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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Peter Parker himself. As some reviewers noticed his general behaviour seems much the same as in Homecoming, still being awkward, at times immature, self-conscious. Others feel that, if anything, Peter's character arc is the reverse of the previous one (clinging to his youth instead of forcibly trying to be viewed as a grown up), since it has him being unwilling to the point of indifference about the responsibility of fighting a big-league villain which in the case of the Elementals were a world-ending threat as far as he, Fury, and Hill knew. Some argue that it makes perfect sense because of the traumatic events of Infinity War and Endgame, especially since he falls for Mysterio's ruse and is led to believe a more qualified hero is dealing with it, while others feel that Peter prioritizing a high school crush over the security of the entire planet (which you know, includes her too) is severely myopic.
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    • Nick Fury is his usual blunt self when talking to Peter Parker, who is still technically a teenager that went through a traumatic experience. A case of Tough Love and You Are Better Than You Think You Are to Peter or a sign of how dangerous the Elementals are and that the world needs Spider-Man? The fact that Fury in the bulk of this movie is actually Talos only muddles the issue. It's possible that Talos has difficulty with human psychology, and being a refugee fleeing a genocidal regime, he's not too impressed with Peter being a reluctant hero.
    • Mixed with Unreliable Narrator, just how unstable was Quentin Beck to begin with? Hearing him tell it, he was just an innocent inventor that Tony fired for protesting how his invention was used and acts as if Tony calling him "unstable" was just an excuse. However, while obviously not justifying passing Beck's invention off as his own (with a humiliating name on top of it), given how Beck turned out completely willing to kill thousands of people for the sake of fame, maybe Tony had good reason to fire him. There's also the fact that Beck is ably, and loyally, supported by several former Stark employees who don't seem to come off as unstable especially, and who don't have any issues or doubts about his narrative of Tony being a Bad Boss and a "boozy manchild".
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    • Just how much did Quentin Beck care for Peter Parker? There's no denying that Beck is manipulating him for his own ends, but at many points it seems like he genuinely doesn't want Peter to get hurt until he has no choice. He even yells at one of his men for getting sloppy and allowing Peter to find out the truth, which forces Beck to kill Peter and his friends to prevent the truth from getting out. On the other hand, when he does decide to kill Peter, he tries to do it in a gleeful manner, constantly taunting him and toying him with his past failures using his illusions, and in the end after knowing that he would lose, knowingly manipulates the masses to paint himself as the hero and Spider-Man as the villain, even going as far as to reveal his identity to the world, ruining Peter's life out of spite even when it achieves nothing for him.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
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    • In spite of having the reputation of completely destroying Mysterio's world and killing all of the superheroes on it, Spider-Man and Mysterio have no problem taking on the Elementals without any outside help. This is actually a hint to the plot twist that they're illusions.
    • Mysterio himself is pretty easily defeated by Spider-Man once he makes full use of his Spider-Sense, with the Elemental/Drones being the main threat in the scene. Justified as he's essentially just a regular man behind a bunch of smoke and mirrors.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
    • The trailers show Peter's classmates goofing off and having a good time, despite having traumatically died and returned from the dead five years later. In the movie proper, we learn eight months have passed, mitigating this trope, although Peter is still a bit shaken about Tony's death.
    • Nick Fury was dusted in Infinity War and lived through Tony's death. He also lost Natasha. And yet he's still carrying on with hero work with his usual brash humor. Justified by the fact that this Nick Fury isn't the real one; he's actually Talos standing in for Nick Fury while the latter is on vacation.
    • Ned only has one reaction to learning that Nick Fury sedated him and "hijacked" Peter's vacation: "Awesome!"
  • Ass Pull: After making a big deal of Peter having to transfer use of E.D.I.T.H. over to Beck, he's then able to just take the glasses back and have control of her again without Beck doing the same thing. Given Tony's paranoia, it's not too hard to believe he programmed E.D.I.T.H. to be loyal to Peter no matter what, and E.D.I.T.H. mentions running the parometric bypass a second time, which mitigates this. However, the issue is not addressed beforehand, which can lead some to this trope.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Spider-Man having an inconsistent portrayal of his Spider-Sense, to the point where some even wondered if he had it, was a point of derision in the fandom. Far From Home turns it into a plot point, as he hasn't fully mastered it, and the inconsistency is explained as Peter not believing in himself. By the end, he's fully mastered it and can see even when Mysterio blinds his normal vision.
    • The Russo Brothers claimed after Infinity War that Aunt May wasn't dusted, which is reversed here as she tells the story of how she came back, likely because we'd otherwise be stuck with an unbelievable case of Angst? What Angst? over her spending five years with Peter dead.
    • Flash in Homecoming was a subject of criticism for, among other things, being a petty Jerkass with no redeeming qualities as opposed to being a Jerk with a Heart of Gold. He returns here, and is made more likable and sympathetic. He's now a Fanboy of Spider-Man like his usual portrayal, he doesn't rag on others quite as much, and we learn his parents are neglectful even after being dead for five years and he outright admits he's just trying to get attention. His constant live-streaming throughout the trip actually ends up helping to save the day in the film's climax. They even bring in Brad Davis as a Replacement Flat Character who's essentially like Homecoming Flash, which highlights this version of Flash even more.
    • At the end of Endgame, fans were miffed that Natasha didn't seem to get any recognition for her Heroic Sacrifice despite it playing a major role in Thanos' downfall, especially compared to Tony's funeral. This film starts out with a memorial to all of the heroes that died helping stop Thanos, showing that her sacrifice wasn't forgotten.
    • After many fans complained about Peter getting all his equipment from Tony Stark instead of creating it himself as in the comics, the final act sees Peter use one of Stark's systems to build and customise his own suit, using his mentor's resources to build something all his own.
    • In Homecoming, Happy was criticized for how poorly he treated Peter and not listening when he tried to explain himself, which often made bad situations even worse. Here, Happy has a much better relationship with Peter, as he risks his life to save his friends and tells Peter that he is indeed worthy of being Tony's successor.
  • Awesome Music:
    • The first trailer features an orchestra mix of Spider-Man (1967) theme song which follows another Ramones number, "I Wanna Be Sedated".
    • How do you officially mark Spider-Man's transition from inexperienced teen to legitimate hero and successor to Tony Stark? "Back in Black", of course.
  • Can't Un-Hear It: If there was ever any remaining doubt about J. K. Simmons being the one and only actor who can ever play J. Jonah Jameson in a live-action movie, there damn well isn't anymore. Guess Kevin Feige agreed with all those online posts begging for Simmons to reprise his role in the MCU.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: Anyone who knows anything about Mysterio from the comics (or various other adaptations) was absolutely not surprised that Mysterio is the villain. The fact that marketing on social media was adamant about the idea that Mysterio had at times worked with Spider-Man rather than simply letting the trailers speak for themselves just dig deeper into incredulity. The real surprise is seeing what aspects of the character have changed in the transition from page to screen, such as Beck being the group leader of a gaggle of disgruntled former employees of Tony Stark.
  • Character Rerailment:
    • Flash, compared to Homecoming, has more in common with his comic book counterpart. For instance, he's actually shown expressing admiration for Spider-Man and noting that he sees the webslinger as a role model, right before calling Peter a dickwad.
    • Happy was uncharacteristically a jerk to Peter for most of Homecoming, whereas he's much more understanding and cooperative this time around.
  • Complete Monster: Quentin Beck, aka Mysterio, is the true Master of the Elementals, orchestrating their attacks around the world to paint himself as a hero. Fired by Tony Stark years ago for being unstable, Beck concocts a scheme to both spite Stark and bring himself the attention he has always craved, entailing the destruction of a variety of villages and cities worldwide via the Elementals, then arriving on the scene as Mysterio to save the day, hoping to be a better hero than Iron Man ever was. Upon befriending and manipulating the young Spider-Man into handing over the E.D.I.T.H. glasses, Beck mind rapes and tries to kill him, threatening to execute his entire staff for a failure immediately beforehand as well. Beck plans to "stop" an Avengers-level threat by using his illusions to destroy London, causing maximum casualties to gain more coverage, and schemes to murder Spider-Man's entire class of high school friends to eliminate potential witnesses to his true nature before basking in the glory as Mysterio. An attention-craving lunatic defined by his petty, treacherous nature, even trying to appeal to Spider-Man's sympathy only to stab him in the back once beaten, Beck gets the last laugh as he frames Spider-Man as a villain and exposes the teenager's identity to the world as a final move to secure his claim to fame.
  • Continuity Lockout: The reveal that Skrull couple Talos and Soren have been impersonating Nick Fury and Maria Hill the whole movie. While it coming out of nowhere is the point, it ultimately means nothing to anyone who hasn't seen Captain Marvel.
  • Creepy Awesome: The illusion prison that Mysterio tortures Spider-Man with in Berlin is as visually stunning as it is nightmarish, and way beyond anything the character has done in the comics. It's reminded more than a few viewers of The Scarecrow's fear-gas illusion segments in Batman: Arkham Asylum.
  • Crosses the Line Twice:
    • The horrible, horrible memorial video that Peter's school shows during the morning announcements in memory of the (non-dusted) Avengers who died in Infinity War and Endgamenote  complete with the most cliched Whitney Houston song imaginable, the words "In Memoriam" written in Comic Sans, and stock footage that still has visible watermarks. It's so un-respectful and utterly (yet believably) incompetent as an In-Universe memorial to the fallen characters that it's almost impossible not to laugh.
    • In archive footage, the Snap is shown to have killed off a number of students during a marching band performance, to horrifying effect. Five years later, the people who were dusted are shown being un-dusted... In the middle of a basketball game, with the suddenly-appearing band members getting clobbered by the running players.
    • Peter almost accidentally killing Brad (and everyone else on the bus, including himself) the first time he tries to use the E.D.I.T.H. glasses (just because he was trying to stop Brad from sharing an embarrassing photo with MJ!) should not be nearly as funny as it is.
    • Aunt May jokes about getting un-dusted in her apartment which, by this point, a whole new family had started living there in the meanwhile. The grandma thought that Aunt May was a ghost haunting her old home.
    • Mr. Harrington reveals his wife pretended to die in the Snap so she could run off with another guy. There was even a funeral. This would normally be appalling, but because Mr. Harrington rattles the story off like he does everything, with casual bluntness and an attempt to be chipper, it’s hilarious.
      "Do you want to watch the video? I've got headphone splitters."
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • The statuesque female agent who demands Peter remove his clothes in a consistently haughty manner. (Being played by German model Toni Garrn certainly helps.)
    • Dimitri, the no-nonsense, wetworks-esque S.H.I.E.L.D. agent tasked to be their tour guide/driver. He has two scenes and is gold as The Comically Serious.
    • J. Jonah Jameson, once again portrayed by J. K. Simmons, is seen as one of the best parts of the film in spite of only appearing for less than a minute.
  • Epileptic Trees:
    • Tony Stark not being seen or even hinted at in the first trailer had some viewers wondering if he might be one of the characters who would die in Avengers: Endgame. As it turned out, this was indeed the case.
    • Spidey swings through New York City at the end, and we get a shot of Stark Tower... Obscured just enough to hide the new owner and keep the identity of the man a mystery. It's widely believed that the man who bought the building is none other than Norman Osborn. (A secondary faction has speculated the remodeled Stark Tower to be the new home of the Baxter Building.)
    • The second trailer reveals that the Decimation tore a hole in the dimension and that Mysterio is from a different Earth. This opens a lot of possibilities of future characters, or alternate versions of those characters. It even opens up the possibility of an Intercontinuity Crossover with other Spider-Man movies made by Sony.
      • As a subset to this theory, a lot of comics fans are already guessing that Mysterio is lying out of his ass and planning a long con involving the Elementals, as he is wont to do in the comics. Those who aren't amused by him referring to the MCU Earth as "Earth-616" often like to latch on to this. They were right.
    • Due to reasons speculated in this Reddit thread, a good amount of fans suspect that MJ is the daughter of Nick Fury.
    • The confirmation of Nick Fury having an associate named Dimitri, played by Turkish-German actor Numan Acar, has many believing that he's the MCU version of the Chameleon. This is due to said character being a Russian villain named Dmitri Smerdyakov, a Master of Disguise who was the first villain Spidey ever fought, and such technology already existing in the MCU. Many also speculate he's in cahoots with Mysterio.
      • This was compounded by a poster that was printed flipped so that Fury's eyepatch is on the wrong eye, which some took as a subtle clue that the Chameleon would be disguised as him, due to an episode of Spider-Man: The Animated Series where his disguise as Fury is found out because he used a flipped picture with the same mistake. While this didn't end up happening, they were right that someone else disguises themselves as Fury in this movie — both Beck and Talos.
    • Thanks to this Instagram post, fans are speculating whether Mysterio is alive or not and if his death was genuine or a case of Like You Would Really Do It.
  • Even Better Sequel: The film is at the very least considered to be a solid if not outright superior follow up to Spider-Man: Homecoming, which already set a high bar to begin with, and is already getting a reputation (among fans at least) of being one of the best MCU films to date, with some even calling it the best Spider-Man film to date, offering stiff competition to even Sam Raimi's esteemed film trilogy. It has also become the highest-grossing Spider-Man film worldwide, dethroning Spider-Man 3 from that position.
  • Evil Is Cool: Quentin Beck/Mysterio, while having no real powers, is a shining example of a character you Love to Hate, with Jake Gyllenhaal's charismatic performance truly selling him as being a master planner and manipulator.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Compared to his comic counterpart who had trouble getting work for not being attractive enough, Mysterio here is played by the gorgeous Jake Gyllenhaal.
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception:
    • Acting like the trailer's release spoils all of Avengers: Endgame, despite it being public knowledge that a second Spider-Man film was coming even before Infinity War was released. It's sometimes met with comparisons to the pitiful attempts to hide that Superman would be coming back in Justice League (2017), which were just mocked as silly when everyone knew it would be happening.
    • Mocking Peter and his friends still being in high school five years later, when Endgame couldn't have been clearer that he's still the same age as when he was snapped, and presumably all the main cast were too.
      • On a related note, saying that the entire high school were apparently snap victims as they're still the same age, when in fact the core group of Peter's friends is only a few people and it's not unreasonable at all that they could have all been among the victims while others in the school weren't. The film even explicitly features a classmate who’s now five years older.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • The MCU is now part of a multiverse (assuming Mysterio's not just lying about that, of course), allowing for appearances of characters from the comics, non-MCU Marvel films, Obvious Crossover Method or really anything else you want. Except not.
    • For the Spideychelle shippers, when and how did Peter begin to reciprocate MJ's romantic feelings for him since Homecoming? And when did MJ fall for him pre-Homecoming?
    • Nick Fury who is actually Talos says that Doctor Strange is "unavailable". What could the Master of the Mystic Arts be doing that is more important than stopping a fire elemental burning the world? Go to it, fanfic writers!
    • Now that Peter Parker has been exposed as Spider Man, what will Flash Thompson's reaction be?
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • The line "You are all alone" from the first trailer after the release of Avengers: Endgame.
    • Now that Sony and Marvel have gotten into a disagreement over Spider-Man's future, Sony is potentially taking Spider-Man back from the MCU. This reflects rather bitterly on the entire film, what with it being about Peter learning to accept his destiny as Tony's successor now that he has been legally prevented from doing so. It's also especially wince-inducing when Happy tells him that Tony wouldn't have sacrificed himself if Peter wasn't going to be around. Even the name of the film, Far From Home, seems bitter now considering it's an inversion of Homecoming, which had previously been seen by fans as referencing Spider-Man returning to Marvel. Their plans for Spider-Man's future as Tony's successor were so big that he was reportedly set to have nine movies to himself. The mid-credits scene of the film, in which Peter panics due to his identify being revealed, now seems like it could be more of a reaction to the future of his film series being put in jeopardy.
      • Additionally, the scene where Spidey asks about various other heroes and Nick Fury actually Talos explains how they're not available and he's the only one they have is ironic now that, with the collapse of the Sony-Disney deal, Spider-Man is practically the only one of Marvel's heroes to not be available in the MCU.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight:
    • Spider-Man's new default costume is red and black. Since it hearkens back to the original Ditko/Lee design, it almost seems like it was fated to be a heartfelt tribute to the late, great Steve Ditko and Stan Lee, both of whom passed away in the year that the movie was filmed. And, quite poignantly, the film is dedicated to their memory, much like Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.
    • Fury snaps "Don't invoke her name!" when Peter brings up Captain Marvel. This is actually Talos breaking character over the hero who reunited him with his family and gave them a chance to be free of the Kree.
  • He's Just Hiding!: A number of people aren't fully convinced that Mysterio is dead at the end of the movie. After all, faking his death is something he's done in the comics. There's also speculation that, with the possibility of an eventual Sinister Six storyline on the cards, that Mysterio would be one of their members.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • J.B. Smoove previously appeared in an Audi commercial promoting Homecoming as Peter Parker's driving instructor. Now Smoove is in an official Spider-Man film. Turns out this was no accident.
    • Jake Gyllenhaal was briefly slated to replace Tobey Maguire as the wall-crawler in Spider-Man 2 after back problems and other circumstances called into doubt whether Maguire would stay on with the film, but he ultimately recovered and stuck with it. 15 years later, Gyllenhaal is finally appearing in a Spider-Man movie... as Mysterio. Gyllenhaal poked fun at this in an Instagram video captioned "I just realized I'm not playing Spider-Man."
    • Peter's new costume in this film has a color scheme that evokes the classic Steve Ditko look, but one that also intentionally or not bears a similarity to the Superior Spider-Man costume, which also made its debut after Peter was supposedly killed off.
    • In the first trailer, Mysterio is described as Iron Man and Thor rolled into one. Four months before the first trailer was released, we were introduced to a superhero that was literally a fusion of Iron Man and Thor.
    • Adrian Toomes' complaint that the Shocker sounds too much like a pro-wrestling name in Homecoming is now downright hysterical given that Quentin Beck's vigilante alias in this film just so happens to coincide with a real-life pro wrestler's ring name. Even more hilarious, wrestling Mysterio dressed up as Marvel's Mysterio for WrestleMania 35!
    • In Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse it's implied that Aunt May has turned Mission Control for Spider-Man, having access to his hero lair and the hall of suits. In this movie Aunt May takes a slightly different approach, sticking a Spider-suit into Peter's luggage without him knowing.
    • Shortly after the reveal that the movie involves the Multiverse specifically because Thanos ripped a hole in reality with "The Snap(s)", scientists discovered a bunch of inexplicable holes within the Milky Way.
    • Zendaya's dates at the opera house always seem to go tits up... It makes sense that regular trapeze training isn't nearly at the level of web-slinging though.
    • During one of the final scenes of the film, Spider-Man goes by a sign that is labeled with the numbers 1, 2, and 3, followed by a question mark and a statement indicating that the people who made the sign can't wait to show visitors what's next. Some fans presumed that this scene is alluding to Marvel's "Phase" format (since Far From Home is the final installment of Phase 3), as a tease of what's to come. The catch is that the sign was already there as part of construction going on in New York City at the time of filming, and it had nothing to do with Marvel's input.
    • This video pretty much predicted (to a certain extent) the mid-credits scene.
    • This famous image from Civil War shows Spider-Man unmasking himself on live television as J. Jonah Jameson watches in shock. The characters are modeled after their actors from the Sam Raimi Spider-Man Trilogynote , with Jameson modeled after J.K. Simmons' portrayal of the character. Come this movie's mid-credits scene, and Simmons' Jameson directly assists in outing Spider-Man's identity.
    • A second installment to a theatrical Live-Action Adaptation of Spider-Man movies that has a character mentioning Doctor Strange off-handedly and the character J. Jonah Jameson makes an appearance, played by J. K. Simmons... Are we talking about Far From Home or Spider-Man 2?note 
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • The second trailer officially reveals that the movie introduces The Multiverse, with Mysterio being from another version of Earth. This has massive implications about the future of the setting. Except not, or at least not for this movie.
    • Both of the post-credits scenes offer massive plot twists for both future Spider-Man movies and the MCU as a whole. The former has J. Jonah Jameson out Spider-Man's secret identity and claim him as a murderer, and the latter reveals that Nick Fury is working on a major space station with the Skrulls while Talos and Soren impersonate him and Maria Hill on Earth.
    • The fact that it's none other than J.K. Simmons reprising the role of Jameson from the Sam Raimi Spider-Man movies had the fandom going absolutely berserk.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: Mysterio reveals his origin as a bitter ex-employee of Stark Industries seeking revenge. A lot of Spider-Man fans don't like how after Vulture, he's the second Spider-Man villain who's changed into having a grudge against Tony Stark, feeling doing this again is unoriginal and too much of a rehash of Toomes' motive. And that's not getting into how just about every villain from the Iron Man films had almost the exact same motivation (even Ultron could be included in this list). Especially considering that Mysterio's comics backstory of being a failed Hollywood artist was more unique.
  • It Was His Sled: Unless you know next to nothing about the Spider-Man mythology, Mysterio being evil will not be a shocker.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • Sony announcing this movie well before the release of Spider-Man: Homecoming made it abundantly clear that he'd live through Phase 3. If anything, it made the reveal that he'd be one of the characters to be killed by Thanos all the more surprising, albeit at the cost of making it abundantly clear that he wasn't going to stay dead. The announcement that Nick Fury and Maria Hill are in the movie adds even more to it.
    • Even if you buy that the film might kill Fury off, his going out with a quick, ignominious bullet would never be how it happens. And of course, we know full well about Beck's illusions by this point.
    • Nick Fury showing up out of nowhere to take out the Big Bad with a single gunshot from behind? Obviously another illusion.
  • Love to Hate:
    • Quentin Beck is a complete scumbag of a person, but Jake Gyllenhaal's performance makes him come off as a truly three-dimensional character and totally sells his charismatic and manipulative personality, making him a very entertaining villain to watch. There's also the fact that he may or may notnote have a legitimate grievance against Tony Stark, who is already extremely divisive in the MCU fandom, who is revealed to have stolen credit for one of Beck's inventions.
    • Likewise, J. K. Simmons as Jameson. Mostly because Simmon makes a welcome return to his Star-Making Role, and the fact that audiences genuinely do love his energy and gusto in railing against that "menace" Spider-Man.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • The movie's mere title cause fans to joke that MCU Spider-Man's solo movies have specific Theme Naming related to the word "home" and the next movie title will be something like Spider-Man: Home Alone.
      • #BringSpiderManHomenote 
    • Given Spider-Man's now-memetic demise in Avengers: Infinity War, fans have joked that the film focuses on Spider-Man as a mound of dust on Titan for more than two hours. (Hey, that is pretty far from home!) Slightly less morbidly, others have similarly suggested it will center on Spider-Man’s adventures in the afterlife.
    • The image of Tom Holland "accidentally" revealing the film's title has become photoshop bait.
    • "Dead for five years? Have fun in Europe!" note 
    • The second official trailer gives two more:
    • It's become a common joke among fans, especially on Tumblr, to refer to Mysterio by the name of his actor 'Jake Gyllenhaal' while calling all other characters by their names. The joke being that Gyllenhaal is not playing a character and is indeed capable of all of the magical feats Mysterio has showcased so far.note 
    • The official posters (by Sony) for the movie have been lambasted for being incredibly boring and poorly designed, especially in comparison to the teaser poster and, really, any other MCU poster. Plenty fans have taken it upon themselves to make even worse posters to mock this. Said fanmade posters usually include a dis towards Ned as well, referencing Jacob Batalon not being credited in any of the official promotional material.
    • Marvel finally figured out how to stop Tom from spoiling anything—make him babysit Jake Gyllenhaal. As seen here.
    • "Everywhere I go, I see his face."note 
    • Peter Parker smiling. Explanation (spoilers) 
    • Spider-Man explaining to Zendaya Explanation 
    • Now this is an Avengers-level threat! Explanation (spoilers) 
    • Peter’s “WHAT THE F—-!” panicked reaction note 
      • Mysterio exposed Spider-Man so hard he had to leave the MCU. note 
  • Mis-blamed: Many MCU fans are blaming Sony for "spoiling" Avengers: Endgame and so on during the period of the release of the Announce Trailer and Endgame's release. Leaving aside the fact that the MCU has a documented history of Trailers Always Lie (misdirecting audiences with their promos and marketing to hide their plot twists) and that the trailers for Endgame and Far From Home might not be the entire picture, the fact is that the MCU—Sony deal set in stone the window for Spider-Man appearing in the MCU and the timeline for the high-school trilogy (if only because these actors will grow up fast and won't believably pass for teenagers forever). Sony only has a say about the content and direction of the Spider-Man solo movies. They have no say about Spider-Man's appearances in cross-overs. It was Marvel that decided to include Spider-Man among the dustpile in Avengers: Infinity War knowing fully well that there would be a Spider-Man movie and promotion for the same before the release of Endgame, and if anything blame should be directed to Marvel for "overextending themselves".
  • Moral Event Horizon: Mysterio crossed the line before the movie even begins, with him staging multiple attacks and killing hundreds of innocents in order to pretend to be a hero. Oh, and then he also ruined a 16-year-old's life for stopping him by revealing his secret identity to the public through an edited recording meant to frame him for everything.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: You will have no idea how much you have missed J.K. Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson yelling "SPIDER-MAN" until you actually hear it in the mid-credits scene.
  • Narm Charm:
    • The film manages to take Mysterio's infamous "Bubble Bowl" helmet, a source of derision from many people In-Universe and Out, and actually make it look pretty badass.
    • The opening montage, paying tribute to the heroes fallen in Avengers: Endgame to the sound of Whitney Houston's "I Will Always Love You". The levels of cheese are off the charts, but the sincerity of it all makes it all the more endearing, specially when you take into account it was basically made by high-schoolers.
    • Is The Reveal of Mysterio's true nature and the subsequent five minutes of shameless exposition a bit heavy-handed and unnatural? Absolutely. Does it fit said character's over-the-top hamminess, gloryhound nature, and have several interesting ties to the past of the MCU, including its first film's most memorable meme? Absolutely.
    • Ned and Betty's whirlwind relationship that they strike up over the course of a plane flight and is over by the end of the trip is the cutest thing ever done in a superhero film. It's ridiculously, nauseatingly sweet and completely accurate to the kind of lightning-in-a-bottle romances that tend to flare up among kids that age.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • While significant and mind-blowing, J. K. Simmons is not the first person to reprise their role in the MCU from a non-MCU Marvel work. Lou Ferrigno, from 1978's The Incredible Hulk, cameoed and did voice work for the Hulk in the 2008 film, and has served as a consultant for subsequent MCU movies. Considering the movie is often overlooked and easily the least successful MCU film, it's easy to forget that.
    • Mysterio being a traveler from a parallel Earth (or not) did in fact happen in the comics, where the main 616 Mysterio went to the Ultimate universe for a time, albeit his motives were very different as he had just gotten sick of losing to Spider-Man all the time and thought he might try his luck at villainy in a different universe where the heroes and villains are less experienced, murdering that verse's version of the Kingpin and attempting to establish himself as the new most powerful crime lord.
    • When the second trailer made reference to a multiverse, a number of people reacted as if this was a new development for the MCU — it had already been mentioned in Thor: The Dark World, Doctor Strange (2016), Ant-Man and the Wasp, and Avengers: Endgame.
  • One-Scene Wonder: Holy shit, J. K. Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson in the mid-credits scene. Not only does the actor completely sell the role with a limited amount of screentime, but what that character ends up doing completely flips the script and positions the third Spider-Man film to go into a completely unexpected direction.
  • Paranoia Fuel: Mysterio's illusions, big time. Once Beck reveals his true nature and shows that he faked an entire building filled with people to trap Peter, you start to wonder, just like Peter, what is actually real. As a result, something like Mysterio's death scene can really mess with your head, since Beck could have easily faked his corpse and E.D.I.T.H.'s voice saying that the illusions were shut down.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • After Michelle "MJ" Jones ended up being a bit divisive in Homecoming for constantly snarking at her friends, doing not much of note in that movie in spite of getting high billing, and having relatively little in common with the character that she's loosely inspired by (Mary Jane Watson), her characterization here is more widely-liked, with some even noting that her insight, observation of people, Action Girl moments and chemistry with Peter is closer to the MJ of the comics, as is her somewhat impish sense of humor.
    • Flash has become more well received for showing his admiration for Spider-Man while still being a dick to Peter. Even that has been toned down by showing there are lines even he wouldn’t cross, like taking a picture of him in the bathroom. It also helps that he has been given an explanation for being so obnoxious, namely by being neglected from his parents, and he's become more aware of his behavior.
  • Signature Scene:
    • One of the movie's most memorable sequences happens in the second half of the movie, when Mysterio traps Spider-Man in a series of illusions in a sequence that feels like it's ripped out of the pages of a comic book.
    • Another contender happens during the final battle, in which Spider-Man masters his Spider-Sense and is able to pulverize Mysterio's drones without falling for his illusions. It's less than a minute long, but damn if it isn't satisfying to see.
    • The mid-credits scene, in which J. K. Simmons reprises his role as J. Jonah Jameson and turns Spider-Man's status quo completely on its head.
  • Slow-Paced Beginning: One of the few criticisms of the film is that it has a somewhat slow-paced first act with barely any superhero action that focuses mostly on setting up the overall plot and character relationships, with the film picking up the pace once the Elementals and Mysterio first show up in Venice. It's likely that the decision to excise the sequence showing Peter preparing for his trip while busting up the mob into a short film played into this perception.
  • Special Effects Failure: Much like the climatic fight between T'Challa and Killmonger in Black Panther (2018), some of the CGI used during the illusion sequences in Berlin and the climax is very obvious and looks more like a video game than a film. While most of it can be attributed to the fact that the setting visuals literally are a jarring CGI sequence meant to mess with Peter's head through absurd visuals and imagery so making things hyper realistic there probably wasn't really Mysterio's priority, it doesn't justify the fact that the rendering for Spider-Man in his real suit looks just like the rest of it when it should be more realistic.
  • Spoiled by the Format: Any doubts about Mysterio actually being the bad guy are likely taken care of when the last Elemental is defeated when there's clearly still a big chunk of the movie to go.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Sandman, Hydro-Man, Molten Man, and Cyclone, due to them not actually existing at all. The "real" characters could feasibly have been included as non-powered versions of themselves acting as accomplices to Mysterio by controlling their respective elemental constructs, but instead the supposed interdimensional supervillains are simply illusions, without any real characters behind them. This does not necessarily preclude the true characters from ever existing in the MCU though, as Morris Bench is mentioned in dialogue as a real person rumored to have attained hydrokinetic powers independently of the events staged by Mysterio.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Mysterio himself is a hell of a Love to Hate, and having him go out through a single offhanded gutshot, and bleed out somewhat on his own terms while knowing he's going to successfully go down as the hero and ruin Peter's life can strike some as rather unsatisfying. This, coupled with people genuinely enjoying Gyllenhaal's performance, means that some would have preferred if Mysterio survived as an Arc Villain with Good Publicity into the next movie, so that if/when he's finally exposed, it comes with the proper Catharsis Factor. Of course considering it's Mysterio it's entirely possible that he's not actually dead and is planning a comeback.
    • Peter is shown to be upset about the events of the last two Avengers movies, but this is more about Tony's death than his own death and resurrection, which is quite odd. In particular, the nightmarish visions Mysterio gave Peter were a good opportunity to have a Thanos cameo and explore Peter's trauma from being killed and resurrected, but this never happens. However, such a scene may have not been possible given Peter and Mysterio's levels of knowledge about the Blip.
    • The fact that Peter had Uncle Ben's briefcase for most of the trip, and that it got destroyed, was only used for a throwaway joke at the end. It's understandable that Peter had more pressing concerns about the immediate dangers, but the fact that neither he nor May seem to care that something belonging to his beloved Uncle was destroyed (even if it was just a briefcase) misses out on a potential moment to connect that loss to the loss of Tony.
    • Despite the post-credits scene of Homecoming hinting that Mac Gargan would form the Sinister Six to go after Spider-Man (only with Adrian Toomes possibly declining participation), neither of them are even mentioned at all. Especially frustrating because, as mentioned below, Jameson publicly revealing Spider-Man's secret identity renders the Vulture keeping it a secret no longer relevant.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Mysterio wasn't the first choice for the Big Bad when it came to speculation, as he's something of a joke in the comics, he was thought to have had a movie in development by Sony already for their universe, and it looked like Scorpion was being set up as the next villain with Mac Gargan's cameo in Homecoming.
    • Nick Fury and Maria Hill having roles in the movie, after having been Out of Focus since Age of Ultron (the former only finally showing up in a major role in Captain Marvel), was definitely out of the blue. Making this even more unexpected, is that the "Nick Fury" and "Maria Hill" we see throughout the movie aren't even the real versions. Rather, they're Talos and Soren impersonating them in compliance with the two while they're on vacation.
    • No one expected Remy Hii to play Brad Davis, who only dated MJ in one issue all the way back in 1979, and is so obscure that even the most hardcore of Spider-Man fans were likely unaware of him. Marvel and Sony took so long to reveal who exactly Hii plays, that most expected someone more important to Spidey's life, such as Harry Osborn, a new villain, or the forthcoming Shang-Chi.
    • Mr. Dell is another example. He only appeared in three issues and debuted in the late-'90s (long after Peter graduated college, much less high school) in the lesser-known Webspinners anthology comic, and was a very minor character in all three of those appearances.
    • William Ginter Riva, a minor character from Iron Man, makes a return after the most extensive Long Bus Trip done in the Marvel Cinematic Universe up until that point. There's even a short clip of Obadiah Stane yelling at him!
    • On an organization-level, few expected that S.W.O.R.D. would be appearing in the MCU as The Stinger suggests. For one, it's a lesser-known branch of S.H.I.E.L.D. (itself Out of Focus since it was dissolved in The Winter Soldier), dealing with extraterrestrial threats rather than Earth ones. Second, though they technically always had the rights to the organization themselves, S.W.O.R.D. was initially scrapped because almost all of the members (starting with characters such as Abigail Brand, Beast, and Lockheed) are considered part of the X-Men side of Marvel (debuting in the Astonishing X-Men) and thus they only just got the film rights before Far From Home's release. The fact that it's being set up carries massive implications for what will happen post-Infinity Saga, but what exactly it is, we don't know.
    • The biggest one of all, on a mind-blowing level: J. Jonah Jameson, reprised by his Spider-Man Trilogy actor J. K. Simmons, in the mid-credits. Not only were many expecting J.J. to be Adapted Out, but the fact that this is only the second time a non-MCU Marvel Studios movie role was reprised in over a decade of MCU movies (after Lou Ferrigno's cameo/voice-over in The Incredible Hulk) only added to this.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The scene where Mysterio Mind Rapes Peter with his illusions in Berlin has been lauded as one of the most visually striking scenes in any Spider-Man movie.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • Sure, Peter, give a superpowered guy you just met a few hours ago unrestricted access to a global defence system designed by flippin' Tony Stark himself. What Could Possibly Go Wrong? After everything Spidey has gone through in the preceding films, it's disturbing how unbelievably naive he still is.
    • Peter's accidental order to drone-strike Brad (along with a bus full of his classmates) was also supremely idiotic, given that he had no idea what the glasses were capable of and so should definitely not have given them such permission.
    • Posthumously, Tony Stark for creating a massive intelligence gathering and drone deployment platform without oversight or safeguards built in, capable of rapid deployment for kill missions and very loosely interpreting the user's commands and not informing them until almost too late that it intends to kill the target, and it can be used to hack into intelligence and personal data servers with ease. Then hand the whole thing over to a teenager naturally prone to selfish, impulsive behavior. He also made it so user friendly in the form of a pair of shades, so that it could easily be given to someone else to use as they saw fit, like an insane former employee masquerading as a hero, so that he can use it to wreak havoc across an entire city. This "suit of armor around the world" idea panned out just as well as all his other ones.
  • Win the Crowd: Mysterio is a popular villain from the comics, so many were excited to hear that he'd be making his live-action debut here. Plus, he retains his iconic "fishbowl" helmet that had long been dismissed as too silly to put in live action but totally looks good here, and certainly not so silly ever since the MCU greenlighted a film which included in its main cast a sentient tree and a talking raccoon.
  • WTH, Casting Agency?: Jake Gyllenhaal isn't exactly the first actor that comes to mind for Mysterio. Specifically, Gyllenhaal is a very handsome man, and part of Mysterio's backstory is that he wanted to get into show business but wasn't handsome enough to be an actor. This was mitigated when it was revealed that Mysterio was being reimagined as a good guy. Or rather, someone pretending to be a hero. It also makes sense since he's chosen to be the "face" of Mysterio out of all the other ex-Stark employees who have banded together — if you're inventing a superhero, you'd want someone who can look the part. In addition, when he's wearing E.D.I.T.H, he bears a noticeable resemblance to Robert Downey Jr.

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