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  • Accidental Innuendo: Shiva's weakness is women, apparently.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: Jake is by far the least liked of the protagonists in North America, due to betraying the party and smashing the Fire Crystal (part of a seal protecting the world) for very stupid reasons. He also puts himself well into Squick territory by flirting with Fina and Lid (teenagers) when he is nearly 30, Sakura (who has the body of a child) and Kunshira (a cat). The fact that both his season 1 and his season 2 rerelease are considered very low tier for their maximum awakening levels doesn't help.
    • The Jake situation is made far worse because Lid, who absolutely loathes him and even violently dropkicks him across a room while screaming "DIE!" at him... apparently starts to fall for him. The implication is even that her Heavenly Technician variant adopted a sexier appearance and flashier attacks to impress Jake.
  • Anticlimax Boss:
    • The boss that's at the end of Chapter 7, Part 2 and the penultimate boss of Season 1, Sol of the Eight Sages, has an array of powerful magic attacks, 50% resistance to six elements (and full immunity to Light-element attacks, which are perhaps the easiest to build towards using with melee fighters), dispels your party if you buff yourself, and has nearly a half million hit points. On the other hand, the Final Boss of Season 1 the Chaotic Darkness, only has 50% Darkness resistance, weakness to Light attacks (see above about how easy it is to abuse those), and significantly weaker attacks. Even with the same number of hit points, the latter is a vastly easier boss for the most part (unless you have a very well-equipped Veritas of the Dark, who will make short work of the former). If anything, the One-Winged Angel form of Chaotic Darkness is even easier, with basically no offense to speak of, making its nearly one million HP more of a chore than anything else.
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    • The Tower of Zot on ELT is comically easy for an ELT level, even accounting for the King Mog currency events being less challenging. This is for the simple reason that almost every enemy is vulnerable to Petrify, including the final boss. Any unit with Rikku's Pouch (for Chaos Grenade) makes the thing a cakewalk. You only need a single unit with decent damage to take out the Ice Lizard and Fell Turtle, which aren't all that dangerous. It's so easy you don't even really need a healer if the damage unit can kill in one or two hits. The redux fixed this exploit.
  • Ass Pull: The Tear of Providence coming with the condition that using it to heal someone removes immortality. Not only does this come out of nowhere, it directly contradicted events of the previous chapter where Citra was healed using the Tear and did not lose her immortality. The entire twist just comes off as an excuse to depower the Sworn Six minus Raegen and Sakura. It's especially egregious in Sakura's case because she wants to be rid of her immortality but never got the chance to benefit from this "cure".
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  • Awesome Music: "Duel," the regular battle theme, immediately told new players they were getting into something really good.
  • Base-Breaking Character: Rain in Season 2 has become one due to joining the Orders as Hyoh of the Delta Star. Many fans found the reasoning for his actions to be ridiculous given that he is trying to prevent the Empire from committing further death and destruction to Paladia by... Joining them and perpetrating the exact same acts. Others think that the Hess side is to blame and seeing as they made things much worse for Rain in the past that he's right to not trust them at the very least and that changing the Empire from the inside might be the only way to make a real difference. Finally there is a third camp who find the whole plot to be a ridiculous Conflict Ball setup to justify Rain and Lasswell being on different sides of a conflict despite sharing the same end goals as one another.
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  • Blame Game: Seen during the fallout after the Esther/Sylvie nerfs. Esther and Sylvie were originally revealed as powerful units who were far ahead of not only the currently released units, but most scheduled units for the near future. As a result, Gumi made a stealth patch nerfing the units to a more manageable level 20 minutes before the banner dropped. The community was up in arms, calling the eleventh-hour changes a bait-and-switch by the developers. When they responded, they blamed "unofficial sources" for the confusion. The passing around of blame only expanded the disconnect between the developers and the community, since the community saw it as an attack on their content creators, and the "unofficial sources" directly ripped their information from the game's data itself.
  • Bonus Feature Failure:
    • Gumi originally had a lot of trouble designing Global-exclusive events in the early months of the game - usually involving a lot of grinding for a negligible reward. It took until the first Festival of the Autumn Moon event for Gumi to design exclusive content that was positively viewed by the player base.
      • The Lands of Plenty event involved hours upon hours of grinding to craft the Shining Splendor. This was when crafting slots were limited to 4, and weapons took time to craft. Making a Fine Blade had small requirements, needing 5 Broadswords, various materials found in the event, and 3 hours to craft. A Superior Blade needed more of the same materials as, but with 6 Fine Blades. However, the Shining Splendor was considered very daunting. Not only did it take 3 Superior Blades, 50 Mythril Ore, 80 of every other ore, and 2 days of time to craft, but it required 80 Cavern Ores. This only dropped in a special exploration gated behind three bosses - one of which had sky-high DEF and countered spells with Osmose. Overall, it took almost 500 pieces of lumber, 360 Copper Ores, about 200 of the other Ores, 80 Cavern Ores, 156,000 Gil (quite a bit back in that time period), and more than 2 days of crafting time to craft the Shining Splendor. This sword was good for its time, and served players well for a while, but the grind was considered unenjoyable.
      • The Demons Unleashed event was considered the turning point of Gumi's design towards Global-exclusive offerings. This event offered two items: Void Vessel and Rod of Gravity. The Void Vessel was simple enough: it did 2,000 Dark-elemental damage to one enemy and was crafted from 5 Farplane Souls and Dark Crysts. It was considered a fine item and even got some use in trial content. The Rod of Gravity, which was the centerpiece of the event, failed to make the event worth the grind. For starters, players needed 44 Void Vessels to craft the rod, or 220 Dark Crysts and Farplane Souls, 66 Litrocks, and 66 Earth's Cores. These were easy enough, but the problem were the 80 Demon Hearts. Only one or two dropped from the highest difficulty, making the grind grueling. In contrast to the Shining Splendor, which was a strong item, the Rod of Gravity was only marginally stronger than the Fire Rod, which could be crafted for free with a Magic Key. Most people grabbed their Void Vessel recipes, did the ADV stage for 100 Lapis, and moved on from the event.
    • The NieR: Automata event, despite being advertised heavily with Global Original units, was a polarizing event. Despite having a long-awaited release without any nerfs to the actual characters or items, they released two Regional Bonus characters, A2 and Eve. Most Global Original characters at that point were used as bridges between meta-changing units (Ling for Warrior of Light/Tilith, Zargabaath for enhanced Ramza) or to take advantage of underutilized or new mechanics (Fryevia for hybrids, Xon as a high-risk, high-reward thief). A2 was the latter, being able to chain and heal herself at the same time, and having a massive ATK buff and a 20% Sap. She was very well-received after they ironed out the bugs that came with her release. However, it became apparent that Eve was based off of Adam, another NieR: Automata unit who had hundreds of copies handed out for free. Unlike most other bad Global Original units, who were largely Awesome, but Impractical or Rescued from the Scrappy Heap by their enhancements or strong Trust Mastery Rewards, Eve was designed to be a worse unit than his counterparts. While the event was one of the most successful collaborations, Eve's inclusion alone left a bad taste in hardcore players' mouths for the long-term.
    • The Global version's Christmas event for 2017, Eternal Winter, is considered to be one of the worst events of all time. For their regional exclusive, they decided to mash all three event types into one. It had the grind of Mog King events, story scenes similar to story events, and the collaborative effort of raids. The main problem is that the low rewards and exorbitant rates openly discouraged players from running it. It was released within the same time frame as the Final Fantasy VII Destroy the Reactor event, forcing players to divide their energy between the two. Unlike a conventional Mog King event, Eternal Winter had no bonuses, worse drop rates, worse rewards in the Mog King store, and even viewing the story scenes required the same currency used to attain rewards. The rewards were grossly overpriced compared to Mog King events, with the only 4-star Summon Ticket offered costing 30,000 Candy Canes. This would take 60 runs of the highest difficulty, or 1,500 NRG, to farm. The VII event sold three of the same ticket for 20,000 currency combined, which can be earned in 10 runs on the highest difficulty with a Conrad and a 100% friend carry. In NRG terms, farming the Eternal Winter event cost six times the NRG for a third of the payout. Finally, the second stage was also gated behind farming the event, and even then the increase wasn't enough to make it worth farming. It says a lot that the players who did farm the event only got the 4-star ticket and enough to craft the single ability, moving onto story or Trust Mastery farming.
    • The Malboro trial at its current release is considered the hardest trial in the history of Brave Exvius due to its challenging mechanics. The rewards are unprecendentedly bad, and arguably the worst rewards of any trial in the game. Malboro's Whisper, which increases your HP by 20% and MAG by 30%, is very useful, giving a bit of extra cushion on your mages, and can be acquired by finishing him off with a Limit Burst. Beating Malboro himself gives you a powerful MAG whip with Phys/MAG Plant Killer+ attached. On paper, it looks good, but only a select few units who have access to whips are MAG-based. Most are 5-star bases or limited edition. The only two who do not fall under these categories are Rydia, a 5-star max who is most known for esper evoking, Seven, a Red Mage who generally only sees use in the Arena due to her enhanced Osmoselash draining MP, and Yuri, a 3-star hybrid chainer who is actually useful in 10-man trials. Even then, Seven has Master of None issues and can equip the more-easily available MAG-boosting swords, and Garnet can go up to 6-stars. Summoning Ifrit gives you Malboro's Eye, an accessory that gives you a usable ability that increases the party's poison, sleep, silence, and petrify resistance by 50%. This is useless, considering statuses are fairly easy for veterans to gear against in the first place and silence isn't a huge deal for physical damage dealers anyways. It's most notably beaten out by the Jade Moon Pendant, which gives a 100% resistance buff against all ailments and was given out for free.
    • The Cash Summon banner might be the biggest failure of all. A golden opportunity for people to get a guaranteed 5-star unit out of spenders was ruined by an exorbitant price tag (to the tune of $45-$70) that very few wanted to pay. The cash summon was a simple off-banner 11-pull with a guaranteed 5-star unit. This came after other exorbitantly-priced bundles that most saw as a ripoff. The community, after seeing the price, revolted, and the cash summon actually led to Gumi getting some negative publicity. The bundle was regarded as such a mistake that later on, when they issued another guaranteed 5-star bundle, they gave 12 NRG restores and a 10% Moogle for $25.
    • The Fabul Castle Guard event for Final Fantasy IV in Japan was met with mediocre reception for both 5* units (Child Rydia and Helmless Kain), so the Global iteration of the event announced it planned to buff both units. Rydia was announced to be receiving the ability to Double-cast her Summon skills, something she did not get until 7* in Japan. Kain was mentioned to be allowed to chain with Lila, a particularly popular and common Chainer since she shared a Step Up with Sephiroth, and would gain an Imperil Wind on his strongest chaining move, Sonic Gale. When the event went live, however, an in-game announcement revealed that Rydia's Double Summoning did not make it into the game, leaving her with a slight buff to one of her attack skills and converting a 20% Magic Passive into a 50% Magic passive. While this seems like a buff, it was found not to make Rydia's Bi S any higher and in some cases may negatively impact her output, since her Esper attacks are based on both Magic and Spirit, stats that are very hard to find at high numbers in tandem on a Rod to trigger the passive. Staves have options like Yuna's Nirvanna Trust mastery, making Rydia easier to build but ultimately not any noticeably better than her Japanese incarnation. Kain, on the other hand, was found to be near impossible to perfect chain with Lila or Aileen (as Sonic Gale was found to have the same frames as Piledriver+2) since the chains in question involved the unit moving, and thus used their attack animations, which would not sync up properly to make a proper chain. This essentially leaves Kain's most effective chaining option as a copy, just like in Japan, while the Wind Imperil on Sonic Gale was of little benefit since other Piledrivers were Earth-based and Aileen had a higher Imperil effect, making Earth a more effective choice anyway. The miscommunication with Rydia coupled with the failure to address the main issues with Kain from his Japanese counterpart left a VERY sour taste in the playerbase's mouth.
    • In the Final Fantasy VIII event, the developers decided to upgrade the Revolver. It became a 125 ATK 2-handed sword, which was a 5 ATK downgrade from Conrad's TMR. The problem was its 100,000 trinket price tag (in comparison, most 3-star TMRs are valued at 12,000 trinkets). The second problem was that Conrad was the 3-star base on Cloud Strife's banner. Not only did Conrad share a banner with the face of the franchise (and one of the most iconic characters in gaming history), but his banner introduced an integral, powerful game mechanic in True Doublehand. Conrad and Cloud's banner was such a money maker for Gumi that they reissued the banner six months later. Veterans had no incentive to pick the Revolver up because they already had a copy of Conrad's Revolving Saw, and it was widely panned for costing almost as much as a high-end Unit of Choice ticket did in Japan.
    • Wave Battle events have been widely panned due to their unoriginal structure. While it originally stemmed from fan ideas, Gumi's implementation has left a lot of players wanting more. Instead of going with a new structure (the specific fan idea was an endless battle with rewards based on how far you got), Wave Battles are largely reskins of other event types with less rewards. As seen during Eternal Winter, a "new event" that was a severely watered-down Mog King event, this type of event goes over poorly. The gear crafted in these events is rarely usable for veteran players, giving them no incentive to run the event past completing missions. In addition, the beginning of the events had no rewards besides the mission rewards from the first run. While they moved to a raid event-style structure, which enabled players to keep the main draw of cactuars, Trust Moogles, and gil, some people still complained about the lack of tickets and general NRG cost.
    • The Enlightenment Point (EP) system exclusive to Global has drawn immediate ire for being a repackaged version of the JP server's Series Boss Battle (SBB) system except worse in nearly every way. While the SBB system requires clearing a boss in twenty turns to unlock new abilities for select units, Global's EP system requires keys to gain event currency, which then can be used to unlock the abilities. The prices required are exorbitant (5,000 EP to fully unlock a single ability) for what were free upgrades in Japan. Fans were immediately angered at the downgrade, which may not necessarily require defeating a boss, but in exchange, is incredibly slow and requires hoarding of event currency over a period of months for small upgrades to units that are for the most part already outclassed in the current meta. While they did remove the original gil cost and increased the amount of EP dropped from the free daily, reducing the time needed for a full unlock to a couple weeks, they decided to gate Gold Keys (which unlock a little more than half a skill) behind the highest tier of rewards (costing nearly as much as a Select Ticket in the Mog King shop). In effect, the Enlightenment Point system was intended to make Latent Abilities accessible to beginners, and not only failed to do so, but made it less accessible for veterans in the process.
  • Breather Boss:
    • Shadow Bahamut, in the Realm of the Dragon King. The trash are strong, with instant KO attacks, strong DPS, and the ability to pre-emptively strike your party. Bahamut is the most challenging "story boss" in Lapis, especially before the age of AoE magic tanks. Shadow Bahamut, however, takes a full turn to charge his Megaflare and has defenses made of paper. If you have strong chainers, he should die before he even has a chance to get Megaflare off.
    • The Wicked Beast Cerberus trial from the Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV event was hilariously easy. His DEF and SPR were very low, even for a trial boss, and most of his attacks were fire-elemental. His biggest concern was a ST Death attack, but this could be Provoked and nullified with Safety Bit or Genji Shield. It also was susceptible to all breaks, and even Poison for more damage potential. In short, this meant that you could easily buff/gear for fire resistance and gear for paralysis, and the fight was incredibly easy.
    • For trials, the Elafikeras qualifies. In contrast to Glacial's RNG-based gameplay or Bloody Moon and Malboro's sheer difficulty, Elafikeras is a fairly easy Rush Boss with an 8-turn limit. If you don't kill it by then, it kills you. On its first turn, it gives your party a full Refresh for eight turns. Every turn after the first, it uses a single attack that hits your party for physical damage. At the 75% and 50% thresholds, it will use a more powerful physical attack if hit with actual magic (a magical skill like Chaos Wave or Aureole Ray won't work) or a magic attack otherwise. As long as you attack with only magic spells, a dodge tank or a decent physical tank with Mechanical Heart for healing will render it completely impotent and remove any need for a healer. Its SPR is paper-thin, allowing mages to do obscene damage. It's so easy that it can be completed with two Tornado-chaining Shantottos and two Wind-based finishers.
    • Among the 3* espers, Siren is appropriately the easiest. With a mere 1.2 million HP, she's extremely easy to wipe out in one or two turns. Her Water-element attacks are easily nullified by a properly-geared magic tank, and her sleep attacks can be protected against or simply cured away. Her only real threat is her non-elemental threshold attack which comes packaged with AoE sleep, and this can be beaten with guard or Reraise.
    • Ifrit's 3-star form is far bulkier than Siren, to the tune of 50 million HP compared to her 1.2 million, but he suffers from an even greater weakness to tanks. A magic tank geared for 200% Fire resistance will absorb all of Ifrit's magic attacks despite the fire debuff, and his physical attacks can be absorbed by a Provoke tank. Ifrit doesn't have anything else to fall back on, so your damage-dealers can attack with impunity, making his high HP more of a slog than anything else.
    • Golem's 3-star form looks very intimidating at first. He has physical and magical AoE damage and powerful ST attacks. The biggest problem is that all of his AoE attacks are Earth-elemental. A Veritas of the Earth with 100% Evade can take the boss down by himself, if rather tediously. He absorbs every Earth attack and dodges everything else. If you want to finish the trial faster, it's still possible if you can build one physical cover/provoke tank with 100% evade and Earth resistance and one magical cover tank with Earth resistance. It's extremely rare for Golem to trigger both AoE attacks on a single turn, effectively making the rest of your team invincible as long as you can dispel the debuffs.
    • 3* Fenrir is a joke compared to his peers. Fenrir possesses no innate imperils for his elemental attacks and only uses a combination of AoE magical and single-target physical attacks, plus some minor status effects. This allows a player to negate nearly all of the damage he can do through a combination of elemental resistance and physical evasion. While he does have a fairly powerful non-elemental magic attack, 3* Fenrir was added after the introduction of 7* magic tanks, who have health and magical resistance more than high enough to take the hit without any risk of dying. With a decent breaker and a source of dispel, Fenrir is practically a free upgrade for anyone capable of beating the previous espers.
    • 3* Phoenix is, rather paradoxically, easier than his 2* form. 3* Phoenix has no imperils, uses a combination of fire and non-elemental magic, and single-target physical attacks. This means all of his damage can be absorbed by tanks. Though his health is bumped up to 100 million, his ice and wind weaknesses are also increased to 300%, allowing elemental attackers to chew through his health with ease. Finally, he trades the threshold-based healing of his 2* form for a full heal every nine turns, which is more than enough for even 6* chainers to bring him down.
  • Broken Base:
    • The announcement that Ariana Grande would be added to the game as a playable character was met with tumult. One portion of the player base took a "wait-and-see" approach, one portion was radically against a pop star being added to the game, and one portion was annoyed that Grande was added before some of the desired content from the Japanese version (such as Orlandeau or the six-star upgrade to Warrior of Light) or characters more beloved by the fanbase (such as anyone from Final Fantasy VII), while some were just bemused by it all, and shrugged and said "hey, a free 6* bard with free gear".
    • In general, the introduction of 5* base characters caused this. The game's initial gacha model was one more like certain other games like Fire Emblem Heroes or Valkyrie Connect - more or less everyone was available as a 3* or 4*, and getting a 5* was more about getting a character who already had a leg up on grinding to their maximum power. While the players were reasonably satisfied with this system (as it meant getting a favorite character wasn't too difficult, if you didn't mind grinding them up some), A-lim and SE decided, for various reasons, that the gacha lacking true "chase targets" for whales was hurting the game's bottom line. So starting with the introduction of Lightning, the game introduced 5* base characters. Not only were these characters easily far more powerful than previous characters (especially since they all debuted with a 6* awakening available), but the odds of rolling one in any given single pull of the gacha was 1% at the time (upped to 3% on Black Friday 2017) - and then it was a literal coin flip as to whether or not it would have been the banner-featured 5*, or a different off-banner 5* unit. This caused a lot of gnashing of teeth on both sides of the Pacific, as it was a huge departure from the previous character acquisition design. As the game progressed, most turned against it since you could still get a 3* or 4* base from a 5* crystal. That problem was solved by crystal equalization in February.
    • To an extent, the emphasis on Brave Exvius original units goes back and forth. Some players appreciate them from a mechanical stand point and like the designs of many, such as the Global Exclusive Ling from the Lunar New Year event, and in general appreciate that BE is trying to have its own identity outside of the crossover characters. Other players are somewhat annoyed that these units take up a significant portion of the banners and Gacha pool, sometimes at the expense of the pre-established units that said players are nostalgic for, especially when some games like IX had to wait 18 months from the game's debut to see a proper event. There was a span of time where the Global game went almost a month without a "regular" Final Fantasy game event, and this could be extended to 2 months for those unattached to Type-0, which is much bigger in Japan than most of the Global playerbase. And then among that there is a minority who are not fond of the Brave Exvius units in JP easily competing with, if not straight outperforming, the established units, such as Ayaka or Lotus Mage Fina being the best healer by a mile in 2017, or Dark Veritas and Aileen being the same-if-not-better than Cidolfus Orlandeau for many fights - though the fans then rebut with the units being good being the point, and so on, and so forth.
      • Even more polarizing are the lower base rarity of certain main characters in the franchise (like Vaan and Bartz, who do not even reach 6 stars). Some are unhappy that their favorite characters (like Lightning and Tidus) are locked behind 5-star bases, but are satisfied with how strong they are as units. Those who like 3-star characters are happy that they have an abundance of their favorite character, but are unhappy with their strength and later ditch them for better ones. However, with the release of units like Trance Terra and Livid Shantotto, fans of weaker 3-star bases are starting to feel some sort of hope that their favorite units will get released. Alim has promised CG versions of each main character of the mainline games, with only Radiant Lightning being released so far in Global.
    • The differences between Global and Japan (and whether they are considered two different games) are seen as controversial. While the debate originally started over exclusive content coming to Japan, it mostly comes in the question of whether the Global version and Japanese version are different games. The producers often use "Global and Japanese versions are two different games" to explain why the Global community doesn't get certain benefits and rewards that Japanese players get. One side believes that the content Global gets is adequate enough to make a difference. For example, Power Creep is much more accelerated due to units like Esther, Sylvie, and Zeno of the Beta Star being released, and some believe that the accelerated curve of DPS units makes it a different game. Others believe that the Global-exclusive event types are mostly reskins of other events, the lack of Global-exclusive trials, and the most substantial difference is that the Global version is less generous. For example, the Global version of the Valkyrie Profile collaboration's banner was severely nerfed, with lower drop rates for the individual units' step-ups, no banners featuring individual units, and off-banners added. Also, units previously advertised as Global-exclusive (like Reberta and Ling) were offered in the Japanese version. Those who believe the two versions are the same game point out that Gumi now uses "Global Original", leaving a possibility of including their content in the Japanese version. In addition, the producers have also admitted that the Global version is directly based off of the Japanese version, and whenever people ask what events can be expected in the near future, the producers usually respond with "Check JP's schedule."
      • The changes to the NieR: Automata banner are especially very polarizing. Some people are glad that A2 (5-star) and Eve (4-star), two other NieR characters, were added to the gacha and pullable, and the expansion of two new characters added to their hype. Others are angry that two new units were added to the pool. A2 looked like a very competent chainer, so nobody minded the rate split there, but people were angry about Eve's inclusion in the normal gacha, calling his inclusion a scheme to nerf the rate for Game-Breaker 9S (who was arguably the most hyped unit in the history of FFBE, along with Orlandeau and Warrior of Light's 6-star upgrade). The anger is compounded by people who haven't played NieR targeting the banner specifically for 9S, who has a game-breaking TMR and was the best debuffer in the game for the next four months. He was only surpassed by a Global Original 5-star base, and the only one in Japan who surpassed him was released long after 9S). Happier people are happy there's more NieR content and that A2 is a Game-Breaker in her own right.
    • The 7-star upgrade system has been hotly debated since the Japanese version announced it in October of 2017. Some criticized the 7-star system as a transition to a pay-to-win model, as you need a dupe of a certain unit to upgrade them to 7-star. Others praised it: while some duplicate units were still good for chaining, other dupes (like Marie and Lightning) were useless in combat. The 7-star system gave these dupes a use besides Trust Mastery Reward fodder, and gave an opportunity for older units to shine again. In addition, Japanese players noted the rainbow rate buff: despite the off-banner chance being raised from 50% to 66%, this resulted in a greater chance for smaller spenders to gain dupes for 7-star units. It also helps that the developers give out Select Tickets on various occasions, guaranteeing a copy of a certain unit after some amount of time, and offer prisms for limited-time units in the shop. The debate is starting to re-ignite due to the Summon Fest system removing the safety nets that buoyed the 7-star system.
    • Exvius Points, specifically in the Japanese version. These are special rewards for spending real money on the game. These rewards include special summoning tickets, leveling materials, and a guaranteed 5-star ticket. Some people see this as a positive, with whales being rewarded for supporting the game's bottom line. Others see this as a negative, especially in JP, where Loren, Karlette, and Mediena are gated behind $500. Many in Global were afraid that Loren would remain locked behind a paywall, but she wound up displacing Roy on his banner, averting most of the worries.
    • The nerfs to the Sephiroth banner step-up led to a lot of debate among the community. Originally, Japan had increased rainbow rates as part of the step-up. Instead, the step-up was nerfed to a version of Squall's step-up in Japan. The rainbow rate increases were removed, a guaranteed Shylt was bumped back from Step 4 to Step 2, and Step 4 was changed into a 10% rainbow ticket. Some saw the nerf as in poor taste, while others decided that it wasn't that substantial (and even a necessity due to being generous enough to not warrant big chases). Some users even braced themselves for the nerf beforehand.
    • The emphasis on Global Original units has become a hot-button topic, starting with the release of Esther, Sylvie, and Zeno of the Beta Star. Some of these units are a period or two ahead of Power Creep compared to Japanese units. The detractors believe these units shouldn't have as much prominence, as they effectively kill the hype around every unit in their class for months (specifically pointing to Esther and Zeno killing the hype for Akstar and Regina). On the other hand, some see their strengthand the deviation from the Japanese version as a positive for the game. In addition, Fan Festa units got outright buffs, with more buffs being promised to other Global Original units.
      • The Global version's 3rd Anniversary celebration is yet another example of fanbase debate. On one hand, some people appreciate the announcement of more Global-exclusive content like a new CG unit, segueing into a Global Original story based around the Precursors, and inclusion of the Eggsterminator, the Easter Boss, into a new vortex dungeon called the Chamber of the Vengeful. Unlike other chambers, this has missions for completing it with up to 25 different units, keeping the game from being too predictable and stale. Meanwhile, some others are disappointed with how Gumi handled the reward system, which was initially geared more toward bringing new and former players back into the game rather than keeping veterans satisfied. At first glance, they seemingly tried not to give away rank and login-based free anniversary tickets like the Japanese version did. When the debated anniversary ticket was announced, it came in the form of a different Anniversary Follow-Up ticket. Unit of Choice tickets were replaced with Super Trust Moogle tickets, but most people bemoaned the replacements of esper ores, supercites, and regular stat pots with weaker versions of them (Mini Stat Pots, Megacites, and regular magicites) and the addition of Minituars and Gil Snappers. Some people in the community thought the nerfs went too far, especially after it became almost impossible to pull Prism Moogles and the 5-star EX ticket drop rates were slashed to the bone. On the other hand, some people consider the removed rewards as little issue since players already got to summon them in the actual anniversary tickets and the limitation as Gumi trying to find a balance between being too generous with rewards (something that became a catalyst to the Summon Festival in JP) and being too stingy.
      • The inclusion of Kaito and his focus on damage over time (DoT) brings up a debate on how to view usability of a unit and character moveset designs. Some argue that Kaito is a bad unit due to his damage that only reach Akstar's level because DoTs from dupes don't stack and passives and TMR that don't match his nichenote . Meanwhile, some others argue that it's a fresh deviation from the usual damage dealers since he can deal said amount of damage by himself which consequently gives more flexibility on team composition. They also say it's a sign of Gumi's willingness in trying to implement new mechanics in the game since Alim's units have been less variative with physical chaining and especially magic chaining.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • In the Arena, there's a high probability that any given opponent will have Amelia, Noctis, Setzer, and/or Rikku in their party. The first two can spam party-wide Stop, Setzer can spam status effects, and Rikku has an easy-to-fill Limit Break that grants auto-revive. Alternatively, multiple copies of magic chainer units (Ashe, Barbariccia, Grim Lord Sakura, etc.) are a common sight due to their ability to easily deal a ton of magic damage.
    • Most people tend to fall back on their top-tier units, especially for common trials. It first came to light with Ayaka and Lotus Mage Fina, who were head and shoulders above their competitors, but can be seen with most units today. Today, it's most commonly seen in the form of Esther and Sylvie, who were head and shoulders above their competition at the time of their release. Esther is most players' unit of choice for physical DPS, while Sylvie will be the best buffer in the game for the foreseeable future. For example, all but three of the Scorn of the Octopus and Teacher trial clears on the (https://exvius.gamepedia.com/Scorn_of_the_Octopus_and_the_Teacher official wiki) feature one of the Easter units, with all but five using Esther.
  • Demonic Spiders: In the Arena, some of the Game-Breaker units can become this if you have to fight against them.
    • Cover units, specifically those with auto-cover traits. They'll reliably cover one character each round, which means you'll either need to trick them into covering someone you don't want to KO as a distraction or using piercing attacks that bypass them. Their high defense means knocking them out is a serious chore, so they'll stay on the field to be a nuisance, and covering has the added obnoxious benefit of negating chains, so they'll take even less damage while guarding another unit on top of the mitigation cover traits usually provide. Most cover units also have healing of some sort, so they tend to stay alive unless you can manage to wipe out the units they're guarding with piercing attacks. If you don't have access to that, such battles often boil down to simply knocking off enough of the opposing team to win by numerical advantage at the end of the match.
      • In particular, seeing a cover unit with Vanille (particularly more than one) pushes an arena fight into Luck-Based Mission. Vanille's Limit Break, when maxed out, has an 89% chance to kill each character, and it's extremely easy to gear her so that she can cut loose with it by the second turn. While she's certainly a Squishy Wizard, if a cover unit decides to protect her, her low hit points and defense become moot, and you can practically guarantee each unit of yours having only an 11% chance to live past turn 2. There are very particular builds (generally, Ayaka, Lotus Mage Fina, Aria, Ling, or Tilith with the Safety Bit equipped) that can overcome it, but they all have severe drawbacks (Ayaka and Lotus Mage Fina are very rare 5-star base summons, Ling and Tilith are limited availability units, and Aria is very much a Squishy Wizard).
      • 7* Awakened Rain is the absolute worst in this regard. In addition to his sky-high health, having his TMR equipped grants him Stop immunity. Combined with the Safety Bit and Genji Shield, as well ailment resistance, someone lucky enough to have pulled four of them can create an almost unkillable pair that will cover each other from magic barrages and are immune to every status effect. On top of that, his Limit Burst chains with that of Hyou of the Delta Star which makes sense, since they're the same person and will chain kill all but the toughest units. And even if your team can live through the onslaught that comes from Awakened Rain and Hyou chaining their Limit Bursts, said Limit Bursts hit 20 times each, which are basically guaranteed to produce enough Limit Crystals to spam this chaining every round, so victory comes down to either somehow being able to rush down multiple copies of one of the strongest defensive units in the game or having the power/resources to defend against a massive combo attack from a team of Master of All units.
      • Lilith seems to have been purpose built to be an Arena nightmare. To start, she takes Awakened Rain's chaining and applies it to counters. If hit with a physical or magical attack, she has a chance (practically guaranteed at max level 7*) to retaliate with magical AoE Divine Ruination chaining. This is deadly enough as is, but her really obnoxious gimmick is that all of her damage abilities — counters included — have a chance to inflict Charm. If the chaining doesn't get you, Charm likely will. The only upside is that she is not immune to Stop, but this is little comfort if you can't manage to freeze or kill her on the first round.
    • Noctis makes pretty much any arena fight a Luck-Based Mission without Ayaka. If his side gets to go first and he uses either Blizzard Flask or Fire Flask, there's a decent chance your whole team is getting obliterated. Blizzard Flask has a 30% chance to stop each of your units and can't be defended against unless you have a chance to cast something to resist Stop beforehand. Stop is crippling because you can only remove it with Dispel abilities (some of which can hurt you) or Ayaka's Stop Detach ability. Meanwhile, the other side is free to attack, and if parameter adjustments are banned, you cannot buff your resistance to Stop. Fire Flask isn't as bad, since it only inflicts status effects that can be guarded against. If you aren't protected, it can hit your team with Paralysis, Sleep, Confusion, or Petrification, which is almost as bad as Stop. At least in this case, as long as you have one unit with a means to cure status ailments and a means to resist them (a Ribbon [Kefka's TMR], Goddess's Protection [Tilith's TMR], and/or Discernment [Seven's TMR]), Fire Flask will at worst stop you for a turn. If you don't have an Ayaka, battles with Noctis tend to boil down to hoping you can knock-out or neutralize him before the AI chooses one of his Game-Breaker abilities and ruins you. And that tends to be hard with his innate 30% physical evasion — which is easy to boost, considering the abundance of dodge equipment in global FFBE and his own Trust Mastery Reward boosting it further by 25%. Amelia is bad to fight for similar reasons, but she's at least easier to kill.
    • Ling is a pain to fight as well. She has 10% more innate evasion than Noctis, making her hard to kill - not to mention innate immunity to sleep, petrification, confusion, and paralysis. Her kit is also top-notch for the Arena: she also has an AoE Raise, a true Esunaga, an MP restore to counter MP drains (and auto-refresh to restore her own MP), and a skill that inflicts 2 random status effects on the enemy party. This makes her very annoying to fight: she has a wide range of useful abilities for the arena.
    • Rem or Enhanced Seven. Rem's Mog King event gives her Siphon Delta, a unique ability that acts as an AoE Osmose. Seven's Osmoselash is also AoE once it is enhanced twice. Either one of these can zero out the MP of an entire party in one hit if their MAG stat is high enough, and since most MP refresh abilities are rather cost-prohibitive, this can leave you unable to meaningfully fight for at least several rounds (if not the entire match). It takes an extremely buffed MP stat to come out of it with any chance of recovering, and even that isn't a guarantee.
    • Rikku also can be frustrating in the extreme in the Arena. Ordinarily, revivification spells and abilities can't be used by the computer in the Arena. However, since Limit Breaks are never off-limits, Rikku's Hyper Mighty G will set up her entire party with an 80% Reraise each time she casts it. Given how easy it is to boost Rikku's limit fill rate (particularly if the player in question did the Final Fantasy X bonus event or the Aigaion boss fight), a CPU Rikku can potentially cast it every turn so long as she has at least a few allies building up crystals. And since it's a Limit Break, it can't be prevented with Osmose or the like. The one upside is Dispel abilities will cancel out the Reraise, but this also means dispelling any debuffs or status effects (Stop, for example), thereby neutralizing the player's own attempts at using a Game-Breaker. Dealing with her in the Arena can be a Sadistic Choice - try to take out her and hope that you can weather the rest of her team, or try to nail the rest of her team hard so that they go down before she can lay down a Reraise (since she can't do anything with a dead ally).
    • Dark Fina and Seabreeze Dark Fina are the bane of physical attackers for one simple reason: Retaliate. Retaliate provides a 30% (35 if enhanced) chance to counter any physical attack with a AoE magic attack that also boosts her MAG if it's been enhanced. Depending on how many physical units you're relying on, this can mean multiple counters that stack up damage real quick. If the opposing player has more than one Dark Fina, they can chain their counters for even more damage. It's irrelevant if you're using magic, but physical units have to hope they can drop her in one round to avoid the counters.
      • Seabreeze Dark Fina got ten times worse with the introduction of 7* units. With her TMR equipped, her limit burst gains an AoE MP drain. Coupled with the high modifier, this is guaranteed to zero out your team on top of the high damage, and once she does it once, she's almost guaranteed to pull it off every turn, especially if her team has been thinned out.
    • While Ayaka is nowhere near as dangerous as she could be in the Arena, her Curaja spell nevertheless makes fighting her incredibly annoying. If she or any member of her party is dropped below 25% and lives to their next turn, Ayaka is practically guaranteed to cast Curaja and restore them all to full health. The only way to stop this is to either kill her/them outright or Osmose her consistently to keep her from refreshing her MP. This can be especially problematic if the other player has geared her for extreme health or 100% evasion, making it nearly impossible to kill her unless the roulette gives you turn consecutive turns. Furthermore, if she can't be neutralized quickly, she may get a chance to fire off her Limit Burst — while it takes over 50 limit crystals to use, should she activate it, it acts as a team-wide Full Life plus Full Cure, and it's one of two revival methods (the aforementioned Hyper Mighty G being the first) allowed to the computer. It can actually be smarter to just kill off Ayaka's allies and just defend for the remaining turns in the Arena (winning via number of surviving units) so that she doesn't build up limit meter from the attacks she dodges and/or heals off.
    • Lotus Mage Fina combines all of the frustration of fighting either Dark Fina form, Ayaka, and Rikku all in one. She possesses a Holy-element version of Dark Fina's Retaliate (fortunately will only trigger once per round, but still potent), she has Curaja to basically max out her allies' hit points at will, and she has a limit break that not only does a ton of hits (thus producing many crystals to set up even more limit breaks, including her own) but also applies a Reraise to all living party members (while it's not as easy to gear LM Fina for spamming it every round, it's still a fairly simple build). Oh, and she also has a counter heal, which can potentially even eliminate the need to cast Curaja. A Lotus Mage Fina that's allowed to survive more than a round (if the AI doesn't deliberately choose the worst option) can potentially single-handedly end an Arena streak.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Most of the game breakers mentioned on their own page (Zidane, Gilgamesh, Noctis, Refia, Chizuru and Paladin Cecil) are such coveted units that they became the subject of their own summon batch, the "People's Choice" summon, where their drop rates were increased.
    • More generally, some of the FFBE-exclusive characters, especially the more powerful ones, have proven very popular, particularly some of the Global exclusives, with Ling, Olive, Fryevia and Reberta all being particular examples.
    • Zargabaath, in the Final Fantasy XII event, was introduced to promote The Zodiac Age. In his source game, he has a bit role as the reasonable judge and a Bonus Boss fight with the rest of the judges. In contrast to his bit part, he is a 5-star base in Brave Exvius. Despite displacing a popular playable character in Balthier, and originally receiving flack because people thought Ramza was coming, he was received positively by the player base after release. He was revealed to be a useful support unit, and became a fan favorite.
    • Ruggles is popular as a character due to his role in Bran and Lunera's story event. While few people still use him, his mere mention in another story event brought a lot of excitement.
    • Chow got massive community hype for being a dog. Being a Game-Breaker was just icing on the cake.
    • Elfreeda is one of the most beloved original units. Her TMR is arguably the best in the game, but people love her for her design and animations. Most other original add-ons, especially for a popular character like Cloud, are glossed over, but Elfreeda managed to stick.
    • Out of all Fan Festa 2017 Unit Design winners, Malphasie is regarded as the most popular ones. Aside from her cool crow-themed design, she is a hybrid chainer with multiple chaining family options, making her suitable in most damage-dealing team composition.
    • The Fan Festa poll named Duane their favorite character. The development team is now planning to add a 5-star version of him to the game, complete with his own story event.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • Some circles like to refer to Agrias as "Poorlandeau", since her enhanced 6* form is a slight downgrade from Orlandeau, but starts as a 4* base rarity instead of 5, hence she's easier to pull without spending money for more Gacha Summons.
    • "Earth Shrine Exterminator Squad" and variants are a common nickname for a team assembled to grind for Trust Master points, as the most efficient place to do so is the very first mission, which is in the Earth Shrine and spawns only rats and bats.
    • Zargabaath received many of these, solely because of his name. The most common are Zargabargle, Zargarbage (before his release revealed him to be good), Zargabae, and Zargabro.
    • "CG units" are a collective nickname for the Season 2 characters that get CG-animated Limit Breaks, with most of them being rereleased versions of Season 1 story characters. Individual units also sometimes get called "CG Unit name" (for example, CG Lasswell for Pyro Glacial Lasswell) for either consistency or because of dissatisfaction with the unit's official name.
    • "Carry unit" is the term used for any unit that can solo a King Mog event (particularly if they can do it at the Elite or Legendary level), allowing the player to round out the other four spots in their party (plus the companion unit) with the highest bonus units they have available, even if said units are at level 1. Frequently, this will be one of the units listed under Game-Breaker; it's particularly welcomed when the carry unit is also a bonus unit (such as Beatrix during the Final Fantasy IX event or Noctis during the Final Fantasy XV event). It can also be used in cases of trials, often involving stacking physical evasion.
    • "Elemental Tetris" is the fan term for the need to prepare for multiple elemental resistances (starting with the Scorn of the Beasts of the Dark trial) when facing a trial boss. This was relatively common in Japan, and came to Global starting with the Dark Espers trial.
    • Lampshaded with the Chain Family update, officially listing which skills chained with each other. Instead of going with the Ur-Example, the official translation, or the official updates' names, this Global-exclusive update canonized the community's names. Graviton Cannon is still called Graviton Cannon, as opposed to its Global translation of Short-Range Graviton or YoRHa Sword Dance, and Bolting Strike frames are called Bolting Strike instead of the update videos' Storm Brand.
    • Less approving community members call Anniversary Follow-Up tickets F-U Tickets, since they are worse versions of the original Anniversary Tickets that Japan got for their login day and rank rewards. Most people understood why UoC tickets were removed, but the rage started after they removed Supercites for regular Megacites and Magicite and added Gil Snappers. The rewards were weighted to the point that it was nearly impossible to pull blank Prism Moogles, the drop rates for 5-star EX tickets were dramatically nerfed, and Gil Snapper drops were weighted at a worse ratio than the raid and Wave Battle summons. While some saw it as a necessity and accepted the nerfs, the section of the community that disapproved took it as a middle finger to veteran players.
  • Friendly Fandoms: Although the fandoms would also tend to compare their games' mechanics, the relationship between Granblue players and those from Final Fantasy Brave Exvius still turn out to be generally positive as both sides remember the fact that a lot of Cygames employees used to work for Final Fantasy titles in the past, and that both games are bound to have similar art and music styles because of this. It also helps that Granblue is itself a Genre Throwback to the older 2D Final Fantasy titles that the players try both games out of nostalgia.
  • Game-Breaker: Has its own page.
  • Goddamned Bats: The tablet enemies. They have extremely high resistance to physical attacks but are brought down by even the weakest of magic or elemental abilities. Their attacks are extremely weak but they have the ability to cast Flash, which can blind the entire party. None of these things make them dangerous, but they seem purposefully designed to disrupt you when you're auto-attacking through a level, forcing you to waste a bit of mana removing them. Some levels which feature them also have a "No magic" mission just to make you waste time chipping away at them.
  • Goddamned Boss:
    • Wiegraf, from the first Final Fantasy Tactics event when it was originally released. He is scripted to use an AoE Confusion attack, which is particularly deadly because it might kill you before you can even take a turn. In addition, the only ways to resist Confuse at the time of its release were through two accessories — one of which was a Trust Mastery farm. This was about two months into the game, well before the days of Minfilia or Lakshmi, so you either had to zerg him down quickly or die.
    • Hartmannellidae, boss of Subterranean Stream. The boss starts with massive defense. If you use physical attacks, it gains physical defense but less resistance to magic. If you use magic, it gains full elemental resistance but gains physical weakness. These two stack, effectively eliminating all its weaknesses if you don't have some form of dispel. If any of your weapons have elemental properties, you're basically screwed. Even if you work up a pattern and have a dualcasting lightning mage to exploit its weakness, the boss is still a massive tank with a debuff spell, a powerful leech spell that can kill some units outright, and a move with instadeath chance which is all the more likely to succeed since it will have numerous chances to pull it off while you chip away at it. On top of all that nonsense, one of the missions is to beat it without a single character being knocked out. Have fun managing that feat. It says something that the local Veritas can be easier to beat than Hartmannellidae. The Ribosome in Mysidia Underground is similar, with the added bonus that it appears as the boss of the final stage and the exploration.
      • The first example of this type of boss is the Amoebozoa from the Lands of Plenty event and the Kolobos Marsh. He has the same sky-high defense as other amoeba-like enemies, but counters every magical attack with Osmose. This made for a very annoying fight.
    • The Shadow Lord, from the Final Fantasy XI raid event. He starts out with nearly impenetrable defense and spirit. After the first turn, he debuffs either his defense or spirit. Two turns later, he'll dispel himself and debuff the other, repeating every three turns. In addition, he'll cast Silence when he's vulnerable to physical attacks, and Blind if he's weak to magic. Without Fryevia's hybrid damage, you either have to bring a hybrid party or focus on one damage type and wait out the turns between the right weakness. This makes defeating him more of a chore than anything, so long as you can survive his attacks reliably. Furthermore, the versions below ELT run away after six turns, so you only get one shot at each damage type.
    • The updated Golbez trial, The Man In Black, is considered to be a pain rather than outright difficult. The boss starts out easy enough, with marginal physical and magic attacks. These can be mitigated easily with enough Dark resistance stacked on a Provoke tank and Fire and Lightning resistance buffs. Once you pass the 50% threshold, however, is where the boss starts to get annoying. Golbez summons the Shadow Dragon, which does a fixed 999,999 damage per turn to someone in your party, much like the Aigaion trial with less outside damage. If you take out Golbez before the Dragon, the Dragon's fixed-damage attack becomes AoE and will wipe your party every turn until it's dead or you are. Meanwhile, Golbez adds a Drain attack to his arsenal, which is non-elemental. The most infuriating part is the Phase 3 transition, which starts after you kill the dragon. Golbez has a 3-in-8 chance to reduce everyone's HP to 10 followed with a bunch of attacks (adding Osmose to his arsenal as well). If you are not buffed with elemental resistances or you don't have Reraise on your party, you die. If he uses Drain, his only non-elemental attack, your tank dies. He also uses Osmose every turn, has a 25% chance to cap off his turn by reducing your HP to 10, and has a very small chance to repeat his Binding Cold-into-AoE combo. However, with two compatible AoE chainers, an EVO MAG-stacked summoner, and Bahamut, you can skip the third phase altogether.
    • The Glacial trial is the first permanent trial example. He starts by summoning 2 minions, which do a decent amount of damage. After that, he casts Reflect on him and his minions, nukes 1-3 members of your party with a massive Ice and Wind-elemental attack, and kills everyone. If the minions survive, they decrease your ice resistance even further and add Ice to your attacks. If you don't Dispel your party's buffs, Glacial's Ice resistance means you cannot damage the boss. The Glacial itself also counters every attack with a 10 million HP heal. He also uses Frozen Hurricane, which does even higher Ice and Wind-elemental damage, at every 20% of his HP. Mystea makes the second phase manageable, but it's very telling that the main strategy is to reset until you get a Hail Powder roll that doesn't kill your DPS units and kill the Glacial on Turn 1.
    • 2* Phoenix isn't all that difficult a boss if you know what you're doing, but the problem is knowing what to do is incredibly counter-intuitive. If Phoenix drops below 40% health and survives, he'll do a full heal. There is no limit to how much he can do this. You have two choices here: overwhelming force to do more than 40% damage, or disable his healing. The latter you could not possibly figure out on purpose without a guide. Phoenix will start off by imperiling himself with 50% fire, lightning, wind, and light. If you use one of those elements on him, he'll dispel and then imperil himself with 50% ice, water, earth, and dark. He'll switch back to the first set if you use those, repeat. In order to disable his healing, you have to hit him with a fire attack while he's imperiled himself with fire, and you have to do this four times. This means switching between two element types for eight turns until you've triggered his Red Hot Feathers buff, which buffs his stats by 40% and disables his healing. After that, he's pretty much a pushover as long as you have a decent magic tank built for fire/earth resistance.
    • 3* Diabolos is a Luck-Based Mission once you drop him below 50%. Getting there is easy enough, as he's a light-vulnerable boss that has breakable physical defense, making him a prime target for light chainers. Once he passes that, though, he adds a skill which casts one of three effects: complete physical immunity for three turns, an AoE dispel, or an AoE break. The first two can make the fight drag on forever, as the immunity forces you to wait turns while the dispel shuts off your magic and provoke tanks, forcing you to spend rounds rebooting your tanks and possibly reviving your units, potentially leading to an endless cycle of turns where you simply aren't in a position to deal damage, until the RNG favors you with the break skill so you have a reprieve.
    • Vindemiatrix in the Chamber of Arms isn't a particularly difficult boss as long as you have a solid magic tank and a decent breaker, but it stands out because it has five different thresholds. It starts out physical immune, switches to magic immune, switches back to physical immune two thresholds later, and finally swaps to magic immune halfway through its fourth and fifth thresholds. As you're swapping units back and forth to deal with the immunities, you also have to keep breaking the boss and buff up your magic tank so it will survive the threshold nukes. This is on top of Vindemiatrix using an MP drain every four turns. This is certainly doable with the right units, but you also have to finish the trial in 30 turns to turn the materia.
    • Most Global-exclusive event trials fall under here. The second-week event trials ported from Japan are usually cakewalks for veterans, but challenging content for newer players that can net rewards. Global-exclusive ones wind up adding minor annoyances like Mana Burn, unresistable status effects like Berserk, and Dispelga. This causes a lot of complaints from Global players, who argue that these annoyances add no challenge and make the game less fun. The most infamous of these is Hasiko, who has recurred six times (including her raid events).
      • The Incarnation of Hatred from the Darkness Awakens and Darkness Apocalyse raids is extremely annoying without powerful magic units. It has a slight resistance to every element but Holy, to which has a slight weakness, and a whopping 350 defense (compare to normal raid bosses, which rarely break 100). If not immediately killed, it has Berserk for your unit with the highest SPR, AoE MP drain, and AoE Petrify. In short, the boss hits your white mage with an incurable status and leaves you with little to no way to recover, plus its constant Mana drains make it nearly impossible to mount offense against it if you can't rush it down in one or two turns. Power Creep makes her re-issue much more manageable, but she is still incredibly annoying.
      • Hasiko's Revenge, the upgraded limited-time trial for the Darkness Awakens event, is equally frustrating. She gains a pre-emptive strike which consists of her Berserk effect, Petrify, and mana drain. This forces you to bring a tank with innate Draw Attacks to avoid Berserk. You also need a mana battery with enough MP/SPR to not be completely drained, so your party can get back on its feet. And because this is a preemptive strike, all of this happens before you can apply breaks. After breaks, she's much weaker, but is still annoying, especially since her missions involve not using items or Limit Bursts.
      • The Trial of Vengeance is roughly the same fight, but with two spirits. Killing them causes Hasiko to debuff her light and dark resistance, which makes it slightly more manageable, but the MP drain is still annoying.
      • The Shadows of Ruination trial consists of the fights from Hasiko's Revenge and the Trial of Vengeance fought back-to-back, complete with pre-emptive AoE MP drain. The only minor difference is that Berserk is moved to the second fight (as opposed to the first). The release of Folka (who has enough bulk to survive each MP drain and access to dualcastable, LB-based MP restoration) makes this more manageable, but most players groaned at having to deal with her again.
    • Compared to some of the other Chamber of the Fallen bosses, The Venomous Vines of Death isn't as brutal (with a decent magical cover tank, a physical provoke tank, and buffer, it's doable even without 7-star units or super TMR gear, and a healer with Reraise makes it even easier), but it's almost guaranteed to be a slog. It's technically a Sequential Boss, with a Great Marlboro followed by a Queen Marlboro and a retinue of three Mini Marlboro. The first part is against an enemy with ridiculously high defense, necessitating a focus on magical attacks to wear it down. The second is against an enemy with ridiculously high spirit, necessitating a focus on physical attacks to wear it down. If you don't have a pair of high-powered hybrid units to chain (and the damage must be non-elemental, fire, lightning, or wind; the other elements either are ignored or outright absorbed, sorry Fryevia), at least one part of the fight will go slowly (and taking one mage and one fighter means that both will probably be slow). On top of that, the mini-marlboros accompanying the Queen Marlboro can heal 5% of their health every round and do a jump attack, so even if the Queen can be taken down quickly, her retinue (two of which have high spirit, so they'll shrug off blows that can quickly bring down the Queen) can heal off damage and make itself immune to attacks for a round regularly (it's not unusual for the mini-marlboros to outlive their queen by several dozen rounds). About the only saving grace is that the side missions are fairly easy - avoiding items isn't a problem with a competent healer/mana battery, you'll almost certainly build up to have a Limit Break ready to combo in for the final blow against the Great Marlboro, and the sheer length of the fights makes filling the summon gauge enough to summon 3 times is more an inevitability than anything else.
    • The Obake Lantern from the Demon Parade wave battle event seems to have been intentionally designed to punish players trying to beat it with a party full of bonus units. Obake Lantern gets a preemptive attack where it damages your units, inflicts a ten-turn damage-over-time effect, and casts break resistance on itself. Unless you awaken and gear up all your bonus units, they'll be dead before turn one. You also have to dispel the resistance buff before breaking. Even if you do all that, its dual Demon/Fairy typing means killers are half as effective, so you need a really strong unit to finish it in one or two turns. Unless you have a 7-star Kaito, whose damage-over-time attacks can kill the boss in one hit, the Lantern can be extremely annoying.
    • The Youkai Lantern replaces Hasiko's Mana Burn with a powerful pre-emptive AoE physical attack that does damage over time for 10 turns. This is very manageable if you have access to AoE Reraise or AoE Raise, but the real challenge comes in completing the no KOs mission. Doing so requires obscene amounts of physical defense-based gear (which is impossible to reach for most mages), Guts (available on the esper Titan, Queen and Primrose STMRs, and a trial reward), pre-emptive Mirage (only available from a limited-time event or Lila's STMR), or a full evade build, and even if you dodge it, you still have to deal with the damage over time. It's nearly impossible to build for the former without sacrificing the necessary Fire resistance needed to hurt the lantern. Most people skipped it, due to the reward only being 10 Lapis.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • The way the game interacted with the magnification features of Android made chaining easier. On Android, enabling the magnification feature created a bit of lag, allowing for users to chain hard-to-chain units like Fryevia, Tidus, and Onion Knight more easily. This was later patched out, to the chagrin of the community.
    • Strangely, Global Original equipment boosts were calculated separately from the equipment cap. This was discovered after the release of Cloud and Elfreeda, and people discovered how they interacted with Randi's enhancements. Unlike JP, Randi received a boost in DEF and SPR, which made it a different interaction. Through this, Randi can outright circumvent the equipment cap, increasing his ATK to be on the level of JP's 7-star units. Grim Lord Sakura also had the same problem, with Kaliva's Unmatched Wizardry TMR applying to her and her 2-handed Reaver weapon. This was later patched in the 2.6.0 update.
    • The Torturous Trio trial is a Global-exclusive boss rush containing three previous trial bosses: Elafikeras, Echidna, and Bloody Moon in that order. It was hyped as fearsome on release until players discovered that you could escape from Bloody Moon, effectively skipping the most difficult boss without losing any of the rewards for winning the trial. This was patched the same day.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: When the Chinese New Year event came out in February, players overlooked Ling. She was a limited unit that had AoE breaks at the same potency as Warrior of Light's Eraser abilities, and she had slightly weaker versions of Tilith's AoE revive (hers was 30%, Tilith's was full) and AoE MP recovery (her 30 vs Tilith's 50). She was undeniably a good unit, but clearly worse than a few upcoming, established upgrades to units who received a previous release. Due to foresight of Tilith and Warrior of Light's 6-star forms, some people decided to forgo pulling for her and figured that they would get her benefits in April, when they were expected to be released. What they didn't see was that Tilith and Warrior of Light's upgrades were both significantly delayed until June, with Warrior of Light being almost delayed until July. Those who successfully got Ling had a much easier time completing high-level content, while those who didn't regretted their judgment after seeing Tilith and Warrior of Light get delayed. Her overall kit still helps take the load off of other units, still making her a strong support unit.
    • This gave rise to the Ling Effect, which refers to the increased hype for almost every Global Original and/or limited budget unit. Some, like Tilith or 9S, lived up to the massive hype. Conversely, after Cupid Artemios was originally unheralded due to his lackluster skills, Xon was hyped as the next big unit. He could steal from all enemies, had a one-turn Hide, and could even Provoke in a pinch. Most importantly, he could steal buffs and apply them to your team. This led to a lot of people chasing Xon, despite him not being a limited unit. The problem with this was that most bosses' buffs were either at the potency of your buffs or close to it, and whatever buffs were stronger were only available for three turns. Those who chased him eventually realized that he wasn't worth the unit slot and moved on, regretting their pulls.
      • Ironically, Ling herself would fall victim to the Ling Effect on her re-issue in mid-November. Veterans pulled because they missed her on the first go-around, and new players pulled because they heard good things about her in the past. The community's stance on her as a unit is mixed. Her supporters state that her uniquely diverse support kit is still useful today, while her evasion gives her the ability to dodge tank with Illusionist Nichol. Her detractors believe that she is a Master of None: everything she does can be matched or outdone by another unit. Also, her banner was fairly poor, with an average healer in Charming Kitty Ariana and a poor 3-star support in Penelo. In essence, she's simply a good limited unit instead of game-breaking.
    • Very similar things happened with White Knight Noel. Despite being limited, everyone overlooked his banner, with a middling healer in Santa Roselia (long after Refia) as the 4-star unit, Cerius (a largely unheralded green mage who was overlooked for Cloud of Darkness's Omni-Veil), and Medius (arguably the worst 6-star max in the game). To make matters worse, this banner came behind the release of Noctis - a well-hyped unit who broke the current metagame in two. For the first week, the Christmas banner ran concurrently with the Noctis banner. The free-to-play players did not spend. Originally, White Knight Noel was heralded as weaker than Cecil due to his ability to cover singular members of the team and off-healing (on par with a strong White Mage). However, White Knight Noel's Provoke gave him a flat 50% damage mitigation for 3 turns as well. It also stacked with WKN's own Draw Attacks passive, which made it (in effect) a full Provoke. When harder content like Gilgamesh and the Dark Espers came out, the meta changed to a dual-tanking meta. Instead of just using Cecil, most would use Snow to Provoke the attack and Cecil to heal or buff. That way, Cecil could take advantage of the mitigation from Saintly Wall. White Knight Noel could taunt and mitigate damage at once, and had the stats to survive. This made many players disappointed because they did not go harder for him. If you pulled WKN, you could save an entire ability slot for another unit, which made it sought-after.
    • Early raid events, plus the Egg Seeker event, gave copious amounts of unit-specific Trust Moogles in the gacha. Lower-rarity characters like Kain, Aiden, and Zyrus were easy to Moogle for their free rewards, but Fryevia and Reberta's Moogles were considered dust collectors due to how rare rainbows were. Spending 400 Lapis for unit space just to store 20 5-star Moogles was considered cost-ineffective - especially considering Fryevia and Reberta were about a month apart. Most players sold the Moogles out of convenience, especially considering this came before the update where one could combine them (so space and Lapis became a non-issue). However, if a player pulled Fry or Reberta later down the line, they found themselves regretting selling their Moogles.
    • In a story example, Veritas of the Earth's pining for Dark Fina in season 1 and during the Time for Revenge side story to the point where he wants to destroy Lapis out of grief can come across as Dogged Nice Guy Wangst until The Reveal in his season 2 side story, where it's shown that he gave up his family and was only a Veritas in the first place because he was risking everything to fight either with her or by her side.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The reason that Final Fantasy V was not brought over during the SNES era was due to the time and budget that would have gone towards a translation going towards Secret of Mana instead (by the time that was finished, it was easier for Square to instead translate Final Fantasy VI, which is what they did). When the Secret of Mana event launched, it turns out, due to a combination of his magical power and his wide range of elemental attacks, that one of the best choices to take on the event was Final Fantasy V Big Bad Exdeath, who could practically solo the whole event with the right equipment.
    • Balthier was bumped off of his banner by Zargabaath, a Support unit. Zargabaath's ostensible purpose was to help bridge the gap between buffers and Ramza because the latter was too game-breaking (and it would cause less people to pull for Roy, who did the same thing). However, in order to fit Balthier within the schedule, they released Basch, who could cover. In short, the displacement of Balthier to help soothe the delay of a Game-Breaker caused another Game-Breaker to be released months ahead of schedule.
  • Ho Yay: A bit of an unexpected pair develop this in the Land of the Crystals - Nichol and Jake. Even as the two readily acknowledge just how different they are, the two are very keen on spending more time together and learning from the other to get better. They even wrap arms around each others' shoulders and walk off ahead of the others. Twice.
    • Lampshaded in the Wandering Lands, where Jake outright makes a gay joke and Nichol takes it seriously.
  • Iron Woobie: Dark Fina. Her life is nothing short of a Trauma Conga Line; she was property of the state and experimented on since birth due to her Hess blood and is only allowed to leave due to the head of the project, Yuraisha, obtaining guardianship over her. She later consents to be the first human to have Yuraisha's immortality procedure performed on her, only to be feared and shunned due having to this power when she survives. When she joins Hess's side out of loyalty to her she then watches the Eight Sages she'd made friends with all get imprisoned in crystal and is then imprisoned herself for 700 years while aware the whole time. Raegen betrays his promise to her and keeps her within the crystal even after knowing where she was. When she is finally freed from the crystal she loses her memory and only reawakens to her true self due to an accident, and then must kill all her former friends whose minds have devolved due to their time in the crystals. And then to save the world from Sol she willingly returns to her prison with little to no chance of escape. She gives off a tough front but this woman needs a hug.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Veritas of the Waters, who hypnotized herself into being the heartless monster who killed Elle due to being exhausted of fighting after 700 years. On one hand, she did not want to continue seeking out revenge and was only carrying on for her friends' sakes and has become actively suicidal by the end of season 1 after killing one of her descendants under hypnosis but on the other she chose to hypnotize herself into a monster rather than standing up to the other Veritas, meaning she brought all her misfortune on herself and is still a villainous person.
  • Junk Rare:
    • A few units available via special summons are derided for being dramatically underpowered for their pull rarity. Queen gets flack for this - she only pops up as a five-star base, which means there's only a 1% chance of even having a chance at her. However, outside of very rare circumstances, she gets outperformed by several three-star base units - most damningly, Krile could outdo Queen at most of her roles, and Krile only maxes out at a five-star rating. Some 4-star units are considered better than their 5-star counterparts on their banner - the most common examples being Mystea over Duke and Tilith over Elza and Vargas.
    • Lightning has firmly fallen into this category as the game has progressed. Despite being a damage-based unit, she has no chaining skills aside from Area Blast, which uses her regular attack instead of a fixed number of frames. Crushing Blow is technically multi-hit, but the frames are so far apart that even another copy can't chain their hits together. In addition, she is hampered by the game's lack of access to strong Lightning weapons, so she can't even take advantage of her Imperil. Unenhanced, her Imperil is dreadful, at only 20% compared to every other unit's 50%. It also costs 2 million gil to enhance it to its full 70% potential, and it doesn't even fix its chaining ability. In short, as more 5-star units have been released, she has fallen from Game-Breaker to Scrappy.
      • Perhaps in acknowledgement, she's been reduced to a free 5-star earned simply by beating Veritas of the Dark at the end of Lanzelt. Ironically, this makes her less junky if you pull a second copy, giving the player a surprisingly less mediocre unit.
    • Before unit/rate equalization happened, 4-star max units had higher rates than 5-star and 6-star max units. For example, instead of gaining a powerful unit or a TMR fodder unit, you had a higher chance of pulling a Tier-Induced Scrappy like Shadow, Lani, or Fran out of a blue (or even a gold) crystal than you did pulling a Zidane. This was turned Up to Eleven with the introduction of 5-star bases and the 6-star cap. If a rainbow crystal popped out, you could get a powerful 5-star base unit (like Noctis or Luneth) or a 3-star base that goes up to a 5-star maximum (like Kuja, Gilbert, or even former "common units" like Galuf or Kain).
    • Eve, as a unit, has reached memetic status despite being a 4-star base. While other Nie R: Automata units are either good, have game-breaking Trust Mastery Rewards, or both, Eve is neither of those. The community's main gripe is that he is based off of Adam, who was handed out for free (and as a very common unit in the raid gacha too). He has marginal DPS skills along the same lines as his brother and nearly identical stats to him. Most damning was his TMR after being revealed to be a worse version of his brother's (increasing MP instead of HP). Even after it was buffed to increase HP by 30%, Eve grew to be the most hated unit in the history of the game, solely because he was only moved from the raid pool to dilute the drop rate for a hyped unit.
    • Ray Jack might be the worst 5-star base on sheer design. While he was a mediocre chainer on the surface, he had one fatal flaw: a cover passive. He also had a clone of Brave Presence, which was fairly useless due to the wealth of units who could reach 100% Provoke, but his cover passive was the most damning part of his skillset. Not only did it force you to choose between having him as a mediocre tank, it was on the same level as Charlotte's original physical cover passive. Even before Cecil's Saintly Wall (which outclassed Ray Jack as well), Charlotte had the same cover tanking ability as a 5-star max unit. To add further insult to injury, Ray Jack's TMR is a slightly better version of Veritas of the Earth's. Earthlord is a 4-star base. Ray Jack was such a bad unit that the community actually hoped for off-banners, referring to pulling him as "getting Ray Jacked".
      • His enhancements did make him somewhat redeemable, giving his chaining skill Octaslash frames and reducing his cover passive's proc rate to 5%. For a short time, he was a usable unit, but was never top tier like some of the other enhanced units in-game. Unfortunately, his 7-star form never came due to his game being shut down, and he never truly had a chance at redemption.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Eve is the game's resident Memetic Loser. The players saw him as the symbolization of greed in gacha games. This was because Gumi included him as a Global Original "bonus" in the normal gacha, despite being based off of a unit from the free raid pool. The other 4-star unit on the banner, 9S, was considered to have a top tier Trust Mastery Reward to the point where he was the unit everyone was pulling for. Even after the NieR: Automata event ended, its resident Scrappy received quite a bit of hate. One would have been hard-pressed to not find "F**k Eve" posts on certain communities during and after the event, and the backlash has become a meme in the community.
    • Whenever anyone gets a rainbow (usually on stream), other players jokingly say it's a bad unit like Delita.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • White Witch Fina's visual design was largely similar to her original design, but with ghosts around her and a bright orange witch's hat that looked more like a traffic cone. Instead of being known by her name, the community eventually called her Traffic Cone Fina or VLC Fina (after the VLC Media Player's traffic cone). She actually got a redesign in the next Halloween event making her hat white to match her outfit.
      • Lampshaded with the Halloween Hat, which was actually released in a bundle for $1.
    • It is common for very delayed units to be memed as JP-exclusive upgrades. With Gumi's definition of "soon" taking months, the community tends to make fun of Gumi for soon. The most common are Warrior of Light's 6-star form and Ramza's ability awakenings. Even Orlandeau, whose gimmick is being Purposely Overpowered, and Rikku, a 4-star unit who's regarded as the best defensive support in the game, never saw as significant of a delay as Warrior of Light did. Ramza's enhancements suffered a nine-month delay.
    • Telling streamers or other users that they will get a Memetic Loser from a rainbow crystal like Delita and Lightning are rather common joke in the community as well.
    • Gungnir (Kain's TMR) has become synonymous with pitchfork due to the abnormally high amount players have received. It has been given out three times as an event reward, and copious amounts of trust moogles for Kain were given out as rewards for both runs of the Shadow Bahamut raid event. The abnormally high amount of Global-exclusive Gungnirs given out as a reward has become a bit of a meme.
    • Gumi's statement regarding them leaving out limited-time unit prisms became a community meme. While they originally promised to put them in due to time constraints, the response was overshadowed by them saying they considered "the players who worked hard for their rainbow units". The concept of attributing blind luck to hard work was so ridiculous that those who brushed it off as PR-speak memed it.
    • Gumi's PR backpedal in Easter 2019 after stealth-nerfing their advertised units gave birth to people calling FFBETubers' content and datamines "unofficial information". Originally, Esther and Sylvie were so strong that they could keep up with Japan's metagame, which was 10 months into the future. A stealth-nerf dropped 20 minutes after, to the community's chagrin. Gumi's response telling players to only listen to their inadequate (and often wrong) "official information" was taken poorly and birthed a new meme.
    • In Japan, CG Chair Rain and Lasswell are now memes due to the prominent thrones featured in their designs.
  • Moe:
    • Refia's chocobo hugging win animation. Awwwwwwww.
    • Luka, as a character, is also pretty much Moe personified. (Which, big surprise, helps fuel her popularity.)
    • Global-exclusive Olive also operates on a Small Girl, Big Gun level of this. Her victory animation involving Sparky tipping over is what really seals it.
    • Kelsus's victory animation involves one of his giant magic hands picking him up and giving a peace sign as the other cradles him.
  • Mood Whiplash: One of the chapters from the "Way of the Warrior" story event features a character dying... and then the Dungeon Clear message appeared and the Victory Fanfare played.
  • No Yay:
    • The Lid/Jake pairing. Most fans decry it as pedophilic, given the large age gap between the two characters (Lid is a teenager while Jake is almost 40). Add the general distaste for Jake, who flirts with absolutely anyone or anything into the mix and the ship is by far the most hated of any teased ship in the series.
    • Fans have similarly shied away from the story's increasing hints at Nichol/Sakura because Sakura is a 700 year old in the body of a child and herself in-story claimed she would not pursue a relationship due to the Squick that invoked.
  • Play the Game, Skip the Story: Brave Exvius features an extensive, involving and well-written campaign, worthy of the 16-bit RPGs in whose footsteps it follows. It also unlocks basically no ability to access post-game content, as its default characters are not very strong (especially as Power Creep has set in with a vengeance) and do not have TMR rewards. Its only value to a hardcore live-events-focused player is 1) the Summon Magic, which is unlocked there; and 2) the (admittedly large) amounts of "Lapis" (IE the pay currency) which can be unlocked by completing its levels. And even then, players may want to prioritize the live events, since the same Anti Poop-Socking Energy supply is used to handle those and campaign levels.
  • Porting Disaster: The Memories of the Aquapolis event was riddled with crashes for some reason: something that was detrimental to gameplay because you could not continue from a crash. In essence, the game kept crashing, destroying all of your progress. This was so bad that they re-issued the event shortly after. During the second re-issue, however, the crashes were still an issue.
    • The Mog King raid event. While porting it over, Gumi did not adjust for its new quality of life adjustments. 1-star and 2-star Metal Cactuars and Gil Snappers were added to the summoning pool, and given the same rates as 4-star Cactuars in the previous raids. 4-star rates were nerfed by a sixth. Megacite made a return to the pool from Bahamut event, but regular Magicite, vanilla Magicite, and Magicite Shards were added to the pool (again, with nerfed drop rates for Megacites). This resulted in an unprecedentedly weaker pool since the first raid, and largely nullified the point of running the event past the King Burst Pot. But worst of all was that the Multi-Summon limit was decreased from 50 at a time to 10 at a time, despite doubling the coin drop rates. It was later ramped up to 100 at a time, though the rate nerfs still remained in place.
      • The same thing happened in the Shadow Lord event. Despite being delayed past the NieR: Automata event, it had the same bad drops as the Mog King raid. Vanilla magicite and shards still returned. However, there was still a point to running it, as the coins sold for 50 gil per coin instead of 1.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble: Nagi acts like a Yandere towards Hyoh, being violently protective of him and wanting to kill anyone who gains his attention. Later, the writers tried to justify this behavior because she had a brother names Hyoh who died during the tournament that promoted her into the Stars. Unfortunately, due to her previous behavior, the relationship still doesn't come off as sibling-like but like Nagi had incestuous feelings towards her brother that she then projected onto Hyoh.]]
  • Replacement Scrappy: Arex replacing Dah Sol as a speaker (and becoming the primary speaker) in update video announcements is not received well by fans. While the former has better fluency in English, his knowledge about the game mechanics or Final Fantasy lore in general is minimal at best, he sometimes misses or gives the wrong information on updates, and he frequently misgenders units.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • In general, most units who started with 5* max forms at release and later got their 6-star forms. Most of these units are used in budget compositions, due to the majority of them being 3*s from the first Type-0 event onward (that set the pattern of 4* and 5* base units with 6* max forms at release, and 3* units capped at 5*). Due to Early Installment Weirdness, many promising 4* units were held back by a 5* max limitation, most notably Tilith, Agrias, and Warrior of Light. One couldn't help but feel a little let down a little later down the road when more recent 4* units like Refia were upgradeable to 6* from day one. When they finally received their 6* upgrades, they received skills that put them close to (or, in some cases, above) certain 5-star bases, with Tilith and Warrior of Light changing their respective class's metas. With the enhancement system, some characters who were received poorly when they were released were greatly improved to become much greater units or even game-breaking themselves.
    • Veritas of the Light was originally seen as a low-tier 5-star unit. This is because a Japanese site rated her fairly low due to being locked into the light element for damage and being a hybrid unit. There was also the lack of usable hybrid-based throwing weapons and guns to take advantage of her Masteries. One non-elemental magical gun be acquired in her event, and the other could be acquired by paying $12 for a limited bundle. The two MAG throwing weapons are in Season 2's story or a TMR from Hope. However, when Fryevia showed that hybrids were just as good as (if not better than) their physical and magical-based counterparts, people started to revisit Veritas of the Light. Her reputation was fully rehabilitated in Global by the time she was released.
    • Ace fits this trope after his enhancements. Ace, before his enhancements, was a mediocre mage, with mostly RNG-based skills that support himself and a skill that can take advantage of Dual Wield. After enhancements, he becomes a very strong support with limited chaining capabilities. Specifically, his Tri-beam Laser skill becomes a beastly DPS ability that can chain, has a chance to increase its potency (topping off with a 10% chance to do 22.5x damage in 7 hits), and decreases the enemy's elemental resistance to Fire, Lightning, and Light by 75%. Spirit Hand becomes a potent AoE MP restore with a chance to restore 45, 100, or 140 MP. This makes Ace one of the best support units in the game, and arguably the best MP battery due to the full on-demand restore capability it has.
    • Dark Knight Cecil was originally as bad as Lightning or Queen due to his highly prohibitive HP cost for his abilities. After enhancements, DKC gets better modifiers and a 9999 HP auto-Regen after every turn. Soul Eater has a 100% dark Imperil and a massively increased multiplier. Dark Cannon gets a slightly increased multiplier and a 50% Imperil. Unfortunately, it requires timing a heal if you use Dual Wield, but he's a very strong finisher if you get the timing down.
      • After being briefly rescued, he has returned to being a Scrappy, with a 7-star form that is nearly indistinguishable from his 6-star and a bottom-tier STMR. His cooldown skill is worse than Delita's due to it being 3 turns shorter and his self-buff only working on humans.
    • Soleil was originally a poor buffer, with her best buffs only being for one turn and having nothing over other buffers to compensate. However, her enhancements (which were Global-exclusive) allow her to massively buff the party AND debuff the enemy at the same time (especially if you use all four in conjunction with each other), turning her into one of the top support characters in the game. Fully enhanced, she has an AoE 120% full buff and a 35% AoE Full Break, but the buff string takes 3 turns to set up and the debuff strike takes 4 turns to set up. In short, Gumi designed Soleil to be the bridge unit between other buffers and 5-star bards, and a powerful budget unit for the years to come.
    • For all the jokes at her expense, Queen saw noticeable improvements in her Global enhancements. Some additions were made to her pinch buffs (300% Attack and 200% DEF/SPR) and some improvement to her Magic Martyr skill to work as an MP battery. By far the biggest, though, was Devastate being changed from a Barrage style move to a regular chain attack (albeit one that only works with a copy), letting her rotate Magic Martyr to trigger her crisis buffs with Devastate for damage in the intervening turns. Provided she has Imperil support to use with a weapon, she at least goes from being a Memetic Loser to usable, albeit an extremely expensive investment.
      • Her 7-star form is unironically good. She becomes a True Doublehand chainer with W-Ability who can also finish. Her STMR is also one of the best in the game, offering a strong 55 ATK and guaranteed Guts. The latter is extremely important, considering how powerful stacks are.
    • Demon Rain, one of the first global-exclusive units released, is considered to be the worst 5-star base in the game without his enhancements. He was designed as a cover/counter tank, but had no mitigation skills or DEF buffs, and his counter was weak. His only plus was his TMR, which was the highest best-in-slot ATK accessory until Desch's Earrings came out in September. His enhancements, however, re-invent him into a powerful Counter/Provoke tank. His counter's strength becomes 3 times as strong as the generic counter with a 30% crit rate, and its proc rate is upped from 75% (including Demon's Revenge) to 100%. His Demonic Fury buff gives him 30% more HP and increases his low-HP buff to 120% ATK/DEF at 50% HP - which is permanent as long as you can keep him alive. His Defend skill becomes Demon's Taunt, which at full enhancement is a 3-turn 100% Provoke with 50% flat damage mitigation. Ignite, however, turns into an 80% 3-turn ATK/MAG buff that grants him access to a finishing skill and a self-MP sustain for 3 turns. This means that he can also become a strong finisher as well. To top it all off, his Doublehand gets increased to a 150% equipment ATK increase for single wielding weapons and includes 2-handed weapons. This allows you to take advantage of other weapons with high positive variance. This makes him a very useful unit, albeit expensive to fully enhance. At 7-Star form he finally gains an area of effect move, allowing him to cover all units and then counter for massive damage. This skillset puts him just below Wilhelm in effectiveness and potentially even more useful given the right circumstances.
    • White Witch Fina was originally a meme unit. She was considered amazingly terrible for 6-star units, with her skillset being based off of Fina's 5-star form with Raise and a meager MP restore. Her SPR+20%+MP+10% skill becomes Witchhood, boosting it to 50% SPR, 30% MP, 50% Camouflage, and a 100% SPR Doublehand that includes 2-handed weapons. You're probably going to be using the Doublehand anyway, since VLC Fina cannot equip shields. Her raise becomes on par with Full-Life. Her only downside is her lack of Curaga, but she finally reaches the higher echelon of healing with her enhancements. Her Entrust skill becomes a true Esuna and has an 80% Reraise added onto it. Divine Ritual becomes an AoE SPR finishing move, with the ATK portion irrelevant. Ritual becomes a very respectable MP refresh that recovers 50% of everyone else's HP and 25% MP. This makes her one of the better healers in the game.
    • Cupid Artemios was originally an overlooked 4-star unit, but his enhancements make him one of the best finishers in the game. His Sun Cupid is enhanced to a 40% ATK boost, but the real power comes in his Flash Barrage move. What was originally a Holy-elemental Barrage increases to a 2-hit finishing move. In addition, the imperil is increased from 35% to 50%, and the potency increases to 8x (which even eclipses most 5-star units). Finally, he is one of three units with an ATK boost when equipping a throwing weapon, which makes him a force to be reckoned with when using Fixed Dice. The only one who outright surpasses him is Ang, and even then he's also limited.
    • Mercenary Ramza, at his base form, was one of the worst 5-star units in the game. He was essentially Ray Jack with worse chaining and no Imperil. He tried to be a hybrid between a tank and a DPS, but his cover passive tended to get people killed when he's a DPS and ST cover is inferior to AoE Cover. Gumi decided to scrap his JP-based enhancements entirely and focus more on his utility kit. Throw Stone turns from a throwaway skill into a full-blown clone of Wilhelm's Impregnable. Blade of Justice, his chaining skill, turns into a 45% ATK/MAG break that increases Weapon and Mind Break's power from 40% to 60% for 6 turns. He gets passives that outright incentivize using him as a tank role. Out go the unsynergistic hat/helm passive enhancements, and in come heavy/light armor and heavy/light shield passives. Gumi completely redid Mercenary Ramza's enhancements from the ground up for the Global version, and he becomes one of the best Provoke tanks in the game. His 7-star form only adds to his power, offering an AoE physical cover, an AoE magical cover on a cooldown, a splash of elemental resistance, and Entrust, making him a well-rounded tank.
    • Beatrix has been looked down upon by players because she had no chaining partners and her moveset doesn't stand out among other 5-star base units, barring a powerful hybrid finisher attack. Her enhancements in JP make her somewhat viable in other areas, but it doesn't fix her clunky rotation and heavy reliance on her cooldown ability. Gumi took notice of this and made her significantly stronger. When fully enhanced, all of her breaking abilities can be powered up to full by using them on their own, her Graceful Paladin passive grants her True Dualwield and increases her stats when equipping a greatsword, her cooldown ability adds a 200% ATK/MAG increase and fills her whole LB gauge, and Seiken - Saint Bringer can be powered up by itself after using the cooldown ability, gains a 120% light Imperil, and can chain with the Absolute Mirror Of Equity family. The much more comfortable turn rotation, improved stats, and slot efficiency are enough for some into using her in various team compositions despite the expensive enhancement costs.
  • While Fan Festa units are generally favored design-wise, a majority of them have fallen out of the meta because of their outdated kits. A free upgrade for them at the end of June 2019 brought players' attention back because the upgrade was a massive improvement that followed (or broke) the meta standard at that time. Circe turns from a mediocre magic chainer and finisher into a very powerful magic chainer upon release (whose damage calculation beats Sol AND Exdeath who haven't even come to Global yet), securing the best mage spot for months to come. Malphasie's damage modifiers grow bigger and she gains access to Bolting Strike frames. Her STMR becomes arguably one of the best TDW accessories in the game. Myra's now permanent dualcast allows for a more comfortable and flexible rotation between healing, buffing, status effect resistance and recovery, damage mitigation, and LB gauge manipulation. Ellesperis becomes a solid True Doublehand Bolting Strike chainer with additional two elemental options (ice and darkness) and a small utility. Beryl's non-tanking roles are improved, allowing him to fill his roles better while his TMR becomes one of the best magic tank and mage materia in the game.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Of the party members, Jake is by far the least liked. Even outside the issues with the playable unit versions of him (outside of Pirate Jake, a unit limited to Halloween that's excellent for item and gold farming - even then, Awakened Xon, Chow, and Lara Croft are just as good at that), he's got a bad combination of Small Name, Big Ego, Casanova Wannabe, and the fact that he hits on teenagers more than ten years his junior. Fortunately, he's probably the least plot-critical of the main party and a bit of a Butt-Monkey.
    • For a boss example, the Global-exclusive Hasiko is hated due to her boss battle involving the Scrappy Mechanic of mana burn and her recurrence. As of March 2019 she has appeared six times as a boss at different periods, including her appearances as a raid boss. There are jokes that her appearance is a way of punishing the playerbase for complaining about bugs or lack of high difficulty content.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • One that can be frustrating at very high-level play is elemental affinities when Dual Wielding. Unlike most Final Fantasy games, using a weapon with an elemental affinity will apply that affinity to both attacks when dual wielding, even if the other ordinarily lacks it. Even if the player uses a skill that ordinarily applies a different element, 50% of the damage will still apply the original element. Since some of the best weapons in the game are elemental, such as Excalibur, and the game encourages the use of weapons which match an attacker's imperil, you may suddenly find your best attacker is flailing uselessly against something that has immunity to an element. This has become less prevalent as time passes, as newer units have the ability to imbue their own elements while wielding normal-typed weapons, and the variety of powerful normal-type weapons has vastly increased.
    • Mana Burn is common among Global-exclusive bosses, much to the chagrin of the community. It doesn't help that the main offender, Hasiko, was issued six times - two of which were limited-time event trials. Even with significantly better MP batteries, most people consider bosses with MP attacks to be a huge pain.
    • Wave Battle events are generally hated by the community. Despite being a Global-exclusive event type, Wave Battles are poorly-disguised, watered-down reskins of other event types. In its first form, it offered a long grind for replacement-level equipment, giving no point to running the event past its initial missions. Its current iteration rarely even has waves of enemies. It is a raid event with less rewards that costs NRG to run. They have been rebranded to Elemental Battles or Story Battles, but the community still dislikes the event type.
    • Over in Japan, the new Summon Fest pool has become so hated that Global players are worried as well. This system was intended to create a new pool for rainbows - ironically, a commonly-requested feature for Global that culls most of the bad and obsolete 5-star bases out of the pool. Rainbow rates and on-banner rates are higher on Summon Fest banners than regular banners, but all Summon Fest units are limited to Summon Fest banners only with no rate-ups for off-banners. Unlike the polarizing 7-star awakening process, which saw similar community outrage that was quelled by the introduction of more Anti-Frustration Features, the Summon Fest is universally reviled because it marks the phasing out of the Unit of Choice system note  Fest units are excluded from the Select Ticket summon, and there are no current plans to create a new Select Ticket for the pool. The attempted reduction of Unit of Choice tickets on the Global side caused one of the two largest player riots in the history of the game, and the Japanese community took it as badly. When they figured out how to best implement the system, it ended in the erosion of all levels of the playerbase and irreparable damage to the community. While the Global version's producers confirmed it is coming, they promised to make modifications in an attempt to make it work, which has done little to quell the panic.
      • While the Summon Fest system originally started with the game's CG original characters, it eventually expanded to the remaining Final Fantasy games' CG protagonists and even non-CG units. The latter, combined with the experimental re-issue of previously featured Summon Fest units note  caused many players, including high-ranking whales, to quit. The producer, Kei Hirono, publicly admitted shortly after that adding these units was a mistake. Global players have also vowed to quit if it is brought over without a proper UoC system, noting the increased amount of limited-time banners compared to Japan before the Summon Fest hit. While there have been promises to slow the system down, most banners in Japan fall under the Summon Fest pool, and the few that don't are limited collaborations.
    • Steel Castle Melfikya, a weapon enhancement dungeon where players battle through ten floors to imbue their weapons with stat increases or other passive abilities, is agreed to be one of the worst implemented systems in the game. After beating each floor, you can choose between one of three enhancements, with the weapon only able to hold three at maximum. The chance of better enhancements increases as you move to higher floors. However, most of the time, the effort doesn't yield a good result, either because the game gives players the stat increase they want with horrible modifiers in deeper levels (1% ATK for katana in 7th floor) or flat-out gives players enhancements they don't need (15% ATK increase on a MAG-focused rod). Even worse, the enhancements players don't want have chances of coming back on the next floor or arriving more than once on the same floor. Some people choose not to enhance their weapons simply because the effort is too luck-based and time-consuming.
    • The Enlightenment Point (EP) system, intended to be the Global version's answer to making latent abilities more accessible, flopped harder than any Global-exclusive feature since the Cash Summon. The system was originally intended to inject new life into old units by giving them new abilities. While Japan's version opted for a mission requirement of beating a high-level boss in 20 turns, Global decided to turn it into more Level Grinding. The problem is that it takes 5,000 Enlightenment Points to unlock one latent ability, the weekly event drops an average of 6,000 EP (3,000 of which is gated behind high-level rewards), and the free daily only drops 350 Enlightenment Points. If you do the free daily quest every day, it takes a little more than a month to unlock one ability for one character. To add insult to injury, this rework came weeks after their announcement that they would rework the rewards for rank and login days, angering veterans of the game even further. While it did help take the load off of new players, the EP system was implemented at the expense of long-time players and defeated the purpose of latent abilities. Instead of giving their older units more power, people just hoarded their EP and keys to unlock abilities for their favorite characters or meta units that they were already using. The system flopped so hard that even after the increases in EP drops for the daily, the team promised to implement significant changes in the next month.
    • Event Points (EP) have evolved into a despised system, especially in Japan. The Event Point system, used in King Mog or Wave Battle events, gives players a milestone for clearing an event dungeon which will unlock tiered reward similar to Raid Points. The big problem with this is that the last reward (a 5-star EX ticket) has crept up to an absurdly high EP tier. For comparison, the highest amount of EP one player can get is 400 EP from clearing LGD stages of a King Mog or Wave Battle event, while the highest reward for Wave Battles is usually unlocked at 30,000 EP, which requires at least 75 battles and two weeks worth of NRG refilling without NRG potion or Lapis refresh help. For Kaito's event, the final 5-star EX Ticket crawled up from 30,000 EP to 40,000. It was worse in the Japanese version when they overhauled the reward system for King Mog events (starting with CG Warrior of Light's) because the highest tier reached as far as 100,000 EP, even with a one-time only special EP battle and easier NRG resources. Many complained about the repetitive and grindy nature of the system, even more when accompanied with Wave Battles' GLEX bosses because they tend to have higher difficulty level and annoying gimmicks, wasting more of players' time and NRG.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • Delita's STMR, The Subservient, is a materia that gives the unit an 80% attack boost with no preconditions. There are four other STMR that give such a boost, all requiring a specific weapon to be equipped. The reason why those are useful and Delita's is terrible is the second effect of The Subservient. Every turn, at the beginning of the turn, The Subservient deals 2000 fixed damage to the unit. The unit therefore has to be kept healed every round, and if the opponent manages to drop that unit's health below 2000 on their turn, it's dead on yours guaranteed. There's virtually no reason to use the materia aside from parameter missions, and it can prove an unwelcome discovery when a player has attached it to their friend unit.
    • The Angel Slayer from the Valkyrie Profile collaboration looks equivalent to a STMR in Brave Exvius, but its hidden mechanics make it dramatically worse. It looks strong on the surface, boasting 180 ATK, but has a variance from 0.01x power to 1.00x. Unlike in the original game, where its sky-high attack made the high variance irrelevant, the variance makes it useless aside from parameter missions.
    • Among the espers, Siren is hit very hard by this, to the point of being a Crutch Character. For one, while espers do give stat boosts to the character equipped with them, tweaking characters towards specific roles, Siren is hit by the Master of None problem. Siren also has some of the least useful skills that she can impart to a character, along with fewer points per esper level with which to buy abilities or stat boosts. Finally, her summon does Non-Elemental damage when her theoretical element (water) is one of the least common resistances and elements in the game. Her main use is to give one character minor stat boosts while waiting for a sixth summon to equip, which doesn't happen until a decent way into the fourth major area, to give a character access to a Water spell to complete a mission, or to give a character 50% Water resistance for a tough boss fight. She is somewhat Rescued from the Scrappy Heap as one of the first two espers (along with Ifrit) to receive a third-star awakening, but the prospect of the other espers achieving such an awakening threatens to have her fall back into this position.
    • Fenrir was also hit hard for this for similar reasons to Siren. While he does have an extra Resistance (specifically 25% to Dark), almost all of his skills are useless. His stats are mainly geared towards hybrid characters, and all of his moves are weak hybrid moves. He has no Killer passives (like Odin or Tetra Sylphid), and he has no useful active skills (like Lakshmi or Golem). For stats, Bahamut was a better option for hybrids anyway. He at least has a useful evoke skill, with a single charge of Mirage and a strong buff, but was inferior in every way. Fenrir's Master of None Syndrome was particularly egregious because he is acquired in Paladia, while Siren is the first esper released in-game. His 3-star form, however, fixed most of his problems.
    • Nyx's Trust Mastery Reward, Guard of the Future, gets the Scrappy treatment due to being the Master of None of Trust Mastery Rewards. This materia, despite coming from a 5-star base, is 20% ATK/MAG/DEF/SPR, auto-Regen, and a 5% Auto-Refresh. Multiple TMRs of each stat boost+20% and above (including Adventurer III, which provides all four at once) have been given out for free. Auto-Regen is a poor ability (not to mention also easy to get for free), and auto-Refresh can be gotten from the Fat Chocobo in Mysidia. In addition, the Refresh is inferior to King's (who is a 4-star base) and Ayaka's TMRs, making it largely inferior. In short, Guard of the Future does a lot of things, but doesn't really excel enough in any of them to make it farmable. It's even Scrappier because according to the document leak, Gumi was weighing whether or not to change Nyx's Trust Mastery to a 100 ATK/70 MAG Fire-elemental dagger. This would not only have improved other units down the road, but would have given Nyx a powerful Fire-elemental option that wasn't limited to event rewards. If you missed the Brave Frontier collaborations, this means your only options for taking advantage of the Fire imperil are Cannon's Blade (which has 106 ATK) and Flametongue, which has a paltry 33 ATK. Gumi went with the original reward instead, and the community was disappointed - especially after the free Halloween dagger was revealed to share its fire element with a dark element and was locked behind a limited That One Boss.
  • Shocking Swerve: Akstar's true identity as a disguised Rain from 50 years in the future. Not only is the first time that time travel is ever mentioned by the story (apart from a non-canon Story Event for Japan's 3rd anniversary and as flavor text on a Global-exclusive unit), but Akstar shares very little with Rain in terms of battle style or character quirks, sharing more in common with Lasswell. Not only that, but Rain is a Lethal Chef while Akstar is a Supreme Chef and Rain was shown to be unable to use the transformation magic that his older self eventually makes use of in order to don this disguise. The Japanese fanbase was not pleased by this twist and many fanartists deleted their FFBE art off of their art profiles as a result of this chapter.
  • Squick: Jake's constant flirting with Fina and Lid is frequently viewed this way, as Jake is 29 while Fina and Lid are 16 according to the official guidebook. Though that's not entirely accurate in Fina's case, and she has begun to recover her memories by the time she meets Jake. Amplified with Sakura: while she's 700 years old (like the rest of the Paladians), she has the body of a child.
    • And then around the Paladia arc, Lid falls for Jake, invoking No Yay from most of the fans.
    • Jake takes Squick to a different disgusting level in Gungan after hitting on Kunshira, a cat.
    • Jake later takes it to literally humongous levels when, upon awakening Leviathan to three stars, it's revealed that this game's Leviathan is female. Jake proceeds to hit on the multi-story sea serpent.
  • Tear Jerker: One sidequest involves tracking down a lost necklace so that the owner can be buried with it.
    • The entire A Promise Beyond Time event, which involves two elves (Bran and Lunera) meeting Ruggles the dwarf. It ends in Lunera getting sick trying to save a dying Ruggles, the couple befriending him, Ruggles dedicating his life to making Gronoa more livable, and Bran sacrificing his life for him. It ends with Ruggles learning the elven language just to make the castle a monument to their love and finishing his tunnel.
    • The ending of Season 1. Just as everything looks hopeless, it shows a montage of everyone who you met on the way, from the Town of Mitra to Ayaka in Pharm, praying for your safety, bringing your friends to life. This sets the stage for Evan's Big Damn Heroes moment.
  • That One Achievement:
    • The gold-rank Undying Myth achievement, for 100 consecutive victories in the Player Versus Player arena, can be frustrating to get for several reasons. First and foremost, all arena stats (other than points earned towards monthly awards) reset every Friday. This includes progress towards Undying Myth, which means that a player who loses their win streak halfway through the week will have to just wait until next Friday to even start at earning it again. Second, the list of opponents only shows their leader unit and player rank, with no information as to what they might be hiding behind it. You can wind up fighting an opponent fully stocked with Game-Breaker units with all the best equipment, and if the A.I. Roulette is feeling merciless, most if not all of the player's team can be slaughtered before they even get a turn. Finally, if the game is shut down during an arena battle, the game counts it as an automatic loss for that fight when it's booted back up. This is mainly meant to prevent players from resetting to get a favorable result with the A.I. Roulette, but it also means that you completely lose your progress towards Undying Myth if the game crashes. This gets even harder with more units who can cripplingly debuff your party being released. Though there is a way to stack the deck in your favor (anyone below rank 40-50 is probably a pushover if you've beaten story mode), there's no guarantee you'll get such opponents. This one at least gets progressively easier as you advance in the game, but without certain units, you're always at risk of one bad roll ending your streak.
    • The three Colosseum achievements (score, times played, victories) aren't difficult, but they are obnoxiously tedious. To complete the Colosseum and craft the Blood Sword which is rewarded at the end, you need to win 913 times, which includes repeating the last three levels several times for the crafting material. This gets you to bronze. Silver requires 1,000 and gold requires 10,000. That is roughly a year's worth of play on a game mode that at best rewards a Mega Ether every 11 matches (two a day). By comparison, winning in the Arena earns you stat pots, various kinds of magicite, and even trust moogles once a week if you rank high enough. Since the Arena also has trophies with the same conditions, it's a no brainer which is worth the time to do.
    • By the same token, many of the item and skill-based achievements require either using or crafting certain things a downright excessive amount of times. Crafting items and abilities 1,000 times is something you will have to deliberately put your mind to, because in both cases there is virtually nothing worth crafting that your units can't already do better. Crafting equipment is marginally better, as raids will regularly reward more crafting material than you will ever realistically need, so you can burn it off crafting equipment and selling the result. Perhaps the worst of these is summoning 10,000 espers. In any given battle, you'll typically only evoke one, if at all.
    • Getting the Ring of Dominion is the most grueling achievement of them all. To unlock it, you need to complete 70 of the 75 Trophies, many of which are That One Achievement-worthy (see above) in and of themselves. The addition of 12 general trophies took some of the edge off, as you can earn 9 of the 12 through casual play. The final ring is incredibly powerful, with ATK/MAG/DEF/SPR+50% and HP/MP+30%. The ingredients are three Hero's Rings, three Koltz Stars, three Hope Diamonds, and three Flaming Bloods. The Hero's Rings are easy enough to get, but each of the other materials has a 2% chance to drop from crafting the other three Rings (Monarch's Ring, Domination Ring, and Ruler's Ring). For the Hero's Ring itself, you need 3 Silver Ores and 10 Fire and Ice Megacrysts. For the three others, you need to combine the Hero's Ring with 60 Megacrysts (each with a different combination). You will need anywhere from 3,000 to 6,000 Megacrysts of each type and more than 1,000 Silver Ores just to craft it: and that's only assuming you have average luck. It is so hard to obtain that anyone who wants it has to be a whale and meticulously plan the Ring of Dominion, nearly ignoring everything else besides it to farm Megacrysts.
    • Any "defeat x with an esper" mission is especially reviled by the fans, given that espers usually deal pitiful damage and require very precise timing for the achievement to actually count. To make matters worse, some bosses with such an achievement have been time-limited bosses, meaning if you mess up it may not be easy to try again.
  • That One Attack: In the Arena, Stop is the bane of anyone not fielding Ayaka or Aerith. Very few units innately resist Stop, Ayaka and Aerith being two of them. Only a select few units have abilities which grant such resistance to the party, which Arena conditions may prohibit you from using and are useless if the computer gets to go first. Finally, the only equippable source of Stop resistance is through the esper Shiva, which is only 50%. Of the units that have abilities which inflict Stop, the most common ones (Noctis, Amelia) can hit your entire party at once, and are usually dual-wielding to make the attack hit twice. There's also an obtainable ability that allows any unit to use AoE Stop. If the roulette goes badly, your entire team can be frozen and you'll have to wait three rounds for it to wear off, if you're lucky enough to survive it. Without Ayaka or Aerith, you basically have to hope the attack doesn't freeze your dispeller units so you can remove it before you get wrecked.
  • That One Boss: Has its own page.
  • That One Disadvantage: Arguably the worst mission in any given level is "No (recovery) magic". This clause pretty much obliterates the role of your healer and/or red mage. You can use items to get around it, but items are nowhere near as effective as your healer. It certainly doesn't help that the game loves to pair this with a boss level. Very few units have healing that is ability-based, most notably Tilith, who is also the only unit in the game with an ability-based 100% AoE heal. Even the ones that do have ability-based healing are often hampered either by the healing being a fixed amount or with such a low modifier that it's generally insufficient for regular use.
  • That One Level: The Realm of the Dragon King, an entire world consisting of eight interconnected explorations, counts as this. These explorations (if you can call the base and summit ones) are technically interconnected, but you can start at any of the six middle points if you use a Tent at the designated rest areas. It is strongly encouraged to use these checkpoints due to the difficulty of these dungeons. The monsters are stronger than any exploration in the game, having hundreds of thousands of HP and doing punishing amounts damage to your party if you don't kill them. Some even have instant KO attacks that they can use multiple times per turn. Most challenging of all is their random ability to pre-emptively strike your party. Before you can set up breaks, Provoke, or tank, these can use any attack: including instant KO. Therefore, it is strongly recommended to have access to Escape - these enemies can outright cripple your party if they kill the wrong people. Shadow Bahamut returns as a Breather Boss who is more of a pushover than the trash. You should be able to dispatch him with no problem. Beating him has a chance of dropping a Rat Tail. Waiting at the end of the quest is Bahamut, who is That One Boss level, and beating him earns you his power as an esper.
  • That One Rule: The Player Versus Player Arena always has a pair of restrictions on what can be used in it (changing weekly), and those restrictions can be anything from a minor annoyance to a crippling handicap, depending on what party the player brings in to the Arena. For example, a ban on black magic will seriously crimp the strategy of someone heavily reliant on units like Dark Fina or Exdeath, while someone heavily reliant on Lightning or Luneth might not even notice. No status effects is one of the big ones, as that and chaining are on the top of the Arena meta list.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • When sidequests for extra lapis and items were added to each quest and exploration, a few of the ones added were particularly cruel. Ones in particular that are prone to frustration include restrictions on party size, defeating the boss with a limit break (depending on their magic defense, defeating them with magic may be equally problematic), and a restriction against healing. Certain ones require certain skills to be used, which can also be difficult depending on who has been recruited — in at least one case, it even becomes Character Select Forcing one side mission requires use of Upgrade, only available on Lid and Black Cat Lid. For the vortex missions, this can be even worse, as the missions generally have decent if not fantastic rewards for completing the sidequests, but require willingly handicapping yourself against foes that can be extremely difficult even with an optimized team.
    • Limited-edition event trials are a thing — the most noteworthy being the True Titan, who was That One Boss level, and the Skeleton King, who was so difficult that he had to be nerfed due to him being able to randomly kill your party with no chance of recovery.
    • The very first part of the exploration in Realm of the Dragon God has a sidequest to "clear" (which can be pulled off, thankfully, by making it to one of the base camp areas and choosing to exit) that section without any deaths among the player's party. As detailed in the main page entry for Brutal Bonus Level, the enemies are powerful enough that they can take out at least one party member per turn, even if the enemy in question doesn't have a One-Hit KO move and even if the party is loaded up with the best TMR gear, if they get an action. And since it's the one place on the world map where enemies can get a preemptive strike, sooner or later, the monsters will have that chance. It's practically a Luck-Based Mission - can the player get to one of the base camps to get out of the area while only facing preemptive strikes from enemy parties that don't focus their strikes enough to take out a party member? The reward for pulling this off (20 light megacrysts), while useful, can be much more easily farmed from countless exploration maps that are much easier to clear, edging this into Bonus Feature Failure.
    • Asura's Realm takes Character Select Forcing to new heights by requiring Pyro Glacial Lasswell. Unlike most other missions requiring a character, Lasswell's Season 2 form is a 5-star base in the paid gacha, and no friend unit is provided like most story events.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: See Ass Pull above. Sakura during her story event was shown to deeply regret being immortal and wants to be depowered so that she can grow out of her childlike body. A cure for immortality is forced upon the other Sworn Six, but not even offered to Sakura before it disappears.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy: Has its own page.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Generally, any time they do a non-JRPG collaboration, it's surprising. Most collabs have been exclusively RPGs, like NieR: Automata and Secret of Mana, but there have been a few for other video games and even musical collabs.
      • As noted, Ariana Grande of all people has been added to the game as a playable unit. She even got a second version in August of 2017, and a third and fourth version were released in November.
      • Lara Croft was added into the game on December 8th as a free unit, along with reskinned versions of Aileen (as Lara), Soleil (as an Egyptian goddess), and Abel (as a pharaoh). Lara being free was a more pleasant surprise, considering how iconic of a character she was.
      • Gumi would later one-up themselves with a shocking non-JRPG collaboration in June. That collab turned out to be Just Cause III. Just Cause is a sandbox-style action game that focuses more on open world gameplay, as opposed to a structured story.
      • When Gumi announced another collaboration with a "Pop Singer" during 2nd day of Fan Festa 2018, many expected another Ariana unit to arrive... only for Katy Perry to appear onstage.
    • Zargabaath gets a special mention, especially considering the merits of his release. Despite being a relatively minor NPC in-game, he was plugged as a new, Global-exclusive 5-star base to hype Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age, despite being a relatively obscure NPC in the game. Even more surprising was the fact that he displaced Balthier, one of the more popular playable characters in XII, on his banner, instead of splitting the 5-star rate.
      • Zargabaath's displacement of Balthier led to him being bumped to January of 2018. People were expecting Gumi to create another Global-exclusive event, but they opted to displace Gabranth and release Basch's event 2 months early. This is particularly surprising because Basch is an all-purpose cover tank who generally snapped the game in half. Usually, game-breaking units of this caliber (like Warrior of Light's 6-star form, Orlandeau, and Ramza's enhancements) get delayed, not pushed up the schedule.
    • The NieR: Automata banner being released months early was a strong surprise, but more surprising was the news that nothing would be nerfed. This included 9S, a game-breaking unit with an even more game-breaking TMR, and Cruel Oath, a craftable katana earned through raid rewards close to Genji Blade. However, Gumi found another way to weaken the event with the addition of a certain Global Original unit.
    • Loren, a character meant as a reward for whales in Japan, was released in Global in the normal gacha. However, how she was released was unexpected, displacing Roy, an incredibly powerful bard who was ostensibly delayed for Power Creep reasons. Due to Gumi's proclivity for delaying 5-star awakenings or 6-star forms until an equivalent 5-star base unit is released, this also threw Ramza's highly-anticipated enhancements back into limbo until Roy was announced for early December.
    • The launch of the Dragon Quest XI crossover event took the Global community by surprise due to the fact that two previous Dragon Quest events were Japan-exclusive. It had long been assumed that, even though the assets for the Dragon Quest characters and related items were in the Global version for over a year, they would simply remain exclusive to Japan because the Dragon Quest mobile game . Instead, the assets were
    • The FFBE team teased a "hyped return collaboration" in June that was supposed to catch everyone by surprise. Some people were expecting NieR: Automata (their most successful collab) or Secret of Mana (which had Randi, who becomes game-breaking at 7-star). Datamines from Brave Frontier showed that the FFBE collab was returning, which meant people were expecting another Grand Gaia Chronicles rerun. The returning collab event turned out to be the King's Knight raid. The first version was a fairly recent event that didn't generate much interest. Unlike NieR or Mana, it was based off of a fairly unpopular mobile game that was created from an easter egg in Final Fantasy XV, as a remake of a fairly mediocre pre-FF title. It also had one of the most maligned units in Ray Jack. Most surprising of all was that King's Knight itself was about to die in 3 weeks. The hyped collab being King's Knight was completely out of left field because it wasn't even that popular.
    • The launch of the Deus Ex: Mankind Divided was a surprise, as the event launched almost exactly two years after the game in question was released, and there had been wide speculation that Square Enix more or less was abandoning the Deus Ex franchise.
    • When the Kingdom Hearts collaboration was announced, the Global presentation from Fan Festa got an exclusive tease that it would feature more than Sora. Most people expected an original unit, like Riku or Kairi. Instead, they got the Kingdom Hearts version of Cloud, who had not made an appearance since 2011 and would only make a small cameo in Kingdom Hearts III. Even though it was Cloud, most people were surprised they went with a reskinned Final Fantasy character over the wide variety of originals.
    • After a delay for one month, one of the most hyped banners of the first half of 2019, Akstar's banner, finally arrived on May 10th. Unlike Japan's banner, the Global version added Zeno Of The Beta Star, the first global-exclusive story unit and Akstar's true identity.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic: Folka, otherwise known as the Veritas of the Waters. The audience is supposed to feel sympathy for her being emotionally broken after 700 years and finally brainwashing herself into a Card-Carrying Villain in order to keep going with her friends' plans. However, the acts she commits under said brainwashing include flooding a city, brainwashing a peaceful esper into mindless violence, and killing Elle, one of the main characters' brothers. Most fans took the brainwashing as a weak excuse seeing as she did it to herself knowing full well there would likely be consequences. While Nichol pursues her to get revenge, the rest of the party talks him out of it. Compared to Citra, who feels she must atone for her villainous actions even well into season 2, Folka felt much too Easily Forgiven. In season 2 she also falls in love with Nichol, brother of the man she killed and her own descendant. Fans were Squicked, finding the prospect of such a relationship uncomfortable.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: The season two unit versions for the Story characters get CG Limit Burst animations. and needless to say they're very impressive looking.
  • Win Back the Crowd: As the playerbase rioted over the Unit of Choice debacle, Gumi looked to offer new deals to tempt them into spending again. In their monthly update video, they announced Hyoh, one of the most hyped units in the game, with an extra, Global-exclusive 25,000 Lapis step-up for Hyoh and Awakened Rain. To sweeten the pot, they also released Awakened Rain's powerful 7-star form four months early. It didn't outright guarantee Hyoh, but Awakened Rain was a powerful consolation prize. After it still didn't blunt the Unit of Choice controversy, they released specific dates on when the missing Select Tickets would come. Then, they revealed that they would give out another Select ticket during the first stage of Hyoh's story event, finally placating everyone.
    • After fans' outrage over the diluted 5-star pool on limited-time unit banners (and outright nerfs to the Valkyrie Profile banner), Gumi decided to make two separate banners and step-ups for the 2018 Christmas event, which consisted of old 5-star units in the first one and new 5-star units in the second one. While the newer banner still contained non-limited rainbow units (as well as the old limited rainbow units available as off-banners), they made sure that the old one will only consist of Kryla, Christine, and White Knight Noel. Fans are legitimately happy after hearing this news.
    • After the backlash of how they handled the Halloween units' release, Gumi and Square Enix made the Fan Festa Select Summon the highlight of their player rewards. These tickets allowed a player to select any Global Original non-collaboration unit in the game. For example, players could get Zargabaath or Barbariccia, but not A2 or Rico Rodriguez. What set this Select Ticket apart was that it included limited-time holiday units like Demon Rain, White Knight Noel, or Chow. Some theorize that this was a move to appease those who failed to pull the Halloween units.
    • After many disappointments Gumi did during 3rd Anniversary celebration like some players being unable to log in to the game and their handling of anniversary reward, it looks like they are trying to redeem themselves with the Global Original Unit upgrade. The first batch that includes 5 Fan Festa units in July 2019 is received very well because the changes not only upgrade existing abilities, they also add new abilities and improves TMR and STMR which are badly needed for those units. While some people are really happy with this and are eagerly looking forward to the second batch, some others believe Gumi is going to mess things up badly again in the future considering how the company operates.
    • The Global version's 3rd Anniversary celebration represents a more polarizing attempt at this trope. At first glance, they seemingly tried not to give away rank and login-based anniversary tickets like the Japanese version did. When the debated anniversary ticket was announced, it came in the form of a different Anniversary Follow-Up ticket. Unit of Choice tickets were replaced with Super Trust Moogle tickets, but most people bemoaned the replacements of esper ores, supercites, and regular stat pots with weaker versions of them (Mini Stat Pots, Megacites, and regular magicites) and the addition of Minituars and Gil Snappers. The problem was that the drop rates were severely nerfed compared to the original Anniversary tickets. The regular summons were weighted towards the aforementioned weaker rewards (with almost total nerfs to premium items' drop rates), the Gold summons were weighted towards paltry amounts of Lapis, and the Platinum summons had a 90% chance to pull 5 STMR Tickets or a 5-star EX ticket. It was nearly impossible to pull a Prism Moogle or UoC ticket, and the generous 5-star EX ticket rates were stripped to the bone. In effect, it saw a lot of backlash once players figured out how bad the rewards were, but some were at least grateful for the free rewards.
  • The Woobie: Hayate, at the end of the Way of the Warrior event. Fresh after watching his sister and father die, which he blames himself for, his mother not only commits seppuku, but demands he help her kill herself. Shortly after, his kingdom is destroyed, and he flees with Lady Kaede to Sian.
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