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  • Annoying Video-Game Helper: Though not nearly as disliked as the other advisors in the series, the one here can be pretty grating, constantly repeating information you already know. Though he is saved scorn by most for having an interesting backstory (a former Imperial Light Sorcerer who crossed the Despair Event Horizon at the Empire's many enemies), story relevance (coming to each faction to give their leaders advice), and, unlike all the others, betraying you to Chaos in a cinematic.
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  • Anti-Climax Boss: While very formidable, Sarthorael still goes down rather easily (especially when confronted by a powerful lord), and his army of Elite Mooks is considerably tougher.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Most players were not impressed with some of the factions' unit rosters (most particularly the Empire's), believing they were lacking and that more units from the table top should be added. For instance, players complained about the Dwarfs lacking a Rune Priest, or the Empire lacking some of the Knightly Orders and light cavalry. However, an Instagram video showcasing a Bright Wizard confirms that the current unit rosters we have seen were not complete, and there will be more units to come (CA even confirmed that they will re-organize the unit roster eventually). Both the Runepriest, and a Knightly Order (Knights of the Blazing Sun) ended up being added, the former in the vanilla game, and the later as DLC.
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    • The announcement that, due to the major backlash, the Warriors of Chaos will be free for anyone who buys the game within the first week after release (and not only for those who pre-ordered.) This has been met positively with fans, as it allows them to wait a day or two after the game's release for Let's Plays and reviews to show up to see if the game is really worth buying, then still be able to get one of the setting's core factions for free.
    • The announcement that the game will have modding support, despite initial claims that Total War: Warhammer would have none (according to the announcement this is due to the licencing issues involved being cleared up). In particular, the devs are allowing for and aiding in a mod that will remove the controversial Regional Occupation system.
      • Adding to this is the release of the new map editing tool, Terry, which has already given the fans to ability to create some spectacular maps on their own. This became a double cheer of happiness from the fandom when modders discovered a way to add custom battle maps to the campaign, which CA later upped with officially supporting the feature, leading to several large mods that completely overhauled the battle maps in the game.
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    • After the colossal headache it caused in the first game (see Scrappy Mechanic below), the March stance was changed so that armies can no longer retreat when attacked and will be completely destroyed if they lose.
  • Awesome Art: A major draw of the game is to see the Old World in its glory, along with its scenery, and all the classic Warhammer unit designs. And by Sigmar are they breathtaking.
  • Awesome Ego:
    • Some fans love Balthasar Gelt for how much of an Unscrupulous Hero his quest battle speeches show him to be.
    • Grimgor is da best!
    • Sigvald the Magnificent is this, as despite being a selfish, narcissistic pretty boy who had a massive ego, has a legion of fangirls, and, admittedly, some of the best quest speeches in the game.
    • Wulfrik the Wanderer is convinced that he's the World's Best Warrior and he can easily back it up with a massive amount of Badass Boasts.
  • Awesome Music: While the entire score is exceptional, the music that plays in the Bretonnia trailer, is the standout.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Mannfred Von Carstein in a nutshell. On one hand, to a portion of the fanbase, he's beloved for being one of the strongest Legendary Lords gameplay wise, his intimidating voice acting and general Evil Is Cool vibes, but to many others, he's a laughable "Manlet" that's hated for destroying the setting during The End Times, and deserves to be beaten up by "Vlad the Dad". It should be noted that his status as this is pretty much an improvement, because Mannfred was originally a full on Scrappy for the entire Warhammer fandom. Expect threads to be filled with Vlad and Mannfred fans bashing each other on various subjects.
      • A later patch broke the Vampire faction in two for this exact reason. Mannfred is still the default, but you can play as Vlad and kick his ass if you so desire.
    • Archaon as well, with half of the fandom thinking he's a complete badass, the other; a whiny edgelord, who is overshadowed by the other Chaos Lords and various non Chaos villains as well.
  • Better Than Canon: A large portion of the Warhammer Fantasy fandom prefer this game over its actual successor, Age of Sigmar.
    • Likewise for the Total War fandom, the game's popularity is enough to warrant interest in other strategy games based in fictional universes like Total War: Third Age or Total War: Westeros, moving away from the traditional historical settings.
  • Broken Base:
    • Whilst a large amount of people are happy for a Total War set in the Warhammer Fantasy Universe, there are those who are upset that Creative Assembly is making a game that is not based in a historical setting (even though it's been stated that a separate team is indeed working on a historical-themed Total War). This died down fairly quickly, for the most part.
      • Though the flames have been re-ignited to an extent with the announcement trailer for the first expansion, as fans of the historical title are once again displeased that a new historical title has not yet been announced.
    • The reveal of the Chaos faction being a pre-order DLC has made a lot of fans unhappy.
      • Similarly, the surprise reveal of optional blood and gore as paid DLC rather than a free patch hasn't impressed some people. Some are happy to have the gore, while others are insulted that Creative Assembly would dare to put a price tag on such a simple feature while giving us free Blood Knights at the exact same time. This isn't the first time this has happened, of course.
    • The inability for players to conquer the entire map due to lore reasons did not go over well, either.
    • The news that the Dwarfs will be able to ally with the Vampire Counts was met with mixed reception. On the one hand, there are some who believe this goes against the lore too heavily. Others think that this opens up great gameplay opportunities. This was based off an off-hand mention in one of the demo videos. In the final game both factions have to destroy the other to win in the long campaign; the most they can do is a non-aggression pact. In fact, both factions have their diplomacy mechanically weighted such that any agreement between the two is likely to be superficial and short-lived. They are quite common in the early game, simply because both factions have more pressing enemies to deal with and aren't competing for the same regions.
    • A large divide has sprang up, between fans of the multiplayer, and fans of the campaign, the former wanting the unit balance to be competitive, and fair, while the later group of people wants the lore, and fun factor to take precedence over gameplay balance.
  • Catharsis Factor: On the tabletop end of this franchise, the decision to end the Old World to replace it with the Age of Sigmar was met with no small amount of disappointment from much of the base. Being able to play in the Old World again in this game is the next best thing to actually playing the old game on the tabletop, and being able to push back the forces of Chaos and avert the End Times is a huge bonus.
  • Continuity Lockout: Many newcomers to the Warhammer series can be overwhelmed by the vast background of the setting, which amounts to thirty years of lore, and be confused about who the heck everyone is. Especially now that Warhammer Fantasy has been discontinued.
    • This has led to more than a few people asking for units or mount options without realising that what they're asking for was introduced in and exclusive to Age of Sigmar. Such as the monstrous, chimera-like form Archaon's "horse" took on.
  • Crazy Awesome: The Orcs are just as batshit insane, and awesome as ever.
  • Creator's Pet: Some fans have accused Creative Assembly of favouring the Vampire Counts over the other factions. Not only was their roster more complete then the others at launch, but two of three of the FreeLC Legendary Lords have been Vampire Counts (Vlad and Isabella von Carstein), Vlad and Manfred are considered Game Breakers in single player, and the Vampire Counts as a whole are considered top tier in multiplayer matches.
    • Their strength in real-time battles is further highlighted by how they can win even though they have a horrible start in the strategic map, quite possibly the worst of any major faction in the series. They've got a very poor economy, but the real killer is that everybody permanently hates them and about half their border starts as and will always be occupied by literally unconquerable enemies. The Vampire Counts are bounded to the South and East by mountains, which they are never able to conquer thanks to the regional occupation system (maybe vampires are scared of heights?). They'll be under attack by Dwarves and possibly also Orcs for the entire game. Played using autobattle, the Counts will get wrecked... but a Counts campaign with Vlad as the leader is considered a pretty easy win!
      • The Vampire Counts actually have one of the best start positions in the game. They're really only vulnerable from the north and west, as the dwarfs are usually going to be distracted by the greenskin threat and even if they do attack a few well placed garrison buildings can easily deal with their forces. This means that you can instead focus on expanding into a divided Empire that is often at war with itself without having to worry too much about your home province. Assisting matters is that you can build a gold mine in Castle Drakenhof, giving a massive boost to your economy.
  • Creepy Awesome: The fandom's opinion of Durthu. An insane tree spirit in the form of a burnt-out husk, wearing a half-destroyed face with a perpetual Slasher Smile, speaking in a deep, demonic voice, wielding a massive sword, wanting to commit genocide against any who dare harm nature. Needless to say, he's a lot more popular than Orion.
  • Demonic Spiders: Marauder Horsemen. Chaos and Norscan factions like spamming them. Very fast, numerous, and damaging, they'll be the bane of your existence, not because they're strong, but because they're so annoying, as their insane speed make them difficult to catch. All the while they'll be chucking spears and throwing axes at your precious cavalry.
    • On a similar note, Chaos Chariots, another effective hit-and-run unit that has players tearing their hair out to go up against. While much harder to use for actual players since the Chariots must avoid being bogged down and thus carefully managed in light of this, the computer has a lot less trouble micromanaging them and your infantry will probably catch one of them in the back if there's that many of them. Later game Norscan factions are infamous for having armies consisting of them. This is believed to be caused by resident Artificial Stupidity being unable to change building lines that have already been constructed so they'll just constantly build the highest "value" units available to them heedless of having part of their unit roster been cut off in some way. Other factions are by no means immune to this phenomenon as well, but the Norsca (particularly the Varg's Surtha Ek, joked to be the true threat to the world instead of Archaeon the Everchosen) being an inevitable opponent for factions aside from Chaos in the late-game has them be especially known to do this.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Helman Ghorst is very well liked by the fanbase for being a flavor text character from the original tabletop that was brought up and turned into a full Legendary Lord with a unique model, as well as being actually useful in the campaign.
    • Alberic d'Bordeleaux is popular as well, for similar reasons.
    • Skarsnik, Warlord of Eight Peaks, and his pet Squig Gobbla are very popular, just like the tabletop, helped by their very unique goblin-only subfaction, and campaign.
    • The most popular vanilla Lord is Emperor Karl Franz, who is beloved for his over the top, completely hamtastic personality, which has spawned countless memes. It helps he's actually very likeable as a character, and very powerful in combat.
    • Despite only being a Palette Swap with some unique abilities and a modified skill tree, Boris Todbringer (and his faction, Middenland) is a highly requested character for getting proper Legendary Lord treatment. An example of his popularity is an official forum that was planned to discuss the Mortal Empires campaign map, and was accompanied by a Youtube video explaining what it is, and among the Legendary Lords present when the video said how many there would be, Boris was among them, which community manager Matt Whelan clarified was only because he's available in multiplayer. This caused the forum to derail completely to the point where Boris was the only thing people talked about.
    • Norsca is by far the most popular faction in the game. Similar to Ghorst and Alberic, but an entire officially approved homebrew faction, with unique mechanics (including the most requested feature of pledging ones allegiance to a specific Chaos God, which the Warriors lacked), a Norse theme in their marauders, very popular Legendary Lords, and filled to the brim with obscure elements of the lore that Games Workshop forgot, like the demonic Skinwolves, repulsive Fimir, and corrupted Chaos Mammoths, the faction practically breathes Evil Is Cool, and the fandom adores them for it. They're even more popular then their parent army, the Warriors of Chaos.
  • Even Better Sequel: When it was released, it was critically acclaimed by critics for perfectly blending Warhammer Fantasy and Total War together. Fan opinion has been very positive, to the extent it's being heralded as one of the best games in the series, along with Medieval 2 and Shogun 2.
  • Evil Is Cool: All the evil factions are this, as afforded by their impressive pedigree, which include the batshit Greenskins, the savage Beastmen, the black armored Chaos Warriors, the hardened, viking-esque Norscans, and the sinister Vampire Counts with their legions of undead. Special mention goes to the evil Legendary Lords, which are equally as badass as their order counterparts.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Isabella Von Carstein. If her sultry Romanian accent wont convince you, her armoured, yet shapely figure will.
    • Sigvald has plenty of female fans. The fact he's essentially a viking pretty boy dedicated to the God of Lust, Slannesh, helps, as do his stunning blonde locks, and chiselled face.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Gobbla and Skarsnik. We ain't kidding...
  • Game-Breaker:
    • Single-player: Auto-resolved battles are decided largely by pure numbers, ignoring other factors like army composition, and preferentially assigns damage to large creatures and heroes. This makes large stacks of otherwise cannon fodder units ludicrously powerful. Except for zombies, which count against the army using them for some reason. This was fixed in a later patch that made auto resolve alot fairer to the AI.
      • Ranged units are also given a disproportionate amount of power in the system, with it being common for a single missile unit to get more kills than several melee ones. Because of this the AI favours them more when building armies, stacking numerous ranged units and(in the Empire's case) siege weapons into armies.
    • The Doom Diver Catapult is ludicrously powerful. It has an enormous range, and self guided missiles that do a lot of damage. Against the AI its pretty much impossible to avoid, and will cut a swathe through the heaviest units. Its not usual for it to get over a hundred kills in auto-resolves, and be much higher rank than other units in the same army.
    • Vlad Von Carstein grants his entire army Vanguard Deployment, letting you place units almost anywhere you want. In addition Vlad also possesses a skill which grants units free experience every turn, along with being an extremely powerful lord in his own right.
    • Multi-player: Demigryph knights (incredibly powerful for their price and counter several high-tier units that cost almost twice as much, while lacking counters themselves) and Shem's Burning Gaze/Soul Leech, both of whom quickly kill the enemy general with three-four castings and cost very little mana for how much damage they do against single characters.
    • Before the obvious nerf, Flock of Doom could wipe out many squads, even late game ones, with a single cast, which made Beastmen magicians overpowered. CA recently restored its power, so while it aint quite as bad, it's back to being very dangerous.
    • The True Everchosen buff you get for defeating Archaon as Norsca grants huge bonuses faction wide. Increasing chaos corruption from characters, +3 experience ranks to all recruited units, and -75% to upkeep costs.
  • Gateway Series: As mentioned below, the game sparked new interest in the Fantasy version of Warhammer, introducing plenty of people to the, sadly discontinued, franchise.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • When playing as the Greenskins or Dwarfs, the Top Knotz Savage Orcs. Less diverse than the other Greenskin factions, but their units are tougher than the mainline Orc equivalents and they use massive numbers of Arrer Boys. While mid-to-late game armies can step on them, they rapidly rebuild forces and their bases are deep in the badlands and difficult to stomp out. They got significantly nerfed in the first patch, so they aren't anywhere near as big of a problem; however, it also added a random event that makes them come back if you ever do manage to get rid of them.
    • Related to the above is the random event of a Savage Orc tribe showing up. While they don't spawn immediately hostile, it's still an Orc warband spawning far from the Badlands in your territory, which can reinforce on its own, can suddenly decide to attack you while you're busy with other threats, and they are entirely composed of the aforementioned Savage units. There's no permanent way to stop them from spawning, and killing them as soon as the tribe shows up may just make them appear again a few turns later.
    • The Norscan tribes can easily become this as well. Despite their armies consisting almost entirely of low tier marauder units, and are thus not particularly difficult to defeat, they seem to have an almost inexhaustible supply of troops and the fact that their homeland causes constant attrition to all non Chaos armies makes them extremely irritating to deal with. They have an uncanny knack of knowing which settlements don't have walls, and are smart enough to sail around the continent to flank an enemy. Most of the factions can't establish a base in Norsca, as there's only some Human/Vampire towns across the sea, or a few Dwarfish holds on the far eastern side of their land. If the player doesn't devote enough forces to purge the north completely, the Norscans will keep resettling their destroyed settlements once the player's army has moved on.
  • Good Bad Bugs: Kholek Suneater can sometimes appear much larger then his already huge size on the campaign map, making him look both hilarious, and intimidating.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The game Warhammer: Mark of Chaos was likened to a Total War game set in the Warhammer universe on its release, if a much more linear one. Cut to years later and an actual Total War game set in the Warhammer universe has been made.
  • It Was His Sled: The Chaos invasion, Sarthorael, and the adviser betraying you are pretty well known twists.
  • Memetic Badass: Surtha Ek, the head of the Varg tribe (and to a lesser degree Felman Ingersson, his counterpart in the Skaeling tribe). He's especially associated with copious amount of chariot and marauder horseman spam, and is more Loved-To-Hated than the actual Big Bad of the first game in the community. This has included calls to make him an actual Norscan Legendary Lord with bonuses to Chariots.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Kemmler is universally ridiculed for his atrocious stats and useless campaign bonuses, making him absolutely worthless to many players, in the campaign and multiplayer. His only saving grace is being able to summon Krell, but Krell gets more love from the fans than Kemmler does (and Krell wasn't added until months after release). The developers are aware of this and plan to update him to buff his campaign performance with new bonuses and a fresh skill tree.
    • In nearly every video where Sigvald the Magnificent is brought up, there will be plenty of people reminding him of his humiliating fate during The End Times: Getting his head crushed into paste by Throgg and then having his bloody corpse pissed on.
  • Memetic Molester: Sigvald, for obvious reasons.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • People have started to call the Chaos Hell Cannons the "Penis Cannons" due to their design (most notably, the two fleshy orbs between the cannon).
      • The fact that Sigvald (the champion of Slaanesh) starts with one certainly helps the meme.
    • Karl Franz in general has actually become a veritable Fountain of Memes. His hammy dialogue is very easily exploited and made to fit virtually any situation. There are even mini stories in which Karl Franz only speaks in his clicked responses, and it is hilarious.
      The Empress: Why do I feel as though you have no interest in me anymore?
      Karl: BRING ME TO MY MEN!
      • "SUMMON THE ELECTOR COUNTS!"
      • "This action does not have my consent!" is also popular for being easily parroted into any situation you disagree with.
    • Kill Them. Raise Them.
    • "BEYOND YOUR COMPREHENSION!", usually accompanied by a picture of one of Surtha Ek's more... unorthodox army compositions.
    • "Say my name! SAY MY NAME!"
    • "Skaven? That's just a myth spread by Tilean traders to raise the cost of wheat" and variants were already a thing in the fantasy fandom, but it has been increased by the widespread demand for the Skaven to be included in the game in the future, and the reality that in the game at release there were no Skaven.
    • WHERE IS KRELL!?
      • HERE IS KRELL!
    • "THAT STILL ONLY COUNTS AS ONE!" is often quoted when talking about killing mammoths from Norsca.
    • "Durthu = Tree Hitler". To clarify, this is due to an early AI bug where Durthu's faction of Wood Elves would become aggressively expansionist, steamroll all the other local groups, conquer a large portion of the Old World, and then ally with Chaos, of all people. The next patch made both Wood Elf factions incredibly isolationist, removing this tendency.
  • More Popular Spin Off: On both counts, towards the Total War series, and the Warhammer Fantasy franchise. Not only is it the bestselling Total War game to date, it reinvigorated interest in Warhammer Fantasy, bringing thousands of new fans to the setting, arguably surpassing Warhammer Fantasy's real successor, Age of Sigmar in terms of popularity.
  • Player-Preferred Pattern: The likelihood of Empire or Bretonnia players to gun for the capital Marienburg and its uniquely high-income port is practically memetic.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: During the last years of the tabletop Grimgor was considered a Creator's Pet who kept getting built up at the expense of more interesting Orcs & Goblins characters and because he was the one to end Storm of Chaos by sucker punching Archaon at the last moment. Here he is still very powerful, but is just one member of the Big-Bad Ensemble, and his great melee prowess is balanced by being stuck footslogging in a game where mounts are very useful for Lords, earning him a far greater fandom than he used to have. His many hilarious and hammy quotes certainly help matters.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Stance-dancing. Armies can enter multiple stances that allow for different bonuses and the AI is adept at cycling quickly between stances to troll the player in unbelievably frustrating ways that a logical person would assume are impossible.
    • The March stance is the most frustrating of these and is so widely-hated that there are multiple popular mods that flat-out remove it. Initially designed as a tool to allow armies to move through friendly territory quickly and reduce campaign downtime by giving a movement speed bonus but decreased vigour and locking out the ability to initiate battles, the AI quickly learned that March stance is instead the most powerful tool for an attacking army in enemy territory. The movement speed bonus means that they can outrun any hostile army, as an army has to use March stance to match their speed and thus can't engage them because armies in March stance can't initiate battles. But even then the AI can work around this because you can switch to March stance from Standard stance at any time - This lets the enemy move to an easy target in Standard stance, attack it, destroy it, then enter March stance and run away, gaining the full movement bonus while negating the entire drawback and also violating a fundamental rule of the game (being in a battle is supposed to use all of your Movement so you can't hit and run like this but changing to March stance adds movement after this check, letting the army move). Even if you do successfully attack the army they have the option to retreat once, moving them further away from the army that attacked them and often out of range of a re-engagement, so they just run away next turn. This cycle of hitting, running, and retreating all combines to mean that it can take multiple armies moving in concert upwards of a dozen turns, or multiple successful and expensive Block Army actions from an agent combined with a strong army in Ambush stance, in order to finally get rid of a single raiding army. The player can do this too, but it's more difficult and less beneficial to them than it is to The All-Seeing A.I..
    • The Underway Passages, Beastpaths, and Worldroots are equally annoying. All of them allow armies to instantly teleport a short distance across the map, through terrain and barriers. This makes trying to hold off Dwarfs, Greenskins, Beastmen, and Wood Elves at choke points or natural barriers impossible. Unless an army is in range to intercept them during said move (which is a random chance) they can go wherever they want. Combine it with march stance and those factions will run circles around you.
    • Attrition is a lesser Scrappy than stance-dancing but is still often grumbled about due to how prevalent it is. You can take attrition from a lot of sources - Barren wastelands, mountain passes, the North where the Goddamned Bats live, Athel Loren, or being in an opposing type of Corruption, with Greenskins also suffering attrition if their Fightiness gets low - and it can devour large portions of your army's health in just a few turns unless you use army-slowing stances to become immune to it, which combined with stance-dancing means you'll probably never fight anything. Towards the final battles with Chaos it's not unusual for half the map to cause Attrition damage. Interestingly this is also hated by more serious players because the AI doesn't know how to handle attrition very well and will stand in army-sapping territories for long periods of time, rendering formidable fights into jokes or paralyzing armies for long periods of time.
    • AI-controlled Beastmen are Scrappy Mechanic: The Faction. Not only are they the main abusers of 'stance-dancing' as mentioned above, but they have access to the Beastpaths also mentioned above and have no cities to attack so you can't threaten their assets like they do yours. The cherry on top is the fact their default encampment stance is also an ambush stance meaning that you often can't see their armies unless they're moving. So in the event you ever manage to bring one to battle, they can simply run away and enter a stance that makes them invisible while they recruit new units and heal their casualties. In addition they spread Chaos corruption wherever they go, which can cause public order problems and eventually lead to rebellions and attrition if not kept in check. To top this off they're a faction you can never completely get rid of as they periodically respawn in random places even if completely destroyed.
  • Squick: Greenskins leave behind shit in sacked towns. Giant, stinking mounds of shit that are crudely shaped into religious idols. Pity the anonymous fellows that have to clean those out for you to put something useful in that building slot...
  • That One Attack:
    • The Net of Amyntok from the Lore of Light can be a complete nightmare for people using either fast-moving units, undead or giant creatures as it pins them down and leaves them defenseless. This only becomes worse if there is a Tempelhof Luminark around.
    • Poison attacks apply a debuff which nerfs an entire unit for a few seconds.
  • That One Level: Both Mannfred and Heinrich's legendary quests send them across the world to begin their missions. With Mannfred going to the Badlands while Heinrich heads to Estalia. Both would require an extremely long march through unfriendly territory, taking attrition from the lack of Vampiric corruption. In either case it's better to just pay the gold and instantly do the battles.
    • Mannfred's are especially frustrating. Requiring you to send a Banshee and later a Necromancer deep into the Badlands. Which is not only time consuming but wastes valuable heroes who could be gaining experience doing useful stuff.
    • The final Bretonnia Errantry War mission if you choose to attempt the Chaos story-line. The battle location is deep in the Chaos wastes and unlike other quests you can't simply teleport to it. It means either spending multiple turns fighting through hostile factions, likely suffering high attrition rates along the way, or a long out sailing diversion. The final battle itself isn't too bad but is also a long war of attrition as you face off agaisnt four different armies in quick succession.
    • Azhag the Slaughterer's very first personal quest, needed to unlock both his special talent trees, requires you to move a character to the border of the Chaos Wastes. Since the Greenskins start in the far southeast this effectively requires you to cross the entire world. The quest itself isn't easy either, pitting your one army against a Chaos warband and four (admittedly small) undead reinforcing armies.
    • Batlhazar Gelt's final personal quest, a duel versus Gottfried Orr for the title of Supreme Patriarch. It takes place right in Altdorf, but more than makes up for it with sheer, ludicrous difficulty that has led otherwise straight-laced players to employ cheats and ask themselves what the hell the developers were smoking in equal measures. To wit: with one army, sans reinforcements, the player must face down two full, 20 unit armies. And not spammy armies filled with trash units: oh, no. Anything from cannons and handgunners to multiple units of demigryph knights and high level heroes. Did we mention that one of the two armies starts within spitting distance of the player's deployment zone, hidden in the woods and set to ambush them the moment the battle starts?
    • Trying to take Castle Templehof as the Vampire Counts. Not only is it level 2, it has access to a garrison building adding mid tier units like Grave Guard and Crypt Ghouls. Trying to deal with these in the opening turns can be nightmarish, as it makes Templehof incredibly difficult to wipe out while they can build up to counter-attack between attempts. Requiring the player to either fortify their lands and try to get mid-tier units of their own, or raise an entire second army just to get the forces nessecary to take out their Starter Villain.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Inverted by the return of Guard Mode, which was well-received by the community.
    • The Siege Battles due to the smaller sizes of the settlements and the oversimplifications of the battles themselves. Where in previous games players can attack through multiple sides and requires strategy and timing, players in this game can attack in only 1 or 2 directions and the strategy when besieging settlements majorly consists of an Attack! Attack! Attack! mentality. Defense towers can now fire well into the attacker's deployment zone outranging most siege weapons, rendering more patient strategies suicidal. It's gotten to the point where players rarely play Siege Battles at all, and call it the real flaw in one of the most popular Total War games of all time.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: In terms of PVP, many consider Gelt and Kemmler to be the worst possible choices for a legendary lord due to how they cost far more than they bring to a fight compared to a much cheaper regular wizard or master necromancer. And making matters worse for Gelt, it is very rare to see experienced players use his lore, The Lore of Metal, unless one plays as The Everwatcher. A patch later made the Lore of Metal fully viable, and gave Gelt a powerful campaign bonus. While he isn't as widely used as the other Empire Lords, he's considered a vast improvement over Kemmler...
    • Though powerful in single-player, Dwarfs are generally considered the least competitive PVP army. Their entire shtick is based on heavily armoured but undercosted infantry in a game where countering enemy army lists (and being unpredictable so the enemy can't easily counter your own list) is a premium. Every faction has an armour-piercing anti-infantry unit that will go through Dwarfs like a knife through hot butter, and to make matters worse the only Anti-Cavalry unit available to Dwarfs are the Glass Cannon Slayers, who are both outrun by cavalry and usually killed by them en masse if the cavalry charge first.
    • Bretonnia is also considered one of the weaker multiplayer armies for much the same reason, except as an army with great cavalry and mediocre everything else.
    • On the other side of the Tier Scrappy spectrum, the Lizardmen and the Tomb Kings get a lot of flak for having insanely good tier 1-3 units that have no real counters and do really well against basically everybody, turning the single player campaign into a cakewalk even on harder difficulties and putting every other faction in multiplayer at a disadvantage. Lizardmen in particular as they have point-for-point the best infantry in the entire game, with amazing endurance and staying power plus healing options, ensuring that the enemy battle line always, always breaks first.
    • Empire Pistoliers are about as infamously poor as Slayers. While Marauder Horsemen are well-known Demonic Spiders, Pistoliers usually cause players to breath easy should they see the AI have them against them due to their poor range and damage-output for this range (not helped by said range making the Pistoliers' AI having trouble with actually shooting at all if they are being chased by infantry that are just even a little faster than the average while set to skirmish), making it simplistic for players to just shoot them to death with their ranged infantry.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Helman Ghorst's announcement as a Legendary Lord alongside Volkmar the Grim led a great deal of people, including those well versed in Warhammer lore, to scratch their heads in response to his name, being an Ascended Extra from a single lore entry. However his appearance makes sense considering the theme of the DLC was heavily based around the Sigmar's Blood Campaign.
    • Another Ascended Extra, Alberic of Bordeleaux was not exactly the first lord that would come to mind for most fans of his faction.
    • More like unexpected race, but before the announcement of the Norsca faction few people expected the Fimir, an obscure and oft forgotten aspect of Warhammer lore, to make an appearance. Norsca itself being a playable faction is also rather unexpected, as it didn't even have a full army list in the tabletop game.
  • Unfortunate Character Design: Hard to tell since the player has to really zoom in, but the players that do upon Empire artillery crews will think each and every one of them has a right-leaning erection. It's definitely supposed to look like the codpieces that were the fashion in 15th century Europe that the Empire is heavily based on (especially the Landsknecht mercenaries), but the actual placement and facing of the crew's really makes theirs look more... natural.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • After Total War: Rome 2 and Total War: Attila, Creative Assembly had a noted reputation for exaggerated promises, poor performance on launch, and buggy releases. Cue Total War: Warhammer's release, and not only were the promises of the advertising upheld, its launch was hailed as notably polished and bug-free.
    • On the Warhammer side of things, the fact that the game is set in the original Warhammer universe rather than the controversial Warhammer: Age of Sigmar appealed to many loyalists to the old canon.
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