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The following contains YMMV items to the Twilight series.

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    Unfortunate Implications 

"Harry Potter is about confronting fears, finding inner strength, and doing what is right in the face of adversity. Twilight is about how important it is to have a boyfriend."
Robin Browne (often misattributed to Stephen King)

The Twilight franchise isn't only criticized for "ruining" vampires. The books, movies and followers have a good deal of notoriously uncomfortable aspects to their stories.

  • Edward's behavior is basically that of an emotionally abusive boyfriend, and he has all the personality of a cardboard box. Bella uses excuses that real life abused women use to justify his behavior, such as that Edward acts this way because he really loves her. And at the end of Twilight it's very easy to see parallels to this, with Bella breaking up with Edward while screaming that she never wants to see him again and demanding that her father let her leave ASAP, Edward chasing her to Arizona to convince her to return, and her deciding to come back after being badly hurt and staying in the hospital... with the excuse being that she fell down a flight of stairs.
    • In fact, throughout the series, Edward performs every action that could be taken as a form of abuse against Bella, short of actually striking her, and even then there was at least one occasion where he grabbed her with force that was just shy of doing any actual damage. There was also the time he threw her into a table and cut her arm, ostensibly to protect her from a rabid Jasper.
  • Bella's behavior is just as vile. This review takes Dr. Hare's twenty traits of sociopathy and applies every single one to something Bella has done or thought in New Moon.
  • This article examines how interracial relationships never work out in these stories, how Bella is essentially marrying an old man who doesn't want sex but always wants to boss her around, how Bella, who wants sex, goes after the painfully prudish Edward instead of the man who wants it as much as she does, and how in the end, Bella essentially chooses not to choose.
  • In the official guide to Twilight, Meyer outright says that turning into a vampire causes the person to turn white, no matter what their ethnicity is. This is not so bad, except that in a previous section, Meyer also states that it is the sparkly, pale appearance of the vampires that make them universally beautiful.
  • The entire concept of "imprinting" is absolutely horrifying. As this blog post explains, not only is it basically child grooming, but involuntary child grooming. Meyer frames it as selflessly helping to take care of someone else's child, but all the other imprinter/imprintee pairs we see, once they reach adulthood, are explicitly romantic/sexual in nature. The imprinter basically loses his personality and becomes obsessively devoted to the imprintee, following her around for the rest of her life and providing for whatever need she requires, "whether it's brother, uncle, or father" - so that he can someday mate with her. Not to mention that all other needs become secondary for the imprinter, and he has no choice in the matter, such that if any imprinter was to be rejected by his imprintee, he would likely attempt suicide. So in other words, the poor dude gets brainwashed into pedophilia for the rest of his life and becomes so obsessed with one girl, who he takes care of and has complete control over as the main male authority figure in her life, that he'd rather die than be without her. And this is supposed to be romantic.
    • Let's not forget that the imprinter having no control in the matter, and the burden falling on the imprintee to accept his love, comes across as reinforcing the notion that men have no control over their own sexual desires, so the woman's place is merely to accept his love forever, and rejecting it is seen as an unimaginable act of cruelty towards the imprinter. So remember, girls: if the man who raised you since you were a child, cared for you like a member of his own family, waits until you're an adult and tells you it's your job to have sex with him, and you say no, it's your fault for breaking his heart.
    • Not to mention that this only happens to the werewolves, who just so coincidentally happen to be Native American. In other words, the Indian man instantly falls in love with the white baby and leaves his own tribe behind to move in with the wealthy white clan so he can be their willing servant forever in the hopes that he will someday get to bang their daughter. Oh, and Jacob does this with the daughter of the woman who rejected him, and is explicitly stated to be greatly like her mother. Electra complex ahoy!
  • This page points out that the entire relationship​ between the two main characters resembles more a drug addiction (or lust) than love. Edward even lampshades it in the first film, but Bella also has her fair share of it, particularly in New Moon. After being left by her boyfriend, she has an Angst Coma that can only be fixed with big "doses" of adrenaline in order to experiment extreme sensations that allow her to have visions. She keeps hurting herself but still keeps elevating the doses of danger, to the point of practically killing herself in the process. And this is portrayed as true love.
  • As stated in this review, the concept of immortal children is terrifying. Meyer (certainly unintentionally) implies that many, many children died in the process of making immortal children so that their vampire creators could have someone to baby and drool over; considering how hard it is for vampires to stop feeding and begin the transformation process, it's very possible that countless children died during this process. Not to mention these vampires were stealing these babies away from their rightful families and condemning them to a life of eternal pain (seeing how painful it is for a vampire to be thirsty), not to mention the fact that they'll never mature, be able to experience life to the fullest, or be able to even begin to understand why they're in pain (because of thirst). Also, the children vampires were responsible for the deaths of literally thousands of people because they couldn't control themselves. And yet we're supposed to believe the Volturi are just so evil for putting a stop to this reign of terror. Furthermore, Bella is completely fine with the deaths of hundreds of people just to save her and her daughter's lives because they're more important than ordinary humans. Even other vampires are seen as less important than Bella and Renesmee in her mind, as she's willing to build an army of them to save her. Renesmee is in the same boat as her mother, since she never objects to the vampires and shapeshifters laying down their lives for her and she doesn't even have the excuse of not knowing any better since that she supposedly has the intelligence of an adult. Keep in mind that both characters are supposed to be smart and compassionate people who think of others before themselves. Made worse since their vampire army never actually did anything but talk, the Volturi peacefully left them alone, so all those humans who were made snacks by the vampires were essentially senseless deaths that could have been prevented had the Cullens go to the Volturi straight away in the first place instead of build an army!
  • Roger Ebert pointed out that portraying Native Americans as werewolves seems to imply that they are savage animals who don't like to wear clothes.
  • Reading the Twilight Lexicon Personal Correspondence #12 can be a rather… unpleasant experience, to say the least. Meyer attempts to justify some of the issues fans have had about aspects of the story, such as the Cullens murdering numerous people without any consequence, and it doesn't go so well.
  • Bella is very shallow, as she rejects Eric and Mike, who are nice to her on her first day, on the grounds that they are not as physically attractive as Edward, who is not nearly as nice, which seems to imply that a relationship should be based on purely physical characteristics rather than actually knowing the other person.
  • As pointed out here, Bella rarely thinks before she acts and usually just lets her emotions and selfish impulses guide her actions… and this ultimately leads her to an eternity of happiness with the man of her dreams and a perfect, adoring family, all of whom seem to care about nothing more than taking care of Bella and making her happy.
  • "Things We Learned From Twilight" sums up much of the above very nicely.
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    All The Rest A - D 
  • Acceptable Targets: This whole series for Your Vampires Suck. Run CTRL+F on that page and you'll find 35 entries. Pick up a vampire book/show/game etc written after Twilight and there's a high probability that it will bash Twilight at some point. Hell, even the page image shows Count von Count punching Edward in the face!
    • Within the Twilight universe itself, blonde women seem to be this as far as Stephenie Meyer is concerned. You'd be hard-pressed to find a blonde lady in the series who isn't depicted as shallow, self-absorbed, stupid, bitchy, or outright evil. Even the nicest blondes are seen as rivals for Edward's affections and resented by narrator Bella.
  • Accidental Aesop: Many opponents of the series cite examples of Jacob and Edward's dominance of Bella as anything from undermining feminism to propagating Mormon beliefs (just look at the Alternate Character Interpretation page).
  • Accidental Innuendo: Eclipse, in the dedication. Among his other positive qualities, the author thanks her husband for his "willingness to eat out." One may be shocked by the level of TMI about their private relationship, before realizing Meyer means going to restaurants.
    Bella: (exasperated) I'm coming!
    Edward: I don't want you to come!
    • In Breaking Dawn, shortly after Bella awakens as a vampire she uses some...interesting words to describe Edward, including getting lost "in the velvet folds" (referring to his voice) and his hand being "satin-covered steel". These descriptors are frequently found in erotica (or fanfiction) but are generally used to describe...well, different body parts...
  • Actor Shipping: Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart have repeatedly denied they are in a relationship. This does not stop fans from insisting that they are lying. Of course, a few fans have seen multiple videos and pictures of Kristen Stewart and Nikki Reed kissing and are pairing them as well. The fact that Stewart came out as bisexual a few years after the release of the last movie only added fuel to the fire.
    • Contributing to this is the fact that Pattinson admitted/joked that he auditioned for the part of Edward entirely for the opportunity to hit on Stewart.
    • Confirmed between Pattinson and Stewart, even after Stewart's "cheating" scandal.
    • And now they have broken up again. A cynical man could be forgiven for thinking that they stayed together after she cheated on him just long enough to promote the film release of Breaking Dawn Part 2.
  • All There Is to Know About "The Crying Game": The first book would really work better if the fact that Edward is a vampire was unknown - but the cover of the book actually points it out.
    • The only thing that a lot of people know about Breaking Dawn if they're not fans is that 'the werewolf falls in love with the Official Couple's half-vampire baby'.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: To say that this book series is unpopular with Native American readers would be a serious understatement, given that Stephenie Meyer's depiction of the Quileute people (a very much real tribe) either ignored or completely rewrote their actual tribal mythology.
  • Angst Dissonance: Even some fans of the series got fed up with Bella’s near-constant crying and moping over Edward leaving her in New Moon, especially as it lasts virtually the entire book. Some considered it to be a disproportionate response (she seems to be seriously depressed and even suicidal, all over being dumped by a guy she’d dated for a few months) and/or found her unsympathetic for how she seems to completely disregard her family and friends during this period, even if they try to help her (and in the case of Jessica and particularly Jacob, outright uses them just to make herself feel better).
  • Anvilicious: The first book in particular is made of anvil. Giving into those base desires will kill you! Sex before marriage will kill you!! Blood equals sex equals death equals don't do it!!!
    • Every woman has the desire to get married and be a mother ingrained in her DNA, even if she doesn't realize it; if she says she doesn't want these things, it's just a silly little rebellious phase that she will get over.
      • In the books Bella originally doesn't want to get married and admits to never wanting a child, but after Edward gives her an ultimatum (he won't even discuss having sex with her unless they get married) and she unintentionally becomes pregnant, everything clicks into place and she realizes that marriage and motherhood were the keys to happiness all along.
      • Similarly, all of the women in the books are either married and has children, wants to get married and have children, or regrets that she can't get married and have children unless she is one of the villains or is meant to serve as an example of someone selfish and irresponsible (i.e. the sort of person YOU shouldn't want to be).
    • Don't even think naughty thoughts. Vampires will hear you. And... and... judge you!
    • Your boyfriend should be the most important thing in your life, he should come before your family, your friends, your future, and even your own personal safety.
    • If you can't get a boyfriend you're doomed to a life of solitary misery... and there's probably something wrong with you (especially if you don't even want a boyfriend).
  • Ass Pull:
    • The Big Bad vamps Victoria, James, and Laurent were not mentioned at all until the very end of the first book. The movie rectifies this mistake and has them shown earlier. The role of the Volturi in enforcing the rules of vampire society was similarly introduced out of the blue in New Moon.
    • Before Breaking Dawn Part II was released, the promotional materials and marketing hyped up an epic final battle that was shown in nearly every trailer and TV spot. When the film was released, the final battle turned out to be one of Alice's visions.
    • Also from Breaking Dawn, just when it seems the Cullens will have to face the consequences of allying with werewolves, mortal enemies of vampires, Jake and his tribe are suddenly revealed to be a group of mystical shapeshifters whose totem just happens to be a wolf, and whose powers are completely unrelated to those of real werewolves (or "Children of the Moon" as the book calls them). This comes despite them being regarded as werewolves by the narrative for the whole of the series. And the Cullens knowing they weren't real werewolves all that time. They didn't say anything about it because You Didn't Ask.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Fans were happy to hear that the film adaptation of Breaking Dawn would not end with the massive Anti-Climax that the book had and that there would actually be a final battle. Even though it turns out that the film has it both ways, and the battle was All Just A Vision.
    • One of the reasons Stephenie Meyer wrote Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined was to try and make the point that Bella wasn't seemingly weak and passive because she was a girl, but because she was a human surrounded by supernaturals.
  • Award Snub: Inverted. At the time the movies first came out, they had been nominated in nearly every category at the MTV Movie Awards, and winning every one of them. Because MTV doesn't monitor IP addresses and allows people to vote multiple times, New Moon beat out Alice in Wonderland (2010) and Avatar (both of which grossed over a billion dollars), The Hangover (the highest grossing comedy ever which, like Avatar, won Best Picture at the Golden Globes), and Half-Blood Prince.
    • Got even worse in 2010, when Eclipse beat Inception, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Black Swan and The Social Network in categories like Best Film, Best Male Performance, Best Female Performance, and Best Fight (Yes, the films with wizards blowing up a restaurant with spells and two guys fighting in a rotating hall got beaten by, well, this.)
    • Finally averted in 2012, where Breaking Dawn Part 2 only won the distinguished award for Best Shirtless Scene, the only category it was nominated for. Its four year streak for the Best Film category was broken by The Avengers.
    • On the other hand has been nominated to about every category of Razzie Awards and won none (except for Jackson Rathbone, but then again, that was mainly because he had the misfortune to turn in two bad performances in the same year, the other being in The Last Airbender).
      • Averted by the 2012 Golden Raspberry Award, where Breaking Dawn Part 2 was nominated for all the Razzies and failed to take only 2: Worst Screenplay (lost to That's My Boy) and Worst Supporting Actress (lost to Rihanna for Battleship).
  • Awesome Music: In an inversion to the quality of the films, many of the songs on the soundtracks are fantastic featuring work by the likes of Muse, Paramore, Thom Yorke, Bat For Lashes, Beck, Metric, Bombay Bicycle Club, The Black Ghosts, Lykke Li, Death Cab For Cutie, The Joy Formidable, and many others. The OST is great as well, and the trilogy is scored by none other than Carter Burwell, Howard Shore, and Alexandre Desplat. See here.
    • Special note goes to Iron & Wine, whose "Flightless Bird, American Mouth" was rereleased as a digital single and became his most famous song overnight due to a heavy case of Song Association.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
  • Best Known for the Fanservice:
    • The film adaptations in particular are well known for Jacob and the other werewolves constantly walking around in nothing but denim shorts, showing off their rippling abs. Or Edward stripping off in public if you're Team Edward. Or both.
    • Many fans were eager to watch Breaking Dawn Part 1 on account of the fact it's the one where Edward and Bella finally get it on. Especially as unlike the book (which mostly skimmed over the sexy stuff), the film actually shows the sex (PG-13 sex, admittedly, but still something), which also got talked about quite a bit in the media surrounding the film's release.
  • Bile Fascination: Like a bizarrely-enjoyable train-wreck, some readers can't pull away.
    • Also, those who hate it seem to be just as obsessed with it as those who love it; as though they're perpetually trying to figure out how anything so purely terrible could exist, let alone get published and make money. In pursuit of the answer to this riddle, many of them spend even more time thinking about it (analyzing it and picking apart its every intricacy) than fans do.
      • Although some of those antis would argue that the only way someone could enjoy this series is not to think about the contents.
  • Bilingual Bonus: Readers who understand Portuguese will get a laugh at Kaure assuming Edward is a Lobishomen in Breaking Dawn, since the word (and the legend) derives from lobisomem, which means... werewolf. Even funnier in the Brazilian translation of the book, where they literally translate it as lobisomem, so to the readers is easy to assume Kaure is mistaking Edward for a werewolf of all things.
  • Broken Base:
    • Leading up to the release of the film version of New Moon, the war between the "Team Edward" and "Team Jacob" factions became so intense that Burger King was able to base an ad campaign around it.
    • And the base promptly exploded when Breaking Dawn came out.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: Arguably features a few throughout the series.
    • In Twilight, the ‘twist’ that Edward and the Cullens are vampires (to the point where the blurb states it in some editions and it’s the only thing some people even know about the plot).
    • In Eclipse, it came as a surprise to pretty much no one but the Cullens that Victoria is behind the newborn army, seeing as she spent most of the previous book actively trying to kill Bella and is virtually the only person known to the Cullens with the motivation to create one. Bella herself repeatedly states she thinks Victoria is responsible, but no one else listens. The film adaption doesn’t even bother hiding this fact.
    • In Breaking Dawn Nessie wanting blood is treated as some amazing revelation. She's half-vampire and explicitly sucking Bella dry; what else could she want?
  • Cliché Storm: Awkward, clumsy girl moves to new school and is instantly adored by all? Check. New girl falling in love with the hottest (cough) guy in school? Check. Hot boy falls in love with new girl? Check. Girl is so in love she will do anything for her true love? Check. And that's just the beginning...
  • Complaining About Shows You Don't Like: Lots of distaste even on this wiki, though ideally tropers are providing examples showing why the negative tropes qualify.
  • Contested Sequel: Even the fans became a Broken Base with Breaking Dawn. The Amazon page gives it an average 3-star rating — because most of the reviews are either 5 stars or 1 star.
  • Creator's Pet: Renesmee from Breaking Dawn. EVERYONE who meets her loves her, despite the fact that she hasn't done anything other than be Edward and Bella's half human/half vampire daughter with psychic powers. Many fans loathe her for hijacking the story away from the Official Couple. Others hate her because her very existence is Artistic License – Biology AND a direct contradiction to previous Word of God. Team Jacob fans hate her for other reasons. Meyer admitted that Bella and Nessie both are avatars of her ideal fantasy daughter (though Bella is also an admitted self-insert).
  • Critical Backlash:
    • The first movie is actually regarded by some as being a decent young adult adaptation, while the other movies are subject to Sequelitis. If nothing else, the movie is seen as being much better than the source material it was based on.
    • To a lesser extent, some antis have a tendency to go on and on about how Twilight allegedly "ruined vampires". Whilst Twilight did end up with a glut of imitators of…varying quality, there were and still are vampire-themed works being made that have been quite well-received and feature a wide variety of stories and portrayals of vampires (as opposed to just romances aimed at teens). Regardless of your opinion of Twilight, its popularity also actually helped revitalise interest in older works in the vampire genre, such as The Vampire Diaries and several others. Therefore, it’s probably safe to say that Twilight hasn’t "ruined vampires forever" or at the very least, not to the extent that some people claim.
  • Critical Research Failure: The vampires aparently only go out when it's cloudy because there isn't enough light for it to be shining on them so they won't reflect it by sparkling, but as you see on these dirty tiles here do they reflect quite a lot of light even when it's cloudy, so they would sparkle when it's cloudy as well.
    • Meyer did no research whatsoever on the Quileute tribe, instead creating an entirely new history for them.
    • The science in Breaking Dawn is highly suspect at best.
  • Critic-Proof: Greatly savaged by critics but still a box office success.
  • Damsel Scrappy: Bella Swan epitomizes this trope, even commenting in her own narrative that "I guess my brain will never work right. At least I'm pretty." Add in the fact that she can't seem to get out of any scrape without the intervention of a male and you've got one of the most textbook examples of this trope ever.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: When all three of the main characters are extremely possessive, selfish and emotionally manipulative Jerkasses at best, neither the Cullens nor the Volturi have very many redeeming traits and the story itself pushing jerks to the front, often giving them incredibly fucked up backstories but portraying them rather positively, while pushing the ones that aren't jerks to the background as fast as possible, portraying them negatively despite them not really showing any negative traits, or making them worse in an apparent attempt to make them less sympathetic, it can become really rather hard to even fake that one cares who ends up with who and/or how the story ends because all end results are equally repugnant.
  • Death of the Author: Meyer ostensibly wrote the series to be about the triumph of love over all obstacles. As is well-known by now, it's instead interpreted by many to be a paean to Stalking Is Love, that vampirism "fixes" people of other ethnicities by making them white, and Bella's baby being so spoiled rotten and easily able to bend others to her will she'll probably grow up to take over the world, among others.
  • Designated Hero:
    • Edward and the Cullens are the good guys because... well, they don't eat humans. They let their vampire buddies eat humans, routinely show up the Muggles, use their awesome powers for pure personal gain, and screw up the lives of many a werewolf to get their way, but at least they don't eat humans.
    • Bella gives minimal thought to the innocent people being killed by vampires, unless it's someone she knows. In New Moon, she seriously considers withholding what she knows about vampires from the werewolves because telling them anything would feel like betrayal to the Cullens (even though she knows full well that the Cullens are in no danger from the wolves at all and that helping the wolves learn about the vampires will help them stop Victoria more quickly and thus keep more people from dying).
    • It's a lot harder to sympathize with Bree Tanner when she shows no remorse at all for committing multiple murders and seems under the impression that she is above laws as long as there is no one to hold her to them. There's also the matter of her and Diego suffering from a severe case of Too Dumb to Live.
    • And in the unfinished manuscript for Midnight Sun, Edward is definitely genocidal, casually mentioning wanting to slaughter the Quilute tribe due to Jacob daring to speak to Bella because as far as he knew they were defenseless. He also comes across as a school killer, plotting the murders of his entire class so he could get to Bella without witnesses, and later plots getting her at her home in a way that comes across as very much like he's planning a rape.
  • Designated Villain: James and Victoria are pretty thinly etched, but it could be argued that the Big Bad of the Volturi have, in spite of some questionable practices, actually done a lot of good over the centuries, particularly by overthrowing the despotic Romanian coven and preventing vampire wars from escalating or breaking out altogether. If analyzed closely, the Cullens and their friends' determination to stand up to them seems to be fueled in part over petulance at still having to obey rules even as powerful immortal beings. Like not turning toddlers into unstoppable murder machines (which requires them to eat babies).
  • Don't Shoot the Message: Many, many anti-abortion activists do not like Breaking Dawn. Also counts as Unwanted Assistance.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: "Team James" has quite a following. Same for Victoria, particularly for Bella haters.
    • Aro has become something of this after the New Moon movie came out and Michael Sheen turned in his Large Ham performance.
    • Tyler's van. At least it tried.
    • Jane is also extremely sadistic and otherwise emotionless, but being played by Dakota Fanning increased her fandom.
  • Dry Docked Ship: Some readers believe Aro and Carlisle were once in a relationship, due to perceived Ho Yay / Foe Yay, or at the very least that Aro was and still is very much into Carlisle.

    All The Rest E - L 
  • Ending Aversion: Some fans were unimpressed by the way Breaking Dawn ends. Common complaints include the retconning of previously-established vampire lore (namely that they can't have children), the rather anticlimactic finale, the introduction of Renesmee and the Fan Preferred Couples not getting together.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Many of the side characters.
    • Carlisle. Some of his fans are among those who otherwise loathe the books.
    • Ditto Alice, who counts Moviebob and Cleolinda Jones among her fans. Being played by Ashley Greene helps just a tad.
    • Jasper, redeemed Blood Knight.
    • On the villains' side, you have Aro, though the Volturi in general probably count. Marcus too, for his sad backstory.
    • And Rosalie for some, particularly people who dislike Bella.
    • For the werewolves there's sweet kid Seth and fierce Leah, who has a particularly memorable moment involving a Narrative Profanity Filter. Jacob too, ignoring his jerkass moments in Eclipse and anything after the imprinting.
    • Sam, thanks to his giant black wolf form being totally badass.
    • A lot of the moviegoers loved how Charlie was done. Like Leah and Carlisle, even the Hatedom tends to like him. The Spoony One (referring to him as "mustache dad") even says he's the most sympathetic character throughout all the movies.
      • Even the Rifftrax team like him! they also call him Mustache Dad, mostly because mustaches are a Running Gag for them.
      • The Distressed Watcher says he wishes the movies were centered on Charlie, a silent but resourceful lawman investigating a string of mysterious murders and struggling with single fatherhood while his daughter keeps secrets from him.
    • Tyler, aka "the guy who almost hit Bella with his van." The van itself too, really.
    • Bree made people pity her to the point that they wrote an alternate take on her encounter with the Volturi and even went as far as have her be adopted by the Cullens.
    • Bella's human friends, who seem like the sort of people you genuinely want to hang out with.
    • The Denalis, Benjamin and his family all became incredibly popular after Breaking Dawn Part 2 came out, as their actors managed to make them fairly interesting and/or likeable (Benjamin having cool elemental powers also helps). Garrett as well (being played by Lee Pace doesn't hurt.)
  • Escapist Character: Bella Swan all the way, which is a big part of her appeal to readers. She's actually an admitted Audience Surrogate, being a very ordinary teenage girl who never felt like she fitted in, who suddenly has all these gorgeous supernatural guys (and human guys for that matter) fawning over her. Edward and Jacob are both utterly devoted to Bella, to the point where one of the main conflicts of the series is which guy Bella should pick. She also stands out in the supernatural world due to her unique, nigh-irresistible-to-vampires scent and the fact she's mysteriously immune to vampire mind powers. This trope is kicked into high gear by Breaking Dawn, which details Bella's fairytale wedding and tropical island honeymoon with Edward. She gets to join an immensely rich family who adore her and becomes a vampire, gaining super powers, inhuman beauty and immortality. What's more, Bella is established to have excellent self-control for a newborn vampire, so she doesn't have to worry about accidentally massacring the townsfolk and easily adjusts to a Vegetarian Vampire diet. Bella also has a hybrid daughter while she's still human (and so isn't affected by the Law of Inverse Fertility like other female vampires) who is also very beautiful, gifted, immortal and well-loved, as well as highly intelligent and fast aging, meaning she doesn't have to worry about potty training and such. Jacob also imprints on said daughter, which neatly solves the love triangle while ensuring Bella gets to keep Jacob around as her best friend. Finally, Bella's mental shield power – which is amplified by her becoming a vampire – proves key to saving the Cullens and their allies from the Volturi in the novel's climax, ensuring Everybody Lives.
  • Esoteric Happy Ending: Jacob's imprinting on Renesmee, considering he stated it's actually a terrible brainwashing not long before. He indeed loses his personality and becomes Demoted to Extra, his imprintee is practically abusive to him, and he had to leave his family and pack for good to live with the Cullens instead.
    • Not to mention that the Volturi are still very much alive and kicking, and are now royally pissed off at the Cullens for making them look like idiots. It's outright stated that the Volturi will never forgive or forget the Cullens' defiance. And even if the Cullens went to war with the Volturi and somehow won, they're the only ones keeping the vampire population in check. Without the Volturi, vampire society will descend into chaos and anarchy pretty quickly.
  • Everyone Is Satan in Hell: Okay, some conservative objections against the book make sense, but there are a lot of people who take the most bizarre potshots against it. According to this video, Stephenie Meyer must have intentionally hidden Satanic messages into her series because, among other things, a kid with the last name "Cullen" once escaped a Satanic cult, and the chessboard on the Breaking Dawn cover has a check pattern just like the floor in a Masonic lodge.
  • Evil Is Cool: The Volturi. A badass group of vampire overlords who's mere name strikes fear into the hearts of vampires everywhere, who go round in black cloaks and steal every scene they're in. Some fans only read/watch the books/films for them and they have some fans who are actively rooting for them. It helps that they make a lot of good points.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Victoria in the films, who comes across as The Vamp and gets a make-out session with Riley in Eclipse.
    • Laurent in the book. Laurent in the adaption of New Moon is easy on the eyes too, going around in a nice suit that shows off his chest.
    • James in the film as well, who walks around with his shirt open or off most of the time.
    • Considering the amount of fans they have, the Volturi are this as well, especially Demetri.
  • Family-Unfriendly Aesop: Most likely unintentional; arguably the whole series. Mostly, the implications that your boyfriend should come before everyone and everything else, being a relatively normal person is lame and makes you lesser than "special" people and if your boyfriend acts like a creepy, controlling stalker, it's just because he loves you.
  • Fan-Disliked Explanation: A few of Meyer's attempts to explain things in the series weren't appreciated by some readers, mostly because they tended to open up a whole new can of worms in regards to the logistics of the world. Team Jacob especially did not like the explanation that he apparently only loved Bella because he was subconsciously waiting for Renesmee, as they felt it cheapened the bond between their OTP, essentially made the love triangle that had dominated much of the series pointless, and/or because it had weird implications that Jacob had somehow imprinted on Bella's ovum.
  • Fandom Rivalry: As mentioned on the main page, Twilight fans have a huge rivalry with Harry Potter fans, who were soon joined by the fans of The Hunger Games. To a lesser extent, fans of The Vampire Diaries, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and The Silver Kiss have also waged war upon Twilight for allegedly ripping-off or stealing the thunder of older (and in their opinion, superior) works.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: If the Amazon.com reviews are any indication, a good portion of the fanbase has excommunicated Breaking Dawn.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Jacob/Bella, though the official couple has its own vast devoted fanbase. Team Jacob supporters cite that Jacob usually comes off as far more warm and compassionate towards Bella (at least until Eclipse) compared to Edward (who's a stalker and a bit of a jerk to her at times), and that their bond is built upon a genuine friendship rather than infatuation. Bella and Jacob actually have hobbies and interests in common and she is generally more relaxed and carefree around him (probably because she doesn't have to worry about him wanting to eat her all the time). Team Jacob also point out that when Edward broke Bella's heart in New Moon, it was Jacob who emotionally supported her and helped her out of her depression, and that while Edward has a habit of lying to/keeping secrets from Bella, Jacob is usually very honest with her (sometimes brutally so). In the films, some fans and reviewers feel that Bella and Jacob appear to have more onscreen chemistry and believable development than Bella and Edward (the wedding dance scene in Breaking Dawn Part 1 being an oft-cited example). It doesn't help that Bella herself eventually admits her feelings for Jacob are stronger than she initially thought and that before Edward came back, she'd at least entertained the thought of having a relationship with him. Stephenie Meyer has stated that Edward/Bella were always going to be the Official Couple even after she added the Love Triangle, but Team Jacob still generally feel they was robbed, or that it's a severe case of Relationship Writing Fumble.
    • Not to mention Alice/Bella. She's the Cullen Bella is closest to after Edward; interestingly, when Edward ditches her she spends months pretending to email Alice and she's reduced to tears of happiness when Alice comes to see her. When Alice had a vision of Bella seemingly dying, she defied Edward's orders to actually travel all the way to Forks to see if Bella was alright (Edward, in comparison, just tried calling Charlie, assumes she's dead based on a vague comment Jacob makes and then cuts off all communication to try and kill himself).
    • Jacob/Leah, mostly because they have some Ship Tease in Breaking Dawn and a fair bit in common (such as both experiencing unrequited love and losing a parent). Leah also doesn't jerk him around and play with his emotions, telling him exactly she thinks and feels, while still being loyal and compassionate towards him. That, and some people just think Leah deserves some happiness after all the crap that's happened to her.
    • Among Jacob/Leah shippers, Nessie/Seth sounds like a better imprinted couple, given that Seth has a pure mind and already likes vampires and is at least younger, so him waiting for Nessie to grow up is easier to buy as a relationship. Or, alternatively, Nessie/Nahuel, which is even hinted at in the freaking book at the end, despite the whole business with Jacob being Nessie's "soulmate".
    • Bella/Tyler's Van. To be fair, that van was totally going to smash her until Edward got in the way.
    • In the movies, some viewers believe Jacob and Alice have more chemistry in a single scene than Alice and Jasper do in any of the films (mostly in the form of apparent Belligerent Sexual Tension; comparatively, Alice and Jasper barely interact beyond Alice toting Jasper around by the hand to stop him from murdering random people).
    • There's a reasonably sized fanbase who ship Aro and Carlisle together, or at the very least are convinced they were once lovers. The fact that they once lived together, Aro found Carlisle fascinating and is still more than a little obsessed with the Cullens, Aro is from Ancient Greece (where homosexuality was more or less socially accepted), and that there's an extended scene in Breaking Dawn Part 1 where Aro is positively thrilled to get a letter from Carlisle and gets ticked off at his secretary for spelling Carlisle's name wrong just adds more fuel to the fire.
  • Faux Symbolism: The author tries to invoke this with references to the forbidden fruit and the lion and the lamb, but seems to have a poor understanding of what those things mean so it doesn't really work. Especially bad since Stephenie Meyer is a Mormon and presumably went to Sunday school in her youth.
    • To address the former, it's supposed to be about exciting but dangerous knowledge, and being pulled from the confines of your safe reality forever (finding out vampires are real and the hot, moody boy you've been swooning over is one). But Bella despises living in Forks, looks down on most of the normal people in her life in one way or another, and obviously places little to no value on living the way she is when the story begins (she says she'd gladly die for any of the Cullens' sake so many times it practically becomes a catchphrase). What she stands to gain from hanging around the Cullens (love, power, wealth, simple excitement) far outweighs anything she has to lose, and she never thinks twice about accepting. Having accepted, whenever something bad happens that might reasonably cause her to step back and rethink her situation, she always uses it as a reason to try to go even deeper (I.e. They find out an evil vampire's probably out to get Bella. She presents that as evidence that she needs to be turned into a vampire right away). Eating the apple's her ticket into paradise, not out.
  • First Installment Wins: Particularly when it comes to the film adaptations, Twilight is generally viewed as being the best in the series and is also the most well-known amongst the general public.
  • Foe Yay Shipping: Like you wouldn't believe. Victoria/Bella, Rosalie/Bella, Rosalie/Jacob, Alice/Jacob and Edward/Jacob are among the most popular.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • Some older Twilight fans – mostly so-called "Twi-moms" – are friendly with fans of Fifty Shades of Grey. It's understandable, considering that Fifty Shades started out as an Alternate Universe Twilight fanfiction written by an older fan, E.L James. Stephenie Meyer herself said she was glad James had found success but that personally erotica was "not [her] thing".
    • Some fans of The Vampire Diaries (more so the TV show than the books) actually do like Twilight as well, while others are more disdainful.
    • There's a bit of this between fans of Twilight and fans of Red Riding Hood and Snow White and the Huntsman – they're both dark fantasy films with romance and love triangles; Red Riding Hood has werewolves, Billy Burke and was directed by Catherine Hardwick (who also directed the first Twilight film), while Snow White and the Huntsman also stars Kristen Stewart. Although, the friendliness with Snow White had a bit of a damper put on it when it was revealed Stewart had had an affair with the director while still in a relationship with Robert Pattinson...
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: Breaking Dawn Part 2 is this now that Kristen and Rob have broken up due to her infidelity.
  • Gateway Series: For some fans, Twilight served as a gateway that got them into paranormal fiction, in particular Vampire Fiction.
  • Girl-Show Ghetto: While Twilight has a lot of reasons to be hated, many have started to note that a lot of the hate tends to have a certain Double Standard compared to similarly flawed works that are instead targeted towards men. Given how a good number of those who complain about Twilight tend to focus on elements such as Edward's lack of masculinity, Bella being a Distressed Damsel, the sparkly vampires, and the fact it's popular with young women, rather than the Unfortunate Implications noted above or its more legitimate flaws, other famous works with similar problems in their writing, such as a number of action, sci-fi, and superhero films (IE, the kind aimed at men), tend to get far less mockery and criticism.
    • Then again, in spite of the polarizing critical reaction to the series, both the books and the films have been massively successful commercially. When combined, the films made over $3.3 billion at the box office and all four main novels and some of the companion books appeared at the top of bestseller lists. It's actually been suggested that the success of the Twilight movies – all of which were written by a woman and starred a female lead (and in the case of the first movie, directed by a woman too) – was uncommon back when the franchise was first released and proved that so-called 'girly' films could actually be profitable and popular, paving the way for franchises like The Hunger Games, Frozen and even Wonder Woman (2017) (all of which were financially successful and generally well-received critically).
  • Ham and Cheese:
    • Everything about Robert Pattinson's performance as Edward.
    • In the film of New Moon, Dakota Fanning managed to rival him despite having a grand total of five lines.
    • You can really see Pattinson giving up at trying at all in Eclipse and deciding to just have fun, making his scenes far more enjoyable than the book counterpart. (Probably helped since in an interview he mentioned being super tired and busy from other projects while filming and barely remembers filming the movie.)
    • Michael Sheen as Aro, too, promptly stealing the show.
      • Especially in the Sequel Hook of Breaking Dawn Part 1.
      • Not to mention having an absolute blast in Part 2.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • When Edward leaves Bella in New Moon, she breaks down and remains almost catatonic for months. This foreshadowed Kristen Stewart's reaction to her highly publicized breakup with Robert Pattinson in 2012.
    • Some of the more unintentionally troubling aspects to some of the werewolves’ relationships (Sam ripped half his girlfriend's face off when she rejected him, Jacob acts like a petulant and aggressive Jerkass around Bella and forcibly kisses her and then there's the whole imprinting on toddlers business) get even more uncomfortable if you’re aware of the depressingly high rates of domestic and sexual violence perpetrated against Native American people.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Jacob has a sister named Rebecca.
    • Dakota Fanning plays Jane, a vampire, in the film adaptations. Her little sister Elle would eventually also play a vampire in Francis Ford Coppola's 2011 film Twixt.
    • Two words: Twilight Sparkle.
    • Melissa Rosenberg, writer of all five film adaptations, later became the show runner for Jessica Jones (2015), which takes many of the Unfortunate Implications Twilight is often accused of and plays them all for the drama they'd have in the real world, with a hero who's Bella Swan's polar opposite.
    • The amount of conservative Christian agenda-pushing by Meyer in the books, as well as the amount of Les Yay Bella gets from other women, is definitely this in light of Kristen Stewart admitting that she liked girls several years after the release of the final film.
    • Edward can be compared to Raphael Solano in Jane the Virgin. Like Edward, he is the Veronica to Michael's Betty, as Edward is the Veronica to Jacob's Betty. They both have the same callous, self-pitying attitude, and families a touch on the bloodthirsty side (in that, Raphael's mother and stepmother are both crime lords). What makes this Hilarious In Hindsight? They share a German voice actor!
    • In the Japanese dub of the movie, Takahiro Sakurai voices Edward Cullen. This is even funnier if you already know that Sakurai voiced in the Japanese version of Castlevania: Portrait of Ruin the main hero Jonathan Morris, a Vampire Hunter. He also voiced Rui Mukami, another vampire, in Diabolik Lovers, who is the complete opposite of Edward in every aspect.
    • The final book in the series is known for being the most polarising even amongst hardcore fans and is called Breaking Dawn.
    • Robert Pattinson was playing a bat related monster, come 2019 he's now playing a hero inspire by a bat as he's been announce to replace Ben Affleck as Batman. Leading to a lot of jokes where Bella admits to knowing Edward's real secret as Batman.
  • Hollywood Homely: Bella. She's supposed to be a "plain Jane", yet describes what she's apparently supposed to see as negative attributes in terms of glowing beauty, like "ivory-skinned", "chocolate brown eyes", "slender but soft". This could be purple prose, or her "plainness" could be like a size 2 complaining how fat she is so everyone will tell her how she's really thin and beautiful. Moreover, her actress Kristen Stewart is a quite good-looking woman and Stephanie Meyer originally wanted Emily Browning to play Bella. Although, it could simply be that Bella suffers from low self-esteem. She also averts plain in the graphic novel.
    • There could be some form of in-universe Fridge Brilliance for this - Bella spent most of her life in Arizona where apparently the girls were all tall, tan, athletic, and blonde, the total opposite of what Bella is, so she likely always felt like an awkward ugly duckling. Then she moves to Forks where pale skin is the norm and is seen as beautiful. She came to school expecting to be treated as an outcast like she was in Arizona but instead finds herself welcomed. In her head though, she's still got this narrow picture of what beautiful is and she's spent so long resigning herself to the fact that she isn't like those tall blonde athletes she can't see that she is pretty on her own merits. When she wakes up in the book as a vampire, she expects to be beautiful but is shocked to find she doesn't look that much different, meaning she's always been pretty, she was just incapable of seeing it. So, yes, self-image issues could be the root of the dissonance.
  • Ho Yay: Loads of this, usually unintentional, between Edward and most other males such as Jacob. One assumes that Stephenie Meyer was unaware of the implications of biting pillows, breaking headboards, and Carlisle selecting a handsome teenage boy as his "companion" in vampirism (rather than say, a pretty woman).
    • The Romanian vampires, Vladmir and Stefan. Not only do they live and travel together, but they finish each other's sentences.
    • Believe it or not, Stephenie Meyer's joke story "Breaking Down" included Mike leaving Bella for Eric.
    • The Volturi. Primarily because the leaders are a bunch of Greek and Roman dudes who all constantly hang out together in lieu of their wives, who are barely mentioned. Aro in particular, considering his obsession with Carlisle and the fact he murdered his own sister to keep her husband, Marcus, from leaving him...
    • Or all the Riley/Diego subtext as seen in "Life Packs A Punch".
    • The scene with Jacob stripping down in front of Charlie in the woods is filled with this.
    • A fair bit between Aro and Carlisle. As mentioned in Fan-Preferred Couple, they used to live together and Aro seems very, very fond of Carlisle and his family, to the point of obsession. Aro is apparently married to woman named Sulpicia, but he barely mentions her and is never seen interacting with her, preferring the company of his male companions, which once included Carlisle. Carlisle himself once painted Aro as a god and protests Edward's suggestion that Aro is behind the newborn army, apparently believing him incapable of hurting them that way. Aro seems rather desperate to make amends with Carlisle after the almost-battle in Breaking Dawn, asking if this will hurt their friendship at all and clearly still thinks fondly of him after centuries. Carlisle seems to respect Aro too and teaches his family to respect and obey the Volturi. Then there's the whole thing about Carlisle first meeting Aro as a relatively young vampire, with the older and more experienced Aro (who originated from Ancient Greece) taking him under his wing to teach him their ways. Not to mention that after leaving the Volturi, Carlisle selected Edward - a handsome teen boy - as his new companion.
      • And the whole part about Carlisle leaving Aro due to a disagreement over the morality of feeding off humans is rather reminiscent of another pair of vampires whose relationship was dripping in Ho Yay.
  • Idiot Plot: Almost every plot point in the first book is brought about by one or more characters being stupid. Hasn't Carlisle ever heard of homeschooling?
    • In Eclipse, the Cullens, Bella, and the wolves wonder who could be behind the strange vampire activity in Seattle. While they also know full well that Victoria is in the area and trying to kill Bella.
    • A large chunk of the conflict in the latter half of New Moon could have been averted, had anyone thought to use a telephone—or had Jacob not decided to answer Bella's phone for her (which was a Jerk Ass thing to do anyway, since she was sitting right there). They also could have been sensible enough to go on more than just Alice's vision, since she herself had admitted her powers weren't always precise or accurate. (One can't really accuse any of the Cullen "kids" of much sense, but Carlisle was a practical person who probably should have thought of that.)
      • Or why Edward didn't call Alice's cellphone, seeing as he knew she had one and knew that she was in Forks and could definitely say if Bella was dead or not. He even comments later that he should have done that!
      • For that matter, why even go to the Volturi to commit suicide in the first place? The book plays it up as Cannot Self Terminate, but a vampire's only weakness is stated to be fire because their biology makes them highly flammable. Dismembering them comes in handy when you have to murder them, but that they can survive: what kills them is fire. Why couldn't Edward just build up a pyre and fling himself into it, instead of going to the Volturi and possibly endangering his entire coven for breaching The Masquerade?
    • And there's plenty more where that came from.
  • Inferred Holocaust: Breaking Dawn ends with the Volturi admitting defeat and leaving the Cullens alone and Bella and Edward being left to have a happy marriage for eternity, with no one else wanting to shanghai members of the family or kill their daughter. They all apparently have forgotten that Aro touched Edward's hand during the climax, giving him access to all of Edward's thoughts so he now has knowledge of all of the powers of the gathered vampires, including Bella, who was supposed to be the secret ace-in-the-hole. That, coupled with the book's insistence that the Volturi would never give up trying to have their way, has led a number of people to comment that Bella and Edward's happily ever after will probably be interrupted when the Volturi come back to kill them which the Cullens won't be able to see coming because the Volturi now know how to block out Alice's visions completely and are going to visit the people they need to be around to do so.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • Criticizing the franchise in some online circles could potentially earn you the ire of its devoted fanbase, some of whom can be extremely vehement in their defense of the series (although these particular fans do seem to be a Vocal Minority).
    • Alternatively, admitting you like the series, even just as a Guilty Pleasure, can potentially bring the wrath of the more hardcore members of the hatedom down upon you (again, this seems to be a case of Vocal Minority).
    • Within the fandom itself, the online war between Team Edward and Team Jacob could get pretty intense at times.
  • It Was His Sled:
    • Believe it or not, Edward being a vampire is supposed to be the major twist of book one. In fact, Eclipse is the only book not to spend its whole first half building to a twist everyone already knows; the others are that Jacob is a werewolf, and Bella has a baby that Jacob imprints on. In some copies of the first novel, it straight up tells you Edward is a vampire on the blurb.
    • Eclipse had one - it was that the vampire population surge in Seattle was an army being created by Victoria to offset the twenty-some supernatural creatures protecting Bella. That one was arguably the worst of the lot, since Bella had known for two-thirds of the previous book that Victoria was out for revenge on her. But the Cullens apparently thought Victoria wasn't capable of figuring out she was outnumbered and getting reinforcements. Even though Jasper once did the exact same thing she was doing.
    • Bella picks Edward. Doubles as a Captain Obvious Reveal for some people, and a Late-Arrival Spoiler.
    • From the film Breaking Dawn Part 2, the climatic battle with the Volturi ends with The Reveal it was only one of Alice's visions of a possible future and Everybody Lives.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Bella. She's been shipped with half the cast by now, including all the Cullens (that includes the ladies), members of the Volturi, Tyler's van, and characters outside the Twilight universe, including Stefan Salvatore, Roman Godfrey, and Lestat.
  • LGBT Fanbase: The whole series, especially the movies, is incredibly campy and filled with handsome, shirtless men, so it's no surprise that it's developed one of these. Rather ironic in light of Stephanie Meyer's avowed Christian-fundamentalist religious views, you have to wonder how she feels about it. She must be very chagrined.
  • Les Yay:
    • The Amazon vampire coven (two vampire ladies who live together in the jungle and are very close).
    • Alice and Bella. Their reunion in New Moon is rife with this.
    • In Eclipse, Leah and Bella when Leah tells Jacob that she had a dream about kissing Bella. We are supposed to see this as a natural result of the werewolf telepathy but... not everybody does.
    • Even with Esme and Bella. Anyone remember her calling Bella "Dearest Bella", like, right against her skin?

    All The Rest M - R 
  • Memetic Mutation: CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN CHAGRIN
    • Also, it's nearly mandatory to Photoshop any picture of Edward Cullen to include sparkles (see pic). On forums and boards that allow it (such as LiveJournal), sometimes even just his name is formatted to sparkle.
    • Association with Twilight Sparkle is also popular, for obvious reasons.
    • Edward seeing Bella for the first time is sometimes interpreted... differently.
    • "This is the skin of a killer, Bella!" *sparkles*
    • Pattinson's "greasy" real-world hair seems to be approaching meme status. If a picture of him is posted somewhere, someone will mention his hair.
    • "JACOB, KEEP YOUR SHIRT ON!" "NO!"
    • And then there's the habit haters have of coming up with alternate shipping "Teams" (i.e., "Team Tyler's van", "Team Mike Newton", etc.)
    • "Still a better love story than Twilight."Explanation 
    • TWILIGHT ISN'T LITERATURE!
    • Aro's Squee! over Renesmee used to be funny.
    • "No one hates Twilight more than Robert Pattinson does" has become this, since he's a rare, open hater of a franchise he himself stars in.
    • Due to his hair, Jasper has picked up the Fan Nickname "Harpo"; RiffTrax in particular calls him that.
    • Jokes about Buffy and the Doctor killing Edward Cullen are popular — the former due to Buffy's status as a Vampire Hunter, and the latter due to the presence of both Robert Pattinson and David Tennant in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.
    • "Saw a snail today.... effervescent" Explanation 
  • Narm: Has its own page.
  • Narm Charm: Some fans like the Twilight Saga simply for its cheesiness.
  • Never Live It Down: The sparkling vampires. Also, the movie was enough of a hit that the actors are now tied to their characters.
  • No Such Thing as Bad Publicity: Before, you'd be much more likely to find it placed in the Teen section - usually huddled in the back of the bookstores, behind all the Fantasy and Science Fiction sections, even. Now? Bookstores have an entire section dedicated to Teen Paranormal Romance; the film franchise, along with the books, find themselves regularly on the bestseller lists.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: Rosalie's brief summary of how she went Kill Bill on the people who gang-raped her could have made a very interesting book or movie, but sadly all the best and bloodiest parts are left out when she recounts it - in all of three paragraphs - to Bella. For those who haven't read it, she puts on a wedding dress and kills all of the men one by one, saving her former fiancé, who is behind a barricaded door and protected by two guards, for last. It's easily one of the most interesting parts of Eclipse, and it's not even described.
    • In Twilight, we don't see James getting killed because Bella passes out just as it starts to happen!
    • In both Eclipse and The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner, we miss the entire battle between the Cullens and wolves and the newborn army. This is especially silly in Bree Tanner's novella, given that she is a newborn and thus should have been at the battle herself.
    • For antis, Leah calling out Bella for stringing Jacob along in Breaking Dawn. Sadly, since the section's from Jacob's point of view it's only mentioned.
  • Older Than They Think: Let's just say that the series is not as original as some of the more zealous fans and haters say it is.
    • Most fans of the series seem to be under the impression that Vegetarian Vampire is a new innovation that Meyer introduced to the vampire genre when, in reality, the concept was used by Bram Stoker, Anne Rice, Vampire: The Masquerade and many others long before the Twilight series came out. This also goes for vampires walking in daylight, having luminous skin and developing emotional attachments to humans.
    • On the flip side, a lot of haters blame Twilight for making vampires sexy and glamorous in the public's eye instead of monstrous, when the 1931 "Dracula" film depicted the bloodsucker as a titillating figure (just look at the movie poster) and other vampire-centered media like Buffy, Castlevania, The Vampire Chronicles, and many, many others play up vampires as sexually desirable (plus, the two don't necessarily have to be mutually exclusive). There's even a trope for it.
    • Even vampires being mineral-based isn't a new idea, as Tim Powers used it in The Stress of Her Regard.
    • Before Renesmee Cullen, there has been in literature a half-human supernatural baby that grows up and matures to an adult in a fraction of the usual time, has incredible powers, and creeps out some people. Who is it? Wilbur Whately.
    • There is an animated series from The '90s called "The Ketchup Vampires". The heroes are a family of Vegetarian Vampires whose son falls in love with a human schoolgirl. The girl's name is, hilariously enough, Bella. Both are a bit younger than in Twilight though.
    • Look up the 1990 novel The Silver Kiss for young adult vampire fiction, the main differences being the human girl learns to accept mortality, the vampire boy actually does get released from his immortality (through his own choosing no less), and the ending is more bittersweet.
    • A minority of fans and even some antis seem to think Stephenie Meyer invented vampire-human romances; (the former view it as some very unique and interesting concept no one's ever thought of, while the latter view it much the same but through the lens of ruining vampires by making them into wussy love interests). Vampire-human romances have in fact been around for decades, if not centuries; rather like the aforementioned Vampires Are Sex Gods, there are also tropes for this.
  • Padding: The books have lots of padding such as Stephenie Meyer describing how beautiful Edward was and how much Bella loved him and the step-by-step descriptions of Bella getting up, brushing her teeth, picking out her clothes, making breakfast for her and Charlie, closing all the pop-up boxes after running her web browser, etc. The most extreme example of padding was in the second book (New Moon), where there are (literally) eight blank pages in the middle of the book. It essentially goes blank when Edward decides he must remove all traces of his life from Bella's.
    • A frequent criticism leveled at the (first half of the) film adaptation of Breaking Dawn—since the filmmakers decided to split the book into two movies, despite how the novel could have been easily squeezed into a single film, Part 1 is packed to the brim with montages to pad out the running time to just under two hours.
  • Periphery Demographic: The TwiMoms, as well as the aforementioned gay following.
    • Also, racial purists.
    • Hardened convicts base their views on romance on this book.
    • A number of males struggled to watch through the movie, just to see the admittedly impressive action scenes, which unlike the books, actually are shown onscreen.
    • Former United States Presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife are both professed fans of the books. His family and Stephanie Meyer are both avowed members of the Church of Latter-Day Saints, and although the series isn't necessarily aimed at Mormons, Meyer's beliefs on sex, abstinence, motherhood, etc., are on full display and championed by the characters without (just refer to the Anvilicious subheading above for specifics), so it's unsurprising that the series has been well-received by conservative Christian audiences who aren't normally big fans of the paranormal romance subgenre.
    • LGBT people have begun to embrace the series online by rewriting whole chunks of the story to be queer.
  • Poe's Law: To this day, people debate whether or not Stephanie Meyer is either a very lucky but very poor author, or a very, very good Troll.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: Jakeward. It's not too hard to guess who they are. Alice/Bella goes by the name of Bellice, while Rosalie/Bella is called Rosella. And some people actually refer to Bella/Edward as Bedward.
    • There's always what the slash shippers come up with. Some examples being: Jaspard, Jaspeth, and Mareth. The former two of which have rather impressive followings, with Jaspard being one of the more popular slash pairings.
  • Protection from Editors: Quality of the writing aside, the sheer amount of basic research fail in the books suggests this. Not just the biology fail, or the Misplaced Wildlife, but the west coast of Brazil? Whatever else any editors might or might not have done, fact-checking and Real Life research they did not. Given how Meyer goes on and on about how much she hated to cut the few scenes she did (and how she put said scenes on her website, spelling errors and all), that seems rather likely.
    • This also happens with the graphic novel, even though Meyer didn't even do that one. Young Kim, the artist, wrote about how her editor would have her cut out a scene for pacing reasons, only for Meyer to convince her to put the scene back in.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble:
    • A lot of people felt this was present between Bella and Jacob, except in visual form... The scene where Jacob and Bella are dancing in Part 1 of Breaking Dawn has more intimacy, romance and pure connection than the original dance with Edward at the actual wedding, even though canonically, Bella is supposed to love Edward more and views Jacob in more platonic terms. Others have argued this is consistent with the books. One of the biggest complaints Team Jacob have with the eventual outcome is that Bella and Jacob actually have some level of chemistry together and spend more time getting to know each other, having fun and sharing hobbies and interests.
    • A bigger example is Jacob and Leah in Breaking Dawn. Many, many readers/viewers consider them just right for each other due to their interactions. Leah is understanding of Jacob's situation while not putting up with his whining, while Jacob comes to empathise with Leah more and actually gives her the time of day. They both open up to each other and support one another. Leah actually becomes much calmer and happier around Jacob; the angriest she gets is when she chews out Bella specifically because she sees how hurt Jacob is over Bella continuing to string him along. But nope, according to Stephenie Meyer, they're "just friends", thus Leah ends up with no-one and Jacob ends up with Bella's daughter.
  • Retroactive Recognition:
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: Ironically, many critics of the series complain that the story would have been far more interesting had the author only devoted more time to the secondary characters and less to the Edward/Jacob/Bella love triangle and Edward and Bella's relationship drama, which seemed stale and boring compared to the far more original, provocative personalities and backstories of the secondary characters.
    • There have even been people on Deviantart and LiveJournal who post "edited" plots that actually aren't hate-oriented. A memorable one suggested that there should have been hints of James' coven's existence earlier and that Bella should have thought Edward was the reason for those hints, making her wonder about the relationship instead of just diving right in without complications. Another pointed out that the books are a good example of when the romance should really be a subplot.
  • Ron the Death Eater: A bizarre and probably unintentional example. Christian Grey was Edward Cullen in the original fanfiction Master of the Universe before they had the Serial Numbers Filed Off and is still rather similar to him in a number of ways. However, despite the fact Christian/Not!Edward is supposed to be the hero and Love Interest, it would seem that many of his more negative traits, such as his stalker tendencies and condescending attitude, have been greatly exacerbated in the Fifty Shades series; a lot of people point out that compared to Christian, Edward almost comes across as sane and normal (say what you will about Edward, he never broke into Bella's house specifically to beat her and have rough sex with her, groped her in public or bought the place where she worked to keep tabs on her).
  • Rooting for the Empire:
    • The first book has James, a tracker who becomes obsessed with wanting to kill and eat Bella. His girlfriend Victoria is also this in the third book.
    • The books put a lot of emphasis on the Volturi being a power-hungry dictatorship that ruthlessly oppresses the vampire world. The trouble is, the only restriction they apparently put on the vampires is to not be noticed by humans, which is given a reasonable justification (human technology could potentially kill vampires) and very lightly limits the ability for a vampire to kidnap or kill a human. Word of God and the series also show that vampires are more or less like animals if left to their own devices, so it makes it difficult to see the Volturi as dictators instead of a group of people who are trying to establish some sort of order and structure to their world. Meyer tries to make the Volturi's corruptness really apparent in Breaking Dawn when it's hammered in that they'll arrive to kill Renesmee and in no way listen to reason... only for them to bring witnesses, reasonably listen to evidence, and leave without killing anyone.
      • It is made clear that the witnesses and plans for listening to evidence were really for show, as they were planning to put them all under a mist and kidnap Alice and whoever else they wanted for their powers. Only Bella's shield actually protects them from this. That said, there are plenty of people, even those who are otherwise genuine fans, who would be quite happy for the Volturi to kill Renesmee even if they weren't doing it for legitimate reasons.
      • It's also the prosecuted vampires who come to that conclusion. Consider this. Basically, the Volturi's methods may not be totally angelic, but they've also prevented a vampire population explosion that'd put a strain on their feeding stock, but also kept the feeding stock which is now equipped to hunt them to extinction from finding out they exist. And as mentioned above, by their nature most vampires are basically animals ruled by their hungers and passions. Even though the book makes a point that the Cullens are so unique for remembering how to still love, they're still supremely arrogant toward non-vampires (toward the end of Breaking Dawn Bella thinks it would be "a shame" to have to kill someone) and think nothing of flaunting their superiority. Mainly in displays of wealth which should stick out like a sore thumb in a tiny town, where a family of seven has only one breadwinner. At the end of the story it mentions all the Cullens' allies maybe reuniting one day to overthrow the Volturi once and for all and presents that as a heroic happy ending, but the books also portray them as the only thing keeping vampires from giving into their urges completely and exposing themselves to a world that would hunt them to the last one. TL;DR, the Volturi are written as being mean for telling vampires not to kill as many people as they want, but they're also written as the only thing keeping humans from learning vampires exist and wiping vampires out.

    All The Rest S - W 
  • The Scrappy:
  • Sequelitis: Both the books and the films get hit with this, especially the latter. The first book is more or less viewed as a flawed and overly-long, yet entertaining paranormal romance story for teens. The sequels, though, starting with New Moon, are generally viewed less favourably. The books get progressively longer but don’t quite come up with the plot points to compensate, leading to lots of Padding and contrived, drawn-out relationship drama to create ‘conflict’. The film adaptations after the first one tend to reflect this, with the exception of, perhaps, Breaking Dawn Part 2, which is seen as one of the most entertaining films in the franchise, probably because of the added fight sequences and twelve minute long battle in the finale (which was absent from the novel). Breaking Dawn Part 1 is widely viewed as the worst of the lot; the novel it's based on is a Contested Sequel where nothing much happens in the first half and the decision to split the films in two was seen as a blatant cash grab.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night:
    • There's a surprising amount of people who ship Leah with Demetri (the Volturi's tracker). The only scene where they're even in the same vicinity is at the end of Breaking Dawn for the battle-where-nothing-happens.
    • There's also Renesmee and Nahuel, who meet all of once right at the end of the last book. Nahuel at least seems intrigued by her, probably because she's the first female dhampir he's met who's not his sister.
  • Ship Mates: Team Edward and Jacob/Leah shippers usually get along, as do Jacob/Leah shippers and Nahuel/Nessie or Seth/Nessie shippers.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Twilight's fandom was home to one of the most notorious shipping wars in recent memory. The conflict between Team Edward (Bella/Edward shippers) and Team Jacob (Bella/Jacob shippers) got nasty very quickly, with numerous hate fics, flame wars, essay-length rants on why their side was better etc. This was, of course, milked for all it was worth by the filmmakers, especially in merchandising. To this day, some fans are divided over which pairing they prefer.
  • Shocking Swerve: For some readers, the Plot Twist in Breaking Dawn where Bella gets pregnant by Edward. In the book itself it's actually foreshadowed to an extent, but some people still found it extremely unexpected on account of the fact it had clearly been established in earlier books that vampires couldn't have kids.
  • Signature Scene:
    • In the first book/movie, Edward saving Bella from an out-of-control van, the sparkling scene in the meadow and the showdown with James in the ballet studio.
    • In New Moon, Bella's cliff-diving and her race to save Edward in Volterra. From the film exclusively, Bella sitting on her bed, staring blankly while the camera rotates around to show the passing months, with Lyyke Li's "Possibility" playing over the top.
    • In Eclipse, the tent scene between Edward, Bella and Jacob (it's not what you're thinking) and the showdown with Victoria in the mountains.
    • In Breaking Dawn, Bella and Edward's wedding, Edward busting the bed during he and Bella's wedding night and the grisly birth scene. From the movie exclusively, the creepy CGI baby and the battle between the Cullens and the Volturi. And Aro's laugh.
  • Silent Majority: Statistically Speaking, this is actually a very successful franchise. The way the internet talks about it? There are no fans about them. Yet nowadays, people are much more likely to run into haters than fans... clearly there are a lot of people who like this franchise, yet feel no need to scream about it on the internet.
  • Smurfette Breakout: Leah, the only female werewolf, has proven to be very popular amongst both fans and antis (especially the latter). Stephenie Meyer even said that if she wrote any more Twilight books, she'd consider writing one from Leah's POV.
  • Snark Bait: For a sizable fraction of those following it.
  • So Bad, It's Good: A significant portion of the series' internet fanbase enjoys the books because of the melodramatic plot and sparkling. Likewise, the films can be enjoyed for their crazy dialogue and stilted acting.
    • The commercials involved with Burger King (especially the commercials for Eclipse) can qualify.
  • So Okay, It's Average: The first book and in particular the first movie adaptation are seen as this by many people who aren't either hardcore fans or antis. The sequels tend to be a lot more contentious.
  • Special Effects Failure: Many in The Film of the Book, including a sparkling vampire who looks a lot more like he's covered in sweat, and way too much pale makeup on the Cullens. Said pale makeup also would stop at the neck or fail to cover the ears, particularly with Bella in the hospital scene.
    • Most distracting was the indescribably abysmal wire-works for the jumping bits that can be easily spotted.
    • Jacob's absurdly obvious hair weave (until he gets his Important Haircut).
    • The special effects in the second film were significantly better in most aspects. Just so long as you ignore the werewolf transformations...
    • The notorious CGI baby in Breaking Dawn Part 2. As the guys from RiffTrax put it:
    "Jack-Jack from The Incredibles looked less digital than this thing!"
    • It still managed to be an improvement over the nightmare-inducing animatronic baby they were originally going to use.
    • By Breaking Dawn Part 2, they just seemed to give up entirely, as there are several scenes with vampires standing around in broad daylight without so much as a shimmer, a particularly egregious example being the final scene with Bella and Edward in the meadow.
  • Strangled by the Red String: The series has this both In-Universe with the concept of "imprinting", which means this can be done to werewolves as soon as the plot demands (arguably, all the examples in book 3 were only to prepare the reader for the last one), and out-of-universe with Bella and Edward's relationship. Edward acts surly and moody toward Bella for the first half of the book, and yet Bella decides that she's "unconditionally and irrevocably in love with [Edward]" right after she realizes that he's a vampire who thirsts after her blood, and is completely devoted to him from that point on, even in the face of Edward's own warnings about how he could kill her. Just how devoted is she? She's willing to give up her human life without any second thoughts to be with him forever after what can't be any more than a month of knowing him, and instantly leaps back into his arms after he renders her practically comatose by leaving her without explanation. And her interactions with Edward after the vampire "reveal" consist almost entirely of them repeatedly professing their love to one another and her even more repeatedly being "dazzled" by Edward's glorious beauty.
    • This is arguably furthered in the films, when in their "romantic" scenes, they both just look bored and uncomfortable.
    • Likewise, in The Short Second Life Of Bree Tanner, with Bree and Diego and, later, Freddie. Bree and Diego interact for one night, she spends most of it afraid that he's going to kill her, and by morning they seemingly are madly in love with each other. The same goes for Freddie. Since it's from Bree's point of view and the "relationships" between her and the guys are so muted, it's possible that we're supposed to see it as her mistaking simple friendship for love (which would fit with her background of being abused and neglected), except that nothing ever indicates this and she acts almost exactly the same way Bella does, including being perfectly alright to die when she finds out he's gone, because life without him isn't worth living.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • In the novel New Moon, Bella is annoyed that Jessica won't talk to her, and thinks that Jessica is being petty and evil. This is after Bella has ignored everyone for four months, used Jessica to get Charlie off her back, ditched her shortly into the movie to pine over Edward, and then nearly frightened Jessica to death by walking up to a very dangerous-looking biker in a bad part of town that Jessica clearly wanted to avoid, all because Bella thought it may be the same one that Edward rescued her from before.
    • In Breaking Dawn, Leah calls Bella out on some of her more selfish actions in trying to manipulate and keep Jacob with her despite knowing full well how much it hurts Jacob to be around her, knowing that she's chosen to die and become an undead monstrosity with Edward over a life with him. Even Bella admits that she's being selfish, but chooses to keep doing it anyway. Everyone else gets angry at Leah for upsetting Bella, including the guy Leah was trying to stand up for. And any point Leah made is completely forgotten.
    • Also, the part where Aro says that humans now have technology that could be used to hurt or kill vampires, so since there's no way of knowing that Renesmee will always be able to keep vampires a secret she's a vulnerability. The response to this is something along the lines of "Aro is a big mean jerk who just wants to destroy the Cullen family for loving each other" and nobody bothers to refute his point until Alice conveniently shows up with another half-vampire. Aro is actually kind of right, though, especially since Renesmee's superpower involves sharing her thoughts with people—that could easily develop into something that'd make it hard for her to keep secrets if she gets more powerful as she grows older (if she ever experiences any Power Incontinence she could end up accidentally sharing random things with random humans).
      • Let's also not forget that Bella finds out she has the ability to project her power over an area. Since Renesmee's power is suspected to be basically an inversion of her mother's, who's to say she couldn't be capable of projecting her thoughts not just into a person she touches, but everyone within a given area? And on top of that, the full scope of Bella's abilities were held back by her self-doubt until she was angry enough to overcome it. Renesmee, on the other hand, seems unencumbered by any such baggage. With all that little encounter was revealing about how much vampires might not know about themselves, it's hard to blame the Volturi for being cautious, especially with a family of known rule-breakers.
    • Charlie gets both this and Informed Wrongness. His daughter is creepily obsessed with a guy who has never displayed any attributes aside from being equally creepily obsessed with her and being an asshole and also gives him no reason to assume he isn't an abuser (which, by real world standards, he is). The narrative pretty clearly wants the reader to side against Charlie, even when Bella and Edward team up to casually manipulate and bully him into letting her do whatever she wants, and despite the fact that Charlie really hadn't been wrong about anything in the entire story.
      • Goes into Tear Jerker territory in New Moon when he's trying to get Bella help when she's clearly depressed. He points out (correctly) that she's just going through the motions and that it would be better if she lived with her mother rather than staying in the town that has too many painful memories. And the readers are supposed to side with Bella, who refuses to move on with her life and even exploits Jacob's infatuation with her, because the only way she can find any measure of happiness is playing games with her life which causes her to hallucinate Edward telling her to stop risking her life.
      • But wait, it gets sadder. Because not only is Charlie desperately trying to get Bella out of her depression (in a dialogue that everyone who tried to get a friend/family member out of their depression will recognize as something they said), but he's also directly talking about the day when his wife left him with Bella, a memory that hurt him even years after and he's on the verge of tears during all of it. And Bella completely ignore his concern, almost doesn't pay attention to him and then proceed to manipulate one of her classmates to "get him off [her] back". It's hard to not feel for Charlie.
    • This is of course treated as a triumph of the 'wisdom' of love over the bland practicality of reason.
  • Take That, Scrappy!: In Breaking Dawn, there's one brief, shining moment when Leah chews Bella out for leading Jacob on like she has been. It happens offscreen and the reader is supposed to hate Leah for it, but it's still something.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Many of the secondary or minor characters in this series are considered infinitely more likable and interesting than the main characters, but are unfortunately severely underused or underdeveloped. Some standout examples include:
    • Leah Clearwater. As well as being an Unintentionally Sympathetic Ensemble Dark Horse, she's a snarky badass and notably the only female werewolf in her tribe's history, which she is generally ridiculed for, but still manages to use her abilities to save the day and prove herself a capable warrior. Some even opine she would arguably have made a much better protagonist than Bella, who is often criticized for being a doormat and Distressed Damsel who never really does anything to resolve conflicts or move the plot forwards on her own. Instead, Leah is mostly there to make bitchy comments and get Jacob injured to create drama in the last few pages of Eclipse.
    • Charlie Swan. As outlined under They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot, many people believe the series would’ve much better if it focused on him. In the books themselves, he's mostly relegated to the role of unwitting Fantasy-Forbidding Father who comes between Bella and Edward's love due to "misunderstanding" Edward and only becomes an important character plot-wise in the first book, due to James potentially targeting him.
    • Just about any of the vampire covens the Cullens recruit to help them out in Breaking Dawn.
    • J. Jenks, the forger the Cullens work with, who is apparently at least half aware of what they truly are but keeps his silence for his own reasons. He's a very interesting and very important character, given he helps the Cullens uphold The Masquerade... and yet he's not actually even mentioned until the last third of the final book and only featured in one small scene.
    • Marcus. He's shown as by far the most reasonable of the Volturi and only seems to be allied with Aro because Aro is his brother-in-law. On top of that, he's the Death Seeker Woobie who lost his wife (killed by Aro, her own brother, unbeknownst to Marcus) and is mind-controlled by Chelsea into obeying the Volturi's will. In other words, his character arc is perfect for a Heel–Face Turn against Aro. Do you think that Stephanie Meyer ever does anything with this plot possibility? No, of course not.
    • Bella's human friends, in particular Angela (who seems to be the one person she genuinely enjoys hanging out with and confiding in besides the Cullens, and is an all-around nice person who, according to Word of God, is the only friend of Bella's that isn't a False Friend or trying to get in her pants). At one point, Bella jokingly mentions that if Angela turned out to be a witch, she could come hang out with her, the Cullens and the wolves too... which isn't actually a half-bad idea. At the least, it would've been interesting to have Angela find out the truth about the Cullens and become a Secret Keeper along with Bella, as well as letting her actually contribute to the plot in a meaningful way. Tragically, she's never even mentioned again after Bella marries Edward at the beginning of Breaking Dawn.
    • Laurent. His betrayal of James to help out the Cullens and relationship with Irina set him up to be a somewhat complex or unpredictable character who would have a big impact on the Cullens. Pity most of it happens off-screen or is merely alluded to, and his only other appearance in the series is getting ripped apart by werewolves (again, unseen), after randomly trying to kill Bella.
    • Meyer introduced an entirely new species in the final pages of Breaking Dawn: the Children of the Moon, who are said to "true" werewolves and the ancient enemies of the vampires, who have been hunted to near-extinction by the Volturi after one nearly killed Caius. Some of those might've been handy to have in the not-battle against the Volturi and they'd have a pretty good reason to want to go to war against them. They're only mentioned once in an offhand comment about Edward to Hand Wave that the Quileute wolves are actually just shapeshifters that turn into wolves, not real werewolves and so the Volturi have no grounds to go to war with them, and then the subject is promptly dropped.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: Many feel that the sprawling, epic vampires vs. werewolves story would be far more interesting than what they see as the walking Romantic Plot Tumor that forms the books. Many others feel that the books would be better if they were about likable, clever small-town cop Charlie solving supernatural murders, rather than being about his obnoxious daughter getting laid.
    • The larger vampire culture and the power games that shape it — like the brutal and bloody vampire mafia wars that Jasper is a veteran of, the overthrow of the ruling Romanian coven and their attempts to seize power again, vampirekind's rivalry with the Children of the Moon, and the Machiavellian Decadent Court the Volturi is implied to be — all sound like infinitely more interesting and awesome plotlines than listening to a bunch of spoiled, selfish teenagers whine about their relationship woes all day and night in a cold, wet, grey corner of the United States.
    • Rosalie's backstory could easily be a great story on its own, essentially being Kill Bill with vampires. Yet it's briefly summed up in a single chapter and never mentioned again.
    • With some tweaking, Twilight could make a pretty decent Gothic Horror. A few people claim the series to be this anyway (mostly because it's got vampires and vaguely Gothic-looking cover art) and it references a few Gothic novels (namely Wuthering Heights and Dracula), but it isn't really an example (as many in the hatedom will be quick to point out). That being said, it does actually have a few traits of Gothic fiction, though most of them seem to be unintentional - namely Body Horror, creepy, obsessive romantic relationships, a heroine who may be a little (or a lot) unhinged, melodrama, several cases of a Woman Scorned, a dreary, isolated setting, dangerous woods and gaslighting the love interest. If the series were rewritten to ramp up these aspects (or heck, just interpreted this way instead of as a sappy teen romance, which judging by the Alternate Character Interpretation page, is easy enough) then you'd have the ingredients for a modern Gothic horror story.
  • Tough Act to Follow: Stephenie Meyer had a huge hit with the Twilight series. Her next novel, The Host sold very well and was also made into a movie, but has nowhere near the same level of hype; the movie was also a critical and commercial failure. Her crime thriller The Chemist was reasonably well-received, but is pretty obscure compared to The Host and especially Twilight. Meyer has stated she has many other ideas for novels, so it remains to be seen if anything she does will come close to her first.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Robert Pattinson's heavily made-up face combined with massive Photoshopping on covers, posters, and promotional art.
    • Renesmee. Full stop. Her CGI self is not very convincing. However, it could have been so much worse. For a while the crew tried using an animatronic doll, but the result was deemed so horrifying the cast even began calling it "Chuckesmee."
    • Bella's character profile in the official guide; she looks like someone took the face of a grown woman and slapped it onto a teenage girl's body.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic:
    • Leah, oh dear God, Leah. Through most of the series, Leah is meant to be seen as a heartless bitch who didn't bow graciously out for Sam hooking up with Emily, uses the pack mind to think of various scandals, and tell Jacob he's being overly angsty about Bella. The problem with that is, with all the stuff she's been through (she has been dumped by her boyfriend because he imprinted on her cousin, she's hated by her wolf pack for being upset about it (while Jacob is coddled for doing the same thing), might have caused her dad's heart attack when she transformed in front of him, is not able to have children, she's the only female to not be paired up romantically with someone at the end of Breaking Dawn, also in the same book she mentally admits that her ex-fiance wants her to disappear, and, to top it all off, her own brother, who she spends all of her time protecting, tells her "you ruin everything!") she comes across as an Iron Woobie. She comes across as this even more so when one considers that the same people who call her selfish and whiny all coddle Jacob for being even more self-centered and whiny over Bella, who he was involved with far less than Leah was with Sam. Because of this, Leah is arguably the most popular character with antis, or even the only character they like at all.
    • Out of Bella's human friends, there is Lauren, who is supposedly an Alpha Bitch because... She doesn't fawn over Bella like the rest of her human friends. The universe itself seems to punish her for this by having her approached by a modeling agency, being told she should cut her hair short and spend hundreds of dollars on head shots, only for them to never contact her again.
    • The Volturi are supposed to be the ruthless, tyrannical rulers of vampires. However, their only rule is "don't break The Masquerade", and in enforcing this rule, they stopped the Egyptian and Romanian covens from their plan to take over the world and rule as gods, broke up devastating vampire wars, and stopped vampires from making vampire babies who couldn't be taught, destroyed whole towns in temper tantrums and feeding frenzies, and basically brainwashed covens to their side. It's not hard to see as the Volturi less as tyrants and more as the only things standing between the Twilight universe and the Vampire Apocalypse.
    • Charlie Swan really loves Bella and tries to be a good father, and she returns this love by decieving, manipulating, and being condescending towards him. It's no wonder most antis like the Mustache Dad.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Bella, whose helplessness and other attributes cause many to regard her as useless at best.
      • In the very first chapter of Twilight, she's moaning about having to move to Forks and everything that it entails, cries herself to sleep, and is generally miserable. However, she chose to go and live with her father; nobody forced her to go, and Charlie's absolutely delighted and buys her a truck as a welcoming gift, while she's barely grateful for this gift and regards her move as an immense act of self-sacrifice. So already she comes off as extremely whiny and entitled.
      • Also her lack of problems but constant "need" to whine about basically everything. Even when there are genuine problems and threats she still tends to focus the narrative back on her.
      • All Meyer's shallow attempts to make Bella seem intelligent, deep and tortured just wind up making her seem whiny, pretentious and entitled.
    • Edward. He's supposed to come across as a tortured, brooding Byronic Hero who hates being a 'monster', but a lot of people think he comes across more as a whiny, arrogant prick. His reasons for being so angst-ridden are somewhat confusing, given that, prior to meeting Bella, the worst thing he did was kill humans...specifically, murderers and rapists whom he could detect using his telepathy. Whilst it could be argued that he believes killing people in any form is morally wrong, it makes little sense why Edward would feel so guilt-ridden or monstrous over killing people FAR worse than he is. He could well have saved several innocent people from horrible fates, which Bella actually points out. It should also be noted that Edward's vigilantism only really comes up ONCE in the entire series, in a single scene early in Breaking Dawn, and is then never brought up again. And yet, Edward is easily the whiniest of the Cullens despite having the least messed up backstory. And this isn't even getting into the way he treats his girlfriend, including stalking her, gaslighting her, manipulating her, insulting her and trying to control her...all in the name of love, of course. He refuses to open up to Bella or consider her opinions, because she 'might get hurt', but is perfectly fine deciding how she will live her life to suit him, as well as following her around, breaking into her house and prying into other people's minds to keep tabs on her, largely without her knowledge or consent.
      • The few glimpses we get into his mind also unintentionally paint him as a pretentious and bigoted asshole who is racist towards the werewolves and looks down on everyone who isn't his family or Bella. Midnight Sun makes him even less sympathetic; he openly contemplates murder more than once to get to Bella (no crippling conscience where SHE's concerned, we see) and generally comes across as a bit of a psychopath. He's not even that sympathetic in New Moon when he tries to kill himself over Bella's supposed 'death', on account of the fact he stupidly assumes she's dead without thoroughly checking and then selfishly decides to do away with himself by potentially exposing the vampire world and risking the lives of several innocent humans (he considers massacring the townsfolk, and even his decision to expose himself in broad daylight puts people at risk because presumably the Volturi would have to do away with anyone who witnessed the sparkling). He only gets worse in Breaking Dawn, where he tries to force an abortion on his wife and even tries to negotiate pimping her out to Jacob to give her a baby without once consulting her or attempting to see things from her point of view. Again, in the name of 'true love'.
    • Jacob, mostly in regards to Bella. We're meant to feel sorry for him because the girl he loves only likes him as a friend and is with his worst enemy...only the kid is about sixteen and Bella is pretty much the first and only girl he's ever had a crush on. He's almost as bad as Bella when it comes to melodrama over their supposed 'true loves' whom they've only known for a short while. It should also be noted that, as a werewolf, Jacob's 'true love' is his imprint, which is made clear isn't Bella, so one wonders why he kicks up such a fuss. He also throws tantrums if she does anything he doesn't like, at one point even stating to her face he thinks she'd be better off dead than a vampire - opinions on vampirism aside, this is an awful thing to say to your supposed best friend. He also forcibly kisses Bella, which could actually be considered a form of sexual assault (indeed, she flips shit and tries to punch him over it, which is Played for Laughs). Finally, he spends most of his time angsting over Bella and everyone in the pack feels sorry for him and supports him...whilst, as mentioned in Unintentionally Sympathetic, Leah Clearwater is vilified for the exact same thing (only worse in her case, due to her long-term fiancé leaving her for her cousin and best friend with no explanation, and then her father dying suddenly, among other things).
      • Doesn't help that his way of "accepting his destiny" and becoming the "true alpha" he was apparently always meant to be was solely to end up becoming Bella's doormat so she could have him and Edward both. Even more horrifying in that after becoming the alpha, he knew full well the Cullens were sending their vampire friends off to eat people and despite the fact he's supposed to be stopping that sort of thing, let them do it. He betrayed his people and his purpose, actively aided the people he was supposed to stop, and let innocent people die. For "Nessie".
    • The Denalis, specifically, their 'mother' Sasha. She was executed by the Volturi for making an immortal child, which is portrayed as a huge tragedy and an example of how awful and tyrannical the Volturi are...only given the nature of immortal children (as discussed on this very page), Sasha honestly comes across as a self-centred nutcase who got exactly what she deserved for torturing and getting an innocent child killed, getting dozens of innocent humans killed and, considering that even knowing of an immortal child results in death, risking the lives of her 'daughters'. All because she wanted a 'cute little vampire baby'.
  • Unpopular Popular Character: Leah, the only female werewolf. Everybody in-story seems to hate her, but some people especially will argue that she's the most badass and well- developed character in the series.
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Bella was specifically written bland so that the reader can step into her shoes and experience the cool supernatural world of vampires and werewolves (and the hotties fighting over her). Compare her backstory (moves from Phoenix to a small town in Washington, becomes popular, falls in love with supernatural beings) with that of Carlisle (devout Christian vampire hunter becomes vampire, spends his life helping people even though they're his natural prey), Rosalie (girl becomes a vampire after being raped and left for dead by her fiance, kills him), Jasper (ex-Confederate soldier and some of his friends raise a vampire army), and others.
  • Vindicated by History: A mild example. After the hype died down and the years went by, several pop culture analysts have been taking a closer look into Twilight's impact and place in pop culture. While many agreed that its quality overall was so-so and its messages are questionable at best, the series has earned praise for being a (relatively speaking) nerdy blockbuster franchise that girls (a demographic that was usually passed over) could claim for themselves in a time when that kind of entertainment was still largely male-aimed and male-dominated, with some even crediting the series' massive financial success for helping to pave the way allowing more female-centered blockbuster franchises (notably The Hunger Games series, the Wonder Woman movie, and others) to be made after years of executives being convinced that female-led films (superheroine films especially) wouldn't sell well. In addition to that, many of those aforementioned analysts (most notably Lindsay Ellis, who released a video titled "Dear Stephenie Meyer, I'm Sorry" in 2018 to discuss this very subject) have also noted the undercurrent of (often condescending) misogyny that laced many of the criticisms and backlash to the series, an issue that has found some Values Resonance in the latter half of The New '10s with the growing power of women in the entertainment industry and push for greater inclusion/representation for women in entertainment being met with reactionary pushback (and that's all that will be said on the matter).
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The CGI werewolves actually look pretty good most of the time, with a lot of detail given to their fur and effort put in to make them all look like individuals with different sizes, coloring and facial features (rather than just copy-pasting one model). The transformations are a different matter, but the wolves themselves provide some of the most impressive special effects in the franchise.
  • Vocal Minority: Twilight has spawned one of the most infamous examples of loony fans, which doesn't really pan out great for the other 90% who just want to enjoy the books and movies and acknowledge all of Twilight's flaws and parody it shamelessly themselves.
    • Also, the extremely vocal and avid detractors, who seem to use every opportunity to bash the series and its fans in every square inch of the internet, including This Very Wiki, are disdained by the less vocal detractors that wish those people would stop dredging up the series all the time and just move on already.
  • Wangst: Both Bella and Edward. Full stop, reaching the absolute peak in New Moon.
    • Jacob gets in on it too in Eclipse and especially in his chapters in Breaking Dawn.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Despite supposedly being a great doctor, Carlisle tends to do things that only make sense to someone with no medical experience. Like cleaning the shrapnel from Bella's wound at the beginning of New Moon in the very dining room where it happened, and stocking up on the rarest kind of blood from the Forks blood bank to make sure Bella has nourishment handy during her first few days as a vampire. When Bella's pregnancy is killing her, he even exclaims "I can't figure out what it wants!" He can't figure out that the offspring from a human x vampire copulation could, possibly, be part-vampire and have a vampire's dietary needs.
      • Not to mention that freaking morphine is his go-to drug, even in circumstances where a much less potent painkiller could have been used.
      • And the fact that he applies antiseptic after suturing Bella's wound, not before. Doesn't do much good if the bacteria you want to get rid of is inside the closed wound.
    • Someone (it's not specified who) diagnoses Bella with a ruptured placenta after she vomits blood. How those two are connected, nobody will know.
    • The fact that Edward, a guy with two medical degrees, orders Jacob to start CPR on Bella while her heart is beating (Jacob mentions it specifically) and she is breathing on her own accord (Jacob mentions that she's coughing). All that's going to accomplish is break her sternum - especially when performed by a supernaturally strong wherewolf. Then again Jacob, for unknown reasons, goes for the inhales instead of the compressions, even though compressions is where he ought to start. While he may not know that, someone with two medical degrees definitely would.
    • Also, agreeing to ally with the Romanian vampires in Breaking Dawn. They were the previous rulers of vampire-kind before being overthrown by the Volturi. The enmity between the two groups is apparently so strong Laurent was denied into the Volturi just because he talked to them once. Yet the Cullens accept the Romanians' help, even though they're hoping to reach a peaceful solution to the dispute with the Volturi.
    • Edward assuming Bella is dead in New Moon, to an extent. All he has to go on is Rosalie’s thoughts that Alice had a vision of her jumping off a cliff and a vague comment made by Jacob. He himself knows that Alice’s visions aren’t always reliable and that Rosalie isn’t the most trustworthy of people. Rather than call Alice to double-check her vision, or if he was that bothered, sneak back to Forks or send one of his family members to check if Bella’s okay (which Alice herself actually does), he decides to call the Swan house (pretending to be Carlisle, for some reason) and ask after Bella. That in itself isn’t that stupid an idea, but he immediately assumes Jacob’s talking about Bella when Jacob cryptically states Charlie’s “at the funeral” and hangs up without clarifying. Especially seeing as Charlie’s a cop, he could’ve been going to anyone’s funeral. Edward still doesn’t double-check that Bella is really dead; instead he goes straight to trying to kill himself. He himself outright states he could've tried calling Alice to check!
    • Bella not telling anyone about James supposedly kidnapping her mother. James is heavily outnumbered by the Cullens and they have two vampires that can predict his moves in their ranks, so there's a good chance Renee could've been rescued (had she actually been kidnapped). Bella could've also tried calling her mother to check if she's okay or checked with Alice, who would probably have foreseen James kidnapping Renee. If Bella had told the Cullens that James had her mother and was threatening to kill her unless she met him alone, they could probably have worked out a plan to trick him; they'd also probably have figured out pretty quickly that he didn't actually have her (Alice could've foreseen that she was fine and Edward would be able to read James' thoughts and figure out the truth). Instead, Bella opts to go right to martyring herself.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Didactic?: Possibly one of the most major criticisms leveled at the film, especially by the British education system and by British parents. Values Dissonance indeed.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: And yet Burger King just made Twilight-themed Happy Meals.
  • The Woobie:
    • Bree Tanner. Her whole character arc is basically a case of Shoot the Shaggy Dog, that gets even worse if you've read The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner. She was raised by her abusive father and believed her mother had abandoned her when she was four, when in actual fact, her father secretly murdered her and disposed of her body. After getting sick of her father's abuse and running away, Bree lives on the streets, rummaging through trash and sleeping anywhere that might offer shelter to survive. She's tricked and made into a vampire against her will and knows no other life than killing people for their blood and trying to avoid being ripped apart by other newborns, being told that her only purpose is to fight a bunch of other vampires she's never even heard of. She finally finds some happiness with Diego, only for him to be killed. She doesn't even participate in the battle against the Cullens and cooperates with them and the Volturi, but is still executed, for the crime of association, under laws she is completely ignorant of. She never even lives to see her sixteenth birthday. The only worthwhile thing that comes from her death is letting Edward and by extension the rest of the Cullens know that the Volturi were in on Victoria's plot, though given how Breaking Dawn plays out, they never actually do anything with this information. Shoot the Shaggy Dog, indeed.
    • Bella when Edward, her true soulmate and only love, leaves her and takes the loving family she thought she would spend eternity being part of with him in New Moon.
      • For some people, though, this comes across as Wangst or Unintentionally Unsympathetic, given she only knew Edward for a few months and yet close to a year later, is still acting depressed and even suicidal over it, treating her family and friends - most of whom have tried to be supportive - rather crappily in the process. That, and it's something of a Foregone Conclusion that Edward was going to be coming back anyway.
    • Jacob when Bella, the girl he has been helping to heal in hopes of winning her love, leaves him, risking her life, to save the man he was healing her from in New Moon.
    • Edward when you realize that while everyone had someone to love in the Cullen Coven he was all alone, didn't even have a date to prom (any of them), and was so depressed that he couldn't even play music anymore before Bella.
    • Rosalie being to having the family she always wanted, then being gang-raped and left for dead by the man she was going to marry.
    • Carlisle was turned into a vampire against his will and had to leave his father knowing that he would never accept him and probably try to kill him, spent centuries trying to kill himself to avoid feeding on people and was almost mad out of loneliness till he managed to get a companion in Edward and then a whole family.
    • Jasper feeling the agony of the thousands of people he killed till he found Alice and peace with the Cullens and his "vegetarian" lifestyle.
    • James. His parents were killed before he turned eleven and he spent his childhood alone, struggling for survival in the wild, with only his hunting skills to rely on.
    • Victoria. Nearly every member of her first coven (including her older sister) was slaughtered by the Volturi, who wanted to add Heidi to their collection. Victoria only survived thanks to her own power of self-preservation. Later, after her mate was killed, she was ruthlessly (if ineffectively) hunted by Edward merely for being an accomplice in his (James's) hunt for Bella.
    • Leah for being dumped by her fiance for her cousin (who he scarred when she rejected him), might have caused her dad's heart attack when she transformed in front of him, is not able to have children, is hated by the rest of the pack, protects a clan she hates, and is the only female not to be paired up at the end. In Breaking Dawn, she mentally admits that her ex-fiance wants her to disappear and her own brother, who she spends all of her time protecting, tells her "you ruin everything!"
      • It's also implied that she's infertile. She says something about being either "not female enough", and she's stopped having her period as a result of being a werew- I mean, loups- dammit, shape shifter.
    • Charlie, whose only daughter goes on a four month crying spree over a break-up with her boyfriend during which she becomes nearly suicidally depressed. He also has to cope with her running off or doing very dangerous things without telling him anything, and her being involved in a relationship with a boy he doesn't approve of, whom from his perspective, seems to be emotionally manipulative or possibly even abusive. And she ends up marrying this guy straight out of high school. Then Bella gets 'sick' on her honeymoon and no one will contact Charlie, let him see her or give him any information regarding her well-being at all. He's left worrying if his daughter is okay and where she is for weeks. And before that, the woman he loved more than anyone (and still loves to this day) dumped him abruptly and moved halfway across the country, taking their baby daughter with them. Charlie only got to see Bella sporadically when she was growing up and when she moves in with him, he tries time and again to relate to her and build a relationship, only to be repeatedly rebuffed by her. His best friend dies of a heart attack too (and in the film adaptions, not long before Harry's death, another close friend was killed by 'an animal', which he then began to believe was actually a serial killer...whom he was never able to bring to justice. He still thinks the person/people who murdered his friend and several other people are out there somewhere, probably committing more murders). And to top it all off, unbeknownst to him, Bella was planning on either 'disappearing' or faking her death to become a vampire. Although this didn't actually come to pass due to certain circumstances and Charlie was oblivious, it's awful thinking about how devastated Charlie would've been to lose his only child that way.
      • In Life and Death: Twilight Reimagined, he actually does lose his son, Beau (the gender-flipped version of Bella, who gets turned into a vampire by James' gender-flipped counterpart Joss and has to fake his death), struggling to hold it together during his funeral.
    • Alistair. He's clearly unhappy about being dragged by the Cullens into a potential battle with the Volturi, and he abandons everyone as soon as he can. Then the official Guide came out, and his backstory was revealed: his own father sold him and his entire family to a vampire in exchange for power. When said vampire transformed him, he fell into a bloodlust that caused the death of dozens, including his father. Upon realizing what he had done, he ran away, only to discover that his family was gone, he couldn't live anymore among humans, and his beloved animals rejected him out of sheer terror on top of that. No wonder he turned into a paranoid loony who refuses any kind of company. The movie makes it worse, because he stated that he was actually growing a little hope that everything would be settled peacefully... before seeing Bella packing a note and resources for Jacob and Renésmee's getaway, at which points he realizes she never had any hope for the Volturi to stop and listen.
    • Marcus. His wife, who was Aro's sister, had been murdered and he never found the culprit. Now, he's The Eeyore of the Volturi. During the climax of the last movie (even though it's only a vision of what could happen), what's his reaction when he's confronted by two vampires about to kill him?
    Marcus: (lightly smiling and without even trying to resist) "Finally..."

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