 2 is often considered the best incarnation of Vandham in the entire Xeno series. While Vanderkam is beloved for being an over-the-top power hungry Well-Intentioned Extremist, and Colonel Vangarre is adored for being a memetic Drill Sergeant Nasty, Vandham is the most humble of the bunch, has the distinction of being an actual party member, is a Badass Teacher for Rex to perfect his Anchor Shot, and his death hit newcomers hard.
    • Quite a few optional Rare Blades have ended up incredibly popular with the fans.
      • The Guest Fighters from previous games in the Xeno series - KOS-MOS and T-elos from Xenosaga, Shulk and Fiora from Xenoblade Chronicles, and Elma from Xenoblade Chronicles X - all qualify as this for their references to their respective games and for being among the most powerful Blades in the game. Shulk especially, since his appearance in the Super Smash Bros. series was many people's introduction to Xenoblade, to the point that people who played Xenoblade Chronicles 2 as their first Xeno game were delighted to see him nonetheless.
      • Wulfric for being a sympathetic shy, super nice guy who only wants friends in spite of his monstrous appearance. He's also a really powerful Attack Blade that the plot hands to you.
      • Zenobia for being a powerful Blade who loves beating up enemies.
      • Boreas has a very fun and quirky character and is not only one of the best healers in the game, but can be maxed out as soon as you acquire him and is fairly easy to obtain by rare blade standards.
      • Perceval, for being a former assassin that now fights for the downtrodden and an excellent offensive tank.
      • Adenine for being a Badass Bookworm and having an ability that increases a fallen enemy's item drop rate.
      • Finch for being an agility-boosting Shield Hammer Blade, thus making her viable on Mòrag. She's also a super adorable anthropomorphic bird whose forgetful nature is actually a useful skill in battle, giving a chance for arts and specials to instantly recharge.
      • Praxis and Theory for being Heterosexual Life-Partners that share complementary designs and the stars of an extensive but rewarding chain of sidequests that showcases Character Development. The two of them are also capable Blades in their own right, with Praxis being a decent attacker with good offensive skills and Theory being one of the better non-DLC tanks in the game.
      • Fan la Norne/Haze, Lila, and Dughall's Dolmes were all Blades that were present in the base game but weren't made playable, much to the dismay of players. While Lila and Dughall's Dolmes didn't quite make the cut, Haze went on to star in a DLC 30+ hour prequel, along with other fan-favorites such as Lora, Jin, and Addam.
      • Speaking of DLC, the three new DLC Blades - Poppibuster, Crossette, and Corvin - all became favorites in their own ways. Poppibuster is a Light element Blade that can be transferred to any Driver without Overdrive Protocols and is widely considered to be the best Shield Hammer in the game; Crossette has a cute design and personality and is a favorite among speedrunners for her deceptively powerful combat capabilities; and Corvin is powerful offensive tank with a versatile set of skills and a unique weapon that grants a Smash art to anyone long before you're supposed to have one.
  • Epileptic Trees: Plenty of them, mostly spawned by the game's ending and The Reveal of its connections to the original Xenoblade:
    • In Morytha, the card picked up by Rex after defeating the Infernal Guldo is noted to resemble Galea, the human scientist seen with Klaus in the opening cutscene of the final chapter. Galea also just so happens to be Meyneth from the first game, AKA the soul of the Mechonis. Given that Klaus was split into the Architect and Zanza, the latter of which is Meyneth's enemy and the soul of the Bionis, some people have been speculating that the Infernal Guldo is the evil Literal Split Personality to Meyneth, much like how Zanza was the evil half of the Architect.
    • The identity of Ontos, the missing third Aegis core, was the subject of debate for a long time. The most common consensus was that Ontos went on to become Alvis/the Monado in the first game, which was supported by Malos wielding a Monado with similar arts to the original Monado, and Mythra having similar foresight powers that the Monado granted to its wielders. Xenoblade Chronicles: Definitive Edition ended up confirming this, giving Alvis' new model a red Aegis core.
    • The end of the first Xenoblade has Shulk wishing for a world with no gods, with Alvis telling him that it will be populated by many different species that would all walk "hand in hand". At the end of Xenoblade Chronicles 2, the Architect's final gift to the species of Alrest is to disperse the Cloud Sea and have the titans form a new continent. However, fans have speculated as to whether the Architect instead sent the people of Alrest to Shulk's new world without Gods, or if Alvis sent the people of Shulk's world to Alrest instead. Further complicating things is Gramps saying that they were crossing a "rift" when descending into Alrest's atmosphere from the space station above the World Tree, leading to people debating if he meant a dimensional rift, or a metaphorical one.
  • Even Better Sequel: While Xenoblade Chronicles 2 is a Contested Sequel, most fans agree that it outshines the original game in some respects.
    • The combat system is considered even better than the first game's, similar to Kingdom Hearts II compared to Kingdom Hearts. While quite intricate with a high learning curve, assigning different Arts to Blades can be easier to understand than the Arts toolbar from the first game, and is more customizable to boot. Additionally, the Driver Combo and Blade Combo systems add more layers of depth that can result in some truly flashy, impressive and satisfying combat when mastered.
    • The exploration is at least as good as the original's. Alrest's Titans are all Scenery Porn in their own right, and densely packed with sights, treasure, and monsters.
    • All of the party members are equally useful in their roles into post-game, unlike the first game where Reyn and Sharla were much less tactical than other party members.
    • The facial animations in 2 are far better at emoting than the more realistic but also flat faces of the original. That is, until the original's remake for the Nintendo Switch came.
  • Evil Is Cool: Jin and Malos are cool. The former for his tragic backstory and really cool powers to the point of being the main character of the Torna prequel, and the latter for being Mythra and Alvis' evil twin with a hammy yet no-nonsense personality and a freaking Monado. In a 2021 Twitter popularity poll of characters across the entire Xeno series, Jin and Malos claimed first and second place, respectively, beating out fan-favorites such as Pyra, Mythra, Shulk, KOS-MOS and Shion.
  • Evil Is Sexy: All of the organization of Torna, which makes sense since they were designed by Tetsuya Nomura.

    F-G 
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception:
    • Calling the game a "waifu-collecting" game, or judging the entire game solely on the fact that it's Best Known for the Fanservice is an easy way to start a multi-page flamewar.
    • While the inconsistent English voice direction does have its obvious lapses, using said moments to invalidate the entire dub and/or the voice actors' competence is also an easy way to rile fans up. Rex gets hit with this the worst. This is because despite these, the game has hours of dialogue, and the entire cast have fine moments of their own and sound more adjusted to their roles as the game goes on. The same even goes for Rex.
    • Labelling Poppi as a "sex robot", Tora as a Loveable Sex Maniac, or anything similar simply because of the questionable in-universe design choices is another easy flame war starter. Despite that, Tora never does anything with them. It's also shown in the same chapter they're introduced that Tora had genuine reasons for building Poppi in the first place, which are further explored in Chapter 4, along with why she even has such design choices.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • "Train-chan" or "Scottish/British Train Lady" for Mòrag, because her outfit somewhat resembles a train conductor and her Commissar Cap looks like the front bumper of a train, along with her notable Scottish accent. "Scottish (Army) Mommy" is also common among those who find her attractive. As the game's fourth permanent party member, she also carries the name "Four".
    • BaeBlade is used to refer to someone's favorite Blades, because of the pun off the name of a certain franchise that couldn't be passed up.
    • "Zaveid's sister" is used to refer to Zenobia due to their resemblance, same powers, and having the same character designer.
    • Much like Seven/Fiora from the original Xenoblade Chronicles, 'Catalyst' is sometimes used as a name for Nia in her blade form (as said blade has the Catalyst Scimitar for a weapon) to avoid spoilers.
      • Likewise, Nia and Roc are sometimes referred to as "Rex's Story Blades," since receiving Roc coincides with Vandham's death, and Nia being usable as one of his Blades coincides with her Character Arc's conclusion.
    • "Coffee with milk" for Pneuma, as this is what Rex calls her once, and it's a name to avoid spoilers.
      • The name Pneuma itself could count for this as well. While it technically refers to the Aegis as a whole, it's most commonly used to refer to the ascended form specifically, as she had no official name other than "Pyra/Mythra's ascended form" until Super Smash Bros. Ultimate gave her Spirit the name Pneuma.
    • Some variation of "Rrrrrosa" for Rosa, due to Chairman Bana's consistent and highly amusing Large Ham Trrrilling Rrrs delivery when announcing her name.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With the other games in the Chronicles series.
    • The first one, in particular, has been this on more recent times. Aside from that, fans of the first game will be quick to point out Shulk's superiority as a protagonist compared to Rex. Though the gap was bridged via Shulk and Fiora's appearance as Guest Fighters in 2, along with Xenoblade Chronicles: Definitive Edition releasing on the same console with a similar art style and Pyra and Mythra joining Shulk in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. As a result, the divide isn't as strong as it used to be, causing both games to have more of a fandom overlap, although there is still a Vocal Minority of fans who insist that the first game is far superior.
    • There was also a short lived one with Xenoblade Chronicles X fans, since X ended on a huge cliffhanger and 2 was such a significant departure in genre and tone from it (X being a realistic Science Fiction Thematic Sequel set in a fairly open world, and 2 being an more comedic (for the first half of the game, at least) and anime trope-heavy Science Fantasy with a more linear story that is a direct sequel to the first game). The presence of Elma as a DLC Blade helped to assuage the division.
    • Just as Xenoblade Chronicles: Definitive Edition came into conflict with fans of Persona 5, Xenoblade Chronicles 2 has been used to portray the Xenoblade series in a bad light. Naturally, these debates get very heated.
  • Fandom-Specific Plot:
    • A number of fan media show what would happen if Rex awoke Malos instead of Pyra. This then goes in two ways of having Rex become evil like Malos or have Malos become a good guy thanks to Rex's influence and then face off against an evil Pyra and Mythra.
    • The most common depiction of post-game life for the characters is Rex, Pyra and Mythra living together in a One True Threesome thanks to Pyra and Mythra being finally split with Mythra discovering her powers don't translate well to social and domestic life, while Pyra has newfound confidence thanks to her Character Development through the game and handles living with Rex smoother. Some of these works also throw Pneuma into the mix as a fourth addition to the ship or a fusion when Pyra and Mythra need to summon her even though Pneuma's fate is left unclear in the main game.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Though the game pushes Rex being with Mythra or Pyra or both, many fans voice their frustration that he didn't end up with Pneuma as she's the combined form of both and could thus solve the debate if either Pyra or Mythra was better for Rex, and instead hoped for Rex hooking up with a revived Pneuma at the end instead of a split Pyra and Mythra.
  • Fans Prefer the New Her: The Spirits image for Mythra in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate has a fair bit of Adaptational Modesty, covering up her cleavage and giving her black leggings. Though some fans have complained about the censorship, quite a few other fans turned out to like the redesign overall or even prefer it to the original (mostly those who find the over-the-top Stripperiffic nature of her original outfit to be ridiculous), and others have noted it looks a lot like Elly's outfit. It was later added into both the main game and the expansion as an Aux Core for Mythra in an update a week before Smash's release, and admittedly it wouldn't be as well-liked if not for it being one of the absolute best Aux Cores in the game; some speculate that the censorship would have gone over more poorly (akin to the censorship in the Yu-Gi-Oh! TCG) if not for the fun little Mythology Gag added to the original game. It also provides a nice option for cosplayers who don't want to show as much skin as Mythra does normally or can't make convincing Fake Boobs.note 
  • Fanwork-Only Fans: One of the reasons Pyra and Mythra are Best Known for the Fanservice is their vast amounts of Rule 34 from artists who have admitted to never playing the game or were commissioned to do so by people who didn't, but were still attracted to Pyra and Mythra's designs. While this is mitigated by their Newbie Boom thanks to being included in Smash to make them more easily accessible, it still resulted in an explosion of fan art created or enjoyed by people that also have no interest in Smash but were attracted to hot they were. This leads to skewed perceptions of the two girls in terms of their personalities and relationship with each other and Rex. Even Rex isn't safe from this as his proximity to the Aegis sisters makes him reduced to a tool for Pyra and Mythra to dominate, not unlike how the Fanwork-Only Fans of of Nier: Automata and Kid Icarus believe 9S and Pit are submissive toys to 2B and Palutena thanks to the large amount of femdom art they have, not realizing they go through a lot of Character Development.
  • Fetish Retardant:
    • The gratuitous Jiggle Physics tend more toward the comical than sexy.
    • Pyra's regular outfit emphasizes her breasts, which jut out at an odd angle. The poncho she wears early on (and can be acquired later as an optional outfit) is considered by some to be a big improvement.
    • Dahlia (or Tsuki) is supposed to be another Ms. Fanservice, and while she has her fans, others find her Gag Boobs and animal traits more off-putting than sexy.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • It's a given that fans of Xenoblade Chronicles 2 and Expelled from Paradise are practically one and the same due to Masatsugu Saito doing the character deisgns of both works, with Xenoblade Chronicles 2 helping Expelled From Paradise getting Retroactive Recognition because of this, especially since Mythra from the former and Angela from the latter look alike to the point where they can be clones. Designs aside both works also are about an After the End Earth inhabited by dangerous creatures and small civilizations contrasted by a false paradise located in space built by humanity's former dominant government. The male lead of both works is also a hot head spiky brown haired Working-Class Hero from Earth that must deal with shady people in order to survive though Rex is certainly more humble and shorter than Dingo. Meanwhile, the female lead is a blond tsundere from the futuristic paradise who the male lead helps give a new insight of life on. These similarities thus allow for Rex x Mythra fans Dingo x Angela fans to be cross fandom Ship Mates, especailly since fans have joked that Dingo could pass for a grown up Rex.
    • Fans the Xenoblade franchise took a liking to Astral Chain at first sight. An incredibly common reaction to Astral Chain's reveal trailer assuming it was the next Xenoblade game.
  • Game-Breaker: Has its own page.
  • Genius Bonus:
    • The Titans are named for the Seven Deadly Sins. In Japanese, they are simply the traditional Latin names of said sinsnote . The English localization also keeps the theme naming, but it's not as obvious because you'd have to have good knowledge of multiple languages to get it:
      • Argentum: Derived from the Latin word argent meaning silver, associated with greed.
      • Mor Ardain: Mor means "big" in Celtic, and "Ardain" is derived from ardan which is Gaelic for pride.
      • Gormott: Derived from the French word gourmand for gluttony.
      • Uraya: Derived from the Japanese word 羨ましい urayamashii, meaning "jealous" or "envious". For bonus points, Uraya is a giant whale, a species often associated with Leviathan, a demon who itself is tied to envy.
      • Torna: Derived from the Dutch word toorn for wrath.
      • Indol: Derived from the English word indolence for sloth.
      • Tantal: Derived from the English word tantalize for lust.
    • Then, we have several Titans that are named after the Seven Heavenly Virtues:
      • Leftheria: Rex's hometown is Liberalitas in the Japanese version, while "Leftheria" is derived from the Greek word λευτεριά lefteriá which in turn is a shortened version of the word ἐλευθερία eleuthería for liberty. The original Latin meaning of liberalitas is similar to charity, which is one of the Virtues.
      • Temperantia: This wasteland is named after the Latin word for temperance, another Heavenly Virtue.
      • Judicium: Yet another Latin virtue: justice.
      • Spirit Crucible Elpys is named after Elpis, the Greek personification of Hope, another Heavenly Virtue.
    • The names of Mòrag's Driver Arts with Brighid may look a bit odd to the casual player, being all some variant of "Azure II" and then another word. However, there are a handful of times where she actually calls out the names in cutscenes and more significantly during special moves, and she specifically says "Azure Striker: Form the Second/Third: [Art name]." This is actually derived from Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) manuals which categorize stances as "form the first/second/third/etc" and allow the combatant to string several fighting techniques together in a continuous flowing movement.
    • In the "Growing Up" Heart-to-Heart, Tora announces the name of Poppi's planned 3rd form: "Quantum Technochampion π", explaining the name came to him when he was deciding whether to enter a swimming pool with his right or left foot. One principle of quantum physics is "superposition", which states that a quantum system can be in several states at once, even if those states are seemingly contradictory. Such as, entering a pool with both your right foot and your left foot.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Like with the first game, Xenoblade Chronicles 2 is very popular in the UK due to its British localization and the representation that comes with it, this time with an even wider variety of British regional accents in the dub. In particular, Nia's rarely-represented Welsh accent is one of many factors that has made her a fan-favorite to players in Wales and elsewhere, while the Scottish accents for Ardainians are either seen as awesome or comical depending on the character.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • Viewing the Maelstrom cutscenes via the Events Theater and then immediately skipping them results in Rex apparently falling into an unseen abyss.
    • A few precise jumps allow you to go over a particular spot of Temperantia's Ancient Wall. From there, you can explore the massive inaccessible portion of the titan, and even swim under or around the map. Swimming too far drops your character through the Cloud Sea before respawning them in front of the Ancient Wall. The same can be done in Elysium, where the out-of-bounds portion is in fact bigger than the portion that can be explored in-game, and can be exploited even further to end up in the Conduit room or the escape pod bay from the ending.
    • Killing the boss of the Ancient Ship without ever drawing your weapon (only possible in New Game Plus thanks to spike damage) brings up the normally unseeable name of the next area: Dreamworld Elysium.
    • Electra's "Mastery of Thunder" nodes stay lit upon transitioning to a New Game+, which means Electra can complete her Affinity Quest without viewing the prerequisite scenes across Alrest needed on the first playthrough.
    • The way characters' speaking animations are programmed on the field can be quite sloppy sometimes. For starters, Rex's mouth moves when Gramps speaks, just because Gramps is present in his model; also, if a Blade switches to their Driver's top-position Blade after a battle finishes, the new Blade will appear to speak the previous Blade's lines. Pneuma has post-battle dialogue, but it will appear to be spoken instead by base form Pyra or Mythra after transforming back; however, as Pneuma is simply a Split-Personality Merge ascended form for both girls (even having either of their names) and her voice is halfway between them, they still fit.
    • Unless you're standing in the middle of a flat area with no NPCs around, the game has some trouble figuring out what to do with the other party members. This often leads to characters standing in bizarre places, interacting strangely with NPCs, or falling off of cliffs repeatedly.
    • One exploit, titled "auto-attacking canceling" by fans, involves slighting moving the characters during their auto-attack combo. Moving them resets their auto-attacks, allowing players to circumvent the combos' end lag or repeat the first hit in rapid succession. This is very helpful for Drivers with slower weapons but fast start up attacks, such as Rex with the Aegis Sword, as it will allow them to attack more frequently and recharge their arts faster.
  • Goddamned Boss:
    • The Phantasms fought at the end of chapter 7 are the most frustrating boss in the main story. While they attack slowly and don't have much health, the battle can take forever since each Phantasm will summon two new Phantasms whenever it is close to death. There is nothing you can do to prevent the new Phantasms from being summoned, as the Phantasms summoning them will evade all attacks until the summoning is finished. The idea is to kill them all at once in quick succession, but this is complicated due to the dungeon's gimmick preventing you from being able to use any blade attacks past level 1, which consequently means that blade combos can't be executed and chain attacks are less potent.
    • Thanatobeast Andraz, the boss of Zenobia's personal sidequest, is no pushover for a Level 65 boss, with health in the millions and a few attacks that hit like a truck. What pushes it into this category as opposed to That One Boss is that the most dangerous things about fighting it have nothing to do with the Thanatobeast itself, and more so to do with the surrounding area. The boss is fought in an area of Temperantia surrounded by a poisonous pool that drains the health of any party member who stands in it, and if that's not enough the area also is infested with Goddamned Bats like Jadas Upas, which can inflict "Shackle Blade" status, that have a tendency to join the fight if it goes on to long. The best strategy to fighting the Thanatobeast is to trigger the fight, then immediately flee and run towards the back of the cave it just burst out of and hope that it follows the party back in and then praying your AI party members stay in the cave.
    • The Final Boss: Artiface Aion. The boss wouldn't be difficult except for the mid-fight interruption that dispels your Blade combo and the boss's Instant Kill that can only be dodged via Blade combo.
    • Artifice Ophion isn't too hard for a Bonus Boss once you get used to it and are proficient with the Blade Combo system. However, what pushes it into this territory is its arena, which has a walk-off ledge that your character can easily fall off with any sort of movement aside from Driver Arts. Combine this with the fact that most Driver Arts will drive your characters forwards non-stop (albeit thankfully not off the ledge on their own), and the Artificial Stupidity of your teammates walking off the ledge for no good reason, and you have a battle where you'll die more times to gravity than to the boss' attacks.
    • Two other bosses made even more frustrating via Artificial Stupidity are already brutal Bonus Bosses: Gladiator Orion, and Elma in Elma: Redux. They have attacks that create a damaging fire terrain effect around them (alongside other nasty effects) and while any sensible human being would know to avoid the fire until it dissipates, your AI teammates will think of nothing but to Attack! Attack! Attack! and end up dying, wasting your time and/or your Party Gauge and maybe even losing the entire battle for you.
    • Vengeful Waldemar in Blade-Sharp Memory, the quest to get Theory. He has the ridiculous combination of an evasion spike alongside an art that gives him perfect evasion for a short time and when he Turns Red from getting his HP down, he also has perfect evasion for a time. Even if you notice that he's evading your attacks, your AI allies will not and you can't order them not to attack, so you're going to be low on HP for most of the fight, meaning one lucky hit and you're done, even when you're higher level than he is.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • Chapter 5 puts some heavy stubble on as the point at which the game introduces the last of your main party members, allowing players to take proper advantage of most of the game's various mechanics and systems, and also when it begins to transition out of its mostly comedic Slow-Paced Beginning into a much faster-moving and serious plot.
    • Meanwhile Chapter 7 is generally considered to be where the game's narrative truly hits its stride, as just about all the major plot-relevant mechanics have finally been introduced, the writing becomes more thoughtful and philosophical, and the story starts dropping Wham Episodes left and right.
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    H-M 
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Jin killing Fan la Norne/Haze. It's a tragedy when it happens. It's even worse after playing Torna ~ The Golden Country, where Haze says she'd hate to be the Blade of someone like Amalthus.
  • He Really Can Act: Rex's English voice acting has drawn quite a bit of ire, with many saying that Al Weaver is flat-out incapable of screaming. That said, even those who outright don't like Al Weaver as Rex admit that he pulls off sad scenes like an absolute champ, making Rex's Heroic BSoDs sound like he's genuinely upset. More ardent supporters of his performance also call attention to his yells later in the game and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, rebutting that those show that the main game's voice direction is to blame for the improper yells and not Al Weaver himself.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Finch's habit of garbling up peoples' names becomes a bit funnier when IGN made an infamous review of Xenoblade Chronicles: Definitive Edition, naming Dunban "Duncan" and Reyn "Rain".
    • Boreas has already been compared to Kirby due to their very similar personalities. Even funnier however, is that come Kirby Star Allies, a new coincidence came in the form of the game's final boss, Void Termina, whose first form's head resembles Boreas'.
  • I Am Not Shazam: Pneuma does not actually go by that name in-game — fanon merely gave her that name (derived from the original name of Mythra's core crystal) to better differentiate her character from her two other forms. Likewise, the character is not a third separate personality, like a newcomer might suppose — she's actually a combination of Mythra and Pyra's personalities. Nevertheless Super Smash Bros. Ultimate uses the name for her Spirit, which is as close to making it canon as possible.
  • Inferred Holocaust: A small-scale example. Fans have noted that, because of the fact that Adenine decided to make the World Tree her new home, since the World Tree ends up collapsing following Malos' defeat, there's a high likelihood that unless she's brought into the final fight, Adenine ended up dying when the World Tree fell. Even if this isn't the case, she's still effectively abandoned, being left out of Elysium. A mitigation to this theory is how the final title screen (if it is considered a canon scene) shows that the lower part of the World Tree (where Adenine would have been) is still intact (if now a bit lopsided from the upper part falling apart), and close enough to Elysium to be visible (and certainly within flying distance for a Titan ship).
  • It Was His Sled:
    • Zeke and Pandoria joining up, since trailers and promotional material made it obvious. It did have the side effect of obfuscating the fact that Mòrag joins first though.
    • The reveal of Mythra's existence as a result of Vandham's death was a shock to almost nobody, not only thanks to her major prominence in promotional material, but also thanks to her being advertised as a major part of Torna ~ The Golden Country. Her inclusion as a secondary fighter for Pyra in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate only made her reveal less of a surprise than it already was.
  • LGBT Fanbase: The game has a lot of fans in the LGBTQIA+ community due to the varied, attractive and colorful character designs. Most notably, Nia and Jin have backstories that can easily be put through a Rainbow Lens, being particularly relatable to transgender fans. Other characters also get notable attention from queer fans, notably Pyra/Mythra (being the "gateway character" to the game for many fans thanks to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate as well as very beautiful women with stripperiffic costumes and whose voice actress is confirmed queer), Mòrag (being a non-sexualized and intimidating yet beautiful military leader), Zeke (being a Walking Shirtless Scene Large Ham who appeals to Bara Genre fans), Pandoria (a Blade whose English voice actor is non-binary, with a design and personality highly reminiscent of that community), Roc (canonically considered neither male nor female by the game mechanics), Sheba (a canonical Lipstick Lesbian who dreams of an "entourage" of beautiful women), and Corvin (an archetypical twink).
  • Love to Hate:
    • Malos is a monstrous Blade who does some horrible things throughout the game, but he puts up some formidable fights, is the source of many iconic story moments and boasts a fantastic voice performance by David Menkin in the English dub. It makes for a very memorable villain who is simultaneously cool and utterly despicable.
    • Bana is an incredibly corrupt Nopon who sells weapons to terrorists and attempts assassinations and wars just for the money, even to the point of being one of Torna's main enablers without being directly involved. But being a Nopon, he is also Laughably Evil thanks to his ridiculous Large Ham performance and his equally ridiculous Humongous Mecha Robot Maid Rosa.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: A lot of Xenosaga perked up when they saw KOS-MOS had showed up as an extremely powerful rare Blade.
  • Like You Would Really Do It: Chapter 7's climax involves Pyra in an apparent vegetative state, her memories stolen by Malos. Absolutely no one playing expected it to stick.
  • Magnificent Bastard: The enigmatic Jin is a Flesh Eater Blade who used to be revered as a hero known as the "Paragon of Torna". Jin succumbed to despair and misanthropy after his kingdom's people were slaughtered and he lost his Driver Lora, and proceeded to found the Organization of Torna with a cabal of fellow misanthropes. A taciturn No-Nonsense Nemesis, Jin curbstomps the heroes almost every time they meet and lectures protagonist Rex on his own personal failings. Jin's most impressive gambit comes when he nearly orchestrates a war between two separate nations as a diversion to his attempt to kill the Architect himself and destroy the world. Not without an immense level of honor, Jin is ultimately so impressed with Rex's personal growth that he gives his life to save Rex and defeat Amalthus in the endgame, recanting his misanthropic ideals and coming to peace with himself. Tragic but utterly driven, the heroes themselves pledge to remember Jin as a "splendid soul" in spite of his atrocious actions.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • Turters, despite being a Ridiculously Cute Critter that only shows up in a few scenes, is frequently depicted by fans as a being of immeasurable power, and often gets declared the best character in the game as a joke.
    • Zeke himself also gets this, being a Chuunibyou Large Ham whose mannerisms are comparable to Captain Falcon (complete with an Awesome, but Impractical Signature Move with a name that he yells very bombastically). Often, people joke that Turters is the source of his power or the one controlling Zeke, or inversely, that Zeke is the universe's supreme deity and that Turters is his son, and make up Chuck Norris-esque "facts" about his incredible might. Such as Zeke not being the Aegis' Driver because it would make him less powerful. There's some truth in this with his "Unleash Shining Justice" skill on New Game+.
    • Territorial Rotbart "returns" from the first game, and is just as devastating for new players as ever. But also roaming Gormott is the Level 90+ T. Rexpy Ancient Sauros, which while not a Unique Monster, has also gained a reputation for being an unnecessarily powerful newbie-killing monster.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Many players use the Mayne Driver in Torigoth as a punching bag due to being one of the only unique enemies to respawn in the middle of a town. Despite having a Blade, his low level means that it won't be long before the party is one-shotting him every time they pass by.
    • Godfrey is frequently mocked for being one of the worst Blades in the game, even more than the small number of Blades that are even worse than him (such as Electra). Having the worst weapon class in the game (Shield Hammer) with the worst element in the game (Ice) and a bunch of generic battle skills a la Dromarch will do that, on top of having literally no useful Field Skills.
    • While not the worst Blade in the game and still better than Godfrey, Aegaeon is mocked by fans for his underutilization during the main story as well as his general uselessness in battle, being entirely focused on evasion and defense while not having the offensive presence to draw enough aggro to make him useful. It's even worse in Torna ~ The Golden Country, where despite being Promoted to Playable, Aegaeon isn't any more useful and is widely considered the worst character in the game, to the point that Chuggaaconroy treated him as the Butt-Monkeynote  during his Torna playthrough.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "THINK YOU CAN TAKE ME?" "DON'T FORGET ME!" "YER DONE!"note 
      • Has become an Ascended Meme as of the introduction of Challenge Mode, at least in the English version. The description of one of the challenge battles is this: "Imperials mostly small fry, get forgotten easily. But these ones not done! Friends think friends can take them?"
      • "Think you can take me?" found its way into Super Smash Bros. Ultimate when Pyra and Mythra were added, via Mythra's down taunt. She will also sometimes say "You're done!" when swapping in from Pyra.
    • Blushy-crushy.note 
    • *angry Welsh Catgirl noises*note 
    • The shot of Pyra drinking tea in Chapter 4 has also been pretty exploitable.
    • This picture of Mòrag is often used alongside the phrases "This is the culmination of years of training!" and "There's a reason why I'm Special Inquisitor."
    • "I am Roc! Always have been, always will be!"note 
    • "I often wonder whether we are growing as a people... or in fact, regressing."note 
    • "These 'I got KOS-MOS!' posts keep getting smarter/subtler..."note 
    • "I'll bash you up proper next time, I swear!"note 
    • Rrrrrrrrrrrrrrosa.note 
      • "Wrong! But also right! Truth is complicated!"note 
    • "I love you, and all you guys!"note 
    • "Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Everbero! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue! Rogue!"note 
    • Malos the Tank Enginenote 
    • "In Indol, there are a great many paintings that depict all manner of hells... but I think... real hell... might be closer to something like this." Explanation 
    • Simpleton. Explanation 
    • "Indeed!" Explanation 
    • "Flora heals an aching soul!" Explanation 
    • Ponytail Mythra. Explanation (spoilers) 
    • The architect watched too much hentai. Explanation (spoilers) 
    • Spin to Win Explanation 
    • Zeke is Sans Explanation (spoilers) 
  • Mis-blamed: The English voice acting got a lot of flak for some of the Narm-filled performances until Skye Bennett revealed while streaming the game that sometimes, the voice actors received entire scripts without the voice direction or context necessary to make situation-appropriate performances, meaning many of the more questionable line deliveries were the result of the voice actors' guesswork. Additionally, she mentioned that said dialogue was mostly done in one take, which implies that the voice actors probably didn't get to re-do any off sounding lines even if they wanted to.
  • Moe:
    • Poppi is a cute, lovable Robot Girl whose loyal, childish personality and inexplicably American-accented Nopon speech make her a very endearing character. As she evolves into her QT and then her QTpi form, her appearance becomes less "cutesy" and more "sexy" but she keeps the same base personality and stays firmly within this trope. Her "sister" Lila also firmly falls into this trope after being rescued from her brainwashing, caring deeply about Poppi and being excited to see her succeed and get upgraded.
    • Pyra is a sweet, kindhearted and adorable girl and one of the most lovable and sympathetic characters in the game. While Mythra is a bit more prickly, she isn't without her moments of this either (moe and tsundere traits go hand in hand, after all).
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Bana crosses it when he attempts to assassinate the leaders of Uraya and Mor Ardain all to start a war so he can rake in more profits.
    • Freudian Excuse or no, Amalthus crossed it when he had an entire Titan destroyed (or rather, the remnants of its populace as shown in The Golden Country) to cover up his failed attempt to steal Mythra.
    • If you didn't hate Malos' guts before Chapter 7, then subjecting Pyra to the Aegis equivalent of a lobotomy by stealing and erasing her memories just to restore his own power and gloating about it to the heroes certainly will.
    • The villain of Perun's sidequest, Doctor Castrofari, crosses it with his willingness to kidnap children from all over Alrest in order to turn them into Artificial Blades For Science!.
  • More Popular Replacement: Tora is the game's resident Nopon party member. Unlike Tatsu, who embraced every negative stereotype of a Nopon and played it straight, being an unplayable character, and generally being a pain in the ass, Tora, like Riki before them both, is a proper party member. The fanbase for both Tora and Riki are split evenly, as Tora is a serious case of Magikarp Power, eventually getting one of the most powerful blades in the game, while Riki's usefulness throughout his game remains linear, as well as whether or not Tora's increased involvement in the story compared to Riki is a good or bad thing.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The unique theme that plays when drawing most of the Rare Blades.
    • Any prompt from your Driver teammates whenever they carrying out the Break-Topple-Launch-Smash combo. Tora's "Tumbly-Tumbly!" comes to mind.
    • The "Down!" voice clip that plays when a Chain Attack finishes an enemy and enters Overkill mode, especially if it's against a tough unique monster or a superboss.
    • The short tune that plays when you defeat a Unique Monster.
    • The metallic ding sound that plays when enemies attack you during a state where you're invincible (during the third Special of a Blade Combo, a level 4 Special, or a Chain Attack), since it means the enemy's attack just got negated. Especially satisfying if it was one of the enemy's more annoying or powerful attacks.
    • "Make your dreams a reality!" Usually because it signifies that Rex can now go ham on whatever monster you're facing.

    N-S 
  • Narm:
    • Rex's "Chaaaaaaaaarge" and "Taaaaake THIIIIIIS!!" sound more like Dull Surprise or the VA not even trying. Even worse, at the climax of chapter 7, he hits exactly the wrong tone in a yell at the end of the scene, ruining the very emotionally-charged moment.
    • "Aaaaiyah!" A long-winded and amazingly stiff battle cry emitted by Rex, sounding nowhere near as tough or angry as it should. Even worse is because of the Japanese version of the game having done the same, it's done not one, but thrice in the same cutscene, the first two not even one minute apart.
    • Some of the cutscenes in the English version, and to a lesser extent the Japanese version are a Hong Kong Dub. While this may result in a more natural performance, there are many instances where a dramatic line is delivered before the character's body actually reacts, which just looks plain silly especially when said line is Punctuated! For! Emphasis!, such as Zeke's Establishing Character Moment in the English dub. The Japanese dub at least has characters' lip movements animated to match the dialogue in more important scenes, whereas the English dub has no such privileges.
    • While most of the game's English voice acting is at least passable, Patroka's line delivery is often rather bizarre. The same voice actress plays the Rare Blade Agate, who doesn't suffer this issue, so it may very well be intentional.
    • The Japanese voice acting isn't immune to this. Similarly to Japanese Goku (but to a lesser extent), Tora is voiced by Ai Nonaka in Japanese and sounds like a little girl, specifically Kyoko Sakura. While this is justified due to his being a Ridiculously Cute Critter, it can still be jarring for people used to his cartoonish and quirky but clearly male voice in the English dub. Likewise, Kenjiro Tsuda as Zeke can come across as too jarring, growly and deep compared to his jolly English dub voice, much like with one of his other famous roles, but it's still a great and bombastically hammy performance.
    • The completion of sidequests ends with a victory jingle. This skews dramatic quest conclusions, such as Vess' quest, which ends with her Driver dying and her returning to her core crystal.
    • There's also mercenary missions often completing after dramatic cutscenes, guaranteed to create a Mood Whiplash.
    • The cutscene that plays after defeating solo Malos in Chapter 7 ends with Nia hurtling him off a cliff by forcing his somatic cells to replicate at a disturbingly fast rate. Seems like a pretty cool, if a bit terrifying scene and all, until you actually start thinking about the logic of it and realize that Nia essentially gave Malos cancer, something sure to inspire more than a few sophomoric jokes in contrast to the intended seriousness of the scene.
    • It is entirely possible to One-Hit Kill the final boss of Chapter 9, Amalthus, by using a blade combo that ends with a Level 3 special that inflicts Blowdown to make them fall back into the hole that they crawled out of. This is actually a valid strategy for speedruns as this boss falls under That One Boss.
    • Near the end of Chapter 10 you can access a Heart-To-Heart with KOS-MOS where Tora, Drommarch and her driver are looking down over Alrest from the orbital space station, talking about how beautiful the view is. What turns the scene unintentionally hilarious is that this is all happening while Malos is using the artifices to rain down death and destruction on Alrest. Something that the characters are just casually watching. To make it worse, if you already had KOS-MOS before reaching this point in the story, then you access this Heart-to-Heart mere seconds after the characters were saying they had to hurry to stop Malos.
    • The Jiggle Physics in the game can be so extreme it's hilarious. Certain female characters with an ample bust will bounce a lot at the slightest movement (particularly Perun and Vale), including just appearing onscreen in cutscenes even. The latter is usually due to a quirk of the physics engine, where if the camera's view of a character's model changes positions between cutscenes the game will interpret it as the body moving, and thus cause jiggling seemingly out of nowhere as if their chest is alive. This seems to be addressed in the Torna ~ The Golden Country DLC where Jiggle Physics are practically nonexistent.
    • Version 1.5.2, marks the return of the player deciding to enforce this with the characters' outfits in serious moments with the addition of swimsuits.note  For instance, any cutscene in Tantal with the characters talking about the climate of the area (Notably Nia clinging to Pyra) turns into straight up Hypocritical Humor. This also includes the party's defeat and the capture of Pyra.
    • The Ringblades have four moveset clones based on it's animations: Mikhail's fans, Obrona's twinblades, Fiora's knives and Elma's katanas, in which they all have some attacks that has the user tosses them out like boomerangs. While this does visually work for the ringblades and fans, it looks rather silly when it's done with the twinblades, katanas, and knives.
    • Niall's Heroic Sacrifice comes off as ridiculous to some, despite the tearjerking moments that follow afterwards. Players have criticized Niall for recklessly charging straight at Bana, who was just about to self-destruct the nearby Rosa instead of staying in the barrier he told Aegaeon to conjure up to protect the others, thus taking away some of the sadness from the scene.
  • Narm Charm:
    • While some considered the Ardainian Soldier's lines of "Think you can take me?!" and "Don't forget me!" annoying, others came to love them to the point of them being mourned when they were patched out.
    • Malos's voice acting is among one of the most beloved performances in the English dub due to just how absurdly exaggerated it gets. Even if he is Chewing the Scenery at every moment, it's a sincerely well done performance.
    • The whole game feels like the plot to a shonen anime, and comes with all the over-the-top Narm Charm associated with those types of works.
    • Some of the weaker moments in the English dub can come across as this. Rex's infamous "airplane scream" is an iconic source of hilarity for many fans, and Nia's "Here I come, ready or Gormotti!" is incredibly cheesy but is also endearing and fits her character.
  • Never Live It Down: Most detractors of the game's use of modern anime and Fanservice tropes will almost always bring up the bedroom scene between Rex and Mythra as one of the most dubious moments of the game's storytelling and overall quality.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Shulk, outside of his DLC appearances. He's not even seen, yet his one line in the finale is the biggest plot twist of the entire game.
  • One True Threesome: Naturally with Rex/Pyra/Mythra as it's the closest thing the game has to an Official Couple, but many fans ascend this to a OT4 by adding Nia to the mix, since she gets many Ship Tease moments with all three of them including confessing her feelings to Rex during Chapter 7 after revealing her true self. The New Game+ title screen even has Nia tackling Rex out of the way to hold hands with Pyra and Mythra and another one where all four of them hold hands.
  • Paranoia Fuel: While she isn't omniscient, Azami can always see her target, regardless of location.
  • Player Punch:
    • Word of God says the intended way to play the game is to start from Chapter 1-7, then play Torna ~ The Golden Country, then finish the game. Anyone who plays the game like this is in for a really nasty surprise in Chapter 8 when Jin reveals what happened while the credits were rolling for the DLC.
    • Chapter 6. Pyra is captured and set to be executed. You spend a significant chunk of the chapter without her or Mythra. Then, at the end of the chapter, she turns herself in and is captured again, which is played for all the drama that it's worth.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name:
    • Pyrex and Mythrex for Pyra/Rex and Mythra/Rex shippers. In Japanese it's Homurex (which can get translated as Homureku) given that Pyra's Japanese name is Homura, though on Pixiv there is also a Rexhom (which can get transalted as Lekhom) tag that some artists prefer using and may require a fan of the ship to search both tags to not miss anything out. The Japanese name for Mythrex meanwhile is Rexhika (which can get translated as Lekhika) or Hikarex (which can get translated as Hikalek) which once again means fans of the ship may need to search both tags.
    • Rexia for Nia x Rex.
    • Outside of the shipping realm, a sisterly platonic example is Pythra or Homuhika/Homuri for Pyra/Mythra and their Japanese names Homura/Hikari as a faster way of saying their names when they're in art together or a faster way for Smash fans to say that they main them.
  • Rainbow Lens: Nia's Character Arc relating to her status as a Flesh Eater can be seen as an allegory to how transgender people fear being persecuted for their gender identity and how they come to terms with it. Thus some players who identify as transgender can relate to Nia's struggles.
  • Realism-Induced Horror:
    • The feeling of helplessness when dealing with a loved one with suicidal depression and not knowing what to do about it makes up the bulk of Rex and Pyra/Mythra's relationship and the main plot as well.
    • The fear and pain of outliving the people you care about is what ends up not only something that the heroes contemplate in detail, it also is revealed to be the driving motivation of all of the main antagonists.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: Pre-release, Vess was mocked due to her strangely proportioned face and her irritating Japanese voice. Once the game came out however many players warmed up to her thanks to her heart wrenching recruitment sidequest, not having to be summoned through the blade core RNG system, decent English voice, and generally being a useful healer with good field skills.
  • The Scrappy: Common Blades are hated by many fans. Not only will most players pull countless Common Blades when hunting for Rare Blades, but they also have extremely generic and visually similar designs with very little variation (especially after a player has pulled hundreds of them trying to complete their Rare collection). While some of them have their uses, such as the rare Orb Master and Ultimate Combo abilities and higher-than-normal stat modifiers, they remain one of the biggest reasons the gacha system for Core Crystals is so hated.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • The only rare Twin Rings Blade in the game is Dromarch (not counting derivative weapons with similar arts such as Fiora's knives, Obrona's twin swords, and Mikhail's fans), and the only Driver with a Driver Combo Art with them is Nia. Thus Nia is the only Driver who really benefits from investing in the category, while other Drivers prefer Bitballs (which have similar but better Arts, and Rare Blades).
    • Shield Hammers are a mild example. There are two categories of Tank Blades: face-tanking Shield Hammers and dodge-tanking Chroma Katanas. The party's single (standard) Tank Blade specialist is an Agility tank while Tora usually fills out the shield tank role... And cannot use standard blades. Other Drivers can use them in mixed builds, but benefit more from specialization. Most rare Shield Hammers at least have decent special abilities that make them somewhat worthwhile, but most of them aren't the greatest tanks either.
  • Self-Fanservice:
    • Some art of Nia tends to amp up her chest area or her curves a little. While these tend to be minor, they're enough to be noticeable in these cases. This is justified as she becomes an outright Ms. Fanservice in her Blade form.
    • Drawing Mythra with a Tomboyish Ponytail is surprisingly common thanks to Rex commenting on how he prefers that hairstyle on her as Pneuma along with this trope.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat:
    • The biggest one is between those who ship Nia/Rex against those who ship him either Pyra and Mythra. It doesn't help that Rex at one point puts up an Love You and Everybody on Nia, while ironically, New Game+ has a title screen where all four hold hands.
    • Even though the game itself pushes a One True Threesome with Rex, Pyra and Mythra together, Pyrex and Mythrex fans still argue over which of the girls is better for him. One would think that their combined form Pneuma would be a compromise between the two sides, but just end up being a third faction.
  • Sidetracked By The Golden Saucer:
    • The Tiger Tiger 8-bit game in Tora's House is surprisingly addicting, and is the only source of the items needed to upgrade Poppi. Slips into a Scrappy Mechanic when you realize the Master Mods and Light elemental core have single-digit drop chances. Luckily NG+ lets you buy the items outright.
    • Salvaging can also be pretty addicting and very profitable.
    • Sidequests are everywhere. Spotting a new quest marker on the map is an invitation to stop doing the main story for a while.
    • Gathering all rare Blades in the game is a common goal for completionists. Gathering tons of Rare Blades early in the game is a very distracting goal.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Meeting and talking to the Archiect better known to fans as Klaus from the first game and the subsequent re-contextualizing of the entire game is probably the most significant and most talked about scene in the game.
    • ...except for The Reveal that Nia is a Flesh Eater Blade, which is probably the game's emotional scene and its narrative high point.
  • Signature Song:
    • Counterattack is the most popular cutscene theme, which usually plays during moments where Rex and the party have the advantage, such as when Mythra or Pneuma awaken. It also has a remix in Smash Ultimate.
    • Drifting Soul is a track which plays during the aforementioned reveal that Nia is a Flesh Eater, as well as a vocal version for Vandham's death and a cutscene before the final boss as well as the cutscene after the final boss of Torna. The instrumental version also appeared in Pyra and Mythra's reveal trailer for Smash. Similarly to Jump Up Super Star it got rather popular, having almost 2 million views on Youtube.
    • Mor Ardain - Roaming the Wastes is the most popular overworld song by a large degree, being used often in Youtube Videos. It also is in Smash.
    • You Will Recall Our Names is the most popular battle theme, used for some bosses and Unique Monsters and plays during the battles immediately following Mythra's and Pneuma's aforementioned awakenings. Similarly to the rest of them, it is in Smash Ultimate.
  • Slow-Paced Beginning: The plot moves at a slow pace until about Chapter 3 or 5, depending on who you ask. Some may even argue that it takes until Chapter 7 to really hit its stride, as that is when the game finally finishes introducing all its major mechanics.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • In Chapter 2, Rex devises a plan to depower Mòrag by exploiting Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors and sending a tank full of water clattering to the ground. When the top falls off, it looks a lot like a bowl filled with jelly instead.
    • When falling below a death barrier with ground underneath (such as Uraya's tail), your character's model will still be in their falling animation, but awkwardly floating above the ground, letting you move them around a bit for a few seconds before respawning.
    • Female characters' breasts briefly jiggle for no apparent reason when the camera cuts to a new angle during cutscenes. The game engine likely counts this repositioning as movement and plays the appropriate animation. note 
    • Portable mode's low resolution, combined with the game's heavy anti-aliasing, makes everything more blurry than intended. Bizarrely this doesn't apply to menus or the HUD.
    • During in-engine cutscenes there is an invisible field around the party that prevents background characters that perform their walk cycle from photobombing the scene. As a result, background characters will sometimes visibly fade out of existence as they approach the party, only to reappear a few meters away. This becomes especially noticeable when it happens to large monsters.
    • The early cutscenes in Torigoth can run at abysmal frame rates even in docked mode and after plenty of patches to improve it, mostly due to the demanding lighting.
    • In the Cliffs of Morytha, the area is designed to appear as a giant series of cliffs positioned above a gigantic, black pit below the area. However, by walking to the southern section of Morytha Falls (where Machine-Gun Julio's tombstone is) and looking towards the north, it is very easy to see the world's model, instead of reaching down to emulate a cliff, simply cuts off flatly, in a manner very similar to floating Super Mario 64 levels such as Whomp's Fortress.
    • Characters all have various idle animations to help them express personality or feelings. Unfortunately, only their bodies animate while their faces remain neutral resulting in motions where the face clearly should animate to match the motion but doesn't. The only variations that the faces have are blinking, the mouth moving during field dialogue, and changing from a "neutral" to a "serious" expression when initiating combat (the latter is much more noticeable with Tora than with other party members).
    • The Torna Blades in NG+ sport "unique" weapons that are actually palette swaps of pre-existing weapon classes. For the most part they work well (even with Akhos giving his Driver an axe instead of a bow).... except for Sever and his weapon. Despite the sword-like appearance of Sever's Tonfa, it is modeled after the Knuckle Claw weapon class. As a result, his Driver will instead be attacking with the sword's hilt and their free hand rather than with the actual blade. Sever himself will still use the blade in some of his specials, however.
    • Certain game assets may be loaded in before their textures are finalized(particularly after fast-traveling or salvaging), making them appear very smooth and simple for several seconds.
    • Unlike with Shulk and Fiora, none of the main cast recorded any new voiced dialogue for Elma's inclusion. As such, her sole cinematic cutscene has only her speaking while the Alrest characters remain silent. None of the Drivers say the names of her arts and use their generic switch-in lines for her. Lastly, all post-battle dialogue with her reuses voice lines for the Alrest gang.
  • Squick:
    • Depending on how you look at it, the romance between Rex and Pyra. Setting aside the fact that one of these characters is technically hundreds of years old, Pyra has the appearance, mentality, and voice of an adult woman, while Rex looks like a younger teen. Possibly made worse when you realize it's the other way around, and that Pyra has only experienced several weeks of life, outside of the Elysium dream realm, at most by the time she starts falling for Rex. It's not much better for Mythra, who's only been alive for perhaps less than two years outside of sleep and some time in the Elysium dream realm.
    • Tora's maid fetish, given Poppi's pre-pubescent intial appearance, has some rather... unfortunate implications. Mitigated by the fact that he never does anything to or with her, as well as Poppi's other two forms, the fact that she is a robot, and that Pyra and Bridgid punish him for it later.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song: The first part of the background music for the Old Factory/Cliffs of Morytha sounds very similar to the beginning of the theme song for Super Smash Bros. Brawl.
  • Superlative Dubbing:
    • While the English Dub of the game is generally considered a mixed bag overall, there are several standout performances. Of note is David Menkin's extremely over-the-top and fun Large Ham performance as Malos, which has been near-universally praised by everyone who has played the game with the English dub. Skye Bennett is also well-liked as Pyra and Mythra and Pneuma, giving the character(s) just the right amount of charm and likability and pulling off a flawless standard American accent (to the point that some people believed that the dub was an International Coproduction rather than exclusively UK-based). Other acclaimed performances include Catrin Mai-Huw (Nia), Kirsty Mitchell (Mòrag), Daniel Barker (Zeke) who was a personal favorite of Chuggaaconroy, and the late Stephen Critchlow (Bana), who was particularly beloved for his line delivery and comedic timing. Adam Howden and Carina Reeves, who were praised as Shulk and Fiora in the first game, also return to voice their characters as Blades.
    • Around Chapter 6 (where the plot becomes more serious and dramatic), the English dub improves considerably, with stronger performances from the main cast (most notably Rex) and far fewer infamous narm moments. This quality was then carried over and improved upon in Torna ~ The Golden Country, which had a dub that was more widely praised all around.

    T 
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Customizing party members' outfits is gone, meaning you're stuck with the default outfits.
      • Unless you have the expansion pass and are willing to grind for the alt-color outfits (and the few true alternate costumes).
    • The Affinity Chart in the first two games tracked NPC locations and relationships. In this game it's an individual's Skill Tree.
    • Enemies now aggro based on sight alone, unless they're non-hostile. Earlier games had a variety of triggers for enemy aggression.
    • You can't make changes to your loadout before boss fights anymore.
    • NPCs don't have audio clips when spoken to, unlike 1 and X. Hearing them talk in a cutscene can be REALLY jarring.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Roc. Rex inherits his core crystal and bonds him in chapter 4, after which he and his 100% unique field skill play no further role in the story. Especially bad in chapter 7, where Rex wields the Dual Scythes during a cutscene. With Pyra/Mythra being benched in that chapter, it could have been a perfect opportunity for Rex to bond with Roc and for the two to reminisce about Vandham.
    • Vandham. Cool Old Guy with a unique design and good chemistry with the party, who dies in the same chapter he's introduced. His death is supposed to be a major turning point for Rex, so it's surprising how little he's brought up.
    • Tora. Fairly prominent in the first half of the game, his arc basically ends after chapter 4, even though Artificial Blades are important during the endgame.
    • Aegaeon completely disappears from the story after Niall's death returns Aegaeon to his Core Crystal, appearing only in a Heart-to-Heart and a late-game sidequest.
    • Dromarch. Outside of being Nia's personal butler, he remains a Static Character for the entirety of the story. While he is present in a majority of cutscenes and participates in a number of Heart-to-Hearts, his interactions with the cast never give the audience more insight into his character or give him character development. Even his interactions with Gramps, as nice as they are, are few and far between. He gets it particularly bad in Chapter 7, the chapter that puts a great deal of focus into Nia's character development. Rather than seeing their relationship with each other explored, the most we get with Dromarch is the reveal that he was the former blade of Nia's "father". By the end of the game, Dromarch is left with no arc explored and no character development.
    • Dolmes, Dughall's Blade. Some fans were disappointed that he was never added as a recruitable Blade in postgame updates, especially since he sports a very unique design and how some players felt sorry for him being mistreated by Dughall. He does appear as a boss in one of the challenge battles of Challenge Mode from the DLC, however.
    • Lila, who was also never added as a recruitable Blade. Although this is somewhat mitigated by how Poppi QT shares much of her moveset.
    • True Rosa in Challenge Mode. While the fight itself is fairly well-done and is challenging but fair even on Bringer of Chaos, many fans found the Rosa fights during the main story to be hilarious thanks to Bana's and Muimui's Large Ham voice clips. True Rosa, meanwhile, is completely silent and apparently pilot-less, making her come across as little more than a Creepy Doll version of a Humongous Mecha and causing the battle to lack the laugh-out-loud moments of the story ones. It wouldn't have meant much for Bana and/or Muimui to return in the battle, seeing as Challenge Battles have little regard for canon, or even for True Rosa to be piloted by Tatazo or someone similar with a new set of comical voice clips.
    • While many fans were elated that Shulk and Fiora returned as DLC Blades, the superboss battle that unlocks them for use during the main game is against a bunch of generic dinosaur enemies with no real connection to the first game rather than, say, Metal Face or a similar boss from Bionis/Mechonis, which would have provided for a much more coveted challenge and an easy contender for Best Boss Ever if designed well.note 
    • Mikhail, specifically the recruitable Blade version of him on New Game+. Despite being a major character in Torna ~ The Golden Country as a child and retaining his memories because he was originally human, he doesn't have any special interactions with Mythra, Brighid or Aegaeon, three Blades who he traveled and spent time with for the enire game. Mythra most of all, considering how Mikhail and Milton were good friends who were often seen together and how Mythra was close to both of them, and how Milton's death was the very reason why she went on a Roaring Rampage of Revenge and sealed herself away.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • The Garfront Mercenaries after chapter 3, despite Rex being named their leader, come up once more during the story and rarely in sidequests.
    • Rex becoming the Master Driver lets Rex engage any Blade in the party except Poppi. The party never remarks on the ability nor the costume change, and the term Master Driver is mentioned exactly once, in a different context.
    • The scene with Queen Raqura that takes place after Niall's sacrifice. Raqura mentions her suspicion regarding the Aegis, which hints that Uraya could become an enemy to the main party, but the scene has no impact on the plot. It's particularly egregious when Queen Raqura is directly involved in the final Mercenary Rank quest yet seems to have completely forgotten about her concern with the main party.
    • The Internal Reveal that Nia is a blade in Chapter 7. While there is a bit of contention following the scene, it's immediately dropped, rather than used to explore the theme of death further due to Nia being able to revive characters shortly after death, but choosing not to at previous points of the story. The issue is never brought up again.
    • Some of the Secret Areas in the game are disappointing, but arguably none more so than the Lost Capital Judicium in Temperantia. Despite its connections to lore (including its importance to Flesh Eater/Blade Eater technology) and its name suggesting something really important and interesting, it just consists of more empty land with a few insignificant details on the wall. Given that Temperantia has a huge unused area with (mostly) proper collision that can be explored via an exploit, it's very plausible that much more was planned for Temperantia before the final release.
  • Too Cool to Live:
    • A respectable mentor to the main protagonist, a badass leader of a mercenary group with a clear understanding of the shades of grey the setting is composed of, has a unique weapon and Blade, can't have core crystals bonded to them. Yep, Vandham might as well start picking out their tombstone now.
    • Haze/Fan la Norne. Their unique ability to nullify Blades let them hold off Torna and bring Jin down to a level the protagonists could match, so of course Fan la Norne is quickly killed by Jin.
    • Jin himself, for that matter. Face it, the game was never going to let you have the strongest non-Aegis Blade in Alrest, Paragon of Torna, and perhaps the only person who could convince Malos to stand down as a permanent party member, no matter how close to a Heel–Face Turn he gets. While Jin does get a well-deserved act of redemption in finishing off Amalthus, it comes at the cost of his life.
  • Tough Act to Follow: Considering the near universal praise of the first game and the great praise of X, 2 had a lot to live up to and opinions comparing it to its predecessors vary.

    U-Z 
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Previous Xeno games had somewhat uncanny models; 2 has its anime aesthetic to avert that. That said, some Rare Blades look very odd in profile because they were drawn by guest artists. The fact that some animations appears to be the result of motion capture can also make the models appear uncanny due to the mixture of styles not blending well.
    • In the rare instance that a non-top-position Blade engages in post-battle dialogue and is replaced with the top-position Blade before the dialogue is finished, the top Blade will appear to speak the previous one's dialogue with their lips moving, which can be startling at best and horrifying at worst. Mythra inexplicably speaking with Fiora's voice is Jump Scare material for those not expecting it. Azurda's voice clips are also counted as Rex's for some reason, meaning that Rex goes through his speaking animation both for himself and for Gramps.
      "Rex" (Azurda): Oh I'm fine. I like it in this helmet... Oh no! Yeugh!
      Chuggaaconroy: That is the most cursed thing I have ever seen, may we never speak of it again...
    • All of the humanoid Artificial Blades have this to some extent, being obvious robots that mimic human appearance. Poppi has a bit of this throughout but is expressive and adorable enough to overcome it in most cases, coming across as similar to Astro Boy and Mega Man in her first form and becoming an absolute stunner of a Badass Adorable Ms. Fanservice in her final form. Lila starts out as this due to her "brainwashing" making her a mindless mechanical killer with Robo Speak, but climbs out of the Valley when she snaps out of it and her true personality shows through. Rosa looks the most uncanny of all, being a Super-Deformed Humongous Mecha with a more obviously mechanical appearance, but the sheer ridiculousness of her boss fights punctuated with Bana's and Muimui's hilariously hammy voice clips and banter quickly more than offsets it. Or at least in the main game; True Rosa doesn't seem to have a pilot and can send Minirosas to chase down the player while each locking down a segment of the Party Gauge, which is something straight out of a waking nightmare. Meanwhile, KOS-MOS, who is a Robot Girl and an actual Blade here, also gives off this vibe with her blank stare, unexpressive face and Robo Speak.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • KOS-MOS, or KOS-MOS Re: in the Japanese version, from Xenosaga appears in the game as a Rare Blade, based on her Episode I appearance.
    • The lack of any overt connections between X and the first game established Xenoblade as a Thematic Series. So the following characters being in 2 made players really surprised.
      • The Monado, and being wielded by one of the toughest bosses in the game Malos during the climax of Chapter 7, catches players by surprise in more ways than one.
      • Very few, if any, expected Klaus to appear again, let alone be the Architect, but even fewer expected Shulk (or more specifically their voice) in the finale reciting their lines from the final battle against Zanza, showing that both Xenoblade games take place at the same time.
      • The Zohar from Xenogears and Xenosaga, called "the Conduit," is revealed to be the object used by Klaus to create the universe of Xenoblade. Which also has the effect of connecting the first Xenoblade back to to those two games as well by way of Revision.
    • Version update 1.4.0 introduces two new blades : The Expansion Pass adds Poppibuster, an artificial Blade that can be equipped on any member of the party sans Tora, and KOS-MOS' rival T-elos from Xenosaga.
    • Challenge Mode adds two characters nobody expected: Shulk (now in the flesh) and Fiora as Blades for your party. Which means that you can have all the normal Drivers use the Monado.
      • One of the challenges involves Tora fighting other Nopon characters. This starts from minor characters from Xenoblade 2, then advances into fighting Nopon from Xenoblade Chronicles X, including Tatsu, then moves onto fighting Nopon from the first Xenoblade Chronicles, including Riki. The final enemy in the challenge is Monopon, the Nopon mascot of the Xenoblade 2 Twitter page.
      • A later update to Challenge Mode would see the inclusion of Elma, straight from Xenoblade Chronicles X, as a recruitable Blade. To say that players were surprised and excited at the prospect of having every Xenoblade protagonist in the same party would be an understatement.
  • Unfortunate Character Design: Dahlia/Tsuki has been hit with a bit of this due to her extremely large breasts. Not helping is the spread of this infamous picture, in which a player who objected to her design deliberately glitched her model's rigging to make her back appear unnaturally hunched forward.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Amalthus. His final moments come across as this to many due to his actions causing many of the events in the story, and that his supposed generosity to refugees is undone by his desire to secretly kill them all with sadistic glee, eventually becoming even worse than the ones who killed his mother or took for granted his generosity.
    • Malos. His last stand can also come across as this due to carrying out Amalthus' most violent desires without any mercy or question, refusing to defy what Amalthus has shaped him into, and often gloating about his various atrocities. When Rex attempts to shake Malos out of it, the latter shoots the former's proposal down in flames. Like Dickson in the first Xenoblade, despite evidence to the contrary, some people believe Malos too is in total control.
    • Albina in the "Mellica the Chorister" sidequest. We're supposed to sympathize with her jealously over members of Indol's choir being essentially set for life, and her desperation to achieve that status to escape poverty. It's a little hard to, given that she's a child who hires mercenaries to murder another child and receives zero punishment for this. Her target instantly forgives and befriends her after hearing her backstory, while most players are left thinking she got off easy for what she did.
    • Generic Blades can easily fall into this, gaining no sympathy when being released because they're often The Load and assigned pointless/useless stats from the RNG system.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Just like its predecessors, the world is wide open and beautiful. And this time the faces are good too!
  • Watched It for the Representation: A fair number of players expressed additional interest in the English dub due to its use of accents infrequently seen outside of UK-exclusive media, such as North English and Welsh accents on the protagonists.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Despite being brighter and more colorful than the first Xenoblade Chronicles, with a Kid Hero protagonist and a Lighter and Softer story overall, the game is still very much for a Teen-rated audience with its occasional heavy themes (including War Is Hell), moderate swearing and Fanservice, along with the very complex battle system that even many adults find difficult to master. It doesn't help that some children have shown interest in the game (though not to the same extent as Persona 5) thanks to its Animation Age Ghetto-inducing art style and Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: Chuggaaconroy has pointed out that the game can be seen as an allegory of Global Warming, with the main goal of the game is seeking a place which will bring total peace to all the titans, which as a result, will bring an end to all wars of the world. The causes of all the war tensions in the game are because the titans are dying and countries have to take land from other titans in order to survive, similar to how the rising sea levels are causing similar conflicts in real life. In one heart-to-heart, Nia finds out that Mor Ardain specifically has been using their high temperatures in order to make their society more prosperous, but they still have to deal with the fact that their titan is dying out soon. Adding to this, an authoritarian superpower (Indol) is directly responsible for hogging resources and contributing to the poor state of the world, all to reinforce its hegemony and satisfy the ambitions of its leader (Amalthus). All of this evokes not only an Anti-War message but also a pro-environment one as well. That being said none of the developers have confirmed if this was their intention or not.
  • What the Hell, Casting Agency?:
    • Nia's English VA has a Welsh accent that sounds unusually adult for a girl who looks as young as Nia. Which can be seen as foreshadowing for Nia being a Flesh Eater - she is an adult.
    • Despite the fact that a lot of characters treat him as a kid, Rex has a noticeably deep English Dub voice for a 15 year old. The game's improper voice direction certainly doesn't help some moments where he had to yell, which can ruin some of the game's more emotional moments.
  • The Woobie: The Architect Klaus, who as a consequence of desperately trying to save his own world from destroying itself ends up destroying the world himself and sending his colleagues into parallel universes, including his friend Galea and half of his own body into the world of the first Xenoblade. And despite successfully recreating life on the planet he becomes despondent when seeing the new humanity follow the same path as the old one, including their own worst traits. This makes him not even try to stop Malos from activating Aion to destroy everything he created, seeing it as proof his atonement was doomed from the start. Thankfully seeing Rex and Pyra/Mythra's determination and optimism as well as hearing Shulk's last line to Zanza, allows him to finally make peace with himself and create a new Elysium for his created humanity to live in.
  • Woolseyism: Quite a few instances of Dub Name Change were pretty well thought out. Overall, the English translation takes liberties to transform the world into a British-isle-centric mythology, especially with Welsh influence.
    • Numerous characters have their names changed completely from Japanese to English, but retaining their Meaningful Name tropes:
      • A poppy is a kind of flower, and Poppi's Japanese name is "Hana", which means flower. Her alternative forms are puns on Japanese 'net slang for female elementary, high school and college students. The English dub changes this to puns on "cutie" and "cutie pie", keeping the slang while erasing the Squick.
      • Homura and Hikari are common Japanese girls names that mean "fire" and "light" respectively. In the West the girls are named Pyra and Mythra, which are not typical names but keep the theme with a Western bent.
      • The leader of Torna is named "Shin" in Japanese. In English, he gets a Barely Changed Dub Name to "Jin", which means both "man" and "blade" in Japanese fitting with his status as a half-human half-Blade Flesh Eater and also lets him share a name with Jin Uzuki from Xenosaga.
      • Byakko, named after the Chinese mythological animal, becomes Dromarch, after the Welsh hound Dormach.
    • Nia calls Zeke "Shellhead". The accompanying One-Eyed Monster joke is based on a Japanese pun; rather than translate both awkwardly they're separate in the conversation.
    • "Flesh Eater" was originally "Man Eater" in Japanese. This changed in English due to the term having very different connotations, and to emphasize the cannibalistic aspect.
    • At the end of Chapter 7, Malos refers to himself as an "Eraser" in Japanese. The English dub changed this to "Endbringer" to connect to Xenoblade Chronicles X and that game's superboss "Telethia The Endbringer".


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