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  • Alternate Character Interpretation: Discussed: At face value, the clean-cut bodyguard Bryce is clearly the good guy, with the hired killer Kincaid clearly being a Boxed Crook at best. But as Kincaid points out, Bryce's profession largely sees him protecting evil men, while Kincaid is paid to kill those same men. Bryce, however, later retorts that in his line of work he doesn't decide whether his clients live or die, a subtle barb at the morality of murder (even the good-intentioned kind) that muddies the water further.
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  • Awesome Music: "Nobody Gets Out Alive", which Kincaid improvises to annoy Bryce during one of the road trip scenes, and which Samuel L. Jackson sings with a gospel choir over the end credits.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: Kincaid killed Kurosawa, ruining Bryce's career. Also, Foucher turns out to be the mole. Who'd have thought.
  • Complete Monster: Vladislav Dukhovich is the former dictator of Belarus on trial for war crimes. He's introduced ransacking the home of a professor who spoke out against him, and shoots his family in front of him to "educate" him. Any witnesses against him during his trial, he has assassinated before they can testify. When Darius Kincaid, the titular hitman, finally brings concrete evidence to the trial, it's in the form of Dukhovich overseeing the massacre of a village that resisted him and having their bodies dumped in a mass grave. Caught at last, Dukhovich stages an explosion to cover his escape from the court, but not before he proudly proclaims to everyone assembled that he refuses to recognize their authority to punish him for the crimes he has committed, and that he is the rightful ruler of Belarus and they cannot take that from him. A remorseless, ruthless, mass-murdering dictator who will do anything to keep control over his country and violently silences any dissent, Dukhovich is the very definition of a tyrant.
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  • Critic-Proof: Met with mixed to negative critical reception, the film did well at the box office in what became one of the worst financial years ever for cinematic releases.
  • Ethnic Scrappy: Salma Hayek's character does not work very much in 2017, even if all of the ethnic stereotypes about Hispanics were invoked for the purposes of parody.
  • Ho Yay: The entirety of the film's marketing plays off how obviously in love the two leads are.
  • Idiot Plot: Kincaid would've never been in all this trouble if he was allowed to give a remote testimony from a safe location. Nor would all the damage to Amsterdam or the Hague have happened if the International Court of Justice accepted the testimonies of Dukhovich's direct victims (one of whom were forced to watch his family be gunned down by the man) instead of deciding that the "hearsay" rebuttal was a fair point.
  • Just Here for Godzilla: A lot of people are interested just because it's Deadpool and Nick Fury's actors sharing a movie.
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    • With the roles reversed, which is comedy gold.
  • Memetic Mutation: You know that video of a car bumping another car into a canal in Amsterdam? That was the filming of this movie.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Dukhovich takes a flying leap over the MEH in the first five minutes when he murders a man's wife and child for daring to speak out against him. There is no sympathy wasted on him when he takes another flying leap off of a rooftop in the end.
  • Nightmare Fuel: As mentioned above, Dukhovich is not used as a source of humor in a film full of absurd comedy and slapstick. Further, the scene where he orders a suicide bomber to set off a large truck bomb on a crowded street is treated with full seriousness, complete with hospital staff going into Mass Casualty mode upon seeing the carnage on the TV.
    • The early scene where Kincaid is being transported through a cramped city is a lampshaded example of Paranoia Fuel, especially so soon after a previous scene where another character was similarly escorted through a city only to be abruptly shot in the head moments before he had made it to safety.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: Nobody will blame you if you look at this movie as Elektra Natchios hiring Deadpool to bodyguard Nick Fury. Especially after Disney purchasing 20th Century Fox.
  • Squick: Bryce is implied to be living out of his car thanks to his career tanking, and is seen peeing in a juice bottle, capping it, and tossing it aside to dispose of later. Numerous characters comment on how disgusting his car is, and there's a lingering stench despite the fact he regularly takes it in to be professionally cleaned. At one point Bryce implies the smell is primarily from an incident a couple weeks ago when a drug mule client accidentally defecated several pounds of heroin on the backseat.
  • Values Dissonance: The Belorussian dictatorship was not enthused that the Big Bad is a Belorussian dictator responsible for violence against a patriotic opposition for understandable reasons, nor Russia, an ally of Belarus. Russian translators dutifully turned the villain into a Bosnian, hinting at the war in Yugoslavia and making the plot less offensive to the Belorussian and Russian governments.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: A Belorussian nationalist dictator oppressing the educated pro-Western population? A new president poisoned with dioxide? Hague trial? Clearly some real events were used to create the story.
  • The Woobie: The unnamed man who was forced to watch Dukhovich murder his family in front of him.
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