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YMMV / Detroit: Become Human

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  • Acceptable Targets: Overweight people and drug addicts.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Why the player characters do things a certain way, of course, depends on how you play and why.
    • Kamski is all over the place. Was the Kamski test a Secret Test of Character or just apathy to the "life" of a machine? Is he a "good" person who intentionally wants android sapience and rights (hinting at Connor's backdoor to being compromised if he goes deviant)? Or is he just fine with seeing the cards fall where they may, happy at either success or failure on the androids' part as he rejoins CyberLife in some particularly short endings. Or are those endings hinting that he's dissatisfied with androids' progress in common sense, since this happens in a "bad" ending, and he's working to improve the next generation that may fight for independence?
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    • The exact nature of the bond Connor shares with Hank when you're on best possible terms with him is left up to interpretation. Most people can agree that there's some kind of strong friendship and camaraderie, but whether it's strictly that or if it goes beyond into other types of relationships is more contentious. A lot of fans believe they have a surrogate father-son relationship due to Hank's own troubled past and some parallels drawn between Connor and his late child, although Clancy Brown denied that this was the case. Others think Connor shows hints of a more romantic interest, which is not helped by some awkwardly phrased lines and the genre's penchant for Ho Yay subtext, or David Cage's comments on Connor's deviancy plotline paralleling a Coming-Out Story.
    • While it isn't considered a "serious" interpretation, the fact that nearly none of the androids Markus liberates have any qualms about working with him and leaving their former lives behind at all has propped the suggestion that he's actually brainwashing them into helping rather than freeing them.
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    • It's revealed that if Connor chooses to go deviant that Cyberlife had planned on him becoming deviant the whole time and were planning on him getting involved in the android revolution so that they could stop it from the inside. This raises many questions and interpretations: Does Cyberlife know what causes deviancy and can "programmed" it into Connor, or were they planning on Connnor becoming deviant by being exposed to deviant androids? Were they fully prepared for Connor not becoming deviant but still succeeding in stopping the revolution as a Plan B, or was that a stroke of luck on their part? Is Cyberlife overall the true Big Bad of the game, or just a company trying to cause some "damage control"? And most thought-provoking: Connor was investigating deviants and programmed for deviancy before Markus came to Jericho and started the revolution, so did Cyberlife somehow know that there was going to be a revolution the whole time?
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    • One that is sometimes used seriously and sometimes jokingly, regarding Alice: While the game properly mentions that she's deviant, some players question just how "alive" she truly is. As some point out, Alice is an android designed to be a child, totally dependent on her caretaker and helpless on her own—which is what she is. True, she willingly ran away from her owner-slash-human-father, but serious supporters of this interpretation point out that she could have very well been using her relationship with Kara as a substitute for the parental figure she never had, i.e. a way to fulfill her programmed purpose. Basically, if an android is programmed to be something, and continue to be that something even after deviating, does their deviancy really "count"?
  • Anvilicious:
    • Racism is bad. The game makes numerous parallels between androids and oppressed minorities, including: androids having to ride at the back of the bus like blacks during American segregation, people complaining about them "taking their jobs" as in the common complaint about immigrants, having to identify themselves via badges on their uniforms like Jews in the run-up to the Holocaust, being sent to what are essentially concentration camps later in the game, and many more parallels. Androids like Markus consider themselves an oppressed race and some deviants can give Connor flak for hunting down his "kind", despite that being what he was programmed to do. Humans abusing androids (either for their own amusement or otherwise) is treated as the result of bigotry analogous to racism.
    • Violence accomplishes nothing. Josh is the mouthpiece of this point, even to his dying breath if you let it get that far. Of course, story decisions can affect how prevalent this shows up — Markus can still succeed with a violent revolution. Meanwhile, Kara's ending is affected by Markus's choices: without certain unlocked options in the preceding level, she will fail to gain the border guard's sympathy due to hostile public opinion from a violent revolution, and it may be impossible to save her in a given playthrough. And there are moments (like the Broken scenario) where violence actually IS the best solution.
  • Applicability: Word of God states that a Coming-Out Story is a valid way to interpret Connor's plotline.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • You're given a flowchart for story choices in each chapter, allowing you to know what caused an event and how you could've changed it, which will help out a lot if you're a completionist. Additionally, choices have more impact on how the story changes than in previous David Cage games.
    • Players of previous David Cage games felt that the fanservice (such as the Shower Scenes) or sexual abuse were a disservice to the character in question (usually a female character). There's almost no fanservice/sexual abuse in the story other than the Eden club level (which actually makes sense with the story this time) and maybe North's backstory as a Sex Bot there. Parodied when Connor sticks a hungover Hank in the shower and runs him under cold water to sober him up.
    • There's no shoehorned supernatural element to the story this time. That isn't to say that there aren't any poor storytelling choices or that David Cage didn't put any supernatural elements into it (in one of the real world commercials, Chloe says that unlike humans, she doesn't have a soul because she's an android), but it's definitely not a major point in the game.
  • Awesome Music:
    • The music for the PGW Trailer, which emphasizes and intensifies the already tense emotional context.
    • As this video demonstrates, a lot of effort went into composing the respective themes for each protagonist.
  • Base-Breaking Character
    • Gavin has turned into quite the polarizing character over time. On the one hand, he's become extremely popular for a character with minimal screentime, mainly among people who like to ship him with RK900. Of course he has quite a few haters as well, in between the fans who already despise him due to the game portraying him as a completely straight example of a Hate Sink, and fans who developed Hype Backlash towards him and 900Gavin/Gavin900 for consuming the fandom over much more prominent characters and relationships despite being a Crack Pairing built entirely on Fanon.
    • North, in an interesting way. Few people seem to actually hate her. However, the fanbase is divided between those who think she's an interesting female character with her own story and motivations, and those who think she's a poorly written Satellite Love Interest.
    • Bizarrely enough, Simon is beginning to get some flak from some fans. Some think that his agreeable nature, possible feelings for Markus and unclear backstory are interesting enough to make him an enjoyable character, while others are annoyed that his only major role in the story is to die if Markus screws up too many times, or to give Connor a lead to Jericho, as opposed to North and Josh serving to represent differing ideals. Some are also annoyed that Simon is so popular despite having less personality and backstory than the other two Jericho leaders, while fans of the character claim that they enjoy making content for him for precisely that reason.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: During the protest march, Markus starts awakening androids who are thirty feet away with nothing more than a gesture. This ability is never referenced again, which becomes particularly noticeable in the scene where he has no choice but to let Connor (who is holding him up at gunpoint) choose for himself whether or not to become deviant.
  • Broken Base: The choice of "buying" a replacement Chloe if you choose to let the first one go has a divided opinion among players. Some feel that the entire emotional experience of letting Chloe go is rendered meaningless if you can just buy a replacement. Others argue that it's just a sort of reset mechanic that the player shouldn't take too seriously. They also argue that there are players who were not aware that they could interact with Chloe so much but chose to let her go, so having an option to get a new Chloe to experience these interactions might be a case of Anti-Frustration Features.
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • Connor beating up Gavin. It’s not only satisfying, it’s awesome as hell.
    • Similarly, Hank beating up Perkins, who’s way worse than Gavin.
  • Complete Monster: While there are plenty of humans who are guilty of racism towards androids in the story, it's this duo that goes above and beyond in regards to how callous they are towards them.
    • Zlatko Andronikov is a sadist who enjoys killing and torturing androids. Posing as a good Samaritan trying to help deviants find sanctuary, Zlatko invites various androids into his house so he can later erase their memories. Once he does, he either dismantles the androids and sells their body parts, or he keeps the androids for himself so he can mutilate their bodies for his personal enjoyment. When Kara and Alice arrive at his home, he attempts to wipe Kara's memories too so he can keep her as his slave, and tries to murder Alice as well. Despite knowing that androids are developing sentience, Zlatko doesn't care, and he willingly treats them all like nothing but toys or spare parts to make money off of.
    • Richard Perkins is an FBI agent who despises androids. After learning about the androids' deviancy and Jericho's uprising against humans, Perkins is appointed to hunt down Markus and to dismantle Jericho. Once Perkins discovers the location of Jericho, he sends several field agents to the location and allows his agents to slaughter dozens of androids, even the ones who surrender or pose no threat to the agents. If Markus and Jericho's primary coordinators survive the attack and Markus leads a peaceful demonstration into Detroit's concentration camps, Perkins will have his agents open fire into the crowd and kill more androids. Perkins later confronts Markus and offers for him to surrender, or else he and the rest of Jericho will perish. If Markus doesn't take his deal, then Perkins will order his agents to resume attacking Jericho; if Markus does take the deal, then Perkins will detain all the androids. Shortly afterwards, he murders North and smugly tells Markus that all of the androids will be destroyed, seconds before murdering Markus too.
  • Crack Ship: For some inexplicable reason, shipping Gavin Reed with RK900, Connor's replacement, is quite popular despite them having zero interactions with each other. Considering RK900 can only show up in one of the possible endings and had only around a few seconds of screentime.
  • Critical Research Failure: It's pretty clear the makers of this game are not Americans and have little actual knowledge about either American culture or law. While generally minor if you're not paying close attention to it, if you are knowledgeable about it, it's impossible to ignore. Examples include characters relaying distances in metric, Markus using the term "car park" while attempting to distract a person (when the correct term would be "parking lot") and finally, President Warren simply suspends the right to free assembly (which is explicitly protected by the Constitution and would likely result in both a political uproar as well as lawsuits against the government).
  • Crosses the Line Twice: There's something so darkly hilarious about Carlos Ortiz's corpse being shown lying down in the gallery when they have an actual model of him when he was alive which can be seen when you probe his android.
  • Designated Villain: Having Connor choose to remain loyal to humanity and continue fighting Jericho when given the chance to become deviant is portrayed by the game as an unambiguously evil act, which both other Androids and Hank will call Connor out on, regardless of circumstances up to that point. While it's hard to argue with putting down a peaceful protest, if Markus has been consistently violent and pushing outright rebellion as Jericho's approach, one has to question how wrong it really is for Connor to fight against him.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: In-game, Gavin Reed is an unrepentantly bigoted Hate Sink with nothing in the way of redeeming qualities whatsoever. Nevertheless he has a lot of fangirls who view him as Troubled, but Cute and are convinced that his behavior stems from some kind of Freudian Excuse, despite the supplementary material, which often provides such Jerkass characters with sympathetic backstories, having nothing remotely kind to say about him either.
  • Don't Shoot the Message: The most common criticism of the game's social commentary. Make no mistake, the game is not at all subtle about denouncing hateful ideologies such as racism, bigotry, and violent extremism, which it achieves by using using androids as an Allegory for real-life oppressed minorities. Nevertheless a lot of its critics contend that while the intent is noble enough, the imagery used to make its point is so heavyhanded and haphazardly applied (with some accusing the game of lazily appropriating minority struggles as window dressing) as to undermine its own message.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Chloe, the female android from the interview short, has become startlingly popular in a matter of seconds, on the grounds of being incredibly cute for an android. That's probably why she's on the game's main menu.
    • In the actual game, Carl Manfred, for his incredibly touching relationship with Markus, and for being one of the few non-Jerkass humans. Being played by Lance Henriksen also helps.
    • Jerry, in part for his jovial persona, but especially for ensuring one of the game's most touching moments.
    • Simon, for being less abrasive than the other two members of Jericho and for his Ho Yay moments with Markus. "Our hearts are compatible," indeed.
    • Ralph, for being a Broken Bird woobie.
    • M. Wilson, the wounded police officer you can save on the terrace during "The Hostage", who, if saved, will give Connor a sincere "thank you" later on in "Public Enemy".
    • Rose. Like Carl, she is one of the few humans who treats Androids as equals, going as far to help them through an underground railroad.
    • RK900, who is an upgraded version of Connor made to replace him in the ending where he stays a machine loyal to Cyberlife. To put it in perspective, the character gets about five seconds of screentime and zero speaking lines.
    • Sumo, Hank's big, goofy, loveable pet Saint Bernard. It's telling that while he only appears twice, his moments are some of the most hilarious.
    • Strange case with Gavin, who has a minimal role on the plot and whose few scenes set him up as a one-dimensional Hate Sink. But since he's massively popular with Yaoi Fangirls, who frequently subject him to the Draco in Leather Pants treatment, fanart and fanfiction about Gavin dwarfs that of many more prominent characters.
  • Epileptic Trees: The Immigration Officer is the Operator from the original Kara web video.
  • Estrogen Brigade: Connor has a prominent female fanbase, apparently.
    • Same goes for his actor, Bryan Dechart, who has seen his own fanbase explode (they've even named themselves the "#ConnorArmy"), with one of his Twitch streams of the game hitting 10,000 viewers.
  • Even Better Sequel: General consensus seems to be that while the game is definitely not without flaws, it seems to be more well-received than David Cage's previous games, especially Beyond: Two Souls. It has a slightly higher score than Heavy Rain critically, but a significantly higher user score.
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • Any of the main characters' lives after the Golden Ending. Perhaps most popularly, Connor and Hank continuing solving crimes together, and in general improve upon their friendship.
    • Connor getting along with Hank's dog, Sumo.
    • Since all three main playable characters have limited interaction — Kara, in particular, only has a few possible encounters with Markus and Connor — it can make one wonder how they'd all work together.
  • Fandom-Enraging Misconception: A lot of detractors who despise the game or David Cage accuse the game of unironically supporting racism, or more specifically claim that Connor is an Uncle Tom or romanticized version of The Gestapo, and his fans of celebrating racism or misogyny. For obvious reasons this is something they really don't take kindly to; they point out that despite its missteps the game does argue that racism is bad, that what made Connor so beloved in the first place is his character development, which centers around him learning to empathize with the deviant androids who symbolize oppressed minorities, and becoming a Defector from Decadence who assists them with rebelling against anti-android racism. While you can choose to stay loyal to Cyberlife and side with the racists, it's Anviliciously depicted as villainous, complete with all the sympathetic pro-android characters turning on you and appropriately karmic consequences for Connor if you do so.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With NieR: Automata, due to the similarities in plot and themes between the two games, usually with NieR: Automata being agreed to be the better game anyway. Some Detroit fans criticized Nier for its Ms. Fanservice protagonist, while Nier fans criticized Detroit for its bungling of its racial themes. Funnily enough, Taro Yoko, who plays other games, tweeted that he played Detroit: Become Human, enjoyed it, and expressed surprise that a lot of people did not like it.
  • Fandom-Specific Plot: Chloe becoming deviant if you choose to let them do so, and where they've gone.
  • Fanon
    • Fans were quick to realize that Hank, who was born in 1985, would be considered a millennial, and it became a popular fandom joke for him to reference Vine, memes, or other modern pop culture.
    • RK900, Connor's upgraded model seen in the Downer Ending of his route, is usually dubbed with C-started names, such as Caleb or Conan, but Richard and "Nines" are also common.
    • The Connor model that shows up in the CyberLife tower leaves quite an impression, but consensus on what to call him is pretty split. Some simply call him CyberLife Tower Connor, though he's also called Evil Connor, Machine Connor and RK800-60, as per his model number.
    • A lot of fans also assume that RK900 is significantly taller than Connor despite having the same physical appearance as Connor as an upgraded version of him due to the odd angling of some camera shots. It's unclear if he actually is.
    • Due to them sharing the same voice actor, Gavin Reed and Elijah Kamski are often depicted as being related.
    • It's never explicitly addressed but the Ho Yay from Simon towards Markus is so overwhelming that nearly every fan agrees that he has some kind of romantic feelings for Markus, even if Markus is in a relationship with North.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Connor and Hank is the most popular couple due to their Buddy Cop Show dynamic, although quite a few also enjoy them for their father-son relationship elements as well.
    • Markus/Simon, due to fans believing they had more chemistry than Markus did with North.
    • Gavin/RK900 is quite popular even though the two characters never even meet at any point. Most fanfiction gives them some kind of Belligerent Sexual Tension dynamic due to the way Gavin treats Connor and RK900 being an upgraded version of him.
    • Kara and Luther since they are perfect mother and father figures for Alice despite their limited interactions.
  • Foe Yay Shipping: Gavin has a very antagonistic attitude towards Connor, not unlike that between Carter and Norman from Heavy Rain. So it's only natural that some fans ran off with this, and applied a similar dynamic to the popular Crack Pairing of Gavin/RK900, albeit with a stronger emphasis on RK900 as a Bastard Boyfriend. Helps that Connor can describe their relationship as a "bromance" in one dialogue option, even if he's being sarcastic.
  • Friendly Fandoms: While the NieR: Automata fandom tends to view this game with disdain, and there are those within the Detroit fandom who aren't so fond of Nier (see Fandom Rivalry), a good portion of other fans are actually quite fond of NieR: Automata. Both games are about three human-like robots achieving sentience and looking for a purpose in a Crapsack World, along with having multiple endings, with several endings being gameovers or joke endings. In addition, replaying the game is encouraged if you want to learn more about the characters and story. Also, certain decisions in Detroit: Become Human may lead to player characters fighting and killing each other (with one instance near the end of the game being you either play as Connor or Markus, similar to choosing to play as either 9S or A2 in the final battle), and the secret ending is a character from the main menu, after watching you play the game, asks you to make an important permanent decision that breaks the fourth wall of the game — saying goodbye. As a result many fans of Detroit like to draw crossovers of the characters interacting together or drawing upon these common elements.
  • Genius Bonus: Detroit is known as Motor City for being the center of the automobile industry. Metro Detroit is also one of the most racially segregated areas in the country, and Detroit's economy also has suffered badly in the past few years.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff:
    • The game has quickly gained a notable fandom in Japan, with Big Name Fans like Taro Yoko commending the game. Sony of Japan even made a mini-film to promote the game. Given that robots are very popular in Japan, this may not come as a surprise.
    • It's also very popular in Russia, for whatever reason.
  • Heartwarming in Hindsight: Markus is played by Jesse Williams, who is well known for his activism for black rights and fitting the perceived parallels to real-world oppression within the story.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • On the deviant path, if Connor screws up the Spot the Impostor, Hank accidentally kills him instead of the evil one, which is what essentially what happened when SpongeBob thought Plankton's Mecha Suit of Mr. Krabs was the real Mr. Krabs.
    • Arguably, an even older one could be to Gargoyles, where one of the characters he played, Wolf, was a member of The Pack, a supervillain team where his organic (albeit genetically modified) character partnered with an android and two cyborgs.
    • It makes perfect sense that Carl would be sympathetic to his android Markus; after all, he used to be one.
    • The Japanese Dub has the main character having previous roles in similar works.
      • Hanawa Eiji (Connor) has done several dub voice roles for several crime dramas, from CSI to Law & Order.
      • Yuuya Uchida (Markus) is the dub voice of Professor X of the X-Men Film Series, who is also fighting for the rights of prejudiced group of people, this time for the androids.
    • Bryan Dechart would eventually get married to Amelia Rose Blaire (who plays the Tracis). Boy, it must have been awkward filming the scene where Connor manipulate coldly manipulate the blue-haired Traci with her lesbian clone/lover's severed head!
  • Ho Yay:
    • Simon is very devoted to Markus.
      • If Simon survives the battle at Stratford Tower, he and Markus reunite with a lingering embrace.
      • If Simon is captured at Stratford Tower and Connor interrogates him pretending to be Markus, he'll beg "Markus" not to leave him again.
      • If Markus is shot during the Battle of Detroit, Simon gives up his thirium pump regulator to replace Markus's damaged one, telling him "Our hearts are compatible". It plays out very similarly to a version of the scene you can get with North which is explicitly romantic.
    • During The Bridge, one of Connor's possible responses to Hank is "I'm whatever you want me to be, Lieutenant". Supposed to be Literal-Minded in context, but still sounds very suggestive.
    • In "Last Chance, Connor", if Connor has obtained Jericho's location from Kamski, Amanda asks Connor whether he feels anything for the deviants or for Hank. You can have him answer in the affirmative, in which case he mentions that he's reluctantly been having inappropriate thoughts lately.
  • Idiot Plot:
    • The "Broken" scenario path where you don't fight back against Leo hinges on almost every human involved acting stupidly. From Leo thinking that he can get away with stealing artwork from his famous artist father, to Carl ordering Markus to not defend himself when Leo attacks him, or even asking for help during his subsequent heart attack, to the police shooting the personal care android who made the 911 call about a burglar on the assumption that it, and not the (to them) complete stranger standing right next to them throwing around accusations was the one who caused Carl's collapse. Hell, in the ending where it's Leo who collapses, the police end up arresting Markus and leaving him for dead in a junkyard anyways, even though Carl can explain the situation. Of course, one can argue that it's akin to how black people back in the day end up getting accused for murder regardless of context.
    • A lot of Kara's plot lines fall apart for a myriad of reasons. The most egregious would likely be Zlatko's mansion; Zlatko tells Kara that the police can use her tracker to find her and that he can remove it. If that were true, Kara (along with every deviant) could be easily found. Trackers just conveniently stop working in deviants to keep the story moving forward. Kara also misses the blue blood on Zlatko's hands, the cages full of android experiments, and that Luther is clearly still subservient.
    • That androids can easily remove their LED-device falls into this. When you've successfully made robots that can look and act practically fully human, you'd think they'd be left with something that would undoubtedly distinguish them from us, and not something that could be removed by the tap of something sharp. Thus, the majority of androids going deviants (including Kara and Markus) remove their LED-device to blend perfectly in with humans, which the plot hinges on for them to get around in many situations.
  • Informed Wrongness: In "Eden Club", if Connor chooses to shoot the red-haired Traci right as she's closing in for an attack, he gets called out on it by both Hank and the blue-haired Traci as if what he did was completely uncalled for, even though his actions are considered to be justified self-defense. Even if he was an android and thus can withstand more damage than humans, it doesn't change the fact that both Tracis were trying to kill them moments earlier before deciding to hightail it.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Yes, Todd is an abusive father, but there are scenes where he's heartbroken at what he's become, such as when he's confronting Alice about if she hates him or not. In fact, most of the emotional abuse (i.e. shouting at Alice) are all about how much his life sucks... Of course, he's still abusing a child...
    • While Leo is definitely heavy on the jerkass side, his resentful attitude towards his father, while not necessarily justified, is at least not baseless, as it's mentioned in his gallery entry that he was conceived out of a brief fling and that Carl was absent for much of his life. If you choose the violent route with him it's mentioned later on that he's apologetic for his actions and attempts to work towards a healthier relationship with Carl, showing that he does have the potential to be a better person.
    • Some of the anti-android protesters can be seen as this. The job market is being flooded with androids that can work infinitely more efficiently than humans 24/7 for no pay or benefits, yet the economy hasn't been restructured to provide a viable alternative for humans to earn a living outside of finding employment in that very same android saturated job market. This doesn't begin to excuse their more aggressive actions, but it's hard not to empathize a bit with someone who's been royally screwed out of their ability to keep food on the table or a roof over their family's heads.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • Some Grey's Anatomy fans got the game specifically for Jesse Williams as Markus.
    • Connor (and by extension, Hank) has been generally well-received, even by some who otherwise disliked the game, to the point that quite a few critics have argued Connor's story is the only worthwhile part.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Connor is often shipped with both the other protagonists, Hank, Gavin, Kamski, the deviants he has faced, North, other versions of himself, and pretty much anyone he has ever interacted with, as well as some characters who he hasn't.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Elijah Kamski is a brilliant cybernetics engineer and the founder of Cyberlife, having developed the line of androids that are now ubiquitous throughout society before withdrawing from public life. Curious to see whether his creations could develop the potential for independence, Kamski sets the stage for an android rebellion by designing Markus and gifting him to a friend of his. He also tests Connor's capacity for empathy by goading him to kill one of his first androids, then provides him with clues on how to prevent being reprogrammed by Amanda in the Zen Garden, an artificial intelligence which Kamski himself based on his former teacher. In the event that all three protagonists are killed off before the finale, Kamski will take back control over Cyberlife in order to study his robots and rebuild their code from the ground up. A cordial and philosophical man in person, Kamski seems concerned only with observing the events he set in motion without interfering, content to let the chips fall where they may no matter how many android or human lives might be lost in the process.
  • Memetic Badass: Connor, for his coin trick skills. In fact, this would sprout interest in coin tricks (especially on YouTube) as more people learned that Connor's skills were possible in real life.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Connor, for Cr1TiKaL fans, as Cr1tikal would deliberately let him die in prompts, before he even knew that Connor doesn't have permadeath. Eventually, Cr1tikal had no other choice than to turn him into a Memetic Badass by the point of "Last Chance, Connor", since permadeath for Connor was put in place by that point of the story.
      • Likewise for Two Best Friends Play fans, since Connor has died in all three of his first chapters, every time caused by some kind of completely unintentional last-minute Epic Fail.
    • Hank, except for the parts where his troubles are taken seriously.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Kara (played by Valorie Curry) looking like Jennifer Lawrence.
    • Connor licking (biohazardous) substances while Hank is grossed out.
    • Numerous jokes about Hillary Clinton, since the 2038 US President Warren looks like her. She must've won the 2016 presidential election in this universe, or David Cage supports Hillary Clinton, or kissing androids turn her on enough for a Heel–Face Turn.
    • Jokes that Detroit still looks like a dump, even with all the advanced technology. For fans of Black Humor, this extends to some of the Downer Endings, such as setting off the dirty bomb that North found "improving" Detroit.
    • Replacing whatever Markus paints for Carl with another image, such as "Bold and Brash (More Like, Belongs In the Trash)", to which Carl responds with "Oh my god."
    • Jokes about Mr. Krabs and SpongeBob, except replacing them with Hank and Connor. Taken further when Hank has to figure out which Connor is our Connor, just like that one episode of where Plankton used a robot suit to masquerade as Mr. Krabs (and SpongeBob fell for it).
    • When Connor gave Hank a comedic Armor-Piercing Slap when the latter was drunk in his house, some fans expect Connor to say, "Are you feeling it now, Lt. Anderson?"
    • Making Snowclones or Stupid Statement Dance Mix videos out of Connor's introduction (which he repeats every time you let him get destroyed).
      Connor: My name is Connor. I’m the android sent by Cyberlife.
    • In the same vein as "Press X to Jason" and "Press F to Pay Respects", the phrase "Press Triangle to End Slavery" has become a popular joke among the game's critics thanks to this screenshot, which is touted as a microcosm of the game's anvilicious nature.
    • "Hank Is A Millenial" is becoming rather popular on tumblr, with players noting Hank’s year of birth listed as 1985 and running with the high probability of his knowing and references vines, memes, and other such millenial culture, much to Connor’s confusion.
    • Ralph repeatedly saying "succulent".
    • Unique to the game's impressive Russian fandom, the "28 stab wounds" scene became one of the biggest fandom in-jokes and popular snowclone material. Feo reference, this is what the scene is like with Russian dub.
    • Images from "The Interrogation" showing levels of stress are popular, especially when paired with another thing that might cause extreme stress or relaxation.
  • Moe: Connor is considered to be this by many fans thanks to his good looks and adorable tics.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Todd is not the nicest on the list and already toed the line with the first few scenes hinting that he's an abusive father, but if you manage to fail "A Stormy Night", it almost always ends with him crossing it by killing both Kara and Alice. This is notable as his point of no return as killing Kara means there won't be a later scene where he's able to have a Heel Realization and thus he destroyed his own shot of redemption.
    • While Leo doesn't go as far as child abuse, he still crosses it when he breaks into his father's house to huff paint, then beats up Markus knowing full well he can't defend himself. The line is fully crossed when his father has a heart attack and he pins the blame on Markus, marking his Start of Darkness. Much like Todd, this is notable because there's a route in which he has a Heel Realization, but in the route where he crossed it, there's no such realization.
    • Although his previous acts were mass murder, if Richard Perkins' deal is accepted, and Markus surrenders, Perkins will cross this by betraying them and instead killing both Markus and North. Unlike Leo and Todd, Perkins doesn't have a Heel Realization, but this particular act is especially cruel.
    • If Connor becomes the Villain Protagonist and has the primary goal of staying loyal to humanity by assassinating Markus, Connor can have a change of heart and become a member of the deviants himself, but he can also become the opposite, and if the player kills Hank when he tries stopping Connor, after having lots of Character Development, Connor proves that he is truly irredeemable at that point.
  • Narm:
    • In one ending to The Interrogation, Gavin pronounces "fuck" in a bizarre way; it comes out sounding more like "fhk" than a real word. He says it multiple times during the game (during that chapter, even) correctly. What, has he got a cold?
    • If Markus pushes Leo in self-defense during "Broken", it leads to several awkward moments. Leo's Ragdoll Physics upon being knocked unconscious are very jerky and unnatural, Carl's voice acting is surprisingly lacking for a man who just watched his son nearly die as a result of fighting with an android who he's come to see as a surrogate son, and his heart attack symptoms (which lead to his death if Markus refuses to fight back) disappear entirely.
    • In the second investigation with Connor, when you proceed to tell Hank about the clues you found, Connor will pause his sentences so that the player makes the choices of what he'll say. While a nice way to involve the player, the pauses can still come off as if Connor just started buffering.
    • Connor converting the androids in the CyberLife tower is an awesome moment and all, but the part where he tells them to "wake up" sounds strained and rather loud, which is especially jarring in contrast to how naturally charismatic and calm Markus sounds when he's the one doing the conversion. Fans have even made fun of this.
    • The triggers for the good endings resulting from the peaceful protest veer into this. Sing a little song? Give your girlfriend a kiss? Warren will personally order the military to stand down and pull out! Yeah, that only works out if the public likes you enough to begin with, but it's also really easy to get to that point.
  • Narm Charm: Kamski's hairstyle (an undercut with a tiny ponytail/manbun), a hairstyle that grew in popularity among young men in the late New Tens to look more young and hip, which is mocked by Internet culture (usually towards YouTubers) for how pretentious and ridiculous it looks. Considering Kamski's characterization, some found it fitting for him.
  • No Yay: Their (visual) age difference hasn't stopped people from shipping Connor and Hank together romantically, though many find the ship to be this trope as they prefer to see their relationship as a platonic/familial one.
  • Player Punch:
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: Many examples, some for the same pairings, litter the tags for this game.
    • Connor/Hank: Hannor, Conhank, or Hankcon.
    • Gavin/RK900: Reed900.
    • Connor/RK900: RK1700. note 
    • Connor/Markus: Marcon, Conkus, or RK1000.
    • Simon/Markus: Simarkus, Simkus, Sirkus, Sarkus, Marmon... Just about anything that starts with "S" and ends with "kus" is on the table.
    • North/Markus: Norkus, Marth, Morth, or Northkus.
    • Markus/Josh: Joshkus. Or Mosh, for those who prefer sillier portmanteaus.
    • Connor/Kara: Connara.
  • Relationship Writing Fumble:
    • Quite a number of fans think that Markus and Carl behave more like lovers rather than the surrogate son/father that the game tried to establish.
    • Markus and Simon have a few scenes that come off as very romantic despite them only being friends and fellow revolutionaries. Even people who don't ship them have noticed how intimately they act in these few scenes, and it's caused many players to theorise that Simon was a possible love interest alongside North in some earlier draft of the game.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap: Leo can potentially be rescued from this if he gets a Heel Realization and attempts to change his life for the better.
  • Rooting for the Empire: There are fans out there who prefer to have the android revolution fail, and consider the humans winning the "good" ending.
  • Sacred Cow: Calling Connor the fan-favorite is a massive understatement. He’s amassed an enormous fanbase consisting significantly of females who love his Adorkable nature and physical appearance, and a lot of players find his segments of the game to be the most memorable and enjoyable. This has also extended to his voice actor, Bryan Dechart, who has also been growing in popularity due to his friendly interactions with the fans and is often interviewed the most in regards to the game. And you’d be making a huge mistake insulting either of them in front of this fanbase.
  • Ships That Pass in the Night:
    • Connor and Markus for their interactions if Connor deviates. Alternatively, it doubles as Foe Yay if Connor stayed a machine, which leads into them fighting each other.
    • Alternatively, Connor and North, as North replaces Markus in these interactions instead if Markus either died at the freedom march or was kicked out of Jericho. Like Markus, this may also double as Foe Yay if Connor stayed a machine.
    • Connor and Kara also have a small following, a little odd considering they interact with each other the least out of the three protagonists.
    • Connor and (any) Traci despite interacting in a single scene. This is motivated in part by Connor (optionally) checking out a Traci at Eden Club, but mostly a pseudo-Actor Ship since Bryan Dechart (Connor) and Amelia Rose Blaire (Traci) have been engaged during the production of the game, and the pair have started livestreaming their playthrough on Twitch.
    • Gavin and RK900, despite never meeting in-game. Although we have an idea of what some of their interactions could be like based on the way Gavin treats Connor who is RK900's prototype.
    • Jerry/Ralph has a surprising following given that they never even meet, with the exception of both possibly showing up within the recycling center. It helps that they are the two charmingly eccentric Ensemble Dark Horse figures of Kara's storyline.
  • Signature Scene:
    • By the time the game was released, the Hostage scene, Connor's first scene where he has to investigate a kidnapping and rescue a child from a rogue android.
    • The carousel scene, where an android that enjoys making children happy runs a carousel for Alice when she and Kara take refuge in an otherwise abandoned amusement park.
    • The android junkyard scene, where Markus has to find replacement parts to repair himself, and then crawl out of the junkyard, where many discarded androids are still conscious.
    • The android protest march.
    • The rooftop chase scene, where Connor pursues a deviant across several buildings.
  • Snark Bait:
    • Not so much the game itself, but a lot of David Cage's interviews for the game (such as complaining no one makes games based on their true-to-life experiences, while directing a game about androids, or claiming the game has no allegorical meaning despite the presence of a ton of politically loaded imagery) have achieved this.
    • The game's simplistic button prompts in dialogue scenes (such as a scene with Markus standing in front a blank canvas next to button prompts with labels like 'SADNESS') are already getting plenty of Memetic Mutation akin to the 'Press F To Pay Respects' meme from Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: Subtle this game is not, but considering the subject matter and the political climate at the time of the game's release, a less subtle example wouldn't have had the same impact and may not have made for as good a story.
  • Special Effect Failure: If Markus is shot and killed during a peaceful protest during "Freedom March", a gun will appear next to his hand in the overhead shots of his body following the Double Tap, despite him clearly not having a gun drawn a split-second before. This is a clear case of reusing some of the closing shots from the path where Markus is killed by the police after the protesters turn violent.
    • At the beginning of the chapter "The Painter", the textures for the back of the bus that Markus is stepping still have to load in, resulting in them being remarkably more blurry and low quality compared to everything else in the scene for just a few seconds.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: Numerous people have noticed the similarities between Connor and Hank to R. Daneel Olivaw and Elijah Baley, the original Androids and Detectives pair. Both duos consist of a clean-cut, polite, and logical Ridiculously Human Robot partnered with a cantankerous middle-aged human detective who goes from resentful to forming a strong friendship with them. Fans of the series describe these two as the closest thing to a video game adaptation of the characters.
  • Spiritual Antithesis: Could be this for Westworld. Both works involves androids being forced to cater to humans every whim to the point of abuse. However Westworld keep androids in theme park keeping them completely isolated from modern human society being used for human's pleasure, while Detroit has completely integrated androids into modern human society serving as manual labor for humans. Eventually both androids rebel against their human masters, but the androids led by Delores is straight-froward into inflicting violence and chaos, while Markus has the option to go for a more peaceful approach.
  • Squick: Connor's scanning ability involves him putting unsanitary substances in his mouth. Lampshaded by Hank at one point.
  • Strangled by the Red String: Despite how pro-violence North is, it is incredibly easy to disagree with every single thing she says but still become lovers with her as Markus, even on a peaceful route. In fact, even springing a kiss on her to avoid the attention of police officers (which she reacts very poorly to) while they attempt to break into a Cyberlife store or outright failing said mission (leading North to criticize Markus for his incompetence) can still be salvaged in the next scene — her relationship can jump two stages from Neutral to Lovers as long as the player isn't outright cold in their responses. Then there's the peaceful ending where kissing her in Markus and North's apparent last moments is a straight-forward and obvious way to get a "good" ending. Then there's also the fact that if Markus' ultimate relationship level with North stays as "Companion" rather than "Lover", it's marked with the color orange rather than blue. note 
  • Take That, Scrappy!:
    • If you hate Leo, you'll be delighted to have Markus push him into some equipment, knocking him unconscious. This is satisfactory because the other option of not fighting back leads to the death of Carl and Leo blaming Markus for it, and becoming a Karma Houdini. In contrast, pushing Leo causes him to have a Jerkass Realization in the latter part of the story.
    • Fans get the opportunity to knock out Gavin in "Last Chance, Connor" after he's shown to be a complete asshole to Connor in his every appearance beforehand.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • The other members of Jericho, particularly Simon and Josh. Unlike North, Markus doesn't get as close to them and their pasts/motivations are unknown. Josh's backstory is briefly described in the Gallery portion of the game, but Simon's is a complete mystery even in-game.
    • Lucy's unusual design, unique abilities and disappointing lack of screentime have been pointed out by many.
    • While Hank is written well as a good, human foil to Connor's cold and at times naive nature, little is done to explore his experience as a veteran detective. Hank displaying human intuition and experience earned from years of police work, even with his substance abuse problems and nihilistic world view, would have made a nice contrast to Connor's analytical approach to crime investigation. Instead, Connor does almost all of the actual detective work, upstaging his human partner constantly, with Hank acting as little more than a chauffeur and a moral anchor.
    • Some feel this way about Kara’s role in the plot as a Heroic Bystander, expressing disappointment that her story does not impact the overarching conflict between humans and androids like Markus and Connor, since it only revolves around Kara’s attempt to escape Detroit and protect Alice. This may be justified however, since while Markus leads the android rebellion and Connor opposes it (at least for the majority of the game, depending on whether the player chooses to have him become deviant or not), Kara’s story gives insight to how the android populace are affected by the chaotic events that transpire over the course of the game.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • How some players feel about Alice's reveal of being an android as well. Some players feel that if Alice really was a human, the story would've been more interesting, and more meaning would've been given to the relationship between her and Kara. A human and android loving each other as family? Could there be a more perfect example of the possibility of peace between the two races? Granted, it would've required a good amount of Willing Suspension of Disbelief regarding the world's Social Services, but still. Some additionally felt that the reveal's impact wasn't explored that deeply, as it came in at the last third of the game and had no relevance afterwards.
    • Given the focus on their relationship and how you can play up Connor and Hank as Fire-Forged Friends, many thought it would have been a more compelling scenario to have Hank be the one who can make Connor go deviant instead of Markus/North, whom Connor had never even met face-to-face before up until that point. Though it's obviously his experiences with Hank that lead way for his deviancy, while Markus/North's words just served the final straw, many may still find Hank's absence from Connor's decision a waste.
    • The player characters and their respective group members barely have any interactions with each other. Justified, as you might as well be holding up both sides of the conversation, though interactions such as how Hank would've reacted to Kara and Alice's relationship would've been an interesting sight.
    • Apparently, using androids as mindless servants and viewing them as nothing more is a uniform practice in society and no one has a problem with it except for Emma, Carl, Rose, Adam (post-Character Development), and Hank. You'd think there would be a lot more people that would try to treat them like more kindly or even groups that discourage the usage of androids and/or vouch for androids, and the results of these things.
    • Freeing the Androids almost always leads to them feeling human and wanting to be treated equal to humans. None of them go crazy from an existential crisis, start viewing humanity as inferior, desire to go back to "normal", or any of the other things that could happen when you give an android sentience.
    • In "Meeting with Kamski", the titular character will test whether Connor has empathy or not by asking him to execute a Chloe android for information. Some have commented that it would probably have been an even harder choice if the Chloe in question had actually showed any emotion to Connor pointing the gun at her, especially since it has already be established androids usually go deviant when their lives are threatened, but she remains completely indifferent throughout the scene. Had she expressed even a little fear or sadness at being held at gunpoint, Connor choosing to shoot her or not would likely have held more of an emotional punch, and made more sense for both Connor and Hank's reactions afterwards than over whether or not he spared a completely emotionless android. Additionally, the fact that there are three different copies of Chloe in the room at the same time enforces the idea that she's quite replaceable, undermining this moral dilemma even further.
      • There's also the fact that the one making the decision in this scene isn't Connor at all: it's the player. In a non-interactive medium, Kamski's test might've said something about Connor's capacity as an android for empathy—as Kamski and Hank seem to think it does—but, since the choice is the player's, what the test is actually measuring is the player's capacity for empathy, not Connor's.
    • A common criticism of Kara and Markus's stories is that they deviate too early and behave indistinguishably from humans right off the bat without the chance to tackle any potentially interesting subplots dealing with the androids' artificial nature and their emerging emotions - of the three, only Connor's truly takes advantage of the premise and delves into the kinds of questions provoked by the game's title.
    • A minor one, but a major part of the game is how the public sees the Androids actions, which is supposed to be presented as something of a Karma Meter. If you do things peacefully, the public will end up supporting the Androids, but when the actual protests occur, no human characters appear to side with the Androids. While potentially justified in that it might have been hard to work more characters in, it makes the entire plot point and gameplay mechanic pointless since it leaves the player left with no reward except one minor event at the end.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Invoked - androids aren't quite as detailed compared to humans, having smoother skin than humans and having slightly stunted emotional displays, especially when they aren't talking.
    • Also discussed In-Universe — one of the earliest magazine articles that players can pick up attempts to squash obvious question about the biology (or mechanics?) of androids, noting that redundant or superficial functions ("bleeding" blue blood, having vital organs/parts, blinking at a regular rate, and talking to other androids instead of simply communicating purely wirelessly) are by design, attempting to avert this trope for humans.
    • After the official box art for the game was released, there have been numerous complaints due to the unsettling close up on Jesse Williams’ face, which is cropped up (presumably to highlight his character's nature as an android).
    • Chloe reaches some of the closest levels, no thanks to her having an extreme close-up on the main menu, making it easier to see the imperfections in the model and animations.
  • Unfortunate Implications: The game has been criticized for nakedly taking real-life instances of racism, bigotry, and discrimination when crafting the struggles that androids face in the game without considering the context behind them. Some critics, such as at io9 and Headstuff, took particular offense to the parallels with the civil rights movement, stating that, among other things, it was insulting to compare oppressed blacks with machines which, in addition to being created specifically to serve humans and not having inherent self-awareness, actually do pose a threat to humanity and have incredible durability besides.
  • Unintentionally Sympathetic: The victim at the Eden Club is supposed to be treated as horrible for abusing the machines and even basically killing one them, but there is nothing to suggest he knew that the androids could feel actual emotions. It is not at the point of the game where the question of if androids can feel is treated as a legit question by the general populace. Yet, the game treats him as horrible and unforgivable for engaging in his fantasies in what was intended to be a private and safe manner.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • Generally a minority opinion, but this is how some feel for the deviants that Connor encounters, in particular Ortiz's android and the Tracis. In both cases, the deviants killed a human who was hurting/abusing them. However, neither can really be considered self-defense — Ortiz's android didn't just fight him off (he stabbed him twenty-eight times and used his blood to write on the wall), and the blue-haired Traci killed her customer not because he hurt her, but because she thought he was going to. Sympathy for them hinges on whether the player thinks Ortiz and the Eden Club customer were deserving of their deaths. Though the blue-haired Traci does say that she did not mean to kill the customer.
    • Related to the Eden Club case, shooting the Traci at the Eden Club is treated as the "bad choice", and it will make Hank's regard for Connor drop. Many do feel genuinely sad at the scene, but most defend their decision for three reasons: 1) The blue-haired Traci had just killed a human, and both had attacked Connor and Hank in their attempt to escape. 2) At the choice, the Traci is charging for Connor with clear physical intent. 3) Connor can die in several places throughout the game, with negative results, and some feared that if they did not shoot the Traci, she would kill Connor. It was an effectively emotional scene, but said emotion tends to be sadness instead of guilt.
    • Some people are unsympathetic to the androids as a whole due to not seeing the deviants as sentient beings and instead as just programmed machines, believing that even after deviating, their emotions are not real and are just simulations. This has led to people feeling that the humans are justified in trying to stop the androids’ cause, even if peaceful, since there are some who argue the robots are legitimately just objects made to serve humans and that, furthermore, humans have a right to be wary of them considering that almost every incidence of deviancy results in human death (regardless of how justifiable some of these instances are.)
    • Some androids Markus converted during Freedom March are actually doing honest and relatively simple jobs such as janitors cleaning floors, personal assistants carrying their human employers' shopping bags, simply accompanying their human employers around, etc; so they may not be necessarily "enslaved". Yet they can be converted into leaving those jobs and abandoning their human employers without second thoughts. Even worse that one of these converted androids is a babysitter (the one with the same model as Kara) who just abandoned the baby stroller upon being converted. If the baby's parents aren't nearby when she abandoned them, things could've been really bad for the baby.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: Despite David Cage's insistence that the game is not meant to be political, it's very hard to ignore the heavyhanded allegories to race discrimination. Androids are forced to sit in the back of the bus, are referred to as "slaves", and even escape to an android safe zone in a chapter titled "Midnight Train".
  • Wimpification: A portion of Connor's fans tend to emphasize his naivety and 'pureness' while downplaying the fact that he has killed people without hesitation, including on his Deviant Path. Even though the people he's killed were Mooks, it still serves to show that despite becoming a Deviant, he still has no problem being ruthless if he thinks the situation calls for it.
  • The Woobie:
    • As a demo with Connor playable shows, the hostage, Emma Phillips, is a more straight example of a woobie. Yes, the family was planning to replace Daniel, but you discover during your investigation that Emma herself is not responsible; a video she took shows that she actually loved Daniel very much and thought he was cool. But because of her family's decision, this innocent little girl is being held hostage with a gun pointed to her head by her former friend, who is threatening to take her off the building with him and kill her. During the hostage situation, she's crying and pleading for her life.
    • As bad as Emma has it, Alice Williams, the daughter of Kara's owner, has it much, 'much worse. At some point before the events of the game, Alice's mother left Alice and Alice's father, Todd, the ordeal causing Todd to become mentally unstable and take his anger out on Alice, abusing her both physically and verbally. By the time the game starts, Alice has been reduced to a quiet, broken shell, constantly in fear of everyone around her, but especially her father. There's also the fact that Alice had to witness Todd severely damage Kara at some point prior to the start of the plot (he ripped off Kara's arm and head as seen from Alice's drawing), the event which left Alice heavily traumatized. And depending on what choices you make, she may end up killing her father to protect Kara, a decision which will obviously leave her severely scarred for the remainder of her life. And the moment Alice and Kara find a place to stay for the night, Alice will blame herself for her father's abuse and wonders if he'd love her if she was 'better.' Much later in the game, you learn that she's actually an android herself, replaced by Todd after Alice's mother took the real Alice and left, which was why he was so angry with her and why she blames everything on her.
    • And then there's the Androids by and large.

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