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    A-D 
  • Alternative Character Interpretation: Has its own page.
  • Angst? What Angst?: Lincoln is very well-adjusted, and even when things go wrong his reactions tend to be downplayed compared to how they would likely be in real life; most notably the events of "No Such Luck". Likely justified given the daily chaos of living with ten other siblings, however. That being said however, in that episode, Lincoln sounded more exasperated and annoyed than any indignation or resentment if it happens to any traumatized kid in real life.
  • Anvilicious: Although the morals themselves are actually pretty subtle (relatively speaking), there are a lot of episodes that generally tend to send some sort of life lesson to the viewer. Sometimes, several within the same episode. Unfortunately, some other lessons that can easily be seen and learnt, tend to get ignored by the characters.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Fans who disliked "April Fools Rules" for Luan not getting any comeuppance for her harsh pranks and gags may find satisfaction in "Fool's Paradise", when Luan becomes a victim of her own pranks. But if that's not enough, "Fool Me Twice" ends with Luan breaking-down and crying over how her pranks almost forced her family to leave town, but then turned out to be a prank on her!.
    • Later episodes have the family being much more caring towards Lincoln, and his Butt-Monkey status (with a few... notable exceptions) is more toned down. Some episodes that end with the sisters showing how much they love their brother seem to have been made specifically to address this concern, like "Room With a Feud"note  when they switch back with their old roommates for his sake or "Yes-Man" with "Lincoln Loud, the Best Dang Brother Anywhere Around", the sisters' improvised concert.
    • There are also more episodes that feature the siblings being more supportive of each other in general ("L is for Love" for instance), and the episodes that have them all collaborate to achieve the same goal (such as "Lock'N Loud", "Fed Up" or "Job Insecurity") all serve the show's purpose to show that, no matter what, the siblings deeply love each other.
    • In "Spell It Out", Lucy is walked all over by her siblings several times and it is revealed that them forgetting about and not noticing her affect her far more than she let on.note  "Tricked" shows the exact opposite situation, with the whole family eagerly helping Lucy create her haunted corn maze for Halloween, which is a very important project for her.
    • "Yes-Man" feels like one massive attempt to properly redo the much-maligned "Cereal Offender", where the sisters did attempt to make up for their misdeeds but were never seen to accept responsibility or offer more than a token apology. In the latter, their antics cost Lincoln his freedom to go to the store, his mother's trust and confidence, and a box of cereal, attempting to compensate him by acquiring the cereal, but allowing him to shoulder their blame. The former, however, has them acknowledge how their own selfishness cost Lincoln something he really treasured, the opportunity to attend a Smooch concert, and going to immense lengths to recreate the concert in full scale in order to proclaim how grateful they are to him, even getting the band to show up.
    • For those taking issue with the negative continuity, Season 3 has so far shown much more consistent continuity, whether through callbacks to previous episodes ("Roadie to Nowhere") or being outright sequels ("City Slickers").
    • After she pulled some questionable actions that tainted her reputation in "No Suck Luck" and "Lynner Takes All", "Net Gains" steers Lynn in the right direction, as she actually learns her lesson and goes through proper development at the end. While it's just the typical "No 'I' in team" Aesop, it's better than nothing for her given the former two episodes. Then, the episode "Middle Men" really surprised people as it explained the reason why Lynn acts like a bully towards Lincoln (even if it doesn’t really excuse her horrid actions) and finally gave her some well-needed Character Development. Or at least revealed to the viewers that deep down, Lynn is revealed to be a traumatized, insecure, conflicted kid with some very serious emotional issues and severe trouble in admitting her flaws because she very likely despises no one more than herself.
    • The announcement of season 5 aging the characters up a year in response to concerns about the status quo being too strict.
  • Awesome Art: The animation is gorgeous, smooth and crisp, with some very nicely colored backgrounds reminiscent of an old-school comic book. Special mention goes to the intro.
  • Awesome Music:
    • The theme song is pretty cool with its rousing tune that sounds like something Luna would write.
    • The ending theme. It's a slower and more relaxed version of the opening theme.
    • You can always expect this from Luna every time she gets A Day in the Limelight episode.
    • The Louds' Christmas song in "11 Louds a Leapin'" is notable for being the show's first official musical number.
    • "Lincoln Loud, the Best Dang Brother Anywhere Around", the song at the end of "Yes Man" during the sisters' improvised concert.
    • "You Got Tricked", the song at the of "Tricked". The fun visuals help.
    • Fenton the Feel-Better Fox's "Cheer Up, Baby" song becomes one In-Universe.
    • All of the songs from "Really Loud Music", especially "Play it Loud" and "Best Thing Ever".
  • Base-Breaking Character: Has its own page.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: Luna's random guitar solos in "Get the Message". They serve no purpose except to censor Lincoln and Lori's swearing, but that's the joke.
  • Broken Base: Has its own page.
  • Cliché Storm: The show has a lot of elements that have been done to death already. The concept is a (mostly) simplistic and anvilicious slice of life cartoon, with a Loser Protagonist who's a young boy that has to fix whatever issue he gets himself in to avoid punishment. Said young boy also serves as the Only Sane Man and main Butt-Monkey of the show with that one friend who appears in almost every episode and has stereotypical siblings (a Big Sister Bully, a Spoiled Brat sibling, etc).
  • Crack Pairing:
    • Luna/Carol Pingrey has a respectable share of fans despite its inexplicability (the two have never interacted).
    • Lincoln tends to get paired with many girls, including those he barely knows or have not met yet, like Sid or Sam.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: The destruction of Fenton the Feel-Better Fox. In-Universe, this is a dramatic moment, as it means that the siblings won't be able to bring it back to Lily to cheer her up. However, the way its destruction is amped Up to Elevennote  makes the scene darkly hilarious.
  • Crossover Ship: There are actually fans who pair up Maria Santiago with Darlene Patel, due to both being doctors who are mothers to one of the main characters. Fan art like this helps out.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy:
    • The show can be pretty mean-spirited from time to time. Lincoln, who's one of the saner and nicer characters, almost never goes a single episode without having something bad happen to him, often for no reason, or for any reason too minor for the punishment he gets and fails so much that it can make a lot of episodes focused on him seem completely pointless. That's not even getting into what his sisters do, who frequently act stupid, ignorant, or just straight-up mean towards him and are almost never punished for it, and whenever they are it’s normally not satisfactory enough. Season 2 and onward has toned down this aspect considerably, but it still pops up every now and then. While it is meant to be played for laughs, it certainly doesn't help to any real life viewer who experienced a Dysfunctional Family and may find the idea that the show's pretense that the main character is happy with their big, screwed up family ("Wouldn't trade it for the world") to be romanticized and off-putting, especially if they come from relatively smaller, more chaotic households with Abusive Parents and siblings who bully them.
    • Many fans view Luan's cruel and extreme pranks toward her family in the April Fools' episodes to be irredeemable and had trouble rooting for her in "Fool Me Twice" when she was on the verge of tears when her family started moving away from her, only to reveal a few moments later that they were just messing with her as karmic retribution. Fans were especially shocked at how "April Fools Rules" transitioned Luan from an innocent, fun-loving girl to a completely sociopathic bitch who's shown to be even worse than Lola in her Ax-Crazy moments.
    • Flip goes off the deep end in "Snow Way Out" by blatantly leaving the Loud siblings trapped and at risk of freezing to death in a snowstorm out of spite over Lana getting ahead of him in a contest, even backing his truck into the restaurant on purpose to make sure they can't get out. He only helps the Louds out later on the condition that Lana agrees to give the contest winning burger wrapper to him.
  • Designated Hero:
    • Lincoln. Sometimes he can act really stupid, really selfish, or even both, making it very hard to root for him whenever he gets the spotlight (which is very common considering he's the main character).
    • Lincoln's sisters. Depending on the episode, they can either be simply innocent girls being abused by Lincoln to get what he wants, be only better than Lincoln due to having more morals, be just as bad as him, or be outright unlikable and worse than him. More than once, they can even be viewed as complete bullying idiots who only care about themselves and seem to have been written just for the audience to despise.
  • Designated Monkey: A lot of fans have felt that Lincoln has become one. Most of the time he gets hurt, humiliated, pushed around, or just generally has bad things happen to him for no reason whatsoever. note  And even when he does deserve it, the punishments he receives tend to be too much or too harsh to really find amusing. Additionally, he is usually the only one who is wrong and needs to learn a valuable life's lesson, while his sisters get off scot-free and their mistakes are almost always Played for Laughs. Again, episodes from Season 3 onward tend to tone down this aspect, with all the kids being punished or learning something, but it hasn't completely gone away.
  • Designated Villain: Sue, the retirement home nurse. She may be a stickler for the rules and a killjoy in everything fun, but her job is to keep the retirement home and the seniors living there safe, and if anything happens to the old folks, she'll be responsible.
  • Die for Our Ship:
    • Ronnie Anne has begun to receive some backlash from the Loudcest shippers very quickly, even more after the events of "Save the Date".
    • Lynn often gets this treatment as well, due to how popular shipping her and Lincoln is.
    • You're either a shipper of Loudcest, thus wishing for the other characters to die to save your headcanon pairing, or you're a shipper between Lincoln, or somebody else with somebody, in which case you'll want Lincoln or the sisters to die instead.
    • To most shipping-oriented Lucy fans, her fling with her Distaff Counterpart Silas in "L is for Love" never happened. Rocky and Lincoln are her only love interests, besides her Cargo Ship with Edwin the vampire bust. A lot of shipping fan art features the Loud siblings with their love interests from "L is for Love" except for Lucy and Lincoln.
    • Many Luaggie shippers were less than pleased over how Luan wasn't the one revealed to have a Bi the Way crush in "L is for Love". As such, they tend to face a lot of rivalry between the Luan/Benny shippers.
  • Draco in Leather Pants:
    • While Lincoln's a good kid at heart, he still can be selfish and rude at times. A lot of fanworks that apply the Ron the Death Eater trope to Lincoln's sisters likewise tend to minimize or even flat out ignore Lincoln's own flaws or the episodes in which he acts like a jerk, in order to ensure the reader will root for him. While it is true that Lincoln often gets the short end of the stick in both canon and fanworks alike, his negative attributes are often removed completely or at least downgraded to the point the detractors derisively nicknames this as "Saint Lincoln."
    • Just like how Lincoln also isn't safe from Ron the Death Eater, the sisters themselves aren't safe from this one, as many people will go too far in defending them, even when they DO act horribly.

    E-G 
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • There's a fairly popular theory among fans that Lincoln is actually adopted, due to his white hair and the fact that he's just generally different from the rest of his family. Not surprisingly, this theory became even more popular after the episode "Not a Loud" was announced and that episode's premise (Lincoln thinking his family is hiding something from him) became known (even though the episode finally jossed the theory). A similar theory is that at least one of the sisters is adopted as well.
    • Luan being bisexual is a popular theory, which is strange since she hasn't done anything that implies she's attracted to girls; she in fact is one of the sisters who swoons over Hugh in "Study Muffin", and the entire plot of "Stage Plight" is literally about Luan trying to get closer to her crush, Bennynote , eventually followed by them sharing their first kiss. As such, a lot of fans like to ship her with Maggie from "Funny Business", while some Loudcest fans like to ship her with Luna.
    • A number of the Loud siblings, mainly Leni, Lola, Lisa, Luan, Lucy, Lynn and even Lincoln are often theorized to have various unspecified neurological disorders, ranging from autism, ADHD, anxiety, depression, bipolar and anti-social personality disorder. Such disorders also tend to run in families.
    • Another popular theory is that Lily is actually Lori or Leni's daughter.
    • Another Lily-related theory is that she's going to grow up to become a gamer, thanks to a well-made fanmade gif.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Cristina, Lincoln's crush from "Making the Case", gained popularity in the fandom despite not even having a single line in her three appearances, often portraying her as a rival to Ronnie Anne or the series' equivalent of Lila Sawyer.
    • Clyde's parents are popular due to their status as a gay couple. It helps that the show does not attempt to draw attention to this fact, instead focusing on how they are Good Parents to Clyde.
    • Carol Pingrey, the girl whom Lincoln uses to coerce Lori into being a part of his revised family portrait by threatening to replace her with Carol, due to her looking similar in "Picture Perfect". She appears onscreen during a few seconds, gets a few blink-and-you'll-miss-it mentions afterwards, and doesn't have any line; but she is popular in the fandom. She generally acts as either a rival to Lori (with differences whether she's a sympathetic one or not), Lori's Sitcom Arch-Nemesis whose only joy in life is messing with Lori, a friend of Lincoln (or more than that), a friend of Leni, or even a mix of those portrayals. She was eventually given focus in "Selfie Improvement", in which she's revealed to be Lori's Sitcom Archnemesis since kindergarten, albeit a sympathetic one. They eventually form a friendship at the end.
    • Kirby from "Out on a Limo", enough for fans to hope he returns in a future episode.
    • Lincoln's dates in "Dance, Dance Resolution" are popular for the following reasons:
      • Tabby, the punk girl, became popular long before the episode even aired, as a brief scene with her appeared on a Nickelodeon music video about a month before the episode premiered.
      • Haiku, the goth girl, gained some recognition, especially once she starts bonding with Clyde.
      • Giggles for being a legitimately nice girl and, unlike Luan, only teasing Lincoln harmlessly instead of mocking or hurting him with pranks.
      • Polly Pain for both her design and interesting interactions with Lincoln.
    • The gender-bender versions of the Loud sisters from "One of the Boys" (and Linka, the gender-bender version of Lincoln) have become very popular even before the episode aired, especially Lars (the male version of Lucy), Loni (the male version of Leni), and Loki (the male version of Lori).
    • Maggie, the 13-year-old emo girl from "Funny Business", is pretty popular among fans, so much so that it's common to find her getting shipped with either Luan or Lincoln.
    • Nikki, Ronnie Anne's tall friend from "City Slickers" became incredibly popular with the fandom.
    • Leni's second prototype design (the one in the top right) is considerably popular, probably due to looking like a mix between both her final design and Lori. Interestingly, several of her design elements ended up being used for Carol Pingrey, listed below.
    • Sam, Luna's crush in "L is For Love", because of the neat design and of the Shipping potential. And the popularity of the first canon lesbian ship on the show.
    • Lincoln's lookalike in "Cereal Offender", who is officially known as the Bratty Kid, has some popularity in the fandom. He's speculated to be related to Carol Pingrey, even to the point of being her younger brother to further parallel with Lincoln. Proposed names for him include Linclone and Wilkes.
    • Pop-Pop is also fairly popular as the resident fun grandpa.
    • Leni's friend Miguel is starting to gain popularity for not being a gay stereotype and his snarkiness.
    • The new girl from "White Hare", slowly to the point where she made an actual appearance note  in a later episode, where she was given a name, Stella, and redesign.
    • Mick Swagger, Luna's idol, thanks in part to being a celebrity who genuinely encourages others to have fun, and just a really cool guy in general. Like Kirby, fans are already hoping that he makes another appearance.
    • Mollie, a girl from Lincoln's class, is part of this. Although a minor character, the fanbase love her for her friendly rivalry with Lincoln in "Pasture Bedtime."
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Ronnie Anne and Bobby's grandmother was seen as this in "The Loudest Mission: Relative Chaos" due to her being obnoxiously stereotypical while the rest of the family had their own unique personalities.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Lincoln/Any-of-his-sisters is very prominent in the fandom, obvious Broken Base aside.
      • Lynn/Lincoln (or "Lynncoln") is the most notable one, not only eclipsing the other incest pairings in popularity but also being the most popular couple in the fandom according to one Booru's poll. In comparison, the canon Ronnie Anne/Lincoln (or "Ronniecoln") is only the second most popular couple.
    • Bobby is paired with Leni in the fandom more than with Lori, due to their similar personalities.
    • Luan/Maggie, the minor character from "Funny Business", quickly became an immensely popular pairing even though Maggie hasn't appeared in any other episodes, and she and Luan are practically incompatible. The Opposites Attract appeal of the couple is probably one of the biggest causes of the pairing's popularity. While "Stage Plight" debunked any chance of the two getting together in Canon by showing Luan's love interest, Benny, the pairing is still popular.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • "No Such Luck" takes the cake when it comes to Fanfic Fuel, as this episode alone has spawned more fanfics than probably any other episode of the series. They are mostly fix fics and AUs which realistically address the issues that would ensue from Lincoln being locked outside, often being tear jerking by nature. Revenge Fics are also very common.
    • Any episode that has become infamous in the fandom (like "The Green House", "Raw Deal", or "Brawl in the Family") will usually spawn fix fics that will fix at least something about it to make it less obnoxious to get through.
    • "One of the Boys" has spawned a lot of fanfictions involving Linka Loud and her brothers, including fanfics that are rewrites of episodes involving Lincoln and his sisters.
    • Two particular fuels are brought by "The Loudest Mission" (and this is the main reason why many fans think that this special was a Poorly Disguised Pilot):
      • 1) As far as anybody knows, the house that used to be the Santiago residence is on sale. Who's going to take it?
      • 2) What sort of misadventures would Ronnie and Bobby have with their relatives?
    • "L Is for Love" because of all the shipping potential.
    • "Middle Men" has started to spawn a few fanfics detailing Lynn's experiences in sixth grade.
  • Fanon Discontinuity:
    • "Brawl in the Family" and "No Such Luck" is this for many fans because of how needlessly cruel they are to Lincolnnote , as well as because of how uncharacteristically idioticnote , selfishnote  immaturenote , hateful and worthlessnote  everyone acts. Even worse, the guilty party gets no proper karma or punishment, nor is Lincoln happy in the end.
    • Some fans of Luan don't especially like the April Fools related episodes as they portray her as a cruel sociopath. Though, in the latter 2 episodes, her family manages to give her some much needed karma and even prank her hard enough to get her to regret her insanity.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • For some reason, the Internet is fond of depicting Lisa wearing The Mask.
    • There is fan art depicting Leni dressed as Star Butterfly.
    • There's a Konami crossover about the children of the Loud siblings, which focuses on Lucy's son, who is part-mummy due to his father and is a descendant of Ganbare Goemon.
    • The show seems to be very popular with fans of Gravity Falls, given all the crossover art.
    • With fellow Nick hit SpongeBob SquarePants, owing to both shows being comedy-focused and fan favorites. Many people have compared both Lincoln and Luan to SpongeBob, Leni to Patrick, Lori to Squidward and both Lisa and Lynn to Sandy.
    • The fandom also tends to overlap with fans of women-centeted franchises such as Sailor Moon, Cardcaptor Sakura, Pretty Cure and Love Live!, for obvious reasons.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • Two of the newspaper gags featured in both "The Loudest Yard" note  and "Health Kicked" note  have since lost any value of humor after the news broke out about Chris Savino's firing from Nick following accusations of sexual harassment and threats of industry blacklisting that goes as far back as 2004.
    • Likewise, Lincoln's attitude towards his crush Cristina in "Making the Case", such as attempting to kiss a picture of her and showing it his chest hair, when it's made clear she doesn't reciprocate his feelings and is so uncomfortable about it that she changes classes (or even schools), becomes a lot less funny after Savino's firing.
    • As does Hugh being stalked and harassed by the lovestruck sisters in "Study Muffin".
    • Let's not forget about Clyde's repeated cringeworthy pining after Lori, which pretty much foreshadows Savino's eventual predicament. It's probably the reason why this was dropped in the third season after the firing.
    • Pretty much all of "One Flu Over the Loud House" has been hit with this thanks to the 2020 Coronavirus Pandemic, from Lincoln waking up to find the house seemingly deserted to the flashback showing just how easily the zombie cold spread from sister to sister.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: According to Google Trends, the show is popular in Southeast Asia, especially in the Philippines and in Latin America territories such as Argentina, Panama, Puerto Rico and Brazil. In fact, the crew added a Filipina Character named Stella into the show.
  • Growing the Beard: Some fans felt that the show improved by the second half of Season 1, due to placing more focus on the sisters rather than Lincoln and generally having the sisters show actual care towards him. Then, Season 2 continued that evolution while toning down some of the show's more controversial aspects. Season 3 has been seen as a major improvement thus far to some, as Lincoln and especially the sisters are continually placed in more positive lights, and the characters aren't as archtypal as in the earlier episodes, and the frequent Continuity Porn.
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    H-M 
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: Lincoln being unable to win a single trophy in "Making the Case" becomes this after The Loud House lost the Favorite Cartoon award to SpongeBob SquarePants at the 2017 Kids' Choice Awards. Ironically, Lincoln WOULD win some real trophies later, as shown in "Insta-Gran".
  • Ho Yay:
    • "Clincoln McLoud". While he has an obvious crush on Lori, Clyde is also very close to his best friend Lincoln. Several episodes show that he's ready to make big sacrifices for himnote  and losing his friendship is one of his biggest fears. In "ARGGH! You For Real?", after taking a level in cynic, Clyde refuses to give a second chance to Hunter Spector and to believe his claims, but accepts to come when Lincoln asks him to do it for him. They can also be rather touchy with each other in their interactions, grabbing each other by the hands, the wrists or the shoulders.
    • In "Study Muffin", even Mr. Loud is in on stalking Hugh!
    • "A Fair to Remember" has Bobby, Lori and Lincoln act like a formerly monogamous couple finding a third partner, completing with Lori getting jealous because the other two are getting along too well with each other without her.
  • Hype Backlash: Ever since its debut, the show has received tons of hype, to the point of becoming Nick's biggest show after SpongeBob. However, the divisive humor, fairly simple slice of life format that's been seen before, anvilicious nature, and the rather divisive fandom, not to mention the very frequent hiatuses that started happening midway through Season 1, have made some question if the show deserves the hype it receives.
  • Idiot Plot:
    • In "April Fools Rules", Luan tells Lincoln that anyone who sets foot on the Loud family premises is fair game for her pranking wrath and her pranks only ever happen around the house. Which thus begs the question of why the family doesn't simply stay away from the house until the heat's off. Granted at least for this year, Lincoln would have been screwed either way due to getting a call from Ronnie Anne about her coming and not wanting her to get nailed in the crossfire.
    • The entirely of "Brawl in the Family" from Lori and Leni fighting over buying the same dress to Lincoln revealing some of the things his sisters said behind each others' backs. And overall, the entire plot hinges on the fact that Lincoln is somehow the only one in the family who's completely unaware of the Sister Protocol. Likely because none of the sisters ever bothered to tell him about it, thinking it would be of no concern to him, but not surprisingly, their decision to use his things as part of the system forces him into it anyway. Plus the solution that stops all the fighting only works because Leni is too dumb to realize she’d never get to wear the dress. In the end, nothing is really solved, nor are any lessons learnt.
    • "Making the Grade": Lisa suddenly no longer wanting to help her family due to her new cool status leads to multiple problems, but a lot of them could easily have been avoided. Lisa doesn’t want to help her dad converting the metric system for a recipe? So what? There are tons of websites and phone apps for metric conversions. Or what about the whole Train Problem that causes Mrs. Loud to be an hour late for picking up Pop Pop? Couldn’t she just look up the arrival and departure times of Pop Pop's train on the Internet, or have Pop Pop tell her when he expected to arrive?
    • "No Such Luck" deals with the family thinking Lincoln is a jinx when Lynn loses a softball game while he was present. That's stupid enough as it is, though he doesn't help himself when he intentionally fed his family this belief initially for his own benefit, but then when he comes clean, they don't believe him. And they likely don’t even realize they’re breaking the law when they keep Lincoln outside and not give him any comfort. By the end, once the disguised Lincoln manages to convince them it’s all an act, does this mean things return to normal? Of course not! Because in the pathetically delusional and overly stupid minds of the Louds the squirrel suit is good luck and they make Lincoln wear it everywhere without considering how he’d feel or if he’d even survive the enclosed space and intense heat.
    • "Absent Minded" has Clyde and Lincoln trying to get various teachers to keep quiet Clyde lied about his perfect attendance record, which was caused by Clyde babbling that he lied about said perfect attendance, and then being paranoid that someone close by heard him. You'd think Clyde would've learned by the fourth time that happened.
  • Incest Yay Shipping: Loudcest. Oh dear God, Loudcest. It's a trend involving shipping Lincoln with any of his sisters or any of the sisters with each other (in particular the roommate ones like Lori/Leni, Luna/Luan, etc.). Even Lily, who is a baby, isn't safe.note 
  • Informed Wrongness: The other kids treat Lisa as wrong for not letting them have a snow day, even though as Lisa points out not attending school decreases brain function. Also, snow days are not a day off as any unscheduled snow days are taken out of summer vacation. Plus, there was no reason they can't play in the snow after school or during the weekend.
  • Iron Woobie: Luna Loud is the third oldest of the Loud siblings and a lover of Rock and Roll. In "L is for Love" the siblings find a secret admirer letter addressed to L Loud. While the others give signs to their crushes, Luna chickens out thinking Sam wouldn't be into her. After the last letter seems to be for her, she and her siblings rush to the restaurant it said to meet at. Only to find it was from their mother to their father. However, inspired by her mother's story Luna decides to give Sam a letter to tell her about her feelings. In "Really Loud Music" Luna enters a music competition but decides to use a safe bubblegum pop song after she doubts her old one. After getting in, the hosts try to model into someone else. However, in the end, Luna decides to play her old song and manages to win over most of the crowd.
  • It Was His Sled: The ending to "L is for Love" became such a major topic in the animation community that it's no longer considered a spoiler and everyone knows about Luna and Sam.
  • It's the Same, So It Sucks: A criticism that's becoming increasingly common is the shows' tendency to revert back to the status quo no matter what. While this isn't anything new with these type of cartoon shows, some feel that it ultimately ends up wasting any opportunities for characters like, say, Luan or Lisa to get any Character Development that'll stick in future episodes.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    Luna: "I stink and I can't write a single song..."
    • Cranky Neighbor Mr. Grouse gets this treatment in "11 Louds a Leapin'". It's revealed that he's part of a big family and is unable to visit them on Christmas, and seeing the Louds together doesn't help.
    • Lori, Lynn, and Lola may be the absolute worst of the sisters, but they were also three of the first characters to get the flu in "One Flu Over the Loud House".
    • Lynn's aggressive and rough personality was caused by brutal bullying she experienced in her first year of middle school, which made her think that she has to act agressive in order to survive there, thus permanently scarring her personality. It’s more than likely that, deep down, Lynn suffers from a combination of hate for bullies, lack of self-esteem, an inability to face her fears and self-loathing.
    • Luan's behavior on April Fool's Day may be sociopathic beyond all reason and belief, but her My God, What Have I Done? moment towards the end of "Fool's Paradise" brings some potential sympathy into the entire situation; her family threatening to move away from Royal Woods (which later turned out to just be a prank) and neglect her is enough to genuinely bring Luan to tears and apologize for all she's done, resulting in an ultimate reconcile and retaliation from the rest of her family. When taking into account Luan's otherwise cheerful and childish personality, the fact that her monstrous streak only comes annually, and how her parents are too scared to punish her, it's fairly obvious that Luan is suffering from some degree of PTSD.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships:
    • Lincoln's been shipped with Cristina (on which he has or had an unrequited crush), Ronnie Anne (actually having feelings for each other helps), the four girls from "Dance Dance Resolution", several unnamed female background characters, Clyde, and all ten of his sisters. Yes, even Lily.
    • The sisters themselves count as well: If they're not being shipped with either their respective lovers or each other and Lincoln, they're probably being shipped with some random background character, their friends, or even their male counterparts.
    • Clyde is often shipped with either Haiku, who he shared a dance with in "Dance, Dance Resolution"; Lucy, for her similarity to Haiku; Lincoln, because Lincoln is very popular himself and because of their strong friendship bordering on bromance; Lynn, due to their close ages; Penelope, the girl who was his partner in taking care of an egg in "Shell Shock"; or any of the sisters in general.
  • Les Yay:
    • Carol's reaction to seeing Lori somewhat resembles a teenager coming face to face with their crush.
    • Ronnie Anne and Sid Chang also show this, particularly in how they act inseparable and can't bear to be without each other.
  • Memetic Psychopath:
  • Moe:
    • The Louds in general are an entire family of moe in that they all have their own respective ways of being adorable (Lily, Lisa, Lana, Lola when she's not steaming mad at someone, Lucy, Lincoln, Lynn, Luan, Luna and Leni especially); quite an accomplishment, huh?
    • The other kids that appear throughout the show can fall under this category, including Clyde, Ronnie Anne, Cristina, Tabby, Girl Jordan, etc.
    • Interestingly enough, Howard and Harold are this to some due to how sappy they come off.
    • Despite Walt's grumpy expression, all the pets count.
    • CJ. His childish ways and silliness makes him too adorable to not gush at.

    N-P 
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • In "Left in the Dark", Lori points out that Lisa is forbidden from using the other kids as experimental guinea pigs. Leni adds in "Especially what you did to me last week!". A flashback shows Leni's head being extremely swollen and covered with pink spots (presumably acne).
    • "Along Came a Sister" reveals that Frank is a girl, and Lisa explains that females are always sluggish before giving birth. Frank laid an egg sack in an air duct that hatches right after Lincoln heads out to bring Frank back to his class. The baby spiders crawl through a vent, and then Leni starts screaming.
    • Lincoln spilling out the contents of Lily's diaper genie in "Sleuth or Consequences". Something similar happens in "Two Boys and a Baby". After Lincoln changes Lily's diaper, he tries to get rid of it with a fishing rod. Unfortunately, the diaper hits a ceiling fan, causing it to spill its contents all over Lisa and Lily's room, and on Lincoln and Clyde.
    • In "Undie Pressure", more of Lisa's bathroom studies is shown, and she appears to be examining collected urine and excrement samples from her siblings that are contained in test tubes. Also, Lori going to the bathroom from a bad smoothie.
    • In "Toads and Tiaras", Lana and Lincoln finally get to go to Dairyland; Lana ends up vomiting right into Lincoln's mouth while on the Milk Shaker.
    • In "It's a Loud, Loud, Loud, Loud House", Charles eats one of Lana's dollars, and she later manages to get it back...only now, it's covered in Charles' poop!
    • In "Snow Bored", Lana reveals she has a lucky booger.
    • In "Intern for the Worse", Lincoln uses an old lady's car exhaust to heat a burrito for her. She then takes the exhaust-covered burrito without hesitation.
    • "Brawl in the Family" features Lincoln eating a bagel that, unbeknownst to him at the time, is covered with lint, dog hair, and boogers.
    • In "Room with a Feud", Lily inadvertently sneezes into Lincoln's mouth.
    • In a deleted scene from "Lynn-er Takes All", after brushing too excessively, there would have been a shot of Lynn's gums bleeding. This was changed to her losing a tooth because the censors intervened.
    • In "Potty Mouth", Lisa is disguised as Lily to take her place in an interview after hearing her baby sister curse aloud. When told to act more like Lily, she intentionally goes in her own diaper.
    • The sisters sneezing and coughing on each other and drinking from the carton in "One Flu Over the Loud House", also Lori sneezing on Lynn's ball and her spinning it and spraying Lori's snot in her face.
    • Lincoln scaring Lori out of the bathroom with Lily's dirty diaper in "Bathroom Break".
  • Never Live It Down:
    • Several fans haven't been particularly forgiving towards the characters who often hold the Jerkass Ball for little reason other than to move the plot forward. For example:
      • The sisters after the events of both "Brawl in the Family" and "No Such Luck", where they each held the Jerkass Ball big time towards Lincoln. Them accepting no responsibility for ruining a grocery run that would've gone off without a hitch without them in "Cereal Offender" struck a similar nerve.
      • The Loud parents also lost some popularity after "No Such Luck" for pretty much the same reasons as the sisters directly above.
    • Some fans still hold grudges against some of the sisters for their actions in A Day in the Limelight episodes. For example:
      • Ever since the beginning of the series, Lori's still seen as a spiteful Big Sister Bully even after episodes like "The Waiting Game" and "A Fair to Remember" showed a kinder, more sympathetic side to her. Some circles have Flanderized her into a psychotic Alpha Bitch who treats Lincoln as a slave and physically abuses her siblings.
      • Following "Sound of Silence", Lola is still hated by some viewers who either completely missed the point and didn't realize that the sisters' stories about her revenge schemes were completely made up, or felt that the prank she came up with was a severe case of Disproportionate Retribution. Even though several episodes have later shown her Hidden Depths ("Toads And Tiaras", "A Tattler's Tale", "Patching Things Up", and "Read Aloud"); making her (alongside with Lori) the sister who gets the more Character Development.
      • Luan still has her haters thanks to the infamous "April Fools Rules" episode in which she pulls off several harmful pranks on her family. Exacerbated by "Fools Paradise", which has her "enthusiasm" for the holiday cranked up to supervillain levels of malice and has permanently tarnished her cheerful image for many fans.
      • Lynn has lost much of her popularity no thanks to "No Such Luck", in which she calls Lincoln bad luck when she believes his presence cost her team a ballgame. The fact that the rest of the family got behind this accusation, including the parents has made fans less forgiving of her more negative actions towards Lincoln. "Lynn-er Takes All" only further tanked her popularity among fans because of her Unsportsmanlike Gloating towards her siblings whenever she wins at board games (although, unlike in "No Such Luck," she does at least get some Character Development).
  • No Problem with Licensed Games: The two games "Lincoln's List" and "Summer School" all have not-too-easy-not-too-hard challenges, and everything makes sense. They also have funny moments, such as the grapes being seen as "good for bats, babies, baby bats, and bat-babies".
  • Older Than They Think:
    • In 1983, British author Jill Murphy created a book series (also adapted to animation in 2007) about a family of elephants whose names and surname start with L, The Large Family, although the titular family is only composed of four children (two boys and two girls), named Lester, Luke, Laura, and Lucy.
    • In the early 1980s, Sesame Street did a sketch with a band parodying The Rolling Stones called The Cobblestones. The name of their frontman was Mick Swagger, which is the same name as Luna's Mick Jagger Expy idol. They also had a skit with two families called the Quiet family and the Loud family.
    • Around the same time, the villain of the adult animated film Rock & Rule was named MOK Swagger.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • A girl with yellow dress and glasses, who stands in a line to the bathroom at a gas station that Lynn wants to use and Lana comes out of in "Raw Deal" (also known as "Thicc QT"), is very popular, with very much fan art in Booru, Tumblr, DeviantArt, and imageboards dedicated to her. Not bad for someone who appears a few seconds and doesn't have any lines.
    • Linka, Lincoln's female counterpart near the end of "One of the Boys" appears in one scene, but has a lot of fanarts and fanworks related to her.
    • Nerd!Lynn from "Future Tense" earned her quite a few admirers, as well as Politician!Luan and Basketball!Lucy.
    • Lori and Bobby's 11 children from Lori's Imagine Spot in "Driving Ambition". This is mainly due to the implications that every individual Loud sibling could end up with a family of their own that's just as big as the one they belong currently.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy:
    • The first episode to feature a physical appearance from Clyde's dads was plagued with debate among those who supported and those who opposed the idea of a same-sex couple on a children's series, although later episodes featuring them have not achieved the same level of controversy.
    • When it comes to certain episodes like "April Fools' Rules", "Brawl in the Family", and "No Such Luck", expect the first thing for people to talk about to be how each episode had one or several of the characters take the Jerkass Ball on poor Lincoln (although in the case of the former, Luan towards her family in general).
    • The various allegations against Chris Savino for some rather disturbing behavior. An early effort by the journalist who broke the story attempted to indict the show as a whole based on Savino's actions, which led to tremendous backlash against him by the show's staff and fans, so the issue seems to have been dropped for now.
  • Periphery Demographic: Although the show is mostly aimed at kids, it still gained a popular following among teens and young adults thanks to resembling the style and characterization of 1990s era cartoons. It helps that the show—albeit subtly—touches upon more realistic topics like LGBT and disability, something that other kids' shows rarely do.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: If a ship involves Lincoln at all, it will have one of these:
    • Ronnie Anne/Lincoln = Ronniecoln.
    • Cristina/Lincoln = Cristincoln.
    • Clyde/Lincoln = Clincoln McLoud (which does have canon basis as their friendship name) or Clydecoln.
    • Lynn/Lincoln = Lynncoln.
    • Luan/Lincoln = Luancoln.
    • Lucy/Lincoln = Lincy.
    • Luna/Lincoln = Lunacoln.
    • Leni/Lincoln = Lenicoln.
    • Lori/Lincoln = Lincori.
    • Lola/Lincoln or Lana/Lincoln = Lolacoln or Lanacoln (or in the case of both, Twincoln).
    • Lisa/Lincoln = Lisacoln.
    • Lily/Lincoln = Lilycoln.
    • Any of the four Sadie Hawkins date/Lincoln = Pollycoln (Polly Pain), Tabbycoln (Tabby), Gigglescoln (Giggles) and Haicoln (Haiku).
    • Lincoln's crush in "L is For Love" Paige/Lincoln = Paigecoln.

    R-T 
  • Realism-Induced Horror: In this review for the episode "A Fridge Too Far", the reviewer mentions that while he enjoys the episode as a whole, one problem he has with it is that when the Loud children get injured by each other's booby traps, instead of being beat up in a cartoony way and being fine the next scene, some of them are realistically injured (Luan has to wear a cast for instance).
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • After fans started placing Luan in a more negative light following "April Fools Rules", her second focus episode, "Funny Business", shows her in a far more positive light. Then, "Fool's Paradise" made her lose part of her popularity again, by showing her being more malicious in her April Fools' pranks and showing no remorse for it. Then, "No Laughing Matter" portrayed her again in a more positive light.
    • Both Lola and Lori were almost universally despised by the fandom initially for their anger issues and selfishness. However, after episodes such as "The Waiting Game" and "A Tattler's Tale", fans warmed up to them. It helps that the more abrasive aspects of their personalities were toned down and they showed more kindhearted moments towards Lincoln.
    • After remaining the most static of the sisters and after having lost much of her following due to the poor reception of "No Such Luck", Lynn finally gets some long overdue character development in "Middle Men", where it is revealed that her bullying tendencies come from having been bullied herself in school. While it hasn't addressed all of the complaints regarding her lack of serious character growth, many agreed it was a step forward.
  • Ron the Death Eater:
    • The Loud siblings themselves are targets of this treatment.
      • In regards to the Loudcest ship, the sisters (mainly Luan, Lynn, and Lucy) tend to get struck with the Yandere treatment pretty hard.
      • The sisters in general have received this treatment, with their negative traits being amplified by some, due to being completely oblivious and/or ignorant of the abuse they put Lincoln through and typically getting away with it. "The Sweet Spot", "Sound of Silence", "Sleuth or Consequences", "It's a Loud, Loud, Loud, Loud, Loud House", "Brawl in the Family" and "No Such Luck" are notable episodes that back this claim up. That said, in most fanworks, the sisters acknowledge how badly they've treated Lincoln and otherwise learn their lesson in the end.
      • Among them, Lynn is one of the most frequent targets, due to being the more static of the sisters and because the episodes in which she takes the central spot tend to insist on the negative aspects of her personality. While she does have some Character Development at the end of "Lynner Takes All" and "Net Gains", some fans tend to ignore them to amplify her flaw.
      • Lincoln himself isn't safe from this, as some fans, when defending the sisters, will sometimes go too far and claim that he deserves any bad thing that happens to him, no matter how clearly disproportionate it is.
    • Due to the shipping wars, it's not uncommon to see many characters (Ronnie Anne, Cristina, Bobby, Clyde, etc.) get this treatment.
    • Chandler, a boy who for a long time only had a major role in "The Waiting Game", receives this treatment. Granted, he wasn't a nice kid to begin with (in the aforementioned episode he is a jerk that uses Lincoln to get free food from the Arcade), but many fanfics flanderize him into a full blown bully (sometimes even an Barbaric Bully) who loves to beat up kids and frequently targets Lincoln. This trope is even more in effect since his second apperance in "Jeers for Fears", in which his jerkass nature is toned down and he even gains new respect for Clyde and Lincoln.
  • Seasonal Rot: Season 3 saw a somewhat mixed response among the fandom. While certain episodes such as "Roadie to Nowhere," "Head Poet's Anxiety," and "Really Loud Music" received near-universal praise for their Character Development, others were more polarizing, with many fans accusing them of recycling plots from earlier episodes ("Scales of Justice" having been compared to Season 2's "Frog Wild," for instance) and just not being as funny or creative as those from earlier seasons. This was likely due to Savino’s firing, as other instances of this happened due to the creators having little or no input like they did before.
    • Season 4 has come under criticism from some fans, who think that Lincoln's character has undergone a Flanderization, accentuating his most negative characteristics and making him more selfish and clumsy, and more likely to attract bad consequences for himself and those close to him (citing "Kings of the Con" and "Stall Monitor" as examples). Like with season 3, some have also made claims of plots being recycled, such as "The Last Loud on Earth" being compared to "The Price of Admission".
  • Self-Fanservice: The sisters, especially the five older ones, as well as Rita. Lincoln, Clyde and Ronnie Anne also get some, though to a lesser extent.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night: Despite exchanging no lines, the Luan/Maggie pairing sprang up and has yet to subside.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat:
    • Between Lynncoln and Ronniecoln fans, with associated fan works having Ronnie Anne and Lynn turn into rivals for Lincoln's affection.
    • The Luaggie (Luan/Maggie) shippers also rival the Luan/Benny shippers.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • Just be yourself. Many episodes, such as "Toads and Tiaras", "Out on a Limo", and "Making the Grade", have various members of the Loud family be thrust into situations where they are acting like somebody they're not, which acts as the conflict of the episode. It is always resolved with said character realizing that they are better off just being themselves.
    • Many episodes have the message that being in a large and chaotic family isn't an excuse to be selfish, since your other siblings deal with the exact same thing, too.
    • "The Green House" shows that you need to protect the planet for the planet's sake, not for yours.
    • "A Tale of Two Tables": Growing up will happen eventually, so don't rush to do so and enjoy your childhood while it's still happening.
    • “Fandom Pains”: Regardless of your feelings towards changes or certain elements in a show you like, there’s no need to make a big fuss over it.
  • Strawman Has a Point:
    • Lincoln going on strike in "Chore and Peace". Luan, Lynn, and Lucy get to work together on one chore, Leni's chore consists entirely of her pulling hair out of the bathroom drain, and the washer and dryer do Lori's work for her. It's easy to see Lincoln's complaints.
    • According to "Brawl in the Family", Lincoln is wrong for not respecting the sister fight protocol and he should have stay out of Lori and Leni's feud. However, Lincoln is right in the fact that Lori and Leni are fighting over such a petty matter and the protocol is interfering with everybody's daily life. This includes Lincoln.
    • Lincoln trying to get out of the way of the sick sisters instead of taking care of them in "One Flu Over the Loud House". Spraying hot soup at them might've been a bad idea, and he could have given Clyde some instructions that allowed them to be taken care of safely, but him trying to get out of their way was sensible considering that they had a very contagious lurgi that manifested within seconds to minutes and it's not as if you can help the sick if you're sick yourself.
  • Testosterone Brigade: The Loud sisters had fanboys before the show even premiered, let alone before there were any preview clips (the pilot notwithstanding).
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Cristina, a girl in Lincoln's classroom who he either has or had a crush on before "Making the Case", and who even got to - sort of - interact with a sister (Luna). It could have been interesting to know more about her and why Lincoln had a crush on her. However, not only does the whole "romantic" business go away like it never happened, but Cristina herself has all but vanished and it's unknown if she will appear again.note 
    • Lincoln's sibling relationship with Lynn and Lucy has become this for some, with many feeling that their relationship could be very interesting due to them being the middle children of the family. However, while Lincoln has had a few episodes focusing on his interactions with Lucy, Lincoln only has two episodes focusing on his interactions with Lynn.
    • The Loud brothers from "One of the Boys" left several fans disappointed, considering that they weren't given any actual characterization other than acting like Lynn (even the ones who are supposed to be the polar opposite of Lynn are just like her), as if to say all boys are boorish and aggressive.
    • Depending on your opinion, the Santiagos may count as this, since they move away in "The Loudest Mission: Relative Chaos". Bobby was nothing more than Lori's boyfriend without much personality of his own, Ronnie Anne appeared even less than him (though compared to him, she was more fleshed-out despite appearing less), and their mother only appeared once in "Shell Shock". Season 3 rectified this by giving the Santiagos solo outings to prove Bobby and Ronnie Anne didn't need Lori and Lincoln to be characters, even moreso when a spinoff starring them called The Casagrandes was announced.
    • The love interests introduced in "L is for Love", with the notable exception of Sam, Benny, and to a lesser extent, Chaz. As for everyone else, who knows if they will appear or even be referenced again.
    • Maggie from "Funny Business". Many fans wish that she would appear again and develop a friendship with Luan—seeing as how she enjoyed the latter's mime act at her birthday party plus Luan isn't depicted as having many friends—and of course see if it would evolve into something more. As of "Stage Plight", the latter is highly unlikely to happen.
    • Rocky, Lucy's love interest for which she even tried to change her personality into "Back in Black", but that accepted her as she really was,and ended up being replaced without explanation, in "L is for Love",to the dissatisfaction of many fans. Perhaps the reason for the change was that Lucy and Rocky looked very much like a childish version of Mavis and Jonathan in Hotel Transylvania, as some people have noticed.
    • The girl with Lori's hair, Luan's teeth, Luna's musical vocation, and Lynn's taste for spicy foods, and her parents with Lincoln's white hair, in "Not a Loud." So many coincidences puzzled fans - to the point that some thought Lincoln's theory of being swapped at birth remained plausible, even after his parents' explanation - and curious about those people, wondering if they would be distant relatives of the Louds, and how would be their eventual interactions with the Louds. However, the mysterious family was forgotten after Mr. and Mrs. Loud presented their strange version of the story of Lincon's birth.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • In "A Fair to Remember", Lori gets jealous of Bobby and Lincoln hanging out because, according to Bobby, Lincoln's like the brother he never had. Leni suggests to Lori that the latter should hang out with Ronnie Anne, saying, "She could be like the sister you [Lori] never had." When phrased like that it sounds like a stupid idea. However, when phrased the other way, "You [Lori] could be like the sister [Ronnie Anne] never had", it actually sounds rather smart. Instead, Lori goes out with Clyde to get Bobby jealous.
    • "April Fools Rules" and "Fool's Paradise" could've been good chances for Luan to learn the rights and wrongs of pranking. Instead, both episodes are considered rather divisive with Luan pulling off several mean-spirited pranks (especially in the latter) and gets away scot-free in the former and shows no remorse in the latter episode. By "Fool Me Twice", however, she seems to have learned her lesson as she, while on the verge of tears, promises never to prank again after realizing how much it affected her family's life.
    • The April Fools' episodes in general did nothing to explain why Luan behaves like a ruthless sociopath on that day and thus wasted some potential Character Development, the closest being For the Evulz. Many fans speculate that her behavior on that day is either a result of a traumatic PTSD-inducing event from her past, a case of Corrupt the Cutie, her Split Personality taking over, or perhaps most mercifully, that it never happened and was just a Nightmare Sequence that the writers chose not to reveal. Since Luan vowed to never behave like a pranking monster again in "Fool Me Twice", it's likely that there will never be another April Fools' episode and that Luan's sociopathy will remain a mystery.
    • "No Laughing Matter" wasted not only another chance for Luan to learn the rights and wrongs of pranking and joking, but also potentially the chance for Luan to realize that life isn't all fun and games, also learning to accept criticism in the process. The fact that she retires from comedy as a whole and goes into a stoic phase afterward shows that there's not much to her character other than her goofiness. Out of no reason other than love, her siblings apologize and try to get her back to her previous state rather than toughening her up.note 
    • "Snow Bored" sounded like the perfect opportunity for Lisa to gain some character development. Instead, she remains completely static all the way to the end of the episode.
    • "No Such Luck" could've been a better episode if the plot had been focused on Lynn learning that she cannot always win and should not blame others for her failures. Instead, she blames Lincoln for "being bad luck", and unlike Lincoln, she doesn't learn anything at the end of the episode. At the very least, she only realizes Lincoln isn’t bad luck in the end and apologizes to her brother, but the whole family now want good luck in their lives and thus make him keep the costume, without paying any regard to Linc’s well-being.
    • "Patching Things Up" has a subplot involving Lincoln and Clyde, which adds absolutely nothing to the main plot. It could have been better if either a. Lincoln would have been left out entirely to put more focus on Lola and Lana, or b. Lincoln would have been involved in the main plot, like actively coaching the twins.
    • "Not a Loud", despite its popularity for refuting the theory that Lincoln was adopted, was criticized by some fans, who felt that the episode missed the opportunity to tell a more touching or fun story about the birth of Lincoln, wasting time on field tests of very predictable results, to find out if Lincoln was an alien, a superhero or an eagle (!), As well as telling a birth story that seemed less credible than the hypothesis, raised by the very episode, that Lincoln ended up in the Loud family due to an exchange of babies.
    • "Vantastic Voyage" could have been a really good opportunity to defy the status quo for the better, as well as provide the moral that you can still have the same kind of memories even when you move onto more modern and efficient technology. Many fans questioned why it was necessary for the Loud family to get Vanzilla back when they could have just kept the more efficient Veronica and have Mr. Loud be less possessive of it.
    • "Ruthless People", in the opinion of some fans, could have been better if it had focused on the characters of Grandpa Albert and Aunt Ruth, presenting more of their personalities and life stories, instead of being another episode of torture, where part of The Loud family is subjected to successive punishments for trying - in vain - to avoid staying at Aunt Ruth's house.
  • Toy Ship:
    • Fans shipping any of the sisters with Lincoln runs rampant by the attosecond.
    • Some fans like to ship Lisa and Darcy together.
  • True Art Is Angsty: The revelation that Luna is bisexual in "L is for Love" resulted in a surge of art and fics that show her crush Sam rejecting her for one reason or another.

    U-W 
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Lori's baby picture. The shape of her head has already had people compare her to a Conehead, and that's not even getting into her webbed toes.
    • Fenton the Feel-Better Fox, with its big wide eyes and creepy toothy smile, looks more like a FNAF animatronic than a child-friendly toy.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic:
    • Lincoln can come across as this at times, usually when fans feel his actions don't fit the punishment he's meted out:
      • In "No Such Luck", while it's true Lincoln made the rumor worse and broke one of Lori's golf clubs just to convince her and Lisa, the family went way too far in the end and ended up kicking him out of the house. Including Mr. and Mrs. Loud! He might've brought it on himself, but with everything his family did you can't help but feel sorry for him. Some people also sympathize with his desire to have a little time for himself, as the episode shows that he has to go to a lot of his sisters' events, but none of them go with him to do something he likes. Not helping is that, reportedly, Chris Savino stated that Lincoln "got what he deserved" in said episode.
      • To a lesser extent, in "Sound of Silence", some people sympathize with Lincoln's desire to have some time for himself. While ignoring his siblings during the whole afternoon was rude, some fans think that it wasn't punishment-worthy.
    • In "Snow Way Out," Lana is treated as selfish for keeping her siblings at the Burpin' Burger. Fair enough at first, since she makes them all eat far more than they're willing to have for the ticket to meet her favorite racer.note  However, it crosses hardcore into this midway through the episode, when the family is snowed in and Flip, who had also been trying to win the ticket (just, openly, so he could scalp it at a fortune), refuses to give any of them a ride out because she wouldn't give it up to him, followed by capping it off by saving the sole employee who had been present and then backing into the building just so they couldn't leave themselves. Her siblings get mad at her for being "too selfish" to comply with this monstrous request, and in the end she's left with no choice but to do it. Between her apologizing to the rest of the family and Flip getting away with this when he often does face comeuppance for lesser actions (the closest he gets is a bit of snow in his face, which... isn't a lot), it's clear that we as viewers are meant to see her as in the wrong, with this only barely mitigated by her being able to meet and assist said racer on the roadside in the end.
    • Luan gets this reaction both in-universe and from the audience in "No Laughing Matter" when she becomes depressed over her siblings criticizing her comedy routine and ultimately retires as a result. Her siblings don't think twice about teaching her to accept criticism and instead try to encourage her to go back to her old ways, implying that she is incredibly vulnerable and may suffer from low self-esteem, which is understandable given her showbiz aspirations.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Can happen to several characters on occasion:
    • Every character in "The Green House":
      • Mrs. Johnson and Lincoln's class for chastising his family's energy usage being in the red zone even when they know he has ten sisters. Especially jarring since Mrs. Johnson is supposed to be a reasonable, understanding and motherly kind of teacher.
      • The Loud house is in the red zone due to the girls wasting energy, usually for frivolous purposes. Especially since they could easily find alternate ways for said purposes.
      • Clyde for not helping Lincoln and making the latter's situation worse by mentioning their computer game tournament. Furthermore, two male classmates decide to join in on the tournament at Lincoln's house because they're in the green, effectively saving energy at their own homes just to waste someone else's. They then proceed to tell Lincoln they can't be seen with him when the girls resume their old energy wasting ways and receive no punishment for their selfishness.
      • Lincoln for not having the guts to kick the other boys out of his house.
    • Luan comes across as this for some after "April Fools Rules", as she holds the entire family hostage to her various pranks and booby traps every year around the house, many of which are painful in nature and clearly out for her own amusement.
    • Lori in "Study Muffin" for openly flirting with Hugh despite already having a boyfriend, and for being a very jealous girlfriend at that.
    • "No Such Luck":
      • Lynn, who blames losing a softball game on Lincoln's presence and thinks he's "bad luck" - after forcing him to come against his will, no less - which eventually leads to the rest of the family treating him as such;note  she reinforces her conviction when he stops playing along with the accusation.
      • Mr. and Mrs. Loud for buying into the rumor and even locking Lincoln out of the house and not even doing anything to make up for it or promising Lincoln never to do it again.
    • The sisters occasionally, due to sometimes being completely oblivious and/or ignorant of the abuse they put Lincoln through and typically getting away with it, or at least not receiving enough comeuppance. They also often meddle in Lincoln's life, sometimes to suit their own needs, which can have negative consequences for himnote  and can be very intrusive, not respecting his privacy. While Lincoln is generally the one learning the Aesop at the end of the episode, his sisters often remain static characters and/or suffer from Aesop Amnesia. "The Sweet Spot", "Sound of Silence", "Sleuth or Consequences", "It's a Loud, Loud, Loud, Loud, Loud House", "Brawl in the Family" and "No Such Luck" are notable episodes that elicited this reaction, leading to the Ron the Death Eater treatment mentioned above.
    • Despite portraying her in a sympathetic light, Lucy has a moment in "Spell It Out" when she complains about the others painting the bathroom pink and then votes to paint it black. Even if she was at the sibling meeting, her siblings would've outnumbered her anyway and the bathroom is for the whole family, not just her.
  • Unpopular Popular Character:
  • Vanilla Protagonist: Some fans find Lincoln as one. While certainly not a one-note character, much of the show's content comes from his reactions to being surrounded by and living with a large cast of varying female characters with such stark personalities. As a result, he comes across as the average and rather generic pre-teen protagonist through which the audience lives through the adventures.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Although the art style and animation is pretty good all across the board, the smoke/smell effects are especially amazing and smooth.
  • Wangst: In "No Laughing Matter", Luan enters a state of depression all because her family expressed brutal annoyance to her comedy routine, which, on their part, was completely understandable as it had been getting excessive and interfering with their peace. To make matters worse, she wholly retires from comedy and treats it like complete junk based purely on her siblings' opinions.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • The main conflicts of many episodes would never have happened in the first place if the Louds remembered to lock their doors. Examples include "The Sweet Spot"note  and "Attention Deficit".note 
    • In "Along Came a Sister", Mrs. Johnson tells Lincoln to not let Frank the tarantula out of his cage. Three guesses as to what Lincoln does when he gets home.
    • Lincoln's inflatable pool has a "no cannonballs" warning since it'll break the pool. He then cannonballs into the girls' pool and destroys it. In the latter case, the girls' pool warning was on the inside, and he didn't see it until too late.
    • Lincoln and his sisters in "Cover Girls", for not realizing that they could have stop covering for each other once everybody returns to the home.
    • The solution to avoid Luan's April Fools' pranks is to keep her locked up until April 2nd. A smart idea, but they didn't bother guarding her to make sure she wouldn't escape.
    • In "One Flu Over the Loud House", the family comes down with a case of the flu which makes them act like zombies, and Lincoln and the only remaining survivors try to escape without getting inflected. If Lincoln would've known better, they would've all put on hazmat suits for protection, as what Clyde did in the final scene, as he's the only character in the episode who didn't get infected. Possibly the Louds didn't have hazmat suits available, but they could have at least put on some of Leni's germ masks. They also never thought to escape out the kitchen window.
    • Everyone in “Brawl in the Family” (except maybe Clyde). To make a long story short, see the recap page for said episode.
    • In "No Such Luck", Lincoln is able to easily convince the more rational family members, such as Lisa and Lori, that he is a jinx. All just by telling a painfully transparent lie and performing what is clearly a deliberate slip and fall, and not one of them even so much as talks to Lincoln to find out if he's up to something. And this isn't even getting into the abuse Linclon endures as a result, all because his family is too uncharacteristically stupid and irresponsible to realise what they’re doing to him or that they’re even breaking the law. Even Lincoln himself could count since he never thinks about owning up before it’s too late, run off to any of his friends’ houses for help or better yet, go to the police and have them sort his family out.
    • In "A Fridge Too Far", Lana sneaks a leftover drumstick from the refrigerator. She doesn't realize it's been hooked to Vanzilla's battery until takes a bite and gets shocked.
    • In "Pasture Bedtime", Lincoln and his friends are invited to girl Jordan's party but also to their friend Liam's first sleepover, they tire him out and go to the party. Lincoln and Clyde want to swim at the pool but don't have swimsuits so they strip to their underwear, forgetting that it's a girl's party. They are soon embarrassed when people see them in their underwear.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • Given Chris Savino's Broken Base status in the animation industry, the positive reception of the show had won back a lot of his detractors. However, the aforementioned sexual harassment allegations and eventual firing from Nickelodeon caused that boat to sink.
    • To an extent, the show is seen as this for Nick as a whole. Their animation department has received a lot of flak over the years. However, shows like The Loud House and Harvey Beaks have been praised as a return to form for the network. It's also considered one of the best animated series of 2016. Furthermore, it surpassed SpongeBob as the channel's highest-viewed series.
  • The Woobie:
    • Lucy in "Back in Black", where her sisters attempt to mold her into something she's not. "Spell It Out" also reveals that her siblings forgetting about her and not noticing her affect her far more than she let on, making the gags of her being forgotten Harsher in Hindsight. In the episode, she's being walked all over by her siblings several times.
    • In "Really Loud Music", Luna is pressured into abandoning her rock image in favor of becoming a glamorous popstar simply because the later is more popular. She obviously didn't want to go through such a drastic change.
    • Annoying Plucky Comic Relief or not, you'll likely feel sorry for Luan in "No Laughing Matter" when it's revealed that she has such a fragile ego that the bluntness of her siblings' criticism brings her to tears. It in fact affects her so much to the point where she completely retires from comedy.
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