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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Why does Professor Willow need to store all the Pokémon you send permanently, rather than just studying your team when you're not using them like other Pokémon researchers? Either he's building an army or he's dissecting them.
    • Despite what established canon says, some trainers still joke about how Professor Willow is processing the Pokémon you sent him into candies and sending one back to you as a gesture of thanks.
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    • Team Valor, Team Mystic, and Team Instinct: innocent Dungeon Exploration Teams of Pokémon Trainers enjoying catching and battling Pokémon and encouraging healthy competition as well as various dungeon explorations, or something more nefarious, with the silhouetted "leaders" of these teams actually being shady criminals with their members being unwitting pawns? It doesn't help that in most previous Pokémon games (aside from Mystery Dungeon teams), Team ______ were almost always the bad guys (Team Rocket, Team Plasma, Team Flare, etc.) This Tumblr post summarizes it pretty well. (However, the correlation of the name scheme is most likely an unintentional side effect of localization: in the Japanese, the various villain teams are named _____-dan / "_____ Gang".) However, in Japanese-language versions, the term "Team _____" (as with the teams in the Mystery Dungeon spinoff, such as Team ACT and Team Charm) is used instead of "_____-dan" / "_____ Gang", assuming these teams are more the former than the latter.
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    • Even though he literally has no characterization to speak of, the fandom quickly adapted Spark of Team Instinct as a lovable goofball, if not simple-minded. If he's not a Cloud Cuckoolander, then he's The Stoner or a straight up Attention Whore instead. That said, he's also frequently portrayed as an All-Loving Hero, just as Team Instinct overall is portrayed.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Drowzee is hated by players in parts of Canada, the northeastern US, as well as the UK and the Nordic Countries, for being even more common than the typical Com Mons.
  • Animation Age Ghetto: Although a wide range of people are playing the app, there are other people who feel like anybody over the age of 12 should be banned from playing it, despite the fact that it is more directly targeted towards older fans than the main series games. Alternately, there have been those who think the game should be exclusively for older-generation Pokémon fans. There are posts on social media saying that if you've never played any of the original games on any of the Nintendo handheld systems, then you shouldn't be playing this game at all.
  • Annoying Video-Game Helper:
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    • The pop-ups that appear every time the game is booted up, reminding players to be more wary about their surrounding and other dangers.
    • If the player is traveling over 15 mph, a warning popup appears to discourage driving while playing, which repeats every five minutes. While this is annoying enough if you're just a passenger, the message may appear indoors if the cell company just didn't care with configuring the building's microcells' A-GPSnote  properly and thus causes the game to think that the player is somehow driving at breakneck speeds in the building.
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Deoxys, being a Glass Cannon outside of its Defense Forme, is anything but a Damage-Sponge Boss, and can go down in seconds to a modestly-sized raid group despite its inflated stats as a Raid boss. It's even possible to solo Attack Forme Deoxys.
  • Author's Saving Throw: Frequently occurs with the game due to its periodic updates and player feedback.
    • An update released on July 30th allows players to customize their trainer at will. Meanwhile a message pops up at the start of a session literally warning players not to trespass or enter dangerous areas while playing, since, apparently, the warning about being alert at all times was not enough.
    • Players noticed with the same update, however, that the escape/catch rate for the Pokémon seemed to have changed so that it was a lot easier for Pokémon to escape and break out of Poké Balls and some EXP bonuses were removed, making the game a far more frustrating experience that it needed to be for many. Fortunately, Niantic confirmed that this was a bug and upon finding out about it, quickly got to work on fixing it. Many players still find it odd that this alledged bug affected so many different things at the same time, and think that the "bug" was actually an intentional gameplay change from Niantic in order to push people to spend money on the online shop, with Niantic backtracking once they realized that this change led too many people to stop playing the game altogether, along with the bad press it generated.
    • After being removed entirely, the footprint tracking system was ultimately replaced by an even more useful system than the original was intended to be, with "Sightings" that specify the nearest Pokéstop to each Pokémon listed in the tracker. However, the function is brand-new and isn't completely functional as of the patch's initial launch.
    • The Zubat plague appears to have been cut down over time. Pidgey and Rattata also no longer hatch from eggs, and Eevee now hatch from 5km eggs as opposed to 10km.
    • To aid late-arriving players that would be no match for the gyms staffed with high CP Pokémon, an update made it so training at allied gyms brings the Pokémon down to the player's level for the purposes of training. This keeps new players from being completely locked out of earning defender bonuses.
    • The 2016 Halloween event boosted the spawns of spooky Pokémon; the Gastly line, Cubone line, Drowzee line, and Meowth line. All four are reasonably rare, Gastly and its evolutions in particular. The doubled candy was a nice bonus. In 2017,the above plus Gen 2 and 3 Ghost-types were similarly given higher spawn rates, in addition to Houndour and Houndoom - making the difficult-to-collect Dark-note  and Ghost-type medals a lot easier to grind for.
    • Niantic responded to the controversy over the Poké Stops being locked while going above the speed limit by doubling items obtained from them and dramatically increasing spawns, albeit only for a few days.
    • Players will have noticed that after October 2016, the number of rare Pokémon encounters is dramatically increased, especially for areas with no Poké Stops nearby. However, this was sidelined by the introduction of Com Mons from the second generation.
    • Niantic eventually released a balance update that addressed the problem of Pokémon that should be strong ending up with low CP due to factors like high speed or only one high attack stat throwing off the formula. For just one example, in the previous formula, Vaporeon and Flareon had reasonably high max CP at 2816 and 2643, respectively, with Jolteon's suffering from a rather unimpressive 2140. With the new formula, Vaporeon has shot up to 3157 and Flareon to 2904, while Jolteon trails with a more respectable 2730.
    • The partnership with Starbucks caused an increase in the amount of Pokéstops available in rural or suburban areas, slightly alleviating the Scrappy Mechanic of living in a town with almost no Pokéstops, since many towns have (sometimes multiples of five) Starbucks. Some, however, viewed this as "Too little too late" - as a Starbucks may still be kilometers away.
    • The Gen 2 update added Nanab Berries, which have the effect of reducing the random animations Pokémon have when you're trying to capture them, a major source of annoyance.
    • The raid battles initially rolled out being available only to players level 35 and above. Shortly over the next day, this threshold dropped, to 31, then 28, then 25.
    • With the new Gym system, the player is now given coins based on how long their Pokémon has defended the Gym for. The rate was initially 1 coin per hour, before it was greatly improved to 1 coin per 10 minutes.
    • Following the failure of the 2017 GO Fest in Chicago, Niantic activated Legendary raid battles with Articuno and Lugia, and began the global events, extending them by 72 hours, while allowing those who attended the fest a 2 mile radius on stops and gyms, a free Lugia, and $100 in coins in apology.
    • Complaints about the strictness of the Extreme weather condition (which was triggered by the local weather service declaring some variety of warning - when weather services frequently issue warnings hours in advance of bad weather, and over a large area where a severe storm pattern potentially could go) led to an overhaul of the system. A player can now designate themselves safe from the weather, and spawns are still affected by the underlying condition that triggered the warning (for example, bonuses to Ice and Steel types in snowy weather).
    • Complaints about obtaining some of the more frustrating Type badges were mitigated in Generation III. Weather affecting spawn rates (and designating more as common spawns) made badges that were only easy in some regions of the world (like Fire and Ice) much easier to get. Moreover, Rocker, Depot Agent and Delinquent (Electric, Steel and Dark, respectively) were made much easier when one of each type (Electrike, Aron and Poochyena) were made into easily caught Com Mons depending on the current weather.
    • With Field Research Breakthrough Rewards system, players are able to use their own balls (eg. Ultra Balls) to capture Legendary Pokémon without the hassle of a limited supply of Premier Balls used in Raid Battles, which are criticized for being always the same as a Poké Ball. Despite having low catch rates, this mitigated the problems players had with Legendary Pokémon (in Raid Battles).
    • The addition of Pokémon research, essentially the game's "story mode", full stop has been considered to be one of the best additions to the game and has breathed new life into the game. It has alleviated many of the complaints and problems that have plagued the game since launch, such as breaking the monotony of simply catching as many 'mons as possible by actually giving players goals to fulfill. Field research quests also give players lots of useful rewards, including encounters with Pokémon that are otherwise damn near impossible to find in the wild, like Grimer, as well as various goodies like Stardust, Poké Balls, and healing items, and even giving players the chance to catch legendary Pokémon (and Absol) without having to do raids. Additionally, a Kanto themed event run the week after it was introduced, helping alleviate the difficulty of the special requests for the unprepared (particularly filling the Kanto dex and evolving a Magikarp).
    • The Ultra Bonus Event in 2018 allowed players who missed out on EX raids, a very controversial feature introduced the previous year, to finally catch Mewtwo in normal raids. It should be noted, however that these Mewtwo do not have Shadow Ball, making them much less versatile than their EX Raid counterparts.
    • In September 2018, the EX-raid system was improved: gyms have a marker showing if they're eligible for an EX-raid, and anyone who receives an EX-raid pass can send an additional invite to another player they've reached Ultra Friends status with, allowing more latitude for people who can't raid there.
    • Starting in October, players had another hour after Community Day to evolve the featured Pokémon for their exclusive move.
    • Following the controversial Feebas Research Day that had limited time slots and difficult quests, the following two months improved on that by giving easier quests and extending the events' length to nine hours. The March Research Day also released two Shiny lines (Lotad and Castform).
    • During the fourth generation release in 2018, many players are shocked by the terrible movesets on fan favorites that are seemingly deliberately added to cripple or nerf the Pokémon. Niantic responded by adding various high-viability moves to several Pokémon such as Honchkrow and Roserade and revamped various Pokémon's movesets right before the release of some of them, such as Giratina Origin Forme or Hippowdon, making them significantly more viable.
    • The May/June 2019 Field Research Breakthroughs, after the 6-months of controversial Random Encounters having players getting multiples of undesirable Pokémon from a roster of 8 different Pokémon each monthnote  causing ire to many players, the first three sets were removed from the encounter pool, in addition to having Latias/Latios being added into mix, reducing the numbers in a roster in addition to increasing the chances of getting a desired Legendary Pokémon on Random Encounters system.
  • Awesome Music:
    • The Gym Battle theme is pretty damn spectacular.
    • As is their 2017 Halloween-themed remix of the infamous Lavender Town theme.
    • Many have noted that the raid battle theme sounds good enough to be part of the main series of games and even has some familiar sounding elements from other battle themes from the games. Not surprising, since Junichi Masuda, the composer for core-series Pokémon games, also composed the music for this spinoffnote .
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Ever since the Team Leaders' official artwork has been released, Spark has been pretty hotly debated. Many fans say, especially compared to Blanche and Candela, that he looks like a dweeb and the least threatening of the three. However, some people are drawn to him exactly for that reason, he's the only one who actually looks like he's enjoying himself while the other two look awfully serious and severe.
    • The various "Eevee-lutions" (Vaporeon in particular) are either loved because they're easy to get or hated because they're extremely powerful in comparison to other Pokémon which are much harder to obtain. Eevee itself counts too since some people love it for being a Breakout Character after multiple generations, or hate it because its spawn rate is too common for a supposedly rare Pokémon.
    • Heracross being exclusive to South America. Many players have mixed views regarding a popular Pokémon based on Japanese beetles but being exclusive to South America. Some people think South America is a good place to catch beetles, while others wished it could spawn globally like its counterparts Pinsir and Scyther/Scizor. Few people even pointed out that this region-exclusivity rule should be kept for Mega Heracross, not normal Heracross (given its Mega form being based on Hercules beetles which are native to South America).
  • Broken Base:
    • Many are happy to see Pokémon applied in real world via augmented reality. The fact that it's made by the same developer behind Ingress also helps, which many fans think that the game will ensure the same quality as the latter. On the other hand, there are fans that don't like it for being yet another spin-off game with cash grab potential, fear the microtransactions will be extremely obnoxious and act as a paywall restricting the players' freedom, and are apprehensive of it being a mobile game due to the industry's reputation as overly-casual and manipulative. Then it was revealed that while the game itself is free, the game's wrist peripheral will cost $34.
    • Pokémon evolve by catching members of the same evolutionary tree to earn "candies" from that line. Earn enough candy and you can evolve one of those you caught into its next stage. Some people are glad, because this simplifies evolution, while others think it's just tedious due to how many Pokémon must be caught for a single evolution (13 for an average 50 candy evolution, not counting other stages), which is compounded by how rare some of them are. Even with the addition of the Buddy system, getting candies for the rarer ones is still tedious, though you at least don't have to catch more. Adding Pinap Berries (which double candy drops, even during double-candy events) has improved this further.
    • The fact that the game encourages players to go outside and meet up in person. Some enjoy this because it encourages players to go out and make local friends and explore places they normally wouldn't, much like Ingress before it. Others worry that it will result in a surge of obnoxious players in places that don't like people just loitering around en masse. And there are those who worry that the game could be used to prey upon other players, or that real-world fistfights could break out over the game, something unlikely to happen in a traditional online game due to players generally being much further away from each other. Note that thievery was reported during the opening weekend of the game, specifically using the game to lure players and then rob them.
    • On a related point, the game requiring moving around in the real world means that the physically handicapped are at a disadvantage since they're not able to freely explore as well as able-bodied players can. Some feel that the game needs mobility-boosting features so that disabled players can get in on the action and the hype factor of the game, while others feel that such features could be potentially exploited by both able and disabled players alike and that there's always the canon Pokémon games on portable systems if one wants to play a game that doesn't rely on moving around. Not only that, but in real life, even if you are fully abled, gyms and stops can be miles away from you. Worse if there is a raid battle ongoing.
    • The game has become one of the most popular video games of all time, easily eclipsing the main series Pokémon games. Some fans are overjoyed that a Nintendo franchise, let alone Pokémon, is enjoying this level of success for the first time in decades. Others react with Hype Backlash and It's Popular, Now It Sucks!; in particular, fans of the main series games (especially newer generations) are disgruntled that a simplistic smartphone game that initially features only Generation I Pokémon (which may lead to the occasional "Genwunner" commment) is getting tons more public attention than the core games.
    • Unlike in the main series games, fully evolved starters (Venusaur, Charizard and Blastoise) are some of the hardest Pokémon to get, due to the amount of candy required to evolve them fully and the fact that even their basic forms are somewhat uncommon (apart from the one you get at the beginning of the game). Some people appreciate that this makes them more rewarding to obtain and that their popularity provides an incentive for players to keep grinding over several days/months, while others wish that they were as easy to obtain as they are in the main series games.
    • The 7/29/2016 (0.31.0) update, which strengthened many attacks but also weakened others, in particular Water Gun and Aqua Tail which effectively ended Vaporeon's reign of terror as one of the best Pokémon in the game. Many players are thrilled with the update, since it dials down some overpowered Pokémon while previously bad Pokémon have been made better, and overall balancing the game. Others are less than thrilled, not happy that their Vaporeon and Snorlax have had their claws trimmed, especially since many of these players have been investing in the now-outdated meta since the start. However, some aren't really upset about the changes, but moreso that Niantic made absolutely no public statement and went ahead and implemented the update with no warning.
    • Many players are outraged that the same 0.31.0 update "fixed" the "three-step tracker" Game-Breaking Bug by simply removing the tracker altogether, making it impossible to pinpoint the exact location of the Pokémon you want. The running joke is that Niantic invited 80 million people to play a game of Marco Polo, then removed the "Polo" part. For that matter, the replacement tracker. Some find it more intuitive than the footprint tracker, while others find it confusing and miss the old tracker.
    • Niantic's method for calculating a Pokémon's attack power has had polarizing results to say the least. It involves multiplying their Attack and Special Attack from the main games but only adding their Speed, meaning Fragile Speedster Pokémon suffer a significant reduction in their attack power. Jolteon, Starmie, Gengar, and Alakazam are a few examples of powerful battlers in the main games that are subpar in Go due to this formula. This is also why Electric-types, like Jolteon, are ranked relatively low, as their speed is meant to make up for their low bulk and raw strength. This video goes into detail about the flaws in this method. Thankfully, this was fixed with a balance update, making Jolteon, Gengar, and Alakazam some of the best attackers and giving them CP reflecting that.
    • One update of the game prevents rooted devices from accessing the game. Some people see this as a fair anti-cheating measure, while others (especially those who own rooted devices) are understandably upset. There are workarounds, but they need to be constantly updated, since the method employed by the game to detect rooted devices, Google SafetyNet, tends to catch up with the workarounds rather quickly.
    • The Buddy System has gotten this. It enables a player to assign a Pokémon as their travelling buddy, earning a candy or two every time they walk a certain distance together. On one side, you have players who are glad to have a way to earn candies for their Pokémon without having to be constantly catching many of the same ones or having to hunt down more of a particularly rare one (especially if you can't catch more of some Pokémon you can hatch from eggs because you live in certain areas and can't travel for various reasons). On the other side, you have players disappointed over the fact that it takes a significant amount of walking to earn large amounts of candy, and the rarer Pokémon require longer distances for each candy (up to 5 km), making the system Awesome, but Impractical for high-tier evolutions (Dragonite takes 500 km of walking to evolve from a Dragonair, assuming you have no candies and never catch any more from that line).
    • An update made it so players would not see any Pokémon at all if they were travelling at over at least 30 miles per hour in an effort to further prevent people from playing the game while driving. While some players have welcomed this change as it would keep players safe and prevent Niantic from being sued by an injured player, other players who until now spent most of their time (if not all of their time) playing the game while being a passenger in a car (and not the driver) or public tranportation like trams have rejected this change as it essentially locks them out of the game until they have a chance to play Go outside a vehicle. This only got worse after Niantic applied the same restrictions to spinning Pokéstops, making the entire game unplayable from a moving vehicle.
    • An update revised the training mechanics, allowing players to use a full team of six Pokémon to train at a gym and scaling the existing Pokémon to the player's level. While initially welcomed due to the ability to allow newer players to be able to earn defender bonuses through gym spots and raise gym prestige rapidly, the latter feature made leveling and staffing a gym with ten Pokémon extremely easy, eliminating the benefit for newer players. To counter this, prestige mechanics were adjusted, increasing prestige penalties and reducing prestige gains to quell the problem, essentially creating the same problem as before the update with slightly different conditions.
    • The Gen II update added Blissey, considered one of the most annoying Pokémon to deal with due to her status as a Stone Wall. Combined with a slowdown of the gym battle, this makes dislodging her from a gym extremely difficult, as she can outlast nearly any attacker.
    • Go on Reddit, and you'll sure enough find a lot of people talking about how they feel the game punishes rural and suburban players — and sure enough, expect at least one or two response from someone talking about how "removed" from the target demographic they are or how the whole point of the game is to "Go out and explore the real world". Then expect responses from people pointing out how in places like New York City or Toronto, you can technically walk outside of your hometown in ten minutes and how many people simply do not have the option to walk out of their town on a whim, since "Walking out of their town" will mean "Spending several hours on foot". Or point out how no other game flat out punishes you for living where you do with an inferior version.
    • The "Adventure Week" event (a Rock-type and specifically fossil based event) that ran from May 18th to May 25th in 2017. While quite a lot of players were happy that spawn rates for certain Rock-types (specifically all of the fossil Pokemon, Larvitar, Magcargo, Onix and Sudowoodo) were heightened and became more frequent during the event, others felt disappointed that many of them, specifically Aerodactyl and Larvitar were not heightened as significantly as advertised by Niantic. The latter is especially bad regarding Aerodactyl, as it was essentially the poster mon for the event, appearing in all the advertisements and presented as a significantly increased spawn, and yet reportedly was still one of the rarest spawns in the game even during the event, with a good portion of the player base complaining that they never encountered one for it.
    • Likewise for the Valentine's Day 2018 event and Chansey. Despite big hype and an increased spawn rate, she was still exceptionally rare. Especially since you would need to catch 13 of them for the chance to evolve it into Blissey.
    • April Fools' 2018 brought a minor controversy related to the game's switch to Retraux Pokémon sprites for a week. While pretty much everyone liked the joke, there was a bit of controversy between people who preferred the normal sprites and people who actually liked the pixel sprites better, owing both to nostalgia and to their larger size making them more clear on the nearby radar.
    • The Ultra Bonus Event that kicked off in the second half of September. It was heavily promoted for enabling players to hatch regional exclusives from 7km eggs. While many players rejoiced for finally getting opportunities to score Farfetch'd, Mr. Mime, Tauros, and Kangaskhan, as well as finish up on catching some Kanto 'mons and Mewtwo becoming a normal Raid boss, fans seeking the regionals would soon discover that the 7km eggs only would have a 12.5% of hatching into a random regional, with the remaining 87.5% being filled with Alolan Pokémon that players likely hatched in great numbers prior to the event.
  • Catharsis Factor: Taking out enemy gyms and defending friendly ones. The actual rewards for doing this are quite modest, but it's nonetheless a powerful feeling being able to exert one's dominance in a given area.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • Go to the closest Gym. There is about a 95% chance that it will have one of the Eeveelutions at it, particularly Vaporeon and Flareon. This is due to the fact that they are much easier to get then other usable mons and have quite high CP.note  The 0.31.0 alleviated this somewhat by Nerfing the Eeveelutions to a degree (especially the formerly dominant Vaporeon), but their power and ease of access still makes them popular choices. Another balance update is likely to make the problem worse, as Vaporeon is now the fifth best in terms of obtainable Pokémon, actually edging out two legendaries (Articuno and Mew), though it's now weaker than Gyarados.
      • As of May 2019, Glaceon is now a commonplace in gyms as it now displaced Vaporeon and Flareon as the most-useful Eeveelution in meta, due to considerable Attack and Defense as well as its Ice-type being a considerable threat to many overused Dragon-types.
    • Also expect to see Lapras, Snorlax and Dragonite, especially as Gym Leaders, as these are the most durable powerhouses that can be obtained in the game whose CP can easily be pushed into the 2000s at levels where most others max out around 1700-1800.
    • At the lower side of the CP spectrum, you can expect a lot of Pidgeot, Raticate, Beedrill, Fearow, Furret, Ledian, Ariados, Noctowl, Xatu, Linoone, Mightyena and even Altaria as novice trainers are sure to have made use of the influx of Com Mons candies they've accumulated. They aren't necessarily bad Pokémon to defend a Gym with; Pidgeot has decent CP for being a three-stage evolution, and Crobat can be surprisingly defensive, even against its weaknesses, and Altaria has considerable bulk if not the Psuedo-Legendary levels.
    • Exeggutor is also a common sight at gyms, thanks to having surprisingly high CP, a wide range of moves, and being a reliable counter to Water-types like Vaporeon.
    • As of the Gen II update, Blissey. Blissey is a Badass Adorable Stone Wall that wins not by overpowering her opponent but by outlasting them. Her HP is such that she can simply tank attacks until the battle timer runs out, leaving attackers with a weakened Pokémon and nothing to show for her. Her CP is on par with Vaporeon, making her very difficult to dislodge with brute force. Naturally, people will always drop a Blissey into a gym and smile when she almost never gets pushed out. The Nerf to gyms thankfully addressed this issue by only allowing one Blissey in a gym at once and gradually reducing her CP as time passes and she partakes in battles. What also makes her difficult to remove is her most common moveset, which consists of Zen Headbutt and Dazzling Gleam. These two moves outright counter Fighting-types and can quickly eliminate one of the game's most recommended picks for battling Blissey (Gengar). Thankfully, the latest update severely nerfed it and it can be taken care of by the majority of Pokemon, although a Machamp being hit in the face by a Dazzling Gleam still hurts a lot.
    • On the offensive side players have a habit of building up Golem, Rhydon, and Machamp, all of which have utility against several of the more frustrating gym defenders (Rhydon and Machamp in particular are two of the best choices for taking down the aforementioned Blissey, due to access to Fighting moves and high offensive stats).
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • When it comes to catching wild Pokémon, attempting to catch the evolved forms of Com Mons is a massive Difficulty Spike compared to catching their pre-evolved forms, as they commonly show up with high triple and sometimes quadruple-digit CP levels, giving them extremely low capture rates.
    • When it comes to Com Mons, Murkrow is the hardest to acquire since it typically spawns with a very high CP and has a pathetic catch rate of 30 (compared to the 255 of most other com-mons and rival Johto bird Natu's 190). Once you unlock Great and Ultra Balls, they'll be downright required to catch the crow if you don't have type bonuses for Dark and Flying-types and save up candies for the eventual introduction of Honchkrow in Generation IV.
    • Fellow Johto mon Aipom, while not as common as Murkrow, also spawns with high CP and has a catch rate only a few points higher than Murkrow's: 45.
    • As mentioned in Complacent Gaming Syndrome above, the Eeveelutions are quite commonplace in gyms, although the most annoying of these to deal with is probably Vaporeon. Vaporeon has higher defense than Flareon and Jolteon but no drawback in damage or HP, and its special attacks (Aqua Tail or Hydro Pump) really hurt. There are no commonly-obtainable Grass or Electric types inherently stronger than it (barring Zapdos and Raikou, which were only obtainable for a limited period), making it hard to knock out even if you have a type advantage. And since Eevees are easy to evolve and Vaporeon has high CP, it's not uncommon to find one in nearly any Gym. All this put together means that a powerful Vaporeon can be evolved with minimal cost to the player while a decent counter will usually require a significant investment into a Pokémon that can never be as good. A nerf mercifully toned Vaporeon's normal attacks down, but Vaporeon's ease of access still makes it one of the most common gym defenders.
    • The addition of Blissey in the Gen 2 update meant the introduction of a Stone Wall that can be nearly impossible to force out of a gym. Her high health, the limited timer, and the revamp of the battle system slowing everything down means that Blissey is likely to survive anything you can throw at her, timing out the battle and scoring an automatic win for herself. The only saving grace is that Blissey is a lot harder to earn than Vaporeon, but the Valentine's Day event just prior to the update made sure to give players a chance to get their hands on one.
    • As of May 2019, due to the new sets of Lure Modules being added, expect anyone to have a Glaceon used in Gyms, as a Gym Defender or an Attacker. Due to Glaceon's considerably high CP and Defense stats, it has surpassed Vaporeon as the most-used Pokémon, due to Mamoswine (the most-powerful Ice-type Pokémon) being harder to obtain in contrast to Glaceon.
  • Discredited Meme: For the first month or so, the vast majority of PoGo-related humor revolved around Professor Willow grinding up transferred Pokémon to make candies. After every gaming webcomic in existence had its turn on the bandwagon, most players finally grew bored of this joke, and redirected their sadistic streak towards Niantic.
  • Fake Longevity: The Celebi questline has a slew of this. One of the early objectives has you catch at least one Pokémon 3 days in a row. This essentially consists of waiting for 3 days, opening up the game at least once each day to catch a 'mon. In another objective you have to walk 10 km with an Eevee as your buddy, in order to evolve it into an Espeon. Not too bad, but then you have to do it again but for an Umbreon. One late objective takes the cake, though: spin a Pokéstop every day for 7 days.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • Some Ingress fans aren't terribly fond of Go due to it having a much bigger and louder fanbase; their large numbers at Ingress hotspots (due to Go piggybacking on a lot of Ingress infrastructure) doesn't help. This has led to concerns that various properties will ban the use of all location-based games, even for the Silent Majority. The rivalry is mostly one-way, as most Go players don't even know what Ingress is.
    • There is also a large fandom rivalry with the core series Pokémon games, especially with the fans of Gens 3-7 note . The fans of the core games tend to dislike the game for removing elements of the core series games, being largely limited to Gen 1-2 Pokémon (frequently seen as a Spotlight-Stealing Squad by the fanbase), and for largely gaining its success via 90s nostalgia (in fact, on debates surrounding the game, it is not uncommon to see core series fans teaming up with people who don't like Pokémon in general in criticizing the game). The Go fans tend to state that there is a bias behind these arguments, point out the exercise and massive popularity and cultural impact that the game has led to, or praise Gen 1 over the main games. This died down once Hoenn Pokémon began being added to the game as promised (which revived the "Hoenn Confirmed" meme), thus confirming that the game wouldn't just be a "Genwunner" thing.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • Given that "Pokémon in the real world" was already a common fanfic plot, it's unsurprising that the floodgates have opened in the wake of Go formally adopting the concept... albeit with its own Plot Holes, which leads to people wondering exactly how Pokémon started appearing in real life.
    • And of course, fans writing stories chronicling their real life Pokémon training.
    • Stories about the three team leaders and their connections to each other are also common.
  • Fanon: Shares one with the rest of the franchise.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Immediately after the team leader designs have been revealed, there were already fans shipping Candela and Blanche.
    • As for Spark, the Twitter fandom shows him to be paired off with the male Trainer.
    • If the female Trainer is going to be paired up with any of the team leaders, it's more often than not Candela.
    • Professor Willow is usually paired up with either Spark or the Trainers.
  • Foe Yay Shipping: Unsurprisingly, the three team leaders are often shipped with each other. Downplayed, in that the leaders aren't necessarily enemies so much as rivals. Bonus points if they are expies of Mystery Dungeon teams.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • There's something of a mentor-student relationship between players of this game and Ingress, with players of the latter getting Go players new to Niantic's games up to speed with the basics such as how to find in-game locations and advising them to purchase external battery packs due to the exceptionally high rate at which Go depletes batteries. The other way around also applies: There are Go players who join Ingress, and in fact shortly after Go's launch there was an influx of new Ingress players.
    • Within the game: Teams Valor and Mystic both seem to be on better terms with Team Instinct than with each other. This is likely because Instinct is the smallest team by far, and thus seen as less of a threat.
    • Ingress Enlightened players who join Team Instinct and Valor tend to team up against Team Mystic, due to Mystic sharing the same team color as the Resistance.
    • Within Pokémon fandom, it is unsurprising to see a few Go players who are also part of Mystery Dungeon fanbase, since the elements of Go are similar to the certain elements of PMD games, especially the teams.
  • Game-Breaker:
    • The Gifts system, hands down. As long as you're friends with multiple people that play every day and amass enough gifts from Poké Stops to send them to you on a daily basis (provided you do the same), your pockets can be filled quickly with extremely powerful items (provided you're at Level 20 and above) that are much rarer than finding them at a Poké Stop, including Ultra Balls, Pinap Berries, Max Potions, and Max Revives. Even the Cap of 20 gifts each day won't stop you from obtaining a plethora of useful items.
    • Golden Razz berries, which fully restores a defender's motivation in a gym, can easily be abused. Someone attacking your gym? Simply feed a defender one of these once its motivation is close to zero. It's also unaffected by the distance penalties for remote feeding. Sure, there's a limit on how many berries you can feed, but since one has to battle a defender about 4-5 times before its motivation is depleted, any sane attacker would most likely give up after having their hard work repeatedly nullified.
  • Genius Bonus: A variation for Halloween event. For some people, especially those with environmental knowledge, the abundance of Gastly line during this period can reflect how polluted the real-life cities and suburbs have.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: This game is TREMENDOUSLY HUGE in Mexico, to the point where hundreds of thousands of Mexicans flocked to Mexico City just to play Pokémon Go.
  • Goddamn Bats:
    • Zubat is just as annoying as it is in the main games, but for different reasons. When the game first launched, it was a Com Mon, but unlike more common monsters such as Pidgey and Ratatta, the number of candies required to evolve it into Golbat was 50 (changed to 25 when Crobat was introduced). As one of the flying Pokémon, it's harder to catch because it starts off further away and moves around constantly, which makes landing Great/Excellent throws harder. Most other fliers in the game are at least evolved forms that justify being harder to hit. Zubat essentially has all of the drawbacks of being common with none of the benefits (though, as noted in Complacent Gaming Syndrome, it's still decent as Crobat). Thankfully, Niantic toned down their spawn rate over time, though they also bumped it back up for the Halloween events.
    • Murkrow. Despite being easy to locate, their catch rates are abysmal compared to other common Pokémon. Aipom suffer the same fate.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • One of the crashing issues can occur during the "will it stay in" part of catching a Pokémon. That said, it can lead to guaranteed captures if the RNG is on your side. The game now can recover from this bug and jump straight to success or failure to catch without waiting for the ball to wobble.
    • Sometimes the server will not immediately recognize a change in the game for a minute or two, such as what happens when players try using the Eevee Nickname Easter Egg and it fails since the server did not register the new name yet. However, this also can be used to a player's advantage, as rarely the game won't recognize a gym has been lost to another Team and you may still have a small window to claim it for rewards.
    • The app's ability to judge where and how far you've walked is pretty spotty. Negatively, it may not record your distance properly and cheat you out of the effort. Positively, you can set the phone down and it will record distance despite never moving.
    • Grimer has a notorious habit of crashing the game. Whether you bring up its Pokédex entry, see it in a gym, or sometimes its silhouette in the sightings, the game will freeze. However this can be used to your advantage, as putting a Grimer in your gym will cause a lot of other players who came to challenge you to crash.
    • The notorious EX Raid mechanic seem to be pretty sloppily programmed, resulting in quite a few bugs in the distribution of passes (which come in waves). Two waves were particularly weird:
      • The February 10/11 raids didn't have any criteria at all for selection, resulting in invitations to gyms merely visited at least once, many of which are located abroad for some people, or even overseas.
      • The March 9/10 raids seemed pretty normal, aside from the invitations coming two weeks in advance. Come March 8, and a new wave of invitations were sent out, also for March 10. Many players were invited for both. Unfortunately for some, both raids they were invited to were scheduled at the exact same time, meaning they had to choose one or the other, or, if the gyms were sufficiently close to each other, run to the next after completing the first raid.
      • It should also be noted that the EX-Raids are intended to be applicable to all legendaries starting from Articuno and Lugia. Thanks to the 2017 GoFest fail, this was changed to them being in normal raids thankfully.
    • A truly bizarre but awesome one happened after the September 2018 Community Day. After the event ended, something caused every Pokémon for the next half hour to appear as Meltan, and become a Ditto upon capture. Cue players who were about to go home from their three-hour hunt going in for Ditto hunting as a Bonus Level.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • When the game was released there were (and still are) many jokes about people being distracted while playing the game, making them easy crime targets... then the incident in Missouri happened where a group of armed muggers used the game to lure players in.
    • There is a time and place for everything. This quote from Professor Oak about not simply riding your bicycle just about anywhere inappropriate has become eerily prophetic and fitting, as some players have been reported to exhibit a worrying amount of carelessness in playing while traveling, or worse, while driving.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • This is not the first time that Pokémon can be caught in the real world. On April Fools' Day in 2014, Google announced that Pokémon had taken up residence in Google Maps and challenged users to go catch 'em all using their map app. Their promotional video is almost prophetic frame by frame. Even better is that the one of the developers, Niantic Labs, started off from Google before becoming independent. It was later revealed in a Famitsu interview with Niantic Labs that they actually got the idea from that April Fool's joke.
    • Capture Pokémon in the real world? So what you're telling me is we all live in a Pokémon World?
    • In the competitive circle, Zapdos is the most popular Pokémon of choice among the three legendary birds. Here, Team Instict, who is represented by Zapdos, is the least popular of the three.
    • Spark being compared to Owain/Odin became very appropriate after Kaiji Tang, the voice actor for those characters, mentioned that he wouldn't mind doing voice work for Spark (even though he's a Team Valor player). Even funnier, he did eventually get the role of an electric-type in the Pokémon universe: Detective Pikachu!
    • The very fact that the characters are designed by Yusuke Kozaki and that the team leaders bear some resemblance to Fire Emblem charactersnote  is somewhat funny, since Pokémon and Fire Emblem have crossed over already and Fire Emblem Fates has been compared to a Pokémon dual-release. To a lesser extent, the Pokémon GO characters resembling No More Heroes assassins note  would invoke some jokes, since both GO and NMH characters are designed by the aforementioned Yusuke Kozaki, and the first NMH game has an Easter Egg referencing the 2nd-generation main series games. Also, Pokémon GO was released in USA first before arriving in Japan, just like what No More Heroes 2: Desperate Struggle did. With always-customizable Pokémon nicknames, the team leaders are also prone to an Appraisal of Cluster F-Bomb similar to NMH, resulting in Funny Moments.
    Hello, Player, I am available to analyze your motherfucker, if you wish.
    Overall, your motherfucker is a wonder! What a breathtaking Pokemon!
    The size of your motherfucker is... colossal. This is indeed exceptional. Fascinating!
  • Hype Backlash:
    • This game is hyped so much that many people not interested in Pokémon end up getting tired of it and more likely getting into shouting matches against Pokémon fans just because of a mobile game. It got even worse when an early preview of the game was revealed.
    • The actual release has been fraught with server issues (leading to the infamous "Our servers are experiencing issues" screen) and the app repeatedly crashing for many users.
    • A somewhat more justifiable example — the game is designed mostly around people who live in big cities. For the millions of people who don't? The game is a much less enjoyable experience marred by blank screens with not a single PokéStop to be found for miles and the only Pokémon who appear are the same Com Mons.
    • In November, a leaked Starbucks email revealed plans for "new Pokémon" coming with a promotion on Dec 7th. Hype grew even further with John Hanke promising an announcement on December 12th. Many fans were expecting this to mean the second generation of Pokémon would be coming that day. This was all but confirmed with data mining revealing 100 new Pokémon. Then the announcement came, and the "new Pokémon" were a handful of baby Pokémon that can only be found by hatching eggs. The announcement did suggest the rest of Gen 2 would roll out over the next few months, but fans are tired of waiting.
    • The surge of popularity around the game's launch had Ingress players concerned that the loud playerbase of Go could potentially result in the banning of all location-based games for all players.
    • For the one year anniversary, players expected a huge event, and got only a purchasable box full of items and another hat Pikachu (this time based on the anime). Reaction to this has been wildly negative. The second year anniversary's box was similarly panned, but ongoing events involving Articuno raids, and Shiny Roselia caused it to be forgotten quickly.
    • The 2017 Pokémon GO Fest in Chicago was hyped up for weeks over the possibilities of Legendary Pokémon and region-exclusives appearing. The event turned out to be a failure due to the game itself being completely unplayable because of internet traffic congestion, with crowds booing Niantic, and there have even been unconfirmed reports of violence. Niantic quickly apologized, refunded everyone present and gave them $100 in PokeCoins, and allowed them to obtain Lugia for free while new events around the world were activated and extended by 72 hours, along with Lugia and Articuno becoming catchable in raids. Niantic would learn from their mistakes by the 2018 GO Fest, which proved to be a success, as did the 2019 GO Fest.
    • Research Day was introduced in January 2019, with the first featured Pokémon being Feebas. The first event was panned for its difficult quests (which included egg hatching and making up to 15 Great Throws), only available for three hours, and having Shiny Feebas be very rare. Failing to help matters was very bad timing as far as the weather went; several places were experiencing extreme weather weather conditions (portions of North America went through a blizzard, and Australia had its worst Heat Wave since 2011), so numerous players were unable to go out and take part in the event in the first place. The Clamperl Research Day in February fixed some of the issues by adding in easier quests, but it remaining a three hour event and continued poor weather (especially in Australia) didn't help much. Fortunately, the Lotad Research Day in March lasted for nine hours, though by that point, the negative reception caused Niantic to scrap Research Days permanently.
    • When the Generation 4 release is announced via the Game Master file, lots of people are shocked about how shockingly bad the new Pokemon's movesets are. Notable examples include Honchkrow not getting Foul Play but getting the inferior Dark Pulse and Brave Bird instead of Sky Attack, note  Roserade getting Solar Beam as its sole grass charged despite it was completely unfitting of its frailty, Magmortar and Heatran not getting Overheat or Flamethrower as its charged move, note  Hippowdon and Gallade getting literally no worthwhile moves at allnote  note , Dialga and Palkia getting Draco Meteor, note  and last but not least, both of Giratina's formes getting Shadow Sneak as its sole ghost charged movenote 
      • Thankfully, some of these are averted in some way or another, such as Honchkrow getting Sky Attack, Roserade getting Grass Knotnote  and Giratina's Origin forme getting much more viable moves via a full moveset revamp, making it among one of the strongest Ghost types in the game.
    • The "Legendary Lunch Hour" experiment of March 13th, 2019 had a novel concept; in the middle of the day, all gyms would have a Legendary Pokémon raid going on at them, so people at work could go get a raid in during their lunch breaks. However, the event ended up a failure because the time window of only one hour (12pm to 1pm local time) ended up being far too small for most people. Because of this, most raids went unchallenged because people either didn't have time to find a raid after finishing lunch and had to go straight back to work or they didn't want to waste their lunch break time trying to find a raid with a bunch of people around it. Later raid hours were moved to around the Dinner hour.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks!: This game has gotten flak for being as wildly popular as it is, both from people outside the fandom and hardcore Pokémon fans. From the non-fan side, people dislike it because it's a spin-off of a "kiddy" game that has managed to be extremely popular or because people see the game as an excuse to be reckless and/or disruptive, especially in more sensitive types of locations such as cemeteries and memorials. As for the hardcore fans, they dislike it because of the significant Newbie Boom, with many fans considering people who only have played Go to be playing it just because it's trending.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: Some of the features of this game (like multiple factions to join and bases that spawn at landmarks to capture and defend) have led people to accuse if of being too similar to Ingress. Also counts as They Changed It, Now It Sucks! because most were expecting it to be more like the main games.
  • Junk Rare:
    • Prior to an update, Eevee was part of the 10km egg group, the rarest type of egg to find at Pokéstops and the longest amount of distance to hatch. All of the other Pokémon in that category are pretty rare in the wild, but Eevee is a reasonably common Pokémon in most places, certainly not so rare as to justify such a placement. The only upside is that egg-hatched Pokémon start out with higher CP than those caught in the wild and hatching comes with a decent amount of candy and stardust, usually enough to evolve Eevee on the spot, so it's not a total waste. Eevee has since been downgraded to the to the more common 5km egg group.
    • If you live in Toronto, the UK or Sweden, Drowzee becomes this. It's a pretty disappointing outcome when you get one from hatching a 5.0 km egg, since you're more than likely to come across more than ten when walking that distance. The Halloween event, which makes Drowzee even more common, is likely to introduce many a head to a desk.
    • Unown is one of the least likely, if not the least likely Pokémon to spawn outside of specific events. But just like in the main series, its stats and moves are terrible. Collecting the various forms gives you a medal, but like most medals it doesn't grant anything to the player.
    • As with the main games, a shiny version of a weaker Pokémon falls under this. Just like in other games in the franchise, there's only a roughly one-in-8,000 chance of finding one (higher during certain events). However, its coloration has nothing to do with how effective it'll be. This is particularly true for anything that's an uncommon spawn - finding a shiny Luvdisc has odds on par with hitting the lottery, but about the only thing it's useful for is pure bragging rights. Either that, meatshielding, which is the process of stuffing a gym full of Com Mons in the hope that the grind will ward enemies off, or recon on an ally Gym to see what kind of players live in your area and how to prepare when you get back.
    • During the month of November 2018, after making Suicune the Research Breakthrough reward for October, came Shedinja, an overall poor fighter and defender outclassed by many other Pokémon. This choice was done as Shedinja cannot be obtained through its normal method of evolving a Nincada into Ninjask, which would create a Shedinja afterwards.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • Why is Pokémon Go so popular? There isn't a battle system like the main games, no story and it only has monsters from the first generation. However, the idea of catching these familiar monsters in real life is a big enough draw.
    • There's people who join just for the in-person camaraderie that the game attracts.
  • LGBT Fanbase:
    • The transgender community really took to the fact that instead of asking the age old question of "Are you a Boy or a Girl?" like the professors do in the main games, Prof. Willow instead asks you to pick your "Adventuring Style" when selecting the gender of your trainer avatar.
    • When the Team Leader designs were revealed, many were drawn to Team Mystic's Blanche for having a very androgynous design.
    • Speaking of the Leaders, the fans have decided they like the idea of Blanche and Candela hooking up, as well as Spark and the default male player character. Really, the fact the Leaders, player characters, and even Prof. Willow are all quite athletic and good looking is a real draw for the gay crowd.
  • Memetic Loser: While all three teams get some heat from one another, Team Instinct (and, by extension, its leader Spark) is the most-often mocked as the weakest and dumbest. Though, Valor and Mystic really are not that far behind on this department, depending on their strength in your area.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Shortly after the announcement, people have suggested hypothetical dialogues of players breaking into places they shouldn't be in an attempt to get Pokémon. Like so.note  And then this is pretty much exactly what happened upon release and drawing attention to all the wacky predictions being right has become a meme in and of itself.
    • Jokes about how Nintendo will abuse Pokémon Go by timing rare, shiny, and legendary spawns to disrupt E3, Tokyo Game Show, and PAX, are already making the rounds, which has ocassionally mutated further into gags like Nintendo stealing the hype from Half-Life 3's announcement at E3 by deploying shiny Jirachi spawns, or breaking up the announcement of the PS Vita's successor by spawning Mew outside the Sony Conference.
    • There are also many jokes about Pokémon spawning in private places like bedrooms, especially ones like Mr. Mime or Hypno.
    • Now everyone can be real Pokémon trainers and stand in one place waiting for other trainers to pass them.
    • There are many jokes about how Arceusnote  will be found at the Vatican. Some take it even further and suggest that in order to catch him, you will have to defeat the Pope in a Pokémon battle. Related to that, once the game came out it was found that a number of PokéStops and Gyms are located at churches.
    • Once the game released, people started sharing pictures of Pokémon they encountered in odd places. Recurring themes include Pokémon found in the bathroom and silly Magikarp pics. Exeggcute is also a favorite subject for similar reasons as Magikarp (finding one in a kitchen, or on a frying pan).
    • "Who is Pokémon Go's Professor Willow and why is he such a daddy?" and other assorted "praises" for the new Professor.
    • Canada is not part of North America. explanation 
    • "The Authentic Pokémon GO Experience in ____" followed by an empty screen.explanation 
    • Picking a team is Serious Business for the internet. It only took a couple days before memes were flying around left and right about how one team is better than the other two. Doesn't matter if you're on Team Valor, Mystic, or Instinct, you'll find plenty of memes bashing all three. Instinct tends to get treated as a Butt-Monkey out of the three, Valor is full of challenge-seeking, power-hungry mad-men with no manners, and Mystic are full of smartasses.
    • Jokes about "[insert some other popular game] Go" and just what that would entail, Neko Atsume, Digimon, and Dark Souls being popular choices.
    • Posting pictures of real animals and complimenting the graphics.
    • The fact that the team colors are also colors of major gangs — Blue (Mystic) for Crips, Red (Valor) for Bloods, and Yellow (Instinct) for Latin Kings.
    • Drowzee City.explanation 
    • As soon as Team Instinct's leader Spark was revealed, comparisons to Owain/Odin were immediately made. The fact that Yusuke Kozaki is the character designer on both games does not help.
    • Minor text fixes. explanation  Niantic actually acknowledges this in an update, saying "No text fixes".
    • GOLD TEAM RULES! explanation 
    • The Team Instinct Dab Salute!Explanation 
    • r Explanation 
    • I PLAY POKéMON GO EVERYDAY, I PLAY POKéMON GO!Explanation 
      My preference in the mobile video gaming market is of the mobile video game titled "Pokémon GO", of which I perform with routinely.Explanation 
    • Spark going missing from the game/"Candela killed Spark".Explanation 
    • Even before a major Generation 3 update on December, there were tons of Mudkip memes throwing into the GO fanbase, along with the revived "Hoenn Confirmed" slapped to a lesser extent. Come this update, some people hilariously nicknamed their Mudkip when walking as their Buddy Pokémon. Like so:
    So I herd u found a Candy!
    • Also before 2017 Halloween event, the revived "Hoenn Confirmed" meme was also slapped in amongst the rumors.
    • Groupon Explanation 
    • Jokes about how Professor Willow looks like Rick Sanchez also surfaced when the game initially released.
    • Whenever an announcement regarding the game is made over Twitter, an iCarly Troll account keeps demanding some sort of crossover with iCarly.
  • Memetic Psychopath: Just what does Professor Willow do to the excess Pokémon that you give him? Many unsettling ideas have come forth, ranging from experimenting on them, to processing them into candy or building a Pokémon army for world conquest. Some fans Take a Third Option and have Willow selling Pokémon to buyers or something else.
  • Mis-blamed:
    • Many problems with the game are attributed to Nintendo themselves, and the game is seen by many as a Japanese product, with players remarking that the game seems to have been designed for Japanese players where neighborhoods are generally safer. In reality, the actual developer, Niantic, is a U.S.-based company with experience with another ARG, and in fact the idea of a Pokémon ARG can be partially credited to them. This actually caused some financial trouble for Nintendo; they had to point out that not only did they not make the game, but that they only have a fraction of the stake in The Pokémon Company, and lost a lot of market value as a result.
    • And even amongst those who are aware that the game is a Niantic effort, some players, particularly those who have played Ingress, think they're still affiliated with Google, and as such point the blame at Google when things go wrong. Niantic actually went separate from Google in October 2015, well before Go's release.
    • The "Koffing at the National Holocaust Museum" incident is often blamed on Nintendo and Niantic, when in fact the generation of Pokémon is largely randomized; it simply happened to be a very bad coincidence. Also, quite a few people took issue with the person who took the picture saying they were offended, given that they had the enormous bad taste to be playing the game at the museum in the first place.
    • A thing that players like to blame on Niantic are ugly shinies, such as dirt green Dragonite and shinies that are just those of deeper or brighter coloration such as Garchomp, Gengar and Leafeon. In reality, Niantic has no decision on the Shiny colors; Nintendo (Or Game Freak) decides them.
  • More Popular Spinoff: While not necessarily more acclaimed by the core Pokémon fanbase, Pokémon GO's nature as an immersive freemium smartphone game that uses familiar characters has made it one of the most popular games period, with success more comparable to Candy Crush Saga and Grand Theft Auto V than modern main series Pokémon games. However, this could also be considered subverted, after estimates revealed that the main series games were in fact becoming more popular than ever due to Go's influence, to the point that Pokémon Sun and Moon became Nintendo's most pre-ordered games of all time.
  • Most Annoying Sound: Players who choose to play the game at max volume in public, especially if they are doing so while in a large group of people such as on a bus or train.
  • Most Wonderful Sound: The third shake of a Poké Ball, since a Pokémon is only able to break out after the first or second shake. If you heard that third shake, the Pokémon is yours!
  • Never Live It Down:
    • A few overzealous fans have caused the whole base to be smeared as a bunch of Too Dumb to Live lemmings who'll mindlessly walk into traffic or over cliffs if it'll get them a better shot.
    • Team Instinct was, by far, the least popular team when the game launched. They've since caught up considerably, but fans still treat them as the Butt-Monkey of the three teams.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Many of the game's innovative aspects are nothing new to anyone who's played Ingress. In fact, nearly all the Pokéstops and Gyms are recycled Ingress portals; hence churches typically having a Pokéstop or gym.
    • Though Eeveelutions don't appear in the wild in the main games, Pokémon Mystery Dungeon has the wild Eeveelutions available for the protagonist teams to recruit, though whether that counts as catching or not is up to debate.
    • Catching Pokémon without battling it first, and just throwing Poke Balls and berries until it's either caught or runs away is nearly identical to the Safari Zone mechanics of the older Pokémon games.note 
    • This isn't the first Mons game to use geolocation to determine which ones appear, Geomon did it first.
  • One True Pairing: Mere hours after their full reveals, Candela and Blanche became the subjects of a massive wave of fanart shipping them together. The fact that their respective teams have the most pronounced rivalry of the trio only seems to be adding fuel to the fire.
  • One True Threesome: It's extremely popular to pair all the team leaders together.
  • Paranoia Fuel:
    • Players can feel the need to check their game constantly, just in case a rare Pokémon may have wandered into their proximity that wasn't there when they checked two minutes ago.
    • Is your team in control of a nearby Gym? Let's hope that person who's walking by you with their phone out isn't playing for an enemy team.
    • The game requires full access to your Google account should you use that to sign into the game, meaning that the game can do anything its wants to anything under your Google account. To compare, Ingress only requires reading basic Google account information (email address, anything on your public Google profile) to sign in. (As it turns out, this was just a mistake on Niantic's part, and an update was released less than 24 hours after they were notified which fixes this.)
    • If you've heard the stories about criminals using Pokémon Go to lure players into their demise via PokéStop, chances are seeing a Lure being used at a PokéStop at 1:00 AM can be this. Especially if said PokéStop is off the beaten path.
    • This can affect non-players as well, but random strangers looking over your shoulder and trying to peek at your phone screen to see if you're playing the game like they are. Very annoying if you're not playing the game and doing something private on your phone (texting, looking up confidential information, etc.).
    • The 7/20/17 update featured a glitch that replaced Team Instinct's leader, Spark's, artwork with the artwork from team Valor's leader, Candela. There's no indication of this glitch happening for Instinct members, they could just check on the stats on their Pokémon and Candela shows up suddenly talking just like Spark. With Team Valor's reputation for being power-driven and hot-blooded, one could be worried that Candela secretly kidnapped poor Spark and just casually replaced his role, in an attempt to merge the underrepresented Instinct to her own team.
    • Later community days also have exclusive moves, which more often than not makes Pokémon complete upgrades over themselves. For example, Metagross hits like a wet noodle because it has bad charged moves, but with the Community Day Meteor Mash, it is among one of the best Pokémon in the game. To make things worse, the moves are exclusive and there is usually no chance for you to get the move if you missed it, or even worse..accidentally TM it, crippling your Pokémon forever. This makes lots of people avoid evolving their high IV Pokémon before community days in the fear of having their Pokémon obsolete, and for a good reason.
    • An odd example involving non-players. With the game largely forgotten, it's no longer on most peoples' radars. Despite this, there remain devotees who continue to play, including adults. However, especially in rural or suburban areas, seeing solitary adult men repeatedly hanging around the same random spot can make many people assume they're casing a robbery or, worse, a potential kidnapper and/or sex offender.
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: The popular pairing of Spark/Male Trainer has been christened "GoSpark" by the Twitter fandom, using the Fan Nickname of "Go-kun" for the name of the MT.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Pidgey, Rattata, and Weedle: annoyingly Com Mon Pokémon who you have probably caught a crazy amount of. Good for power leveling with a Lucky Egg. Terrible for anything else. And with Mega Evolutions six generations down the line, their evolved forms aren't much better. Making matters worse is that they have higher flee rates (20%) compared to rarer Pokémon, making them likely to cause further frustration.
    • Zubats also count, especially since they're hard to capture and evolve into the somewhat mediocre Golbat. The Gen 2 update alleviates this somewhat with the addition of Crobat, which is respectably strong, and allowed Zubats to evolve with just 25, making them more reliable for power leveling.
    • As of Generation II, Murkrow. Depending on where you are, Murkrow can spawn everywhere and can be considered a devil in terms of capture rate. Some players wasted more than 10 balls to catch one. Murkrow itself is rather substandard compared to even fully evolved Com Mons, and even though it can now evolve to Honchkrow, doing so is a costly endeavor requiring a Sinnoh Stone, compared to the cheaper evolution requirements of other Com Mons that can be spammed for quick XP. Aipom also counts, and the only trophy it counts towards is much easier to get by catching Rattata, Pidgey, and Sentret.
    • Gen II added Sudowoodo, a rather mediocre Rock-type with low CP which, unlike other Pokémon like Murkrow, has no evolution in future Gens to look forward to. The problem isn't so much running into them in the wild, since they are rather rare, but the fact they hatch from 10km eggs. It can be pretty disheartening to put in the work hatching that egg hoping for a Dratini or a Chansey, and get an underwhelming Sudowoodo instead.
    • The trading update added 7km Eggs which contain Alolan Pokémon. Among the possible outcomes, Alolan Meowth is distressingly common, and quickly earned the ire of players gunning for the rarer Pokémon.
      • Later on babies are migrated there too, so there's a fat chance of hatching Igglypuffs and Cleffas from 7km eggs, which are even worse.
  • Scrappy Mechanic: Has its own page.
  • Silent Majority: Even though many on the internet claim the app as Deader Than Disco, Pokémon GO remains popular, and there are still many people who would go out to search for Pokémon every day. Niantic reports that while it doesn't match the game's peak popularity of 200 million players, about 15 to 20 million still log in daily, and new downloads are slow but steady.
  • "Stop Having Fun" Guys:
    • Even just after the game's launch and there are already reports of players who take the game way too seriously, camping out at Gym locations and even being verbally abusive towards others players who try and beat the Gym they've claimed, as well as players who take their friends being on other teams too seriously and will post memes biasing for or against a particular team just to rile them up. There have even been reports of players grabbing other player's cell phones out of their hands because they were about to catch a rare Pokémon in the area that they, themselves, wanted (not knowing that Pokémon spawns aren't limited to a single player, they are available until they despawn naturally and as many players can catch the same spawn as is needed). Needless to day, these jerks might as well be on Team Rocket or UAA.
    • For the most part, the various memes bashing other Teams often seem to be shared between friends as a gesture of friendly Trash Talk, so it shouldn't be taken too seriously.
    • One may encounter people, or groups of people, who "claim ownership" to Gyms or areas of Gyms, and may get personal when the Gym they're currently occupying is under attack and they haven't hit the threshold for max coins of the day, even if they're only losing out on a few coins. It's also likely those people have alt-accounts in other factions for the express purpose of getting their 'mons out once that time threshold is reached. Somehow the idea of simply re-conquering the Gym is lost to them...
  • Tear Jerker: During the Halloween event, Cubone and Marowak gained a spike in spawn rates. This becomes tearjerking to anyone who knows about their backstory.
  • That One Achievement:
    • "Depot Agent", which requires you to catch 200 Steel-type Pokémon to get all three ranks. There are only two Steel-types available in Generation One: Magnemite and its evolved form Magneton, neither of which is a common find. The Gen II update helped a bit by introducing Skarmory, Scizor, Forretress, and Steelix, but it remains a frustrating achievement to obtain. Gen III finally soothed some of the agony by making Aron fairly common.
    • By the same token, "Hex Maniac". There are only four Ghost-type Pokémon — Gastly, Haunter and Gengar plus Misdreavus — from two evolutionary lines, and all are difficult to find. The 2016 Halloween event temporarily rectified this by increasing the Gastly line's spawn rate, though the odds of catching 200 over a week can be pretty slim, depending on the player's schedules, and the 2017 Halloween event introduced the Generation III Ghost-types (Sableye, Shuppet, and Duskull and their evolutions).
    • Likewise for "Dragon Tamer", the Dragon medal, which for the first year and a half had only the rare Dratini line and Kingdra, which can take a good deal of work (and, for the latter, a rare item spawn) to evolve from its not-too-common preevolutions. Mitigated in areas that, as of Generation III, find Trapinch to be common spawns.
    • Prior to Generation III, "Delinquent" (200 Dark types) had similar issues. Due to the lack of Dark-types (even by Retcon, unlike Steel and Fairy), it wasn't at all available until Generation II launched, and it had nearly the same issues that "Hex Maniac" had - while two Dark-types (Murkrow and Sneasel) were common in some areas, this was far from universal, and they were compounded by having abysmal catch rates. The 2017 Halloween event mitigated this by improving the spawn rates of Dark-types and introducing a Generation III Dark-type (Sableye). Finally rectified with the broader launch of Generation III which introduced easily caught Poochyena as a Com Mon.
    • "Pikachu Fan" requires catching 200 Pikachu for all three ranks. Slightly better than the above in terms of rarity, but not by much, though numerous accessory variant events did help.
    • "Rocker" (200 Electric-types) isn't much better. Prior to Generation III updates, uncommon Chinchou aside, most Electric-types, like the aforementioned Magnemite and Pikachu and especially Mareepnote , were extremely rare. This was mitigated in Generation III update when Electrike was added into one of the more-common Pokémon spawns.
    • "Youngster" and "Fisherman" are even worse, as not only do you have to catch the (admittedly common) Rattata and Magikarp, respectively, the Rattata must have the XS tag to count and the Magikarp must have the XL tag, and you have no way to control when those tags will appear. 200 is thus more like 600 (and that's assuming an even spread of possible tags), which is a lot of Rattata and Magikarp.
    • Then there's the absolute worst offender of them all: Unown. This Pokémon is based on the English alphabet, and has 28 forms for every letter plus ? and !. The Unown medal requires catching each of those forms. Good luck with that. Heck, good luck getting the medal to appear at all, since it's hidden until you've caught at least one Unown and the Pokémon is so rare that most players haven't even seen it on Nearby, let alone in a gym. It's even rarer than wild Tyranitar.
  • That One Attack: Any defender or raid boss that carries a counter-coverage move will be significantly tougher to take down for its counters, with the most notorious examples listed below:
    • Blissey with Dazzling Gleam. While her bulk alone makes her very difficult to take down in her own right, Dazzling Gleam gives her surprising firepower on top of it: a two-bar 100 base attack move that's super-effective against Fighting-types, whom are the only Pokémon that possess STAB on the moves super-effective against it, Dragon-types, whom make for the best generalists to sweep gyms, and Dark-types, whom one of its strongest Pokémon, Tyranitar, resists all of Blissey's other moves. Even Pokémon that take neutral damage from it will worn down by successive streams of Dazzling Gleam, and the only ones that would resist it are generally too slow to take it down within the time limit.
    • Kyogre with Blizzard will make short work of Grass and Dragon-types, which are often fielded to resist Kyogre's Water attacks, and in the former case, score super effective damage on Kyogre. This leaves other Water-types as the only things that can endure Kyogre's moveset without risk of getting one-shot, but with Kyogre itself being resistant to their attacks, this can lead to a drawn-out battle which can end in a time-out. There's one effective outlier to this: Your own Kyogre, albeit with Thunder as a charge move.
    • Mewtwo with Focus Blast, a Fighting-type move which makes short work of all Dark-types, one of the three types Mewtwo is weak against. Hoping to gnaw Mewtwo to death with Tyranitar? The latter Pokémon is doubly weak to Fighting-type moves, reducing it to a Glass Cannon at best, Cannon Fodder at worst. Gengar isn't a consideration either: despite immunity to Focus Blast, it's weak against both of Mewtwo's fast moves, Psycho Cut and Confusion. The only viable counter to a Focus Blast Mewtwo is another Mewtwo with the Shadow Ball charge move, a move that Mewtwo can no longer learn, meaning newer players will have to rely on less effective counters or trade for a legacy Mewtwo. Thankfully, you now have Giratina Origin forme, which not only has high amounts of DPS thanks to having Gengar's infamous legacy moveset, it also has high enough bulk to outright laugh at Focus Blast in addition to an immunity to it, so if it returns, this is less of a problem.
    • Any Dragon with a Dragon type charged move falls into this category too, since their attack is so absurdly high that they can rip through even extremely tough Pokémon in a single charged move. To make things worse, since Fairy and Ice types are often ineffective in this game, you are usually forced to use Dragon types against them and they can kill your Dragons faster than you can fire charged moves, as Dragon is weak to Dragon. This is made worse by the dodge glitch, which means that any Dragon type raid boss will kill your Dragons without fail. The worst is in fact, Draco Meteor Dialga since fairies are ineffective against it and it can OHKO or 2HKO nearly any Pokémon without fail and can most certainly OHKO even maxed Machamps.
  • That One Boss: While most raid bosses are quite easy, various raid bosses are literally nightmarish to beat or even grind:
    • Tier 3 Claydol. While it has a cp of merely around 13000, it has among one of the highest defense of any raid boss, to the point that Kyogre and Gengar need to be nearly maxed to even have a chance. The other high tier counters, such as Shadow Ball Mewtwo, Tyranitar, Gyarados and Sceptile need weather boost to even succeed despite high DPS. While it is much easier in the 2019 Hoenn event, due to the raid boss HP boost afterwards, it has returned back to its past difficulty and your non-Kyogre counters, including Giratina Origin and Mamoswine need to be maxed to even stand a chance.
    • Tier 3 Jolteon. While this might seem like a typical high difficulty tier 3 raid boss at first, it only has a sole weakness to ground. The problem? Ground moves are limited to Earthquake (And recently Bulldoze on Mamoswine) and are incredibly slow and inefficent, so most of the time you are barely doing any damage and you will time out. Groudon makes this slightly better, although you will still need to have them maxed or near-maxed to have any visible effect.
    • Tier 3 Alakazam used to be such a thing. When the raid system is first out, Alakazam solos are among one of the hardest things to do in the entire game. Not only it has incredibly high attack and while ghost and dark type Pokémon are the best counters, it can kill a Gengar in four confusions, can kill a Tyranitar in a single Focus Blast note  and can OHKO Gengar or severely cripple Mewtwo with just one Shadow Ball note , it even has a high defense stat, which means that you can time out in front of it if your Pokémon are not strong enough. Thankfully, due to the double nerfs at late 2018 and you get much better counters such as Weavile and Giratina Origin, it's much easier than it is before.
    • Tier 3 Flareon used to be incredibly difficult to solo, to the point that it is a Hopeless Boss Fight. This is due to its incredibly high defense combined with virtually no effective counters, as Golem and Vaporeon lack firepower. Thankfully, this is averted since you get much stronger counters now, such as Waterfall Gyarados, Kyogre, Smack Down Tyranitar and Rhyperior.
      • Ninetales is another variant of Flareon, aside that it has more colorful coverage moves and its attack is lower, meaning that it doesn't give you a lot of charged move energy and it can instantly kill nearly any counter using Solar Beam. This transforms it into a Hopeless Boss Fight. At the next time it is released, we have much more effective counters in addition to Rampardos and Palkia, although the latter does not have a water fast move. Beware though, as dodging Solar Beam will make the timer pretty close and will often activate server desyncs that might both destroy your Pokémon and heal the boss.
    • As far as lower Tiers go, Cloyster should take the cake. Cloyster is a Tier 2 raid boss, but its defense is so high that non-lv30+ Machamps and Raikous will fail to even tickle it. Thankfully due to the double nerf, it should be much easier than before if it returns, being lower in difficulty than Piloswine at Tier 3 according to online simulations.
  • That One Level: Most timed events will cause Pokémon that are harder to catch than most low-CP Com Mons to spawn more frequently compared to normal, increasing the amount of stronger Balls and Berries you'll likely need to scoop them all up in one go. A few examples:
    • The 2017 Christmas Event adds in Delibird (who was one of the missing Gen 2 Pokémon) for limited availability. Delibird can be a pain in an ass for many players to catch and can easily cause the above-mentioned Game Over for the player, requiring it to find another one.
    • The Pokémon Go Community Day event hosted in January 2018, which made Pikachu, one of the harder Mons to catch in the game, severely more common. The Community Days to follow typically feature similar, low catch rate Pokémon including starters and pseudo-legendaries.
    • The Kanto-themed event that occurred from April 10th to April 17th not only turned the usual Com Mons into rare finds, but drastically increased the encounter rate of Kanto's lesser to almost non-available but harder to catch Mons, including the Starter trio and Pikachu.
    • The Pokémon Detective Pikachu event caused a massive surge in the population of Aipom, which, if you've been taking notes, has only a catch rate of 45- making them a pain to catch without risking them breaking out and darting away. It's also arguably the event's signature 'Mon, as Aipom's Shiny form was released alongside the event.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • The March 30, 2018 update added a quest system, with the primary quest chain leading to catching Mew. However, several of the subquests that need to be completed to catch Mew have caused much hair-pulling among players. The ones most likely to result in frustration are the fifth-tier "Catch a Ditto" quest (as it's impossible to know whether a Com Mon is actually a Ditto in disguise until someone successfully catches it - fortunately for social players, a Ditto is always a Ditto for anyone trying to catch that particular spawn), the fifth-tier "Catch 10 Ghost-Types" quest (while more common than they used to be, see That One Achievement for the difficulties in finding them - as of Generation III, there are still only nine in the game, with four of those being evolutions), and the sixth-tier "Evolve a Magikarp" quest (hope you saved 400 Magikarp candies before quests launched).
      • The Kanto Celebration in 2017 managed to remedy some of these issues by dramatically increasing the spawn rates of Magikarp and Gastly everywhere.
    • On top of the quest system are quests that are much easier to obtain and complete, but some are frustrating enough for a player to discard them on sight. These include the "Perform X throw types in a row" (missing or getting your Ball deflected, which happens without warning, will reset your quest progress) or "Catch X (Type) Pokémon" (in places or occasions where the types asked for are unlikely to spawn, especially in the case of Electric, Ghost and Dragon-types). What's more, these types of missions often spout out some of the rarest Pokémon you can find as a reward. And when one of these quests is compulsory, (e.g., "Make an Excellent Curveball throw" in the seventh tier of "A Mythical Discovery"), it will give you a headache.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • A common complaint about the battle and catching systems. Gym battles feel more like a stripped down fighting game than an RPG, using an unusual attack-and-dodge mechanic. Catching involves throwing Poké Balls until either the Mon is caught or runs away. While catching Pokémon isn't quite the typical way for the games, it's pretty close to how the Safari Zone worked in earlier games.
    • Taken to an extreme with the July 30th update. The glitched in-game tracking system was removed and third-party tracking websites were taken down, making it nearly impossible to track down Pokémon. In addition, the update also decreased the range of the detection circle around the avatar by about 30%, meaning you now have to get even closer to find Pokémon that you already have no way of accurately tracking, not to mention using PokéStops and Gyms. There are also other unconfirmed claims about the update, such as state Gyms and PokéStops were removed, and a drastic increase in the difficulty of obtaining Pokémon. Needless to say, the update did not go over very well. However, some people believed that such a reaction was incredibly short-sighted, which turned out to be true when the following update began to add an improved tracking system (as long as you live in San Francisco) and Niantic specified that the greater difficulty in capturing was due to a bug.
    • The November 7th update made spinning Pokéstops while driving prohibited. This resulted in a huge backdraft on Reddit, calling Niantic out on making it impossible for them to use their GO Pluses.
    • The Nerf of the Eevee Brothers Easter Egg. This means any new player who is attempting to get all three is reduced to pure dumb luck while early players were able to more or less get them effortlessly. While some don't see this as a big deal because the game had already reached its peak playerbase by that point, others (particularly those late to the party or who only found out about the trick after its removal) are pretty miffed that they can't benefit from the trick, especially since it only worked once for each of the Eeveelutions. A similar Easter egg being added for the Gen 2 Eeveelutions along with the original being put back has eased tensions over the subject.
    • The revision of the Gym system was met with mixed reception. On one hand, there is no longer a need to grind Prestige as each Gym now always has 6 slots, and while a single Pokémon may need to be beaten several times over to expel it, its effective CP drops with each victory, making it easier to defeat each time. On the other hand, rewards for defending Gyms are now dependent on how long your Pokémon defends a Gym for, making it nigh-impossible to get anything in Gyms with a high turnover rate, and players are now capped at 50 coins per day as opposed to 100.
    • The trading system introduced in June 2018. Unlike the mainline Pokémon games, you can't just transfer Pokémon freely and call it a day- you and your partner now have to pay Stardust based on if the Pokémon you're trading for is already in your PokéDex, if it isn't, and if it's Legendary or Mythical (the last of which cannot be traded for at all). It also puts a one-day limit on so-called "Special Trades" for Legendaries and Pokémon not in your Pokédex, limiting them to just one a day. Lastly, rather than keeping the stats of your Mon the same, it now has a chance at lowering the CP and IV's of the Pokémon being traded, completely invalidating their usefulness (if any) in battling.
    • While the Pokémon's I Vs do change, its level only drops if a player is too low-leveled for it. Alsom the I Vs can go up as well as down, as they are simply rerolled at random. Furthermore, trading with ultra or best friends includes a very low IV floor. This still increases the chances of the Pokémon getting good I Vs. Essentially, the trading system is bad for giving specific Pokémon away and keeping their good stats... but it's perfect for trading away tons of trash for candy and the possibility of getting a better Pokémon or even a lucky Pokémon. Lucky Pokémon cost half as much stardust as normal to power up.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • High-tier:
      • Vaporeon is probably the best Pokémon in the game for sheer ease of access relative to its strength. Eevee only requires 25 Eevee Candies to evolve, and Eevee is just short of one of the Com Mons in this game; since Eevee candies are easy to get, it's also very easy to increase their CP. With the "Rainer" Easter Egg, it's possible to guarantee a Vaporeon while evolving your Eevee. Its Water-typing is great offensively and defensively, it has almost twice as much HP as Jolteon and Flareon, it has the second best DPS in the game (only second to Mewtwo!), and its maximum possible CP is just shy of the top ten (better than Gyarados, in fact). It's become a real staple of Complacent Gaming Syndrome in Pokémon Go, to the point where it is hard to come across a gym with more than three members without seeing at least one of these guys guarding it, if not two or three. Niantic subsequently put a heavy Nerf on Water Gun and Aqua Tail, making Vaporeon's DPS decent but not quite as broken (especially for its easy accessibility), and a balance update gave Gyarados higher CP (though, ironically, the same update also propelled Vaporeon into the top 10, making it better than Articuno and Mew). It's now largely obsolete thanks to stronger water types, such as Gyarados getting a water fast move, Kyogre and Hydro Cannon Feraligatr.
      • Vaporeon's position as the most-useful Eeveelution has been surpassed by Glaceon whose its right mix of Attack and Defense, and its higher CP (3126 vs Vaporeon's 3114), gave it a huge advantage on many Dragon-type Pokémon in compensation of weak type-defenses. Glaceon, due to its weak Speed stats in core games have been overridden in this game, became an instant treat and threat on some Flying and Dragon-types (and Grass-types) Pokémon in gym battles. Its counterpart, Leafeon, isn't immune to this either, despite being lower in CP, since it has similarly good Attack and Defense that would knock Vaporeon out combined with its type-advantage in terms of Eeveelutions.
      • Machamp. While barely even worth mentioning before Generation 2, after the Generation 2 moveset revamp, it has got what can be summed up as the best fast move and the best charged move in the entire game; The Counter/Dynamic Punch combo. Counter hits incredibly hard and Dynamic Punch is a 2-bar move that can be spammed in incredible speeds. Adding up with its incredibly high attack and decent bulk, it can easily surpass the effectiveness of most Olympus Mons in the game. To make things even better, it is effective against most of the normal types placed in Gyms and most tier 4 raid bosses are weak to fighting. In fact, some legendaries are weak to fighting and if you see anything even remotely weak to fighting, Machamp is always there. The best part is it can be easily obtained via Tier 3 raids and the Machops that infest in Cloudy Weather.
      • Speaking of fully-evolved starter Pokémon, Blaziken, just like its main-series counterparts, are quite a tough chicken to beat meta-wise. Blaziken's high-Attack and HP stats and, depending on where you are, Torchic being one of more-common starter Pokémon would put it head-to-head with pseudo-Legendary Pokémon like Salamence and Metagross, as well as Eeveelutions. Even without Speed stats and Hidden Ability in this game, Blaziken is still a cockscrewing threat to many.
    • Low-tier:
      • At the other side of the Eeveelution scrappy-spectrum is Jolteon. Just like Vaporeon, it's easy to evolve and power up, but it really gets the short stick compared to the other two forms. Its stats really don't do it any favors, having lackluster defense and almost half as much health as Vaporeon does. Unlike Vaporeon, whose Water Gun has one of the best DPS in the game, Jolteon's Thundershock has less than half as much DPSnote . As the final nail in the coffin, while Vaporeon's max CP is 2816 and Flareon's is 2643, Jolteon's max CP is a rather unimpressive 2140 (just a bit stronger than a Pidgeot). It's obvious Jolteon was intended to be a Fragile Speedster, but due to the way speed is weighted in this game, it's worth practically nothing. Mercifully, a balance update rectified this bringing up Jolteon to 2730 while Vaporeon was boosted to 3157 and Flareon to 2904, making only slightly weaker instead of cripplingly so.
      • Jolteon's position as the weakest of the Eeveelutions would be usurped by Umbreon upon the launch of Gen II. Fellow Eeveelution Espeon's CP maxes out at exactly 3000, just a short margain ahead of Flareon and behind Vaporeon. Umbreon, on the other hand, is left in the dust with its painfully low max CP level of 2052, which is even lower than Jolteon's initial max CP, which made it next to useless in Gym Battles until the June 2017 gym revamp introduced the motivation system; giving it a sporting chance against de-motivated Pokémon. Even then, though, it's still not going to amount to much when put against fully motivated Pokémon, and doesn't change the fact that its max CP is still abysmal in comparison to the other Eeveelutions. However, some players took advantage of Umbreon's Stone Wall status among all the Eeveelutions. Even worse with the May 2019 update, where the addition of Glaceon has thrown Umbreon down to hell.
      • Pokémon that have depended on an ability or held item in the main games to be useful, such as Marowak or Medicham transitioned poorly to Pokémon Go, due to the lack of either of those two mechanics in the game. Marowak ended up being a Stone Wall, whereas Medicham was turned into a Master of None. Azumarill subverts this: despite not being able to hit as hard as it did in the main games, its low CP and passable bulk, along with being a Water/Fairy-type Pokémon that can slow down some overused Dragon-type attacks, allow it to serve a similar role to Chansey, being a gym defender with a slow motivation decay (thus allowing it to serve low-traffic gyms for long periods).
      • While the other two Regi- legendaries sometimes get use as bulky mono-type attackers with solid offensive types (see below, under Both), Registeel is hit hardest by the transition to the mobile platform. Its type is a niche attacker at best (and it doesn't help that it's surpassed in this regard by Aggron, whose base form is a Com Mon in many areas), its attacking stats are atrocious (on par with several not fully evolved 'mons like Teddiursa and Staravia, and dwarfed by Lairon, which is the evolution before Aggron) plus the formula for determining its stats in this game really hurts it (its balanced defenses do little for it, compared to what the unbalanced defensive stats of both Regice and Regirock are). Add in the inability to use it for gym defense as it's a legendary, and Registeel hands-down is known as the worst tier 5 legendary raid in the game, and all indications suggest that it'll hold this distinction for at least two or three generations. It is also extremely horrible in pvp due to having extremely horrible pvp fast/charged moves.
    • Both:
      • Blissey is the Stone Wall of Pokémon Go, with gargantuan defenses, a passable attack, only one weakness, and just the right moves so that even Fighting-type Pokémon - whom possess STAB on the only moves super-effective to Blissey - won't likely outlast her in a fight. Because gym defense battles have a stingier time limit per battle than raids, Blissey has the upper hand in any battle she plays defense on, for players would be forced to use Pokémon strong enough to take her down in the time limit (meaning Mighty Glaciers that resist all of its moves, such as Aggron, are impractical choices). It was a nightmare to deal with in the first iteration of the gym system, for entire ladders would be crowded with an Amazon Brigade of Blisseys taunting players with their perpetual smile, which even the then-underwhelming Fighting-types were helpless against. The gym overhaul made dealing with Blissey more feasible, especially with the one Pokémon limit per gym, and buffs to Fighting-types like Machamp. Nonetheless, she remains the only "good" defender in the new system, with enough bulk to ward off lower-level players or those that are short on time, which is amplified when paired with a Chansey and Snorlax; their shared weakness to Fighting-type moves are barely a factor in players defaulting to these three in gym defense. After the CP nerf, it is still the bulkiest Pokemon, although even bad Pokémon such as Cresselia or Melmetal in high enough levels can take it down one on one with some time left.

        On the flip side, the traits that make her the greatest Stone Wall in the game make her one of the worst recurring raid attackers, as she can't provide any meaningful contribution to attacking the raid boss, and at best keeps the player passively involved in the battle. This wouldn't be as much of an issue, had it not been for the team selection's auto-select feature frequently picking this Pokémon for her high CP: when an entire party is fainted during battle, players are put under pressure under the time limit to find replacements, and are forced to either lose time looking for the proper Pokémon, or settle with the auto-selected Blissey. Because of their non-contribution, players that use Blissey are accused of leeching off the efforts of more active players, and are actively discouraged from using them for attacking.
      • Defense-oriented legendaries. They're not as efficient at raids as their more offensive counterparts, and can't be used to defend gyms due to their legendary status. This limits them to the role of a bulky attacker, which puts them at a level closer to that of non-legendary attackers. Suicune gets the worst of it, as it's statistically outclassed by Kyogre and doesn't even learn a STAB fast move. Ho-oh doesn't fare much better, with it playing Master of None to dedicated Fire-type attackers like Moltres or Entei, and even bulkier attackers like Lugia or Groudon. Only a few defensive Legendaries like Latias are exceptions.
      • Pokémon with horrible moves. Recently, Niantic seems to like to give new Pokémon incredibly horrible moves as if they know that they are horrible, downplaying even Pokémon with incredibly high stats. For example, Staraptor has the same attack as Machamp but was given Brave Bird, which is OUTRIGHT ATROCIOUS in this game. Another example is Melmetal, who is pure steel but does not have a STAB fast move, and its sole STAB is in fact, Flash Cannon, which is again, atrocious. Probably the worst one is Giratina's Altered form, it has induced a Hype Backlash thanks to getting Shadow Sneak as its Ghost charged move. Be noted that Shadow Sneak is one of the worst charged moves in the entire game and can invalidate even Gengar, should it have that.
  • Tough Act to Follow: Even a year after release despite all the early issues and controversy, Pokémon Go still maintains a massive player base and mind share amongst people throughout the world with a degree of success very, very, few games have been able to match, even by mobile standards. To say that the mobile games Nintendo has planned for its other IPs have the bar set high for them would be putting it lightly.
  • Ugly Cute: The strange new Pokémon that appeared at the end of September 2018's Chikorita Community Day, Meltan, appears to be a gold nut on top a grey blob body, with a floating marble in center of the nut and a red wire tail sticking out the behind. It's such an unorthodox and just plain weird design that many have compared it to the Ultra Beasts, but its small size and animations make it appear endearing as well.
  • Uncanny Valley: Mr. Mime returns with the same disturbing "puppet-ish miming" animation and perpetual creepy smile it had in Pokémon X and Y; in fact, the combination of cartoonish, drawn-on detailsnote  with realistic lighting and textures based off Pokémon Super Mystery Dungeon's graphics arguably makes it even worse.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • While not exactly unprecedented, many players were surprised when Alolan forms were announced to be arriving to Go during Gen III. (Though granted, this is a somewhat unusual case as it was less that the playerbase wasn't expecting the forms to be in the game at all and more that the playerbase wasn't expecting the Alolan forms to arrive this soon to the game; generally expecting them to arrive much closer to when Gen VII mons would be added to Go.)
    • Heart Spinda, which was a One-Scene Wonder from an obscure 2004 Advance Generation episode, became a limited-addition form for the 2019 Valentines Day event. Catching it requires five Great Curveballs in a row, however.
    • The release of the Lake Guardian trio from Generation IV (Azelf, Mesprit, and Uxie) was expected... however, as every other legendary had been released either as a Raid Boss or as a Research Encounter, absolutely nobody expected the three to be released as a wild encounter. While not quite as surprising, each one was assigned to a different region, also a first for a Legendary Pokemon.
  • Unfortunate Implications: A post of a Koffing at the National Holocaust Museum went viral. The museum was understandably horrified by the implications, and has asked visitors to refrain from playing while at the memorial (though the idea that playing video games at a place like the Holocaust Museum would be somehow acceptable no matter what Pokémon happened to be there has Unfortunate Implications of its own).
  • Unwinnable by Insanity: Before eggs were moved to their own tab on the Pokémon page rather than among items, it used to be theoretically possible to create a situation where you couldn't acquire any new items, by maxing out inventory space and then filling it with only incubators; incubators cannot be discarded and are only consumed after incubating a number of eggs, but you couldn't acquire any eggs because the inventory's full of incubators.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Compared to the other two team leaders, Blanche has a more androgynous design, with little to indicate gender either way in official character art. This was settled when she was confirmed to be a woman via Word of God, though it seems character designer Yusuke Kozaki considers it open to interpretation.
  • Win Back the Crowd: After experiencing a gigantic playerbase from early July - mid August of 2016, with a massive impact on pop culture at the time, the "Go Phenomenon" left as quickly as it came, likely due to the combination of Niantic mishandling certain well-liked previous features and the few changes in the game over this period. Whilst it still managed to hold a dedicated playerbase over the months, with the Halloween, Christmas, and Valentine's events triggering massive surges in activity, as well as the introduction of Ditto, this was not enough to make the game "popular" again, to the point that many articles even stated that the game was Deader Than Disco. When Niantic attempted this with the Gen 2 baby Pokémon added in December, it was met with indifference at worst, and anger at best, due to the majority simply being pre-evolutions to Kanto 'mons, and being notoriously hard to find. However, the release of the Gen 2 and 3 Pokémon (increasing variety of Pokémon in the game, as well as stopping many of the "genwunner" complaints), adding the well-received Pokémon Research system, and John Hanke promising the much-requested PVP in the future has once again made the game popular among the mainstream audience.

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