Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / God of War (PS4)

Go To


  • Accidental Aesop: The fight between Brok and Sindri creates an unintentional Aesop for both Atreus and the audience. Being nice and sugar-coating your words won't always be the most effective strategy to solve a problem. Sometimes you have to be blunt or aggressive so people can actually understand and listen to you.
  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • Faye, Kratos' wife and Atreus' mother, is subject to this a lot considering she is dead by the time the game starts, we never see how she was like in life and only hear it from other people. From all accounts, she was an All-Loving Heroine that helped people in need without expecting anything in return and managed to love Kratos despite the horrible things he did in his past. However, the revelation that she was a Giant and she foresaw all the things her husband and child would do in their quest (including Baldur's fight) puts many things into question: was she genuinely nice as she appeared to be, or did she have a sinister side, using her loved ones to get revenge on the Aesir from beyond death? That being said, while she did ask for her ashes to be scattered, she probably wasn't the one who created the prophecy (though she definitely knew about it and engineered the quest to scatter her ashes so they could be aware of it). At the same time, she did know what would happen, and felt Atreus and Kratos needed to bond, and so formed the entire journey in an effort for Kratos to become a genuinely good father, and Atreus becoming a man. Another interpretation as pointed out by Kratos is that Faye did hate the gods, but her vision of Ragnarök was simply fate and not something she was trying to set in motion. The last version is supported by Mimir, who says that Ragnarok was fated, Kratos just moved the date of occurrence sooner.
    • Advertisement:
    • Odin. Is he really a Well-Intentioned Extremist trying to prevent Ragnarok at any cost, or just a tyrant on a power trip that will do anything to stay in charge? For what it's worth, most characters share the latter opinion of him, and there is a lot of evidence to support it with Mimir's torture, Freya's exile and the Valkyries' corruption. But then again, much like Faye, he doesn't appear in the game despite being alive so we can't really tell his motivations.
    • A big one and ultimately the point of the game: How valid is Kratos' attempt at redemption? Does making Atreus a worthy and honorable god, and even more important a good person, make up for all the harm he's caused? Is he even worthy of forgiveness, and if so at what point can Kratos earn that? Should Kratos be seen as The Atoner or a Retired Monster? Is he honestly trying not to hurt people unnecessarily, or is he just so devoid of people to hate that he hasn't had a chance to act out his violent tendencies? Athena mocks his attempt at redemption, saying that a teacher, a husband, and a father are all things he could never convincingly be. Kratos actually agrees with her assessment of him being a monster. Kratos however, retorts that he is no longer the Greek Pantheon's monster. The overall implication seems to be one where there are times where "being the monster" is necessary to win on the battlefield, but that raging intensity must be tempered with discipline and self-control.
    • Advertisement:
    • After losing his immortality thanks to getting hit by Atreus' mistletoe arrowhead dagger, Baldur was overjoyed to finally be able to feel again. After that, he was turning around to face the duo in a seemingly non-hostile manner. Considering that his beef was with Freya and the only reason you are fighting him was to protect her, was he 1) going to thank Kratos and Atreus and then go after his mother, 2) Go for round 2 to feel the sensation of pain once more or 3) Thank the duo but still fight on anyway to feel pain. Too bad Freya in her distress at her son losing his immortality, proceeds to yank Baldur away before a proper response was formed.
    • During their second trip to Helheim, Atreus eventually witnesses, to Kratos' distress, a hallucination of when he beat his father Zeus to death, but when Kratos comments on it to Atreus afterwards, the latter claims he didn't see anything. Was Atreus horrified at what he had seen and wanted to pretend he never saw it? Or did he understand enough to acknowledge that it was something shameful of his father's past and he simply wanted to spare him of having to talk about it? A third possibility is that this happened shortly after Kratos snapped Atreus out of his arrogant behaviour when finding out he was a god, meaning Atreus realized his father had a past-self he regretted as well and had learned a similar lesson that he just taught him.
    • Advertisement:
    • Modi:
      • Is he a Dirty Coward who's too scared to fight anyone stronger than him or is he a pedophile towards Atreus? Some of Modi's dialogue has some pedophilic undertones, which is shown when he asks Magni to let him "get the kid" if they find themnote . Modi also says how he wants Atreus to be his new brother and he finally dies after making another lewd joke about Faye.
      • When Modi stuns Kratos with lightning, is his rant a result of going through the stages of grief? or is he genuinely furious about being denied the right to prove himself a worthy heir of Mjolnir?.
      • After his father, Thor, had beaten him senseless for Magni's death, did Modi goad Atreus into killing him because he wanted to die after that kind of humiliation, or did he figure he was going to die regardless and wanted to give one more middle finger to Atreus?
    • Is Mimir trustworthy? On one hand he comes off as a friendly and honest man, who is blunt about his own foolishness in serving a evil god like Odin for the sake of his own ambition. On the other, he is heavily implied to be Puck, a fairy whose principle characteristic is causing discord for his own amusement—which this portrayal of the character admits was true in the past. He was at Odin's side providing him council during some of Odin's worst atrocities, and Odin eventually turned on Mimir as well. Is he trying to right the wrongs of Odin, or is he manipulating Kratos and Atreus as petty vengeance against the Aesir in spite of the damage it would cause to the world?
      • To Mimir's credit, if one beats Sigrun her claims that he corrupted the Valkyries do back up his assertions that Odin is a pretty terrible person.
    • Is Kratos preparing Atreus to kill him? Kratos knows what he's capable of and fears his temper. Kratos killed his original family and it's not hard to believe that he doesn't want Atreus to hesitate with defending himself from Kratos' blind wrath. Hence why he's being as distant as possible with Atreus.
    • Is Kratos really breaking the Ragnarok prophecy or is he performing his role in the actual prophecy hidden in Jötunheimr? Magni and Modi are the best example of this; they both believed they were destined to survive Ragnarok until Kratos killed Magni, causing Modi to tremble in disbelief and fearfully ask how Kratos was able to do this. In Jötunheimr, both Magni and Modi are shown fighting against Kratos and Atreus (Fárbauti and Loki) on the tapestry which indicates how they will die in the lead-up to Ragnarok. So is Kratos really a chaotic paradox or another pawn in the prophecy?
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Kratos' character development into a harsh but more responsible man could be seen as this after he got particularly hard to root for in previous entries.
    • Word of God is that part of the whole Kratos/Atreus dynamic can subtly be seen as this for God of War: Chains of Olympus, which tried to make Kratos more human by having him openly dote on his daughter Calliope in one scene. This got a mixed reception as many found Kratos' sudden display of fatherly love to be jarring and out of character rather than heartwarming, a criticism Cory Barlog considered while making this game, ensuring that Kratos and Atreus' relationship would develop more slowly and naturally than the "out of nowhere" scenes Kratos had with Calliope. It should be mentioned that no one wondered if Kratos cared for his daughter which he obviously did (given his family's death being the whole reason for his revenge towards Ares), the complaints were more on the manner of which Kratos acted like a blatantly doting parent that seemed out of character for such an otherwise stoic, brutal character.
    • One of the major factors hampering the game's longevity was it's lack of a New Game+ option. The 1.30 update adds one in, but also adds a swath of other new content to NG+. This includes: an entire new rarity of gear (Perfect) that requires a NG+ only resource called Skap Slag, new enemy moves on NG+, and new gear sets. Even better, said update also allows the cutscenes to be skipped on a subsequent playthrough (be it new game plus or just another play-through from the beginning), addressing a major grievance of fans who want to replay the game but don't want to be forced to sit through the game's numerous cutscenes a second time.
  • Awesome Music: Prior to the game's official reveal at Sony's 2016 E3 press conference they had a live orchestra play the game's main theme. Even better, said orchestra also played a live rendition of the game's background music during the stage demo.
  • Badass Decay: Kratos seems to be going through this. The warrior who lifted and threw Titans and wiped out the entire Greek Pantheon now finds himself winded when put against minor Norse Deities, trolls, and struggling to lift building-sized objects. There is some implication that this is a result of him simply getting old, though Word of God states that it's more of him just becoming complacent over the centuries and being out of practice than having to do with age.
  • Best Boss Ever:
    • Hraezlyr, the dragon, entirely for its presentation and spectacle.
    • Ditto with Modi and Magni. A great Dual Boss with an intense fight against the sons of Thor.
    • Many of the valkyrie bosses, frustrating as they are, DO qualify for this for being a post-game Bonus Boss that feels very rewarding.
    • The third and final encounter with Baldur due to having a beefed up moveset as his first encounter, which is made more awesome than annoying as you are too.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: Most people with even a passing knowledge of the more important stories of Norse Mythology will suspect the tattooed Stranger is Baldur the moment he mentions that he can't feel anything and his tattoos glow with light. And this suspicion is certain to be confirmed the moment Sindri shows the mistletoe arrows, and possibly that the Witch is Freya/Frigg when she reacts extremely negatively to them. To be fair, there are a few differences: 1) Baldur in myth couldn't control fire/ice; 2) had blond hair; 3) he was completely untouchable, not able to come back from any injury; 4) mistletoe killed him instead of removing his invincibility (although this is perhaps debatable since the dart was a lethal hit in myth). But God of War has played loose with godly powers before.
  • Catharsis Factor: The part during the final battle where Kratos and Atreus work in perfect unison by taking their turns landing blows on Baldur to swelling music will leave most players shouting "Hell Yeah! at the screen.
  • Common Knowledge: If you were to listen to various gaming outlets, it's only with this game that the franchise "grew up" and stopped being about an angry man who does nothing but murder everything non-stop for no good reason. As fans of the previous game were quick to point out, the other games have more than their fair share of Character Development and pathos for Kratos, and he didn't spend every waking moment as just a perpetual singularity of blind rage. Ironically, when the first game was released, it was praised at the time for being an M-rated game that actually deserved the title of "mature" instead of just being a gory shlockfest.
  • Common Crossover: Between God of War, Horizon Zero Dawn and Spider-Man (PS4). Unusual in that, unlike other common crossovers, most of this comes from the creators of the works. Here from Guerilla Studios, Here from Santa Monica Studios, and another from Guerilla.
  • Crossover Ship: Kratos/Aloy has met some love thanks to Guerilla Games making this wonderful piece of art of Aloy bonding with Kratos and his son.
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Revenants are absolutely hated for their mobility, durability and HUGE damage, averting the Squishy Wizard trope. If you even try to hit them, they'll just flee while hitting you with damaging spells that also causes status ailments. Even when you learn to abuse Atreus' arrows to stun them, there's also the durability to take into account. It gets worse when there's two of them. (And taken Up to Eleven in the Ivaldi's Maze challenge, where you frequently encounter four at a time, along with draugr, wolves, wulvers, or dark elves in the same encounter area, just to make it interesting. And while they spam you with poison attacks, you watch your life timer slowly run down. And then there's the way they just keep laughing all the time...)
    • Dark Elves teeter between this and Goddamned Bats, but Dark Elf Lords are this, full stop. While also very durable and hard hitting, their landmine attack, which they love to spam, blinds you for a time if it connects and deals decent damage without any resistance. Then there is a mandatory part where you have to fight two of these guys at once...
    • Wulvers. Much like another RPG with normal wolves being not-so-bad while werewolves are actual hell, these bastards are way too durable for their damage and speed, with surprisingly good reach. And that's before they become enraged.
  • Epileptic Trees: Who summoned Jormungandr in the thunderstorm during the quest to heal Atreus? Just what this small scene even means has lead to wild speculation, since aside from Mimir, the only ones who could speak to Jormungandr would be people he would not like to meet (like Odin). The guesses have ranged from Loki/Atreus from the future, to a surviving giant.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Jörmungandr, the World Serpent. His impressive introduction scene helps revive the grand sense of scale mythological beings often have in this series. Despite his sinister appearance, Jörmungandr aids Kratos and Atreus in their quest multiple times. He even answers Atreus' cry for help during the endgame.
  • Even Better Sequel: Not only was it considered by many fans to be arguably the best game in the series, but some even consider it to be the best game on the PlayStation 4 to date — as of August 2018, the only two games with better Metacritic scores are Grand Theft Auto V and The Last of Us, both of which are actually Updated Rereleases of previous-generation games.
  • Fanfic Fuel: Where to start with? This game marks the beginning of a new era and mythology (Norse instead of Greek), while opening up many opportunities for stories to be told. Granted, since the new saga has barely begun, there is a great possibility many of the fan stories will be Jossed in the future sequels. It also helps that it has been more or less confirmed that other pantheons exist in the series besides the already seen Greco-Roman, Persian and Norse (in particular the Egyptian, Mesoamerican, Celtic, and Japanese). There are alot of people wishing for a God of War game set elsewhere (most popular candidates are either Egypt or Japan) after the Norse saga ends. Although it's worth mentioning that Egypt was originally considered by David Jaffe way back in GoW II, and that during the 2018 PS4 game's development, the team was literally split 50/50 between Norse and Egyptian until Cory Balrog stepped in and decided on Norse. However, one piece of concept art shows what this game would have looked like had the developers instead chosen ancient Egypt: [1]
  • Genius Bonus: The in-universe confusion over Freya and Frigg being the same god when Atreus thought they were separate is pretty in-line with real world debate on if the two are the same, since Freya isn't mentioned outside of Scandanavia, only Frigg, and the two gods have a lot of overlapping qualities. The one name being well-known while the other is not is explained by Mimir as Odin trying to Unperson Freya so that a Vanir could not claim credit for her great deeds, and he did so by attributing them to the goddess "Frigg", which was just his pet name for Freya and not a real Aesir.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • Nightmares aren't too hard to kill, but goddamn, will they annoy you with their laser beams.
    • Ditto with the Tatzelwurms, nasty snake-like beasts that can burrow themselves underground and spit venoms and fireballs at you when you least expected it. They can be pretty fast when they're underground and hard to dodge when they lunge at you, and they will occasionally break your combos by biting you when you try to melee them.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Kratos' quote "She would have died to see him live. Only a parent could understand." becomes heartbreaking after the announcement that Kratos' mocap actor, Shad Gaspard, died saving his son from drowning.
  • Heartwarming Moments: What is the main goal of this game? Not seeking blind revenge on the Gods, or taking down some monster but to lay Faye's (Kratos's wife and Atreus's mother) ashes to rest.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Avengers: Infinity War, which came out literally the week after the game, features Thor (a bearded demigod with a scar over his left eye) being crafted a magic axe by Sindri (there referred to by his other name of Eitri).
      • The dev team was apparently aware of the previous point, so they put a Lawyer-Friendly Cameo of the Infinity Gauntlet and the six infinity stones as the best talisman in the game. It's a Joke Item with a Magikarp Power that becomes extremely powerful once fully upgraded and with the right combination of enchantments. Though upgrading it is either Guide Dang It! or paying incredible attention to where Baldur's dragon is headed after being mortally wounded during the second fight with him.
    • Comparisons of the Stranger to Conor McGregor, since McGregor is known to train at the Mjölnir Gym and shares a physical resemblance to the Stranger. It is emphasized further by the Stranger fighting shirtless, when Conor's MMA fights are naturally shirtless, showing their similar physiques. Another guy who gets compared to the Stranger is Dutch pro wrestler Aleister Black, most likely due to their dark, brooding style of speaking.
      • On a similar note, Magni has been compared to Brock Lesnar due to their similar physiques, hairstyles (if you ignore Magni's braids) and menacing personas.
    • The ending reveal that Faye was a giant, making Atreus half-giant as well can be this when you remember the ending to the original God of War. How did Kratos gain the ability to defeat Ares? By Pandora's Box turning him into a giant.
    • In The Simpsons episode "Mona Leaves-a", Homer's mother dies, and requests Homer spread the ashes from the highest peak in Springfield. However, it turns out she was manipulating her son to achieve her goals in death. The game has a nearly identical story to the episode.
    • The fact that Kratos and Atreus spend some time rowing a boat on the river and Kratos calls Atreus "boy" through most of the game becomes pretty funny when one goes on to watch the film Bird Box, where the heroine (a ruthlessly pragmatic survivor of the post-apocalypse) has to make a perilous journey rowing a boat through a river and calls her kids "Boy" and "Girl". Honest Trailers even made reference to this parallel.
    • Due to it being based around ancient mythology, having a wrathful protagonist, and involving killing various deities, cultimating with the Top God of the verse, many considered Asura's Wrath the Japanese God of War. That said, the similarities are even moreso with this game, since Kratos, like Asura, is a family man who, after losing his wife, fights to protect his child from nefarious Physical Gods in an old-world pantheon. That, combined with a somewhat more cinematic focus, makes that less the Japanese God of War, and this more the American Asura's Wrath.
  • Hype Backlash: While most agree that it's a good game, many journalistic outlets declared it to be the perfect video game, utterly flawless in every way, dumping all over the previous God of War games in the process, which has caused a fair share of backlash.
  • Iron Woobie: Kratos once again, but this game made him a lot more of this: Broken over the death of Faye, struggling to raise and care for Atreus after her death, still showing immense guilt and self-loathing over the chaos he caused in the last games, even showing regret over killing Zeus, and of course, trying to be a better person while instilling the same thing to his own son and to not go on the same path as he went on makes you pity him. Reminder that the game makes one of the most bloodiest and most violent characters in any game out there actually feel sympathy and care for, especially remembering that Kratos wants to so hard to forgive himself and be nothing but a better person and a better father to his son.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: Not the game in respect to prior entries in the series obviously, but many have taken issue with the game being an over-the-shoulder, character and story driven game since many other Sony exclusives are like this. They fear that the series has lost its unique identity in favor of Sony homogenizing its game output.
  • Jerkass Woobie: The Stranger AKA Baldur, who spent a century with sensory deprivation. Ever since his mother removed his ability to feel (including the ability to taste), he actively sought death by someone who could kill him. Meeting Kratos didn't satisfy his need to feel until he punches Atreus while unwittingly removing his invulnerability via mistletoe arrowhead attached to his bow string. Kratos and Atreus were lost for words when they found out after overhearing the illusions of himself and Freya arguing over this dilemma.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • With the announcement the game would involve Norse mythology, fans have naturally joked primarily about Thor and other Asgardians from the Marvel Cinematic Universe freaking out about Kratos coming to kill them too.
    • "Dad of War"
    • The unofficial Fanon name of Kratos's son Atreus is ... "Boy", which seems to have stuck even after his real name was revealed. It's becoming increasingly common to associate the "BOI" meme with this game as well due to Kratos referring mostly to Atreus this way than calling him by his name.
      • A few people have combined the above two memes into "Dad of Boy."
    • A few people have taken to calling the dedicated button to command Atreus the "son button".
    • Thor himself showing up at the end of the game as a Sequel Hook is jokingly interpreted by some fans as him trying to recruit Kratos into the Avengers to fight Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War.
    • The reveal that Atreus is Loki, which, according to Norse myth would make the World Serpent his son, has caused many fans to describe the finale of the climax battle (where Atreus asks Jörmungandr to help him and Kratos) as the "Best family moment ever" or "Best grandfather-father-son cooperation ever".
      • Also, joking that Atreus would refer to Jörmungandr as his "BOY".
    • Comparing the manner of which Mimir speaks to the World Serpent (particularly his warm-up noises) to a certain blue fish speaking "whale".
    • "Dad Time"/"God Time". The Ksavir amulet is similar to Bayonetta's Witch Time mechanic, where time slows when you execute a perfect dodge.
    • With the option to leap to your doom from the branches of Yggdrasil, many a commented have referenced the very first scene of the very first game.
    Kratos: The Aesir have abandoned me. Now there is no hope.
    And Kratos cast himself from the highest tree in all the Nine Realms.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The Leviathan Axe will clang against various distant objects and make a dull smack when it finally returns to Kratos's hand. Very satisfying.
    • Although it is part of a theme instead of a separate sound effect, the trumpet that sounds after a Valkyrie is killed perfectly captures the feeling of relief and satisfaction gained from killing one of the game's toughest bosses.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • The entire concept of the game featuring Norse Mythology is seen as a bold new idea. However, David Jaffe had expressed interest in making such game in the same universe as far back as God Of War II, which specifically featured a prophecy alluding to the possibility.
    • As this video elaborates, a lot of the plot points this game has, plot points people pointed towards when talking about how more mature the storytelling is, were previously done throughout every game before this (just that this game has all of those together, as opposed to them being spread throughout multiple games).
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: By the end of the Olympian Trilogy, it had become very difficult to root for Kratos due to his selfishness, lack of remorse for his actions, and obsession with revenge even if it meant devastating the world. Here, time and age has mellowed out the once vengeful demigod into a wiser and more reasonable figure who feels genuine regret over his past actions and is trying to redeem himself by acting as a good father for Atreus, relatively speaking, while making an effort to control his infamous rage.
  • Signature Scene:
    • Judging from all the reviews, the moment everyone knew that God of War is back in full force was the first boss fight with The Stranger.
      • Of particular note is when The Stranger demonstrates his strength and effortlessly punches Kratos over his house.
    • Kratos and Atreus awakening the World Serpent.
    • And of course, the scene where Kratos recovers the Blades of Chaos and proceeds to unleash hell with them, just like old times.
    • The final battle against Baldur, and by extension, Baldur's death.
    • The scene of Kratos and Atreus spreading Faye's ashes across Jötunheim.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped:
    • Power can indeed corrupt, but power is ultimately a tool. Whether power hurts or helps people is up to the user. You can use it to serve others if that is how you choose to apply it.
    • Revenge will never bring you fulfillment, even if it feels good in the moment. Seeking revenge just fills you with anger until you've hollowed out your ability to feel any other emotion, and in the end you will have suffered more than the object of your revenge.
    • It's possible for war to linger on for so long that both sides have forgotten the reason why the war started in the first place. Tribalism can lead to wars outlasting their purpose, with the only so-called "meaningful" reason for its continuation is that our side is right and the other side is wrong.
    • Redemption is a matter of the heart, and no one can determine for you if your path to correct your life is hopeless. Even people with a dark past deserve to make an attempt to change the way they live; if they have genuine remorse for what they've done and wish to improve. Even if others dismiss it as a sham, and see you as a villain, don't give up. They could never make that choice for you. Trying to do the right thing is never a worthless gesture, and it's better than giving up. Also, don't get discouraged if you fail along the way, so long as you're alive there will be opportunities to make up for what you've done.
    • Conversely, the consequences of your actions linger on even if you try to make up for them. It's important to acknowledge both the good and the ugly parts of your past, because for better or worse they have shaped who you are now. Sometimes, even if you had good intentions your actions can leave ugly scars that hurt yourself and others forever. The healthy response is to acknowledge that you've done wrong, learn from it, and try to do better next time.
    • Even people in positions of great power and authority make mistakes, sometimes mistakes that are just as bumbling and messy as any ordinary mortal. Never assume you're too big for the problems of the world to come knocking on your door. In fact, because you're bigger in status, the problems that come your way tend to be a lot worse. This isn't to say lofty people should give up on their ambitions, but they must be good stewards of the resources and talents they have lest the circumstances of life blow up in their face.
    • Kratos continuing to live long after the people who held grudges against him have died, conveys a message of "war doesn't determine who is right, only who is left." Sometimes by the time we've gone through self-reflection and realize we were in the wrong, or at least could have handled our problems in a healthier way, it's already far too late to correct it. If there is any cosmic "justice" to be found in situations like this, it might be better to stop moping over the sins of the past and just live your life; try to live better than the mistakes that caused the grudges of the past to exist. Maybe if you survive for a while longer, you might bring hope to future generations and allow them to learn from the mistakes you and your enemies made. This is reflected in Kratos' firm affirmation "The cycle ends here. We must be better than this."
    • You can actually do more damage to someone by protecting them, Kratos caused the poor relationship between himself and Atreus because he was trying too hard to ensure that he knew how to survive in the future and not become as bad as him. Freya and Baldur's estrangement was caused by Freya's overprotectiveness in an attempt to protect Baldur from "a needless death". Baldur became a villain because Freya's curse drove him to insanity, whereas, Atreus nearly died when his godhood was unknowingly activated in a fit of anger.
    • It's important that the person we aim to be is, above all else, a better version of ourselves. Admiring the powers, talents, and even good character of others is fine, but we must keep things in perspective. The people we admire often have their own struggles, their own character flaws that hold them back from achieving the greatness they desired. Moreso, we often have our own flaws that we must work on before we can make progress in a personal journey. The people we admire had their personal journeys, and we must strive to stay the course on ours. Kratos passes on this perspective to Atreus, citing that the failures of past gods will not be their inevitable fate — they will be the gods they choose to be.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: A Norse mythology setting with an Older and Wiser god on a journey together with younger version of Loki? It's easy to see this game as a video game adaptation of the 2011 run of Marvel Comics' Journey into Mystery, with Kratos in place of Thor.
  • That One Attack:
    • Some of the harder Valkyries have a very nasty attack where they scream "VALHALLA!", launch themselves into the air, and dive-bomb you. You have a very tight window to dodge this, and if you don't you'll get pinned and take a minimum of three stomps to the head, which is enough to kill on the highest difficulty. Worse still, some Valkyries have a unique riff on the attack. For example, Gondul will rain down a fireball, then perform the dive, when you've probably had plenty of practice with the typical timing before fighting her. Others will attempt the dodge three times in a row. Sigrun can use both those variations and switch mid-combo.
      • In addition to the above: The "VALHALLA!" scream from the lesser Valkyries can actually help you, serving as a handy audio cue to aid in timing your dodge. Sigrun however does not call the attack and can often use it alongside her other combos, or simply at random. This makes it particularly deadly if you happen to lose track of her and don't see the initial launch.
    • The Valkyries also possess an attack where they dash at Kratos and attempt to stab him with their wing. What makes this attack nasty is how incredibly fast the move is, the fact that it is also unblockable and, just like the above move, the timing can change depending on which Valkyrie you're fighting.
    • As mentioned above, the Dark Elf Lord's landmine attacks. If you get hit by one, your visibility will turn near zero for a big while and you will be very vulnerable to attacks from all sides...and this will possibly lead you to getting hit by it again.
    • Geirdriful and Sigrun also have an attack where they hover in the air, look up, and unleash a flash that blinds you for several seconds, leaving you vulnerable to follow-up attacks. None of the usual counters (blocking, dodging, interrupting with an axe throw) work for this attack. The only way to avoid its effects is to turn the camera away so the valkyrie is off-screen. This is the only time you will ever do this in the whole game, so even figuring out the counter can be a major Guide Dang It!, and the window to execute it is extremely brief. Sigrun has no less than six hovering attacks, each of which requires a different counter, and you have a split second to react.
  • That One Boss:
    • Round One against The Stranger can be quite brutal, even for a Wake-Up Call Boss; not because he's a Lightning Bruiser that will force you to adapt to the new combat rather quickly, but because he's a Marathon Boss with three phases and you have no real way to heal yourself.
    • Svartáljǫfurr, the Dark Elf King. Remember the Dark Elf Lords mentioned in the Demonic Spiders entry? This guy comes first, and he's all that, plus a truck ton more health and kites you far more often.
    • Gullveig, the Revenant boss in one of the favors, due to being a souped up version of the much hated Revenants.
    • All of the Valkyries are brutal, though optional, Bonus Bosses even on the lowest difficulty. But Sigrun stands among them as the absolute worst. Compared to other Valkyries, she has significantly more health, deals more damage, is noticeably faster, lacks the scream that telegraphs the aforementioned dive-bomb attack AND has the combined abilities of almost all other Valkyries, with the exception of Kara's ability to summon Draugr to aid her. It should also be noted that, because of the sheer amount of attacks she possesses, Sigrun is also the only Valkyrie who can, and will, cancel her moves mid-attack to switch to another move.
  • That One Level: The level where you first encounter the Heavy Draugrs that you fight in the pit (aka Atreus screaming "Something's breaking through the wall!"), particularly during the higher difficulties. You don't have many options against them, their attacks will easily break your guard for other Draugrs to pile upon you, and you don't even have the option to parry back against them. Your only option is to basically throw axes at them until they yield except you don't have much room to maneuver and one hit from them and you will be sent back to the continue screen where you have to start the cheesing over again. By the time you re-encounter them again, you have far more space to maneuver and can cheese them thanks to the bridge gap and any other future encounters turn them into just another strong enemy to fight.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • The No-Damage Run Challenge (in Muspelheim Trials) is back and is as hard as ever, arguably even more so with the new over-the-shoulder camera style which means your line-of-sight is limited to the right side of the screen and makes you vulnerable to enemies who sneak up on you from the left and the back. The Impossible version of the challenge is arguably the hardest trial in the game, where you'll have to contend with Wulvers and a freaking Soul Devourer at the same time.
    • The quest to free the Valkyries. While a very simplistic "Fight and free 9 Valkyries" quest, every fight with the Valkyries is tough in its own right. It gets worse when it comes time to fight Sigrun. The game recommends end-game level equipment and abilities for when you fight Sigrun and for good reason.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Fans of classic God of War have not been nearly as receptive to this game as the influx of newer players for this reason. In particular, the loss of the hyper-violent focus on gameplay that formed so much of the series' identity in favor of a slow-paced, character-driven plot has resulted in shellshock for people who happened to like it the way it was.
  • Ugly Cute: The World Serpent can dip hard into Uncanny Valley, but some fans think that it's not that bad when he's in the distant skyline, combined with his slow movements, relaxed nature, and habit of sleeping, it can be almost endearing to return to the Lake of the Nine and see him there same as he ever was.
  • Values Dissonance: Non-western players might not fully register The Reveal that Loki is Atreus's true name due to a general unfamiliarity with Norse Mythology, and Loki's overall nature. However being familiar with the Marvel Universe or watching Marvel Cinematic Universe movies and knowing Marvel's version of Loki could help you make the connection.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • A developer confirmed that the sex mini-games that were viewed as Rated M for Money gimmicks will not be returning.
    • In general, the series' new direction has been well-received, ironically because it's perceived to be more mature than past games' bloody carnage. While people still love previous God of War games, the newest game has been met with open arms as it sticks to its roots while providing a fresh and new twist to both the gameplay and the story.
    • Dropping the QTEs was met with thunderous approval worldwide.
  • The Woobie: Atreus really deserves a hug for the utter hell he goes through, losing his mother, struggling with his newly discovered godhood, trying to bond and be close to his distant father and yet he still tries to be a happy kid. And let's not even add the known knowledge of Loki....

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report