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YMMV / Doctor Who S9 E5 "The Time Monster"

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  • Accidental Innuendo: When they're left alone together in the lab, Stu says to Ruth, "Let's do it!" He's referring to having a trial run of the TOMTIT, although Ruth says "What?" in a way which seems to imply she thought he might have meant something else.
  • Foe Yay: The Doctor and the Master's TARDISes end up inside each other. Yeah. And then it ends with the Master on his knees, begging the Doctor for mercy.
    • The whole serial is one huge Doctor/Master slashfest, honestly. It starts with the Doctor having a nightmare about the Master. Wherein he lies on a chaise longue and wakes up to a giant Master looming over him, calling out to the Doctor: "Welcome! Welcome to your new Master!"
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  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment: A very saddening thing is brought to light with John Levene's commentary of this story on DVD. The baby that portrayed infant Benton, Darren Plant, didn't live to see his first birthday. That makes him the shortest-lived cast member on the series of all, who didn't get to grow up to even understand what he took part in.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: The Brigadier berates the Doctor: "One moment you're talking about the whole universe blowing up, and the next you're going on about tea!" This sums up one of the Doctor's most famous monologues at the end of the last story of the classic era, "Survival": "Somewhere there's danger, somewhere there's injustice, somewhere else the tea is getting cold."
  • Special Effect Failure: Having the immensely powerful Kronos depicted as a glowing winged humanoid may have seemed like a good idea at script time, but the actual effect is less "I am an uncontrolled primal force of nature" and more "I am a man dressed in a chicken suit flapping my arms while dangling unconvincingly from wires" instead. A shame, since the Atlantean costumes are very much what you'd expect, and presumably drew on BBC Wardrobe's historical drama department.
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  • Strawman Has a Point: Ruth Ingram is supposed to be an obnoxious Straw Feminist who treats men the way sexist men treat women. However, her initial complaint about her boss banging on about his 'male superiority' is bang on the money, since her boss goes around calling himself The Master. The Master also treats her in a sexist way (inexplicably), saying things to her that are wildly inappropriate by anyone's standards and treating her less experienced male colleague like the boss rather than her. Her one sexist line to Benton ("Just stand over there and look pretty") is also played by both actors involved as being mutually enjoyed flirting rather than an insult. All in all, she comes off as being a reasonable feminist, if perhaps a bit prone to hyperbole when talking about legitimate grievances.
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