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  • 8.8: Angry Joe's Six out of Ten note  was not received well by the Destiny community, especially given that even Joe himself admitted that Destiny 2 was an improvement over the previous game. Many also complained of him going into the game with very negative feelings and accused him of being overly nitpicky with regards to the game and its flaws.
  • Abridged Arena Array: If you're looking for quick Strike completions, whether it's for Vanguard Tokens or some objective requiring a set number of completions not exclusive to the Strike Playlist, look no further than the Lake of Shadows; because the level lacks a room that requires killing waves of enemies or holding a point in order to progress, you can run past most enemies and proceed all the way to the boss, only killing a couple of elite enemies along the way to open the path forward. One quick run-through takes no longer than 5 minutes and can even be shortened to a little over 3 minutes.
  • Anti-Climax Boss:
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    • The final boss of the Warmind expansion, Xol, Voice of the Thousands and one of the Worm Gods is brought down in a single battle. Some players felt that the epic score and intensity of the battle made it worthwhile, but others felt that it was a letdown for a battle against one of the Darkness's chief lieutenants. The final bosses of the other expansions tend to be a more grueling, sprawling encounter that takes up an entire level. Xol, on the other hand, is faced only at the tail end of the mission and has a rather dull fight pattern; in fact, the mission to defeat him ends up repurposed as a regular strike in the same expansion. The 1.2.3 update expanded on Xol being a pushover by revealing that he's Not Quite Dead and built himself the Whisper of the Worm (a darkness-infused Black Spindle with the original Year 1 White Nail perk) to revel in the chaos the Guardian and the Taken bring across the system. Furthermore, in Forsaken, Toland occasionally slips up the revelation that the Xol fought on Mars was a trick.
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    • Siviks is made out to be the main antagonist of the Black Armory expansion, stalking the player throughout their quest to reclaim the forges and even setting up the extremely controversial puzzle in Niobe Labs. Then he goes down like a punk at the end of the exotic questline for Izanagi's Burden, where you kill him in the Bergusia forge without much fanfare. Even Ada-1 moves on to inquiring about further Black Armory mysteries instead of making an eulogy on him.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • When Warmind's main story campaign was done and gone, many criticized Xol being defeated right then and there in a single battle to be fairly anticlimactic, given the character's standing in the overall setting. Since then, Bungie subtly remedied this by adding secrets that explain that no, Xol isn't "dead" and lives on through our kills in the form of a powerful Exotic weapon, and Forsaken even has Toland bring into question whether or not the Worm you fought over Mars really was Xol, adding to the mystery.
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    • Destiny 2 was highly criticized during its first year for the large amount of characters cracking jokes when it was unnecessary, as well as the fairly low stakes; the story essentially didn't have a personal feel to it, making it hard to care for it. Come Forsaken, things take a dark turn, less jokes are being cracked, and the story is more personal, as your Guardian slowly starts slipping into unsavory behavior while on a quest to avenge Cayde's death.
  • Awesome Ego: Emperor Calus is insanely arrogant, self-obsessed, and decadent... but with all the incredible accomplishments he’s pulled off and his remarkable charisma, one can’t help but feel he’s completely earned the right to be so full of himself.
  • Bile Fascination: Most of the views for the incredibly lazy "Keeping Track" commercial are from trying to see how bad it really is.note 
  • Breather Boss:
    • After the absolute pain in the ass that is Vorgeth, what with an immunity barrier and annoying Eye Beam that pushes you back, Dûl Incaru, the final boss of the "Shattered Throne" bonus dungeon, is easily manageable despite the 590 Power level difficulty, and if done correctly, goes down fairly quickly with the right damage stack.
    • After struggling through the two hellish phases of the Bergusia Forge ignition (Vandals sniping you with incredible precision, Exploder Shanks going Zerg Rush on you, and Overcharged Shanks slowing down your movement), the Forge Warden boss is nothing more than a Fallen Walker with a lot of health, lacking the phase shields that make the other Forge Wardens extra tough to take down.
  • Broken Base:
    • The revamped Crucible. Some like it for the more grounded approach and increased focus on gunplay and teamwork, while others dislike it for restricting mode choices note , nerfing ability cooldowns and generally increasing the time it takes to kill a single Guardian, making the aforementioned grounded playstyle bland and uninspired. Even months into the game, most question whether Bungie meant to make the Crucible appeal to a more casual playerbase, or turn it into an e-sport; the latter option being something that puzzles many even more due to the game's inherent contradictions to a competitive e-sports/MLG environment note .
    • Exotic quests that require Crucible play to complete. One side says that the Crucible is just as much a part of the game as the rest of the content, and that it's not unreasonable for the developers to expect their players to participate in every aspect of the game if they want to get the best guns. The other side says that they don't have any interest in the PvP side of the game and as such they don't engage in it. Due to that, they're very low-skilled players who end up having to spend hours slogging it out in the Crucible against players with a far higher degree of skill. The Last Word was probably the worst of this, as getting killed would cause the players to lose progress in the quest.
    • The Year 2 Annual Pass, mainly with its lack of campaigns, new Strikes and new PvP maps. Some like the idea of more frequent, but less substantial, content updates, and point out that out of all the smaller DLCs (Dark Below, House of Wolves, Curse of Osiris, and Warmind), all of them have been pretty underwhelming at best, especially with regards to their campaigns. They see the smaller DLCs as Bungie cutting out the fluff to deliver more endgame content on a more regular schedule. The other side argues that Bungie is just charging the same amount of money for less content, and that they threw the baby out with the bathwater by just dropping the Campaigns instead of improving them or altering the way that they were told, such as using them to tell a multi-part story over several DLC instalments.
  • Casual/Competitive Conflict: The main reason why the fandom is in such a splintered state. A good amount of Destiny 1 veterans regard Destiny 2 as a dumbed-down game that caters way too much to the casual by making the story lighter in tone, oversimplifying gameplay mechanics, and disincentivizing individual plays and loot; in essence, this sequel doesn't have much in the way of keeping anyone's attention on the game once they obtain everything, let alone offering appealing rewards. As a result, controversies arose and the playerbase dwindled much faster than it ever did with Destiny 1 over its entire game cycle. It's not until nearly half a year into the game's cycle that Bungie started addressing core problems with concise suggestions and increased their communications with the fragmented fandom.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome:
    • During the first weekend of Trials of the Nine, the MIDA Multi-Tool exotic Scout Rifle was used by at least one player in ninety-eight percent of all matches, and accounted for thirty-five percent of all kills note . This is due to the MIDA Multi-Tool being a top-tier Scout Rifle, and the Eternity map used for the first week of Trials had a lot of long sight lines that favored Scout Rifles; not to mention that the MIDA was given as a quest reward rather than subject to random drops, so a lot of people had one.
    • The Explosive Payload weapon perk for many experienced players, until its bonus damage nerf in August 2018. It makes the weapon's projectile create a small area-of-effect detonation on impact that also avoids a large chunk of damage falloff penalty, making weapons with this perk such as the Better Devils and Sunshot hand-cannons or the Nameless Midnight scout rifle much sought after in the community.
    • High-Caliber Rounds was the other must-have weapon perk, being one of the big reasons the MIDA Multi-Tool was so prevalent in the Crucible alongside Uriel's Gift. It causes enemies to stagger, or in the case of players, suffer from more flinch/knockback upon being shot, throwing off their aim. (Both points also apply to Explosive Payload above.)
      • Most egregiously, the MIDA Multi-Tool had High-Caliber Rounds in the original Destiny, was Nerfed by having that specific perk removed, and brought it back for the sequel, with predictable results.
    • If it was not Uriel's Gift being loaded into someone's Energy slot in Season 1 Crucible, it's Last Hope - a sidearm with maxed-out stability, high impact for its archetype, three-round bursts, and ultimately the fastest time to kill at short range that isn't a Power Weapon or the bugged Prometheus Lens in the Curse of Osiris launch week. The Last Dance is a close second as a sidearm with similar overall properties and different perks, but more recoil than Last Hope.
    • Swords tend to be surprisingly popular in the Power slot due to the fact that even a single light swing will be a One-Hit Kill, you get plenty of ammo per box spawn, and the fact that you get a third-person camera when using it and thus gain a massive situational awareness advantage over first-person players with guns. This means that players can corner-camp with impunity and become a massive annoyance to their opponents if they can't be flushed out effectively via grenades or flanking. The biggest offender is the Hunter exclusive Quickfang, which boosts movement speed and has the fastest swing time of any swords, all while still able to One-Hit Kill enemy Guardians. Year 2 moved away from this trend in Heavy weapons due to shotguns being moved to the Special slot and therefore a much more accessible close-range OKHO weapon than swords.
    • For boss battles and especially the Leviathan Raid, players were expected to wield one of their following as their boss-melting DPS weapon of choice in Year 1: the Coldheart Exotic Trace Rifle (itself a Pre-Order Bonus and thus commonly owned), the Merciless Exotic Fusion Rifle, and any Rocket Launcher with the Cluster Bomb perk such as the Curtain Call or Sins of the Past. Used in conjunction with Rally Barricades for instant reloads, the total DPS output on Calus with over 100 Force of Will stacks can kill him in just one damage phase. Sweet Business with Actium War Rig is also exceptional at DPS and skull-farming, but its low ammo capacity means it runs out of ammo far too quickly to be used for both.
    • Following the "Go Fast" update, the Vigilance Wing, a five-round burst pulse rifle, had become the weapon of choice amongst PvP players due to the extremely low time to kill it has. It can kill an enemy player in two to three bursts.
    • The Graviton Lance followed suit in Warmind, becoming a makeshift hard-hitting Scout Rifle with a fast rate of fire and laser precision, with the added bonus of making headshots a deterrent against tightly grouped enemy teams.
    • The hardest waves of Escalation Protocol almost always require multiple Guardians with the ability to deal a Damage-Increasing Debuff, be it the Tractor Cannon, a Nightstalker's Shadowshot coupled with the Orpheus Rig, or a Sunbreaker's Hammer Strike. Stacking those debuffs is much more preferable than most damage-dealing Supers, though the Voidwalker's Nova Bomb is also a desirable option due to its synergy with Tractor Cannon. Given the sheer difficulty of the last two Escalation Protocol waves, however, it is generally agreed that using all the above (some normally considered as game breakers) is the strict minimum, and straying from that strategy is bound to fail.
    • After Gambit launched, the Sleeper Simulant quickly became the go-to gun for the game mode, due to its ability to one-shot a Guardian with a body shot even while that guardian was using their Super. It also had very generous Aim Assist, making for a high-damage weapon that was very easy to use. It was the go-to weapon for Invaders and was excellent at clearing blockers and damaging the Primeval Taken that spawned when your team banked enough motes.
    • Following the weapons slot changes in Patch 2.0, using a shotgun, any shotgun, is bound to get you decent results in the Crucible, given that it's a oneshot with little to no preparation, and closing the distance against Guardians that try to stop you with their puny Primary weapons is incredibly easy. It's got to the point that players have had enough of "shotgun apes" roaming in the Crucible and avoid PvP altogether.
    • Well of Radiance became a must-have super for endgame PvE content shortly after it was released, due to its healing, overshield, and massive 35% damage output increase, as well Bottomless Magazines if Lunafaction Boots are equipped. It's worth nothing that Bungie removed Blessing of Light and Weapons of Light from Ward of Dawn in Destiny 2 to avoid this situation, but created a super ability better than the original Ward of Dawn in almost every way with very predictable results.
    • For random weapon rolls, you can never go wrong in PvE with the combination of Outlaw note  and Rampage note . Any weapon that rolls with that combo usually steamrolls over the rest unless you are aiming for a specific weapon's unique perk combinations (which appear more often with each expansion in the Annual Pass), or are tuning for a more specific purpose like the Crucible (where Kill Clip note  is usually a superior choice to Rampage due to a larger short-lived damage boost and the difficulty in getting 3 stacks of Rampage in PvP). It's just that the combination of getting a large damage increase on top of being able to quickly reload your weapon to keep the stacks going is one of the most appealing options when considering a weapon's strengths and weaknesses.
    • Celestial Nighthawk is an exotic Hunter helmet that condenses all Golden Gun shots into one, but with a 6x damage output. Since Crucible or Strikes rarely need that much damage it became a go-to for Raids, while using other buffs provided by allies they can sometimes deal 15 percent of the damage to the boss health in one shot. If a Hunter isn't using Celestial Nighthawk they had better be using Orpheus Rigs and Shadowshot.
    • Black Armory introduces us to what is unequivocally the most common cookie-cutter weapon loadout ever due to its extreme versatility: the Blast Furnace pulse rifle for the kinetic slot, the Exotic fusion rifle Jötunn for the energy slot, and the Hammerhead heavy machine gun. All for these weapons boast the highest range and stability in their class, with the Jötunn boasting nigh-unlimited range (with an added bonus of slight homing) and ridiculous stopping power (enough to oneshot regular Guardians in the Crucible and critically injure roaming supers), and the Hammerhead essentially being a Heavy scout rifle in disguise due to its predictable recoil pattern. This unholy trinity is sometimes referred to as the "Dad loadout", mocking low-skill, non-hardcore players that use these weapons to outrange the competition.
    • Riven used to be a challenging boss requiring knowledge of her puzzles during the opening weeks of the Last Wish raid, but as the Light Powers kept going up with each Annual Pass expansion, most fireteams started eschewing those puzzles and go straight to destroying her entire health bar in one go with a combination of buffs like Well of Radiance and debuffs like Hammer Strike or Flawless Execution, as well as high DPS weapons like Rocket Launchers with Cluster Bombs or Agressive-type Grenade Launchers with Spike Grenades. What was once the most elaborate boss fight in the entire game devolved into simply feeding her mouth with enough dakka.
  • Complete Monster:
    • Dominus Ghaul is the brutish Cabal leader of the Red Legion. After usurping Emperor Calus in a coup, Ghaul began traveling across the universe conquering dozens of worlds and destroying those that didn't submit to his rule. Once he sets his sights on Earth, Ghaul invades the Last City and deploys a ship that severs the Guardians' connection to the Traveler. While the Red Legion slaughter helpless civilians and Guardians, Ghaul has the Speaker submitted to Cold-Blooded Torture so he can uncover more information about the Light. He also deploys the Almighty, a weapon that causes supernovas and destroys several planets, and targets the sun. When Ghaul's plans fall apart and the Speaker dies, he murders the Consul, his surrogate father and friend, because he berated him for wasting time. Afterwards, he proceeds with his plan to strip the Light from the Traveler. An envious and proud warrior, Ghaul nearly destroyed the Solar System and almost drained the Light from the galaxy because he felt he was entitled to the Traveler's power.
    • Riven of a Thousand Voices is the monstrous Ahamkara behind the events of Forsaken. Having been sealed inside the Dreaming City by Mara Sov, knowing of Riven's deceitful nature, Riven would come into contact with Oryx, the Taken King, and broker a deal that allowed him to forcibly turn everyone in the Dreaming City into Taken while Riven would keep her free will upon becoming Taken and gain complete control over the city. Disguising herself as the late Mara Sov, she would corrupt and manipulate Uldren Sov into doing her biding; she would have Uldren kill numerous Fallen to resurrect as the undead Scorn, lead a jailbreak at The Prison of Elders to free the Solar System's most notorious criminals, murder Cayde-6, and kill most of the Awoken, his own people, inhabiting the Reef. When Uldren unknowingly frees Riven, she proceeds to devour him alive before embarking on her intent to wreak havoc throughout the Solar System. When a Guardian raid team was sent to kill Riven at the Dreaming City, she would make sure that when she perishes, the Dreaming City would be kept in an time-loop and remain under Taken influence, forever subjecting those in the city to constant suffering and cementing herself as a sadistic manipulator of the worst kind.
  • Contested Sequel: The main point of contention is how much of an "improvement" the game is over the original Destiny. Generally, reviewers and fans alike agree that the game is a major improvement over the first game, when it first released; the contention kicks in when many veterans feel that Destiny 2 takes significant steps back compared to the game that D1 became as a result of its patches and expansions. The biggest problem is that Destiny 2 feels very content-light compared to Destiny 1 with all the expansions added on - but then some point out that of course it does because it hasn't been expanded yet, while others then respond with wondering why everything had to be thrown overboard for D2, and so on. The latter sentiment became more intense after Season 2/Curse of Osiris expansion and the various controversies that arose. As of Forsaken onwards however, many former detractors have warmed up to the game or feel the issues they had have been addressed, and the game is generally agreed to have finally Grown The Beard.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: In a meta sense, the Prometheus Lens, upon the Curse of Osiris release, is a Game-Breaker due to a bug, but since Bungie needs time to implement a fix for it, it will remain overpowered until then, and the Trials of the Nine are not getting cancelled. So how do they mitigate the unfairness of having stacked fireteams of Lenses all aiming for flawless runs? Why, have Xûr sell it for everyone, of course!
  • Demonic Spiders:
    • Cabal Scorpius Drones. They appear rarely, can't move (being Turrets) and have pretty low health, but can bring even a Player at full health using a Super to low health in just a few seconds of its constant fire even from a distance.
    • Cabal Incendiary, especially on activities with high Power requirements. Because they deal damage over time, it's easy to forget you are staying still in their trail of fire, and the residual damage stacks up fairly quickly.
    • Cabal Gladiators are basically War Beasts except they're bigger, have more health, do more damage and are slightly faster. They also tend to single you out of cover while you're recovering health. They can also One-Hit Kill you if you touch a wall while they're hitting you.
    • Cabal Quartermasters. They're essentially Ultra Colossi with pretty low health for Ultra Standards (you'll most likely kill him using a cheap Rocket Launcher), but if there's any kind of distance between you and him, he'll forgo using his Cannon and start sending endless barrages of missilesnote  until you break line of sight. If you get hit by any of his missiles, there's nothing short of a miracle stopping you from dying. Fortunately, they only spawn near the end of public events exclusive to the Faction Rally event.
    • Fallen Scorch Cannon Captains. Like the first game, they deal a ton of rapid explosive damage and have high health AND shields. Unlike the first game, they'll now start teleporting a lot around you when at low health, making it harder to land shots (and potentially wasting Power or Elemental Ammo). They can also fire their shots like a Mortar if you decide to use a Barrier (as a Titan) in front of it or get into cover right in front of him.
    • At first glance, the Hive Knights' shield/regen ability isn't as bad as Hobgoblin stasis, since it can be flanked. The issue is that while they heal a similar percent of their health, it's Hobgoblins and Knights, so you end up wasting a lot more bullets on them. To make things worse, they seem to — unlike Hobgoblins — have virtually no cooldown on this ability, and yellow-health Knights will happily spam their shield and healing to their shitty little heart's content. As a result, the Revenant Knight turns into a Damage-Sponge Boss in Mook's Clothing that won't go down unless your whole fireteam is constantly pummeling him from multiple angles. And it's not exaggeration to say at least one appears in every major fight of the Savathun's Song Nightfall.
    • Hive Shriekers; while they no longer send out explosive homing projectiles once they're killed, instead of firing in slow bursts they fire a neverending stream of Void projectiles once they target you. They're also escorted by many more Hive, and in the "Savathûn's Song" Strike they even have to be taken out by a energy orb that leaves the holder weaponless.
    • Taken Centurions. They don't appear too often, but they have a fairly tough Arc shield and a homing projectile that can seek you out even when you're behind cover. You can shoot it to destroy it, but that'll alert the enemy to where you are.
    • Scorn Abominations are essentially reskinned Hive Ogres with a powerful Arc bolt attack that can snipe you very accurately and from an extreme distance, making fighting Hobgoblins a preferrable option.
    • The Berserkers from "Scourge of the Past" are modified Fallen Captains that are both invincible and invisible at a distance, requiring you to close in to break their shield. Once you get close, however, the Berserker will deploy a field that suppresses all of your abilities, leaving you with only your guns to destroy two weak spots that are located at opposite ends (this usually requires two Guardians to tag-team the Berserker), else you get oneshotted by the Berserker's beam weapon. As if it wasn't enough, breaking the shield will send the Berserker on a very aggravating teleportation spree which would make even regular Captains faint, and the suppression field sometimes has a nasty knockback effect that can effectively turn you into a victim of physics or shut you mid-flight and into a hole.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Of the new cast members, Failsafe is generally the most popular garner, due to her Woobie status and hilarious mood swinging between Friendly and Helpful to Deadpan Snarker.
    • While Cayde-6 is still the most beloved member of the Vanguard, Ikora Rey has steadily grown to rival him in popularity as the game progresses, as many have taken notice of her fascinating Hidden Depths and strong Character Development. Her supporting the Young Wolf’s hunt for Uldren Sov in Forsaken (while Zavala did nothing) also greatly endeared her to players.
    • Sagira, the Ghost of Osiris, mainly due to her unique design from other Ghosts and being the first non-player ghost to be voiced.
    • Emperor Calus, mainly because of how Crazy Awesome and Affably Evil he manages to be, as well as a being the source of some great Raids. His desire to convince the Guardians to join him is also seen as a very unique and interesting villain motive, and some players wish you actually could do so.
    • Mithrax the Forsaken, a Fallen Captain, started as a minor character in the Rat King questline who earned sympathy both in and out of universe when he allowed the player to walk away with the item he was coveting after the latter saved him from a Hive Knight. He ended up becoming so beloved by fans that he’s become an Ascended Extra, taking Varik’s spot as the Token Heroic Fallen and effectively becoming a non-Lightbearing Guardian like Hawthorne. Joker's Wild endeared him to the fandom even more by directly involving him in a well-designed secret mission, coming close to becoming this universe's equivalent of the Arbiter from Halo.
    • Hiraks, the Mindbender seems to be the most popular of the Scorned Barons from Forsaken due to his interesting gimmick of being a Hive worshipping Fallen, along with a cool design and fun boss battle.
    • The Drifter has endeared himself to many thanks to his laidback personality, fascinatingly unconventional views on the Traveler and Darkness, and insanely memorable Gambit dialogue.
    • The Zero Hour mission features TR3-VR, a nightmarish security robot that sweeps through vents killing you with a combination of whirling electric buzzsaws and electric discharge with a terrifying clattering noise and bright red floodlights. Naturally, the community loved him. The week hadn't ended before Bungie released merch based on the psycho roomba.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • As with its predecessor, the Destiny 2 fandom has an intense rivalry with the Warframe fandom due to broadly similar gameplay styles, setting, and players hawking Warframe to unhappy Destiny fans.
    • Anthem (2019) has begun to garner a fair amount of attention from players for many of the same reasons as Warframe, being a shared world shooter-RPG set in a post-apocalyptic future.
  • Franchise Original Sin: Back in the first game, the boss stomping mechanic, while criticized for being unoriginal, was largely glossed over since most of the gunplay happened at a distance and the knockback effect of the boss stomp was moderate. In Destiny 2, the Shockwave Stomp ends up overused for most story and endgame bosses, including some bosses that don't have feet, and the increased knockback and radius have gone to the point where you can get propelled at the speed where you can die if you hit a wall (in a similar manner to a Phalanx's wonky shield bash). Naturally, this got a lot of flak from the fandom, who wishes the developers at least took some time to make a different, less obnoxious close-range combat animation for bosses.
  • Game-Breaker:
    • The Orpheus Rig Exotic Leg pieces for Hunter. They have an exotic perk that grants bonus Super Energy for every enemy tethered with a Shadowshot Arrow. When used correctly, they can give a Nightstalker and his/her team near infinite Super meter allowing a Trapper to continuously spam arrows as though they were a Pathfinder. Even when not used perfectly, they can significantly reduce the amount of time it takes for a Super to come back up. In certain modes with high density enemy spawns like raids, they can generate a dozen orbs in one shot to replenish allied supers (even if allies take the kill if they are tethered you produce orbs), guaranteeing everyone being able to use their super repeatedly. The ability to disorient and suppress so many enemies at once ends up being a perk rather than the feature.
    • The "Attunement of Hunger" skill tree for the Voidwalker Warlock. When all four nodes of this Skill Tree are unlocked, the Warlock will be able to kill an enemy with a special melee attack, or consume their grenade, to instantly restore their Health to full and proc the "Devour" perk, causing all your kills to restore your health to max for the next nine seconds. This isn't too crazy on its own, but when combined with the "Insatiable" perk, which resets the timer on the Devour perk and grants bonus Grenade energy whenever you get a kill, basically turning the Warlock into a nigh-unkillable grenade-spamming murder machine as long as there are enough weak enemies around to feed them.
      • Exacerbated by the Nezarec's Sin Exotic Warlock Helmet. Nezarec's Sin reduces your grenade, melee, ability, and super cooldowns by a small amount for all void damage kills. Yes, void damage. Not void ability. By pairing this helmet with Void Energy/Power weapons, a Hunger Voidwalker can attain terrifyingly short cooldowns and keep the Devour buff running even longer.
    • The "Code of the Earthshaker" skill tree for the Striker Titan. It's the only Titan subclass that gets two grenade charges, gets the grenade charge refilled by damaging enemies with a sprinting Shoulder Charge with area effect damage, and the Pulse Grenades that the Striker gets are considered the best grenades in the game by far. Not broken enough for you yet? It gets even more broken with one piece of Exotic equipment:
      • An Insurmountable Skullfort is an Exotic Titan helm that enhances Arc-based melee attacks by triggering health regen and instantly re-proccing the melee sprint attack on a kill. Striker is the Arc-based subclass. Put all that together, and you can now clear out a horde of weak mooks with a single charge, recover some of the damage you might have taken while charging into them, throw two of the aforementioned best grenades from all the grenade energy you just got from the one charge, and still have another melee charge proc'd for the next set of weak mooks you can Shoulder Charge into for two more instant grenade charges!
      • With Patch 2.0, Seismic Strike is a One-Hit Kill in the Crucible, and if you're using Insumountable Skullfort, you get the melee charge back upon killing a Guardian, making it possible to use nothing but Seismic Strike in a match and come out on top. The exotic helmet also works with Code of the Missile, which offers an even deadlier melee option in the form of Ballistic Slam; with the Skullfort, you're essentially spamming a mini-Super at this point.
    • A more general Titan example is the Rally Barricade. It's only half-height, the main gimmick being that crouching behind it instantly reloads your current weapon. This includes Power Weapons. Entire fireteams can exploit this to take down bosses without having to worry about lengthy reload times and just 'spewing bullets and rockets like no tomorrow.
    • Speaking of dakka, we have the Sweet Business/Actium War Rig combo. The Sweet Business does everything well except for its awful reload time. The War Rig auto-loads a tenth of the active auto rifle's magazine back in every two seconds or so. Throw in a Rally Barricade, and you never have to worry about that reload time whatsoever. The only remaining problem is how quickly you will expend that meager 450-round Kinetic ammo reserve! And as of Warmind, its ammo capacity has been upped to 999!
      • Sweet Business is one of the few Exotic weapons that enjoyed a large boost in the Crucible following the weapons slots changes one week before Forsaken's release, being able to achieve a time-to-kill faster than nearly any other Primary weapon when fully spun note . Thrown in the Titan's updated Rally Barricadenote , an Actium War Rig rolled with "Unflinching Auto Rifle Aim" (adds resistance to incoming flinch), and the Sweet Business's own Masterwork perk, "Serious Business" (which also adds flinch resistance when spun up), and you have a frightening lawnmower (or instant turret) that can clear an entire corridor of hapless Guardians.
    • Not even one day into Curse of Osiris, players have noted that the second-ever Exotic Trace Rifle, the Prometheus Lens — on top of being the Mook Horror Show it was built to be — absolutely shreds Guardians in the Crucible, much faster than any other weapon short of Power-class. Indeed, mere fractions of seconds of exposure gets you killed, in contrast to the Coldheart which at least has a kill time on par with regular auto rifles. It's so overpowered that many likened it to Destiny's Vex Mythoclast at its prime. Also works as a literal example, as it turns out it was bugged. Because of holidays season, Bungie decided to nerf it to the ground one week later, with the promise to playtest it and apply a proper fix in January 2018.
    • One of the most common loadouts for boss DPS, especially raid bosses, is a Sunbreaker Titan with Code of the Fire-Forged and the Synthoceps exotic gauntlets. The Synthoceps provide a buff for Melee and Super damage when surrounded by enemies, which you almost always are in Raids, and Hammers are the only Super that allows Titans to attack from range. Code of the Fire-Forged, on the other end, allows the hammers to deal additional damage through the clusters of explosions created after the initial impact, and is optimized by throwing from a fairly long distance. After the Synthoceps got buffed, this combination now deals total damage on par with a Gunslinger equipped with Celestial Nighthawk.
    • The raid armor's unique perks give you a serious advantage while on the Leviathan; one of the arms piece's options giving you a 20% damage increase from any source after killing an enemy with a punch, while the class item gives you 25% bonus elemental damage for your subclass's abilities. You can stack these to make short work of most enemies in the raids, and it's even possible for a team of Gunslingers equipped with Celestial Nighthawks and both aforementioned armor pieces to down either Calus's or Argos's entire health pool in mere seconds.
    • With Warmind's release, another Damage-Increasing Debuff combo became popular in the form of stacking a Sunbreaker's Hammer Strike with a teammate's Tractor Cannon, then going to town on any tough enemy you want dead with the Legendary IKELOS_SG_V1.0.1 shotgun obtained from Escalation Protocolnote , with additional damage input from a Warlock's Empowering Rift (which can further be abused with instant reload thanks to Lunafaction Boots). This combination usually makes short work of bosses who don't explicitly keep their distance from you.
    • The Black Hammer in all its unnerfed D1Y1 glory comes back in this game as the Whisper of the Worm, being able to fire forever so long as you keep chaining precision hits, on top of dealing obscenely high damage on those precision hits (moreso once you complete its Masterwork objective, which increases the crit's modifier). All in all, it's usually the first answer to difficult bosses, especially as new content with higher power level requirements pile upon the base game. It's one of the few times the fandom has been genuinely ecstasic about a secret weapon's discovery, as the weapon is a throwback to Destiny's early months of hilariously broken PvE loadouts.
    • With Patch 2.0, the Sleeper Simulant, once left in the dust upon the Whisper's discovery, has picked up some serious slack, with its headshot damage becoming the equivalent of five bodyshot bounces and gaining increased ammo reserves to compete with other Power weapons. It has become one of the best weapons to use in Gambit, if not the best, thanks to its incredibly long range and stopping power, as well as the fact that when you invade, the enemy team won't have as much time to focus on you as they would in the Crucible.
    • The Attunement of Fission was hands down the most broken subclass in the Crucible until update 2.1.4; its Handheld Supernova allows you to oneshot any Guardian from full health, and that's just your grenade charge. Nova Warp lasts for an eternity and oneshots anyone within a very large blast radius, even trumping over other Supers due to Nova Warp's innate resilience.
    • Before their nerf in Season 5, the Ursa Furiosa gauntlets were one of the most broken Exotics in the Crucible due to a bug that miscalculated the amount of damage absorbed needed to regain your Sentinel Shield, which translated into soaking a couple of potshots and surviving until the super's end, only to get another super charge ready. You could theorically go on a massive spree with infinite supers, so long as enemy players aren't wise enough to not shoot you.
    • Another Titan exotic armor piece, the One Eyed Mask helmet, lets you track enemies through walls and grants you an overshield and increased damage upon killing whoever inflicted damage on you. The health and armor granted upon a kill in particular is cited by most to be an absolute game changer, allowing players to play aggressively in the Crucible and still come out on top.
    • With the nerf to the Sleeper Simulant in Gambit, players found an even more broken alternative for invading in the form of the Queenbreaker. The bullet magnetism on this linear fusion rifle's bolts is absurd, proc'ing a headshot even though you aren't actively aiming for the head. This effectively allows an invader to wipe the opposing team just by looking in their general direction. Bungie eventually revealed that the gun somehow disrespected the limits of its fellow Linear Fusion Rifles and had a ridiculous 200% more Aim Assist than intended, and it was fixed with the launch of Joker's Wild.
    • On PC, "Titan Skating", which is achieved through binding the jump function to a macro (or the mouse's scroll wheel) and using a Titan's Catapult Lift, is considered by anyone worth their salt to be an essential asset for speedrun-level plays in PvE and blazingly fast flanks in PvP. By Titan skating, you can also abuse the aforementioned Shoulder Charge / Insurmountable Skullfort combo in the Crucible, as you'll be in the enemy's face before they can even react or even fathom how you got to them so quickly. This was patched out with the release of Joker's Wild
    • For basic PvE content, Izanagi's Burden is one of the best weapons you could ask for, as its unique perk turns it into a Special weapon with the firepower of a Heavy weapon (moreso if you score precision shots, effectively outstripping any other weapon in single shot damage), giving it less constraint on ammo as it is more common than Heavy bricks. Honed Edge is also very effective in Gambit, oneshotting High Value Targets with a headshot once their shield is down; it's more situational in the Crucible due to the need to find special ammo while starting with only 2 rounds, but the threat becomes real once you've scavenged a few green bricks. Its DPS might fall short of the Whisper of the Worm, another PvE Game-Breaker, but it's still impressive for a Special weapon.
    • Ever since the weapon slot changes occurred shortly before Forsaken, the Telesto was noted to have retained its damage numbers from when it was still a Power weapon, swiftly killing Guardians with only 4 bolts connecting to the body. Consequently, it became one of the most prevalent, easy-to-use Exotics in the Crucible, and one of the few Fusion Rifles actually worth using in a meta that's unfavourable to them. Update 2.1.4 reduced its damage per bolt and consequently its viability in the Crucible, though it also got a damage increase in PvE as a consolation.
    • Update 2.1.4 buffed the two default Striker branches by significantly reducing the Super energy drain from light attacks, and with the Trample ability from Code of the Juggernaut, you can go on an indefinite killing spree with the Fists of Havoc, so long as you keep killing enemies with shoulder charges. This turned what was a mediocre subclass branch into one of the best possible mob-clearing Supers in the game, until diminishing returns were introduced in a later patch.
    • In the same update, the Attunement of Chaos' version of the Nova Bomb suddenly became one of the best single-use Supers due to its increased damage and improved tracking on the post-detonation seekers (which are nearly as deadly as the Nova Bomb itself when they pile up on a single target), decimating clusters of elite enemies and OHKO-ing some of the lesser bosses. Pair that improved Nova Bomb with the Skull of Dire Ahamkara, and you'll be spamming the Super every time you nuke a cluster of enemies.
    • By the of time Joker's Wild, it's become clear that the Spectral Blades super is the most overpowered roaming super in the Crucible, given that you are granted invisibility, the standard increased resilience for roaming supers, True Sight and a considerable amount of super uptime (which can be lengthened with the exotic chestpiece, Gwisin Vest). Unless your team gangs up on the Spectral Blades user or shuts it down with a oneshot weapon/ability, expect the kill feed to show your team getting picked off one by one as you're futilely shooting at the Nightstalker, who simply shrugs off incoming fire and constantly swipes their way to you, killing you in one hit with a very wonky hitbox range.
    • The second pinnacle Crucible weapon in the game, Luna's Howl, essentially standardized Year 2's time-to-kill table for Primary weapons with its blindingly fast 0.67 seconds TTK note  and incredible ease at which you can activate the main perk, making it hard to recommend most energy Primaries over this one. On PC, there's much more leeway due to recoil not affecting keyboard and mouse players much (allowing them to wield stronger Primaries that are usually less stable), but on console, where recoil and aim assist are persistent elements, the Luna's Howl usually comes on top of energy weapon usage in the Crucible. It's the same story with its stronger variant, Not Forgotten (packing significantly more range than the Howl), though it's rarer due to the need to grind all the way to Legend rank in Competitive.
    • On PC, the Ace of Spades is the number one Primary in the Crucible due to its massive Range stat of 86 (whereas most HCs fall in the 70s, placing the Ace firmly in Pulse Rifle range territory) and very manageable recoil when you play with a keyboard and mouse. Those two traits turn what is a fairly situational PvP gun on console into a menace in ranged confrontations, and the Firefly perk, which you can keep indefinitely until you use it all up, allows you to casually kill Guardians with two headshots. It's such a dominant gun on PC that the likes of Luna's Howl and Not Forgotten, or any other Primary for that matter, are usually shelved in favour of Energy Secondaries for better coverage.
    • The Recluse, Season 6's pinnacle Crucible reward. This SMG is normally tame by itself, but the moment you get a kill through any of your equipped weapons, it turns itself into one of most powerful mob-clearing Primaries in the game, owing to the Master of Arms perk being essentially Kill Clip with the refresh rate of Rampage, ramping up bodyshot damage to being just slightly lower than headshots (considering it's a 900 RPM weapon, this means it has the lowest TTK of all Primaries in the Crucible with the perk active, and melts elite PvE combatants with incredible ease). Feeding Frenzy is also a nice quick reload bonus to keep the carnage going.
    • Update 2.5.0.1 absolutely busted the Lord of Wolves in Crucible by changing the Release the Wolves perk to activate on holding down the reload button, instead of on a kill. Even with an all-around damage decrease to the weapon note , it still allows players to easily sling ten rounds at a range beyond that of a normal shotgun. It can kill normal Guardians in one trigger pull, and can even knock Guardians out of their super in two trigger pulls.
    • The Warlock solar super Well of Radiance introduced in Forsaken is basically an overcharged healing rift, while primarily defensive what made it crazy was making any guardian inside the circle functionally invincible by giving them an overshield and immediate recharge when taking damage. The only thing able to kill a guardian inside is high damage power weapons (direct hit rocket launchers, headshot with Sleeper Stimulant), supers or insta-kill mechanics. In addition it enhances weapon and super damage of everyone inside. When combined with Lunafaction Boots exotic the guardian can deploy an enhancing rift in the same place, providing another damage boost and reloading all weapons for a time. When combined with Phoenix Protocol exotic the damage dealt in the rift including allies is returned to the guardian as super energy, letting them redeploy it almost immediately. It became a Raid staple for that reason, letting you one-phase bosses like Riven.
    • On the subject of Solar Warlocks, The "Attunement of Flame" branch of Dawnblade has become one of the best roaming supers in the game following the nerf to Spectral Blades. Its ability to fire both tracking projectiles and increasing the duration on a kill means that a Warlock can easily wipe a team, travel to their spawn, and then kill them again.
    • Outbreak Perfected has two main perks, dealing damage produces a swarm of SIVA nanites that seeks out and attacks enemies and the rifle itself deals more damage when more SIVA nanites are attached to a target. The second effect stacks with any SIVA nanites produced by allies also using Outbreak Perfected, so coordinating fire on any boss becomes a Gathering Steam burn effect.
  • Gameplay Derailment: Trials of the Nine is meant to be a serious confrontation between two teams of four Guardians each, but as time went on and the population dwindled, it has become common practice to cheese the game mode by trading wins with teams that constantly pair with each other (this is very dependent on the fireteam hosts' geolocation). This is much easier to pull off on PC due to multiple factors note . Competitive mode works similarly, though it's a much longer cheese if you're going for Redrix's Claymore (not to mention there is a higher chance you might run into different teams due to the Glory system factoring who you can pair up against).
    • The weapon quest "A Gift for the Worthy" required players to rack up 1500 grenade launcher final blows and 500 grenade launcher multikills running Vanguard Strikes. Since its release, you can encounter groups of players who launch the strike "The Corrupted", then run right out of the strike to the nearby Blind Well to farm the waves of enemies while still technically running the strike and thus earning quest progress.
  • Genius Bonus: The glowing Vex motes that move in right angles during spawn in and in other places are tracing out a Hilbert curve.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • The Cabal War Beasts; they're lightning fast, constantly Zerg Rush you, and can tear through your shields in seconds if you can't get out of their reach. However, they are very squishy and can be killed with a few shots or a single normal melee attack.
    • Fallen Scorch Cannon Vandals and Dregs. The firepower of the Scorch Cannon Captains with about half to a quarter the health of one, and no shields.
    • Taken Psions. Individually weak, but they possess Self-Duplication; Psions will periodically split in two (often right as they're about to die) and can quickly overwhelm you with sheer numbers, flanking shenanigans, and painful precision shots. To make matters worse, the new Psion spawns with full health.
    • Taken Hobgoblins. Whilst they lack the invulnerability+regeneration power of their pre-Taken counterparts, they instead periodically generate homing explosive projectiles for retaliation - they'll constantly snipe at you and if you dare to shoot back, expect a volley of missiles in return. This can easily be fatal if you're not careful.
    • Taken Goblins are the epitome of aggravation, as they have an unnerving tendency to shield tough enemies like Taken Knights and Taken Minotaurs when you thought you had a window of opportunity to kill them. To make matters worse, they often come in packs, and more often than not you'll see a pair of Taken Goblins shielding each other just to provide you with two invulnerable enemies that contribute nothing to the fight (except maybe to distract you from the bigger threats).
  • Goddamned Boss: While INSURRECTION PRIME is widely praised to be an innovative boss, it does have a couple of caveats that annoy raiders to no end: it frequently rotates its torso around and rarely stands still, making it tricky to disable the shield generators scattered around its body; if stunned, it also has a chance of kneeling down in the wrong direction and in front of a building, leaving little space for your fireteam to spread apart and still deal effective damage when the phase radiance puzzle is activated.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • The community was delighted to see that Guided Games would be gated through admission passes which drop randomly. How did they find this out, you ask? Bungie was fiddling around with the servers and the tickets dropped as part of the side effects.
    • The "Infinite Coil" glitch, where you use a Titan's Rally Barricade and shoot the Wardcliff Coil while spamming the crouch button, resulting in multiple Wardcliff Coil rockets being directly returned to the magazine. Doing this for long periods of time allows players to gather an otherwise impossible amount of rockets to use, trivializing many PvE encounters. This has been thankfully patched by the time "Curse of Osiris" launched.
    • Upon Mayhem Clash's introduction in the Dawning event, players noticed a glitch which allows for Voidwalkers with the Attunement of Chaos path to hurl an infinite number of Nova Bombs. Normally, using the Chaos Accelerant ability to power up your grenade at the expense of your Super's energy prevents you from using the latter, but since Mayhem recharges every ability so quickly, the rate at which you drain your Super's energy is negated by the enhanced Super charge rate. All you need to do assign the Super's activation button/key to a separate input from the grenade's, then activate the Super while powering up the grenade. This cancels the powerup's animation and goes straight to hurling a Nova Bomb without an actual Super animation, and can be spammed relentlessly since it doesn't consume Super energy.
    • The Exotic grenade launcher "The Colony" was bugged on the PC version of the game, being unable to track targets if the game's framerate is higher than 40 FPS. This has been fixed by the end of February 2018. Similarly, the One Thousand Voices had superior damage on PC given the higher framerates, but was brought down to console standards for consistency in January 2019. Unlike the Colony, this induced disappointment in both console and PC players, feeling that such a rare raid Exotic would rather benefit from being as strong as it was before the PC fix. Joker's Wild buffed the One Thousand Voices by 25%, but then another bug appeared along with it, as simply having the exotic weapon equipped would increase all of your weapons by 25% damage as well until Bungie fixed it a couple of weeks later.
    • An interface bug appeared during the patch that introduced Masterwork Armor and raid-specific perks on raid armor, where previewing how a shader looks on a single piece of equipment automatically sends the user back to the top row of available shaders. This is annoying if you happen to want to preview various shaders, but are suddenly forced to scroll down constantly.
    • If you're a either a Stormcaller or Dawnblade and have two Lunafaction Boots in hand (one pair equipped and the other stowed away), you can reset your Super's duration by swapping the boots, essentially making it infinite for as long as you remember to swap before the Super expires. The exact same bug applies for the Titan's subclasses, only replacing Lunafaction Boots with the MK. 44 Stand Asides in the equation.
    • Should an Arcstrider get caught by an enemy Nightstalker's Shadowshot tether, the former can simply spam light and heavy attacks to get out of it and have an infinite Arc Staff, so long as they never get their feet off the ground even once after the tether activates.
    • For the boss fight against Val Ca'uor, one player can simply stand on Calus's robot double as it's being raised right before the damage phase, then intercept the three Greed orbs note  and throw them back on the ground, ripe for other fireteam members to pick them up and chuck them at Ca'uor for a whopping 400,000 damage (which is a lot, considering the boss's middling health). Note that this discovery was purely incidental, as the team in question is no stranger to melting Ca'uor in one phase through conventional damage stacking.
    • On 8/28/2018, the week preceding the release of the Forsaken expansion, after the 2.0.0 sandbox update and Forsaken preload, many players were able to obtain Forsaken gear from flashpoint engrams. For those who hadn't maxed out to 405 power they were able to equip said weapons or armor, but those whom had reached 405 were unable to.
    • The Blind Well's waves up until the final boss can be essentially skipped over by firing your Telesto at the ground and shooting the bolts with another weapon. For some reason, the game registers the bolts as enemies that can be accounted for the Well's progression, making it a breeze to speed your way to the boss phase.
    • The Synthoceps were discovered to boost the user's weapon damage by 50% when they proc'ed the gauntlet's perk while standing in an allied Warlock's Well of Radiance; apparently, the game assumed that because you are standing in someone's super, you are also using a super, hence the Biotic Enhancements perk appyling itself to your weapons. This in turn made Synthoceps-wielding Titans a massive boon to raid fireteams with at least one Well of Radiance user. These were thankfully patched on Black Armory's release, as it would otherwise trivialize future challenging bosses.
    • The week before Black Armory launched, the Inverted Spire strike was temporarily unavailable due to a bug. The bug in question? The boss, Protheon, Modular Mind, spawned three times its normal size, spawning hilarious "Big Boi" and "Swoltheon" jokes.
    • The update for Arc Week buffed a lot of Arc subclasses, but inadvertently made the Combination Blow perk for the "Way of the Warrior" Arcstrider branch apply itself to the Arc Staff, making the super much more potent that it actually should be. Combine that with Raiden Flux for longer super uptime, and you have a fairly busted combo that destroys bosses that don't keep you away from melee range. The bug was fixed by the end of the Revelry 2019, but not before one player managed to completely solo Riven with it.
    • The Menagerie's take on the Gauntlet can be largely skipped over due to an oversight which designates grenade launcher projectiles and Telesto bolts as entities that count towards passing the Gauntlet's final gate in the same manner a player would, allowing players to simply spam grenade launchers at the finish line and inflate the score. Additionally, running past the third checkpoint and going back through it removes the "Keep Moving" death debuff, allowing you to stay in the course until the encounter ends. Update 2.5.1.1 was thought to have fixed it, until it players found out that you can still kill yourself on the finish line with the grenade launcher and count as multiple finishes, essentially making the cheese still functional.
    • The mission "The Other Side" wherein you obtain the Bad Juju can be unexpectedly turned into a cakewalk if you bring an Arcstrider tuned to the Way of the Warrior and buy the Orb Tribute from the Visage of Calus. Upon activating the Arc Staff and hugging the Orb Tribute stand, the game will mistake your character as building another super even though it's already active, and once you gather enough orbs to officially activate it, you can use your dodge ability and the super bar will instantly refill itself note , essentially granting an infinite Arc Staff within the Tribute Hall and the mission, so long as you keep tabs on the gauge and refill it when necessary.
  • Growing the Beard: Forsaken is generally seen as the point where Bungie hit their stride with the game and began addressing complaints. This sentiment only increased after the announcement of Shadowkeep and Free-to-Play, which led to a massive spike in player count.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: While hilarious, a lot of Cayde-6's lines in the "Rally the Troops" trailer turn into Black Humor once you play the game and realize just how bad the situation actually is. He pokes fun at the idea of them dying, which under normal circumstances wouldn't be a big deal... except that with the Traveler captured and their Light gone, anyone who dies now is Killed Off for Real. When he says "You're a bunch of dirty misfits, but you're all that's left so you'll have to do", it's because they literally are some of the only ones left. When Cayde promises to kill anyone he doesn't see fighting, the Titan makes an Oh, Crap! face because he's basically saying "fight and possibly die for real, or I'll make sure that you do."
    • It becomes even harsher in hindsight with the trailer for "Forsaken", in which Uldren kills Cayde.
    • Likewise "Insecure men tend to surround themselves with others like them." "Cayde? Anything to add?" "Nope, she's totally right. Which is why I work alone."... if only he were a tad less secure.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • For Forsaken, Nathan Fillion could not do voiceover for Cayde-6 because he was instead working on a fan film on Uncharted as protagonist Nathan Drake, so who did they call in to replace him in the DLC? Why, the actual voice actor for Nathan Drake in the games, Nolan North! What’s even crazier is that North's performance sounds very similar to Fillion, to the point that some people never even noticed the change until it was pointed out.
    • The teaser trailer for Shadowkeep revived the infamous "Moon's haunted" tweet and turned it into a Destiny meme. Not even a week after the reveal, CNN tweeted out new information on the Moon's south pole, revealing that there's something massive beneath its surface. The highest rated reply?
      Bungie: Don't say we didn't warn you.
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks!: It's widely acknowledged that it gets a little too easy to reach maximum Power Level and getting most of the good weapons and armor; by the time one does reach that milestone, the small amount of endgame content and lack of variance in gear becomes detrimental to the game's replayability.
    • This has been partially addressed in the Warmind DLC, which has made reaching max LL harder and has added plenty of grind, though that hasn't come without new complaints.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Fikrul, the Fanatic. He may lead the twisted and corrupted Scorn to kill off all the regular Fallen to immortalize them, he genuinely cares for the entire Fallen race. When confronted in the final mission, he is enraged that the Young Wolf has murdered all of his fellow Barons, who he even calls his friends. He will even take his own steps in avenging them, much like we did with Cayde.
    • For all his selfishness and cruelty, Uldren Sov is ultimately just doing what he thinks he has to to save his sister, unaware that Riven is playing him for a fool and the real Mara has no desire to be “rescued”, making his entire quest and all his crimes pointless.
  • Magnificent Bastard: The Spider is the clever and charismatic head of the Fallen crime syndicate that rules the otherwise lawless Tangled Shore. Coming into contact with the Guardian and Petra Venj, The Spider would exploit their desire to avenge Cayde-6's death to rid himself of the Scorn infesting the Tangled Shore. The Spider would place bounties on criminals for the Guardian to kill and allow him to regain control of the Tangle Shore and in return he would give them the locations of the Scorn Barons and their leader Uldren Sov, all of whom played a part in Cayde-6's muder. When The Spider learns that his brother Siviks stole all the weaponry from the Black Armory, he has the Guardian kill him to establish business relations with the Black Armory, making The Spider the Guardian's most unscrupulous ally.
  • Memetic Badass:
    • The Niobe Labs puzzle gained infamy for taking longer to solve than any Day 1 raid clear in the franchise (in fact, it's still unsolved, forcing Bungie to skip that Day 1 completion and open up Bergusia Forge one day after the fiasco). With the subsequent bombshell that Bungie would end their contract with Activision earlier than the 10-year mark and gain full publishing rights to the Destiny franchise, fans joked that Activision did a Rage Quit over the puzzle.
    • If there's something that can inspire fear in Guardians, it's not Oryx, not Riven, not some Worm God; no, it's TR3-VR, the most dangerous sweeping bot in the Tower.
  • Memetic Bystander: The sweeper bot featured the "Last Call" trailer, who has to listen to Cayde's monologue in the middle of the Cabal assault. Fans often joke about they will riot if the bot isn't featured in the series of "Meet [X character]" trailers. Hilariously enough, one of these sweeper bots does end up being a key character in post-story content as Calus's emissary.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • "Fucking/Fuck You, Gary!" Explanation 
    • "FOR THE PUPPIES!!" explanation 
    • "Dammit, not her again!" and variations in it. Mild Spoilers 
    • The Single Greatest Roast in Video Game History Explanation 
    • Vex Milk explanation 
    • Hawthorne's great clan speech Explanation  Full copypasta 
    • Friendgame Explanation 
    • Spendgame Explanation 
    • Two tokens and a blue!Explanation 
    • Trials of the Beam/Laser Tag Explanation 
    • Seven Bright Dust! Explanation 
    • Tess Avarice Explanation 
    • #RemoveEververse explanation 
    • We're listening Explanation 
    • "It's too hard to make content" and variations thereof Explanation 
    • Due to so much content being thrown overboard at release and mechanics being oversimplified, detractors have taken to referring to this game as the prequel to Destiny.
    • "The Crucible is exciting to watch on Twitch!" and "Intrinsic joy" Explanation 
    • THAVIKS, THE REMOVED! Explanation 
    • "ULDREN SOV MUST DIE!Explanation 
    • Cabal, again?! Explanation 
    • Edge Transit Drops Explanation 
    • 24:02 Explanation 
    • Just about everything related to Gambit, essentially replacing Variks and his Prison of Elders gig. No, really.
      • "All right, all right ,all right. Let's see what we got. [Enemy race] on the field!" Explanation 
      • DEATH HEALS PRIMEVAL Explanation 
      • Meatball Explanation 
      • "[Insert Drifter wisdom tidbit here]... Transmat firing!" Explanation 
      • By the time Joker's Wild launched, the Drifter has become such a Fountain of Memes that someone made a soundboard comprised of all his voicelines.
    • [X] is the 15th wish! Explanation 
    • When is [X] getting nerfed? Explanation 
    • Moon's haunted. Explanation 
    • “The helmet stayed on.”Explanation 
    • Scooty Puff Jr Explanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon: Uldren Sov had always been antagonistic to the Guardians since his first cutscene, but he had never done anything actually evil. Come the Forsaken DLC, he fully cements that he's a bad guy by murdering Cayde-6 with the Ace of Spades, Cayde's own Hand Cannon.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy: As the game keeps getting caught in underhanded tactics, issues with the Eververse, and Bungie's continued PR disasters, the player count steadily dwindled, while those on the outside who never played the game are more interested in the controversy than the game itself. This greatly affected Forsaken's sales despite its praise and a marked increase in returning players. Fortunately, the game seems to have finally outgrown this from The Black Armory onwards, especially after the announcement of Shadowkeep
  • Polished Port: The PC port is greatly optimized, allowing for uncapped framerate and ultra graphics settings so long as your PC specs allow it. The smooth framerate and control over FOV in particular make for a fantastic experience that's simply not possible on console, and controls with a mouse and keyboard are very precise, in true competitive FPS fashion.
  • The Scrappy: Zavala has become this over the course of the game. Despite being the leader of the Vanguard, he often comes off as The Ditherer who never takes action, which really started to rub players the wrong way after his refusal to act after the murder of Cayde-6. He’s also Overshadowed by Awesome, as many feel he’s too straight-laced and boring, while also lacking the strong Character Development that Cayde-6 and Ikora Rey have gone through.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • In a game so focused about loot and grinding, the unannounced cooldown that gives diminishing returns from looting in quick succession and stalls resource farming is universally despised by players. While there are ways to reset that Anti-Grinding timer, it still doesn't justify the fact that it's not even notified in the game.
    • Shaders are consumables now, so players that want to color-coordinate their armor may have a hard time of it if they don't have 4-5 of a given color on hand. Alleviated in the update that added Collections; you can now reacquire any shader you've already found at any time via your Collection. Especially helpful for rare or time-limited shaders, such as Faction Rally or Eververse exclusive patterns.
    • The balance between the three main attributes (Mobility, Resilience and Recovery) is considered to be a joke by most due to how insignificant the changes in gameplay are when stacking the first two, whereas maxing out Recovery is considerably more helpful in any scenario, be it PvE or the Crucible. As a result, armor sets that offer little to no Recovery (Hunter sets are the worst offenders) are deemed as inferior to the ones that do grant a significant increase to it.
    • The Eververse and the microtransaction system itself has become the main focus of ire for players, who feel that Bungie is increasingly trying to push players to spend money by locking more and more loot behind engrams rather than making them available through gameplay and achievements.
    • The Guided Games are considered by most to be a poor man's matchmaking, as it sometimes takes upwards of half an hour to find players who even bother to either mark themselves as guides or seekers, and the system functions on a limited number of tickets. To make matters worse, accidental disconnections and ragequitting alike put the "Oathbreaker" penalty on your account, limiting the number of times you can use Guided Games even further. To add insult to injury, even third-party applications allowing for pick-up groups are faster to get an activity going.
    • The Strike modifiers rotation system introduced in the "Go Fast" update is widely hated by players, especially when it's forced upon them for Heroic Strikes; on top of the extra health you'd expect from a higher-difficulty Strike, you have to deal with a crippling modifier note  that outweights by far the positive modifier note , resultings in days where you seriously don't want to even touch Heroic Strikes Fun fact . It says something when Prestige Nightfalls, normally the hardest type of Strike, are seen as more desirable to grind for than matchmaking-enabled Heroic Strikes.
    • The method of obtaining the Seething Heart, the item required to start the Malfeasance quest, has been universally loathed by the community for several reasons. The first is the chance for the boss that drops it to replace the round's Primeval in Gambit, which is abysmally low and dips even further if the curse in the Dreaming City is below maximum corruption (so two weeks out of a repeating three-week cycle.) The second is the fact that you need to win in order to get the Seething Heart. And since this is the Internet, well... teammate competency is an unreliable thing.
    • For Season 6, Bungie tried to make Iron Banner a little more challenging by introducing the Iron Burden item, which reduces your power level by 100 and is a necessary debuff for a couple of triumphs. Only, the drop in damage inflicted against higher power opponents, as well as the increase in damage taken from them, is so great that you can't reliably get kills like you normally would, and you're likely to get killed in half a second most of the time. To further compound the problem, the associated triumphs require an insane amount of kills note  while under the debuff. The system is so widely hated that after listening to feedback, Bungie promised it wouldn't come back for Season 7, opening an even worse can of worms as there's now suddenly a triumph worth points that you can miss out forever and have little time to complete it.
  • Scrappy Weapon:
    • The Fighting Lion Exotic grenade launcher, which has a small blast radius, odd bouncing pattern, difficulty in triggering its reload proc against non-shielded enemies, and doesn't deal enough damage to justify its single-shot magazine size in either PvP or PvE gameplay. Most of the fandom agrees that there are more efficient ways to deal with shielded enemies, let alone one worth the Exotic slot, and that it needs a damage buff to justify its single round in the magazine.
      • Part of the problem is that Grenade Launchers are generally a Power Weapon type, except for the Fighting Lion being an Energy Weapon with primary ammo and thus having its damage nerfed to compensate, especially in PvP.
    • The D.A.R.C.I gets flak for having what is perceived to be a useless exotic perk: highlighting enemy targets and show the distance between the player and the target. Coupled with its low damage and high rate of fire, it doesn't do a lot of damage, leaving players looking for a better alternative. Several updates buffed its perks to be able to solidly stay in the Heavy slot, even with a bunch of other powerful Heavy Exotics like the gamebreaking Whisper of the Worm, another Heavy sniper.
    • Some weapon archetypes are considered by the community to be garbage no matter how good their perks are, simply because they aren't competitive enough. High impact weapons have it worst, as their slow rate of fire stretches out the time-to-kill to inefficient levels compared to faster-firing ones; in contrast, the fastest-firing archetypes aren't nearly as punishing as the slow-firing ones, but still overshadowed by the middle pack. Bungie spent all of early-to-mid 2018 to balance things out and lower overall time-to-kill on all weapon archetypes, and by the time Patch 2.0 rolled out, nearly everything became viable; it's now become a matter of chasing that "god roll" on weapon archetypes and perks.
    • Swords are not looked upon kindly post-Patch 2.0; with shotguns being relegated to Special ammo and thus becoming much more accessible high-damage, close-range weapons, swords are essentially left to rot in the Heavy slot, where they have to compete with significantly more powerful weapon types that also have a lot of range. The combination of being unable to outfight shotguns in the Crucible most of the time, middling ammo count in PvE, and the fact that boss DPS is outright suicidal due to the overuse of stomp mechanics; makes swords one of the least appealing weapons, with parts of the fandom calling for relegating them to the Special category of weapons.
    • Scout Rifles in general, especially in PvP. At the ranges that they're supposed to be played at, they get outperformed by pulse rifles and hand cannons, and at shorter ranges they get outperformed by auto rifles and SMGs. The only decent exotic Scout Rifle, the MIDA Multi-Tool, is due to having above average stats and boosting movement speed rather than any "exotic" bonuses.
  • Snark Bait: Destiny 2's first year is generally considered to be the "dark age" for the game series, due to constant PR disasters, lack of satisfying rewards, and nearly every gameplay element being bogged down in the name of PvP balance, hemorraging the playerbase faster than Destiny 1 ever did over its 3 years. It was not until the few months preceding Forsaken that Bungie decided to open the flood gates and revert the game back to a Destiny 1 feel, embracing the power fantasy that entails such a change; a decision widely acclaimed both by the fandom and critics alike.
  • That One Achievement:
    • Getting the Triumph for solo-ing the Shattered Throne without any deaths is one hell of a task, given you have to fight hundreds of difficult Taken enemies, on top of taking down two of the hardest bosses in the game, both of which will give you a hard time due to the lack of cover in the boss arena.
    • On the Crucible side of things, the hardest checkmark for getting the "Unbroken" title is hitting Legend rank in Competitive three times, which means three seasons and therefore a lot of time and suffering spent in that playlist. If you're an even bigger triumph chaser, each season adds a hidden triumph of earning 50 victories while maintaining your Legend rank, which can only mean fighting the best Crucible players constantly if you aren't cheesing with the connections.
    • The "Maximum Carnage" triumph and medal in Gambit. Killing an entire team while invading isn't hard if you are prepared for it, but killing 7 essentially requires you to make far-fetched strategies like killing 3, then hoping all four Guardians gather together so you can kill them all in one fell swoop with a massive AoE attack like Nova Bomb; which frankly doesn't happen in your everyday Gambit match.
    • The "Now That's Just Showing Off" triumph for Iron Banner, which requires you to kill 2500 Guardians while under the effects of Iron Burden and against Guardians that have a higher power level than you (disqualifying Guardians of lower or equal power level). Getting that insane amount of kills while handicapped over the seasons wouldn't be so bad, if not for Bungie announcing that they'll remove the Iron Burden debuff for Season 7... with only 2 Iron Banner events left before Season 6's end. The result is a predictable, frantic rush to get these kills, not helped by players that simply don't care about the triumph and will gladly slaughter you while you're essentially fighting with one arm.
  • That One Boss:
    • Thaviks, the Depraved of the Exodus Crash strike. The boss itself has very simple mechanics, but the fight is still filled with annoyances. For starters, electrified exploding Shanks constantly appear throughout the room, all of which create an electric field that reduces the player's movement, disables jumping and does damage over time, all while the dozens of enemies flooding the room tear them apart. Then when it comes to the boss itself, Thaviks, since he's a bigger Marauder, starts out invisible, moves very fast and shoots his Shrapnel Launcher fast and aggressively, making it very hard to get away from him if he sets his sights on you with how quickly he closes the gap between himself and the player and making facing him in close range a death sentence. If you do manage to get a bead on him, Thaviks will throw a smoke bomb and teleport away after taking little damage. And after getting most of his health down, he'll switch to using swords that'll kill you in 2-3 swings. Finally, almost everyone agrees that this boss has too much health and takes forever to bring down. Combined with his "Get Back Here!" Boss tendencies, and you've got a huge time waster. Naturally this only makes him even worse on Nightfall which is now a Timed Mission. The boss's notoriety is so bad that it has become commonplace for players to go back to orbit right as they start the strike, and Bungie even took it out of the Heroic Strikes playlist rotation in late May 2018.
    • Brakion, Genesis Mind from The Pyramidion strike. The first phase of lowering his shields isn't that bad, and he lacks the stasis mode that makes regular hobgoblins irritating, but that's about it. His primary fire does enough damage to three-hit-kill and is so fast and tracks so well that if you've got low mobility it never misses, his fire attack covers a huge area, and lesser Vex are constantly spawning in after the shield phase and become very overwhelming very quickly. The fun really starts once you knock off his head and enter his final phase, where he runs after you while rapid firing his line rifle with no accuracy drop. The worst part about that is that he loves to get right in your face after the shield phase. This leads to him a) overusing the knockback stomp universal to all bosses—which wouldn't be a problem if the boss arena weren't a series of thin platforms above a Bottomless Pit—and b) killing you seconds after your teammate revives you.
    • Of all the trials presented in the Leviathan raid, none is more aggravating than the Pleasure Gardens, where you have to kill the six Royal Beasts. Its main problem stems from being heavily reliant on team communication as to indicate where to move your fireteam towards power buffs while remaining undetected. Not only do you need to slip past the Beasts' patrol pattern, but your beam users need to position themselves efficiently and lead you the way, while also having to jump across platforms without being detected themselves. Without a significant damage boost, each of the Beasts takes forever to kill, and eliminating them one by one is not an option, as the surviving Beasts will be more likely to trigger the damage phase without the slightest provocation from players. Then comes the Prestige Mode, where two more Royal Beasts are added to the equation, and their patrol patterns have completely changed as a result, throwing even experienced raiders in for a loop.
    • If the Royal Pools of the Leviathan Raid weren't hard enough to your taste on normal difficulty, they definitely are in Prestige Mode. Every enemy is beefier and more deadly than before, and it's not helped by the fact that a good part of the encounter is spent standing on stationary plates, meaning you're sitting ducks for those hardened Gladiator-type Royal Bathers (which conveniently happen to debuff you if you kill them, making for an even harder task to stay still on your plate); anyone who's not running a Recovery-heavy build will be hard pressed to survive the entire encounter.
    • Zevious-3, the Forge Warden of the Gofannon Forge on Nessus, keeps you on the edge by constantly teleporting itself away, cutting your fireteam's firepower by warping one Guardian at a time, and being flanked by numerous reinforcements. If one of the lesser Servitors even get close to the boss, it and Zevious-3 can mutually shield each other, making for a really frustrating situation where you have to pop your Super to destroy the smaller Servitor and get back to damaging the boss, who can choose to either relocate itself or randomly teleport you.
  • That One Level:
    • Savathûn's Song, for non-Titans. The main gimmick of the strike is that someone has to pick up a ball of Void Light and deliver it to a pillar in order to destroy a invincible Shrieker, while leaving the carrier with nothing but melee attacks. Which is a bad thing since there are a lot more Ogres than usual in this Strike, who will gleefully melt you with their eye beams. Hell, in one room where you need to deliver it, it's guarded by a Ogre outside the room and two Ogres and a Shrieker inside the room.
    • For Solstice of Heroes, the Redux of 1AU, specifically the "Sunside" portion of the level, can be absolutely brutal, especially if you're soloing the mission. The portion in question has you going outside the Almighty and running along a portion of the hull exposed to the Sun's damaging solar winds, where you will take constant damage unless you are in cover. The Redux version of the mission puts a lot of Elite Mooks in your way, gives you less cover to work with, and drops Cabal Drop Pods directly along the paths you are most likely to take to get from cover to cover. The difficulty is massively exacerbated by the fact that you will likely be wearing the Scorched Event Armor the first time you make this run, which gives you only a single point in Resilience and no points in Recovery.
    • Niobe Labs became infamous due to a glitch in the first days that made it accidentally unwinnable, leaving out a particular clue on how to solve it. This was rather significant in that this was story-related content that was locked out to everyone until a team cleared. Bungie responded by just unlocking the content manually and later patched the glitch, leaving the puzzle more of a novelty quest rather providing anything important.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • Getting the Legend of Acrius (Exotic Shotgun) is a fairly painful process that requires you to randomly get the quest item in the first place, randomly get 5 collectibles by killing Cabal enemies, then complete the Leviathan raid (you can technically skim down to just beating the final boss, which is still a monumental task in itself). Then, you have to complete a 300 Power quest, which turns out to be a Nightfall Strike on Prestige difficulty; completing this will reward you with the Exotic shotgun minus most of its perks, and you'll be tasked with using it to kill more Cabal in particular circumstances. Then, you'll have to come back to the Leviathan and raid several more times to get Emperor Seals note . Finally, if you want the ornament, you have to complete the raid on Prestige difficulty. It's by far the longest and most grueling Exotic weapon quest upon the game's launch.
      • And as of the release of Curse of Osiris, while the map requirement for the "End The Arms Dealer" Quest is still listed as 300 Power, the actual quest has been silently raised to the current hard cap of 330 Power, which you only find out after you start it, and is now unplayable for those who do not own the DLC due to its Prestige difficulty. The fans were not pleased to find out that this weapon and sidequest are ultimately gated off behind a paywall post-release.
    • Acquiring the Whisper of the Worm is essentially the Black Spindle quest from Destiny cranked Up to Eleven, as you have to really push your platforming abilities to the fullest on a Timed Mission that also includes brutal waves of Taken. This is on top of actually finding the mission, which is found on Io at a very specific location and time.
    • If you dislike the PvP side of the game, the advent of 'Forsaken' looks to be a solid stream of sidequests to grind your teeth by; whether it's getting a large, yet unspecified number of pulse rifle kills in the Crucible (the progress bar is a percentage, not a number, and the scoreboard doesn't track your Final Blows statistic), or killing invading Guardians with a hand cannon in Gambit (where you show up as a bright dot on the invader's radar, but the invader is just one among a horde of PvE enemies on radar until you spot them directly). At least one quest has multiple PvP stages.
    • Just when everyone thought the Iron Burden fiasco from Season 6 was bad, Season 7's Iron Banner introduces a mind-numbingly tedious questline which requires dozens of matches, if not hundreds, to fully complete, with each step getting progressively grindier requirements like melee and grenade kills (in a metagame that's flat out punishing to abilities other than supers) and kills with weapons that simply aren't competitive. What's worse is that armour pieces for that season will not drop in the loot pool until you've completed each quest step, which essentially forces you to sit through the entire slog if you want the whole armour set. Compound that with Lord of Wolves being busted during the same season, and you have a recipe for a very unenjoyable Iron Banner experience.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The shader system is one of the most negative changes in the jump from D1 to D2; what once was an unlimited-once-acquired and free aesthetic, is now severely limited in quantity and costs glimmer to even apply. Thankfully Patch 2.0 changed it so you could retrieve any acquired shader from the Collections tab at a very meager price.
    • The shift in weapon categories is also a case of "if it ain't broken, don't fix it", as Kinetic and Energy weapons are essentially letting you equip two Primaries from the first game's weapon system, while most Special Weapons (sans Sidearms) are moved to the Power Weapon slot, traditionally occupied by D1's Heavy Weapons; this induces redundancy for having two similar weapons out of three, and causes Tier-Induced Scrappy for the Power Weapon slot (e.g., why use a shotgun when you can always wield a rocket launcher). This also translates into making players feel a lot less powerful than in the previous game. Patch 2.0 remedied this by changing back to a Primary-Special-Heavy trinity system, but also went beyond by letting you equip up to two Specials based on whether they're Kinetic or Energy-based, making the best out of the old D1 system and D2's weapon typing.
    • The increase in ability cooldowns. Bungie wanted players to think strategically before using these abilities and make the moment when you do use them thoroughly satisfying and pivotal, but since these abilities are roughly of the same effectiveness as the first game and are just as easily counteracted, the magic is lost, and players feel bitter about the slow pacing note . It's telling when Mayhem Clash, a limited-time Crucible mode, is widely praised for decreasing ability cooldowns to ludicrous speeds.
  • Tier-Induced Scrappy:
    • Weapons-wise, many players are fed up with the general overuse of the MIDA Multi-Tool, Uriel's Gift and Last Hope in the Crucible due to most other weapons not being viable enough and the latter two being purely subject to Randomly Drops instead of being guaranteed quest rewards. It doesn't help that weapons have to be balanced for both PvE and PvP use.
    • Arcstriders are generally regarded as having one of the worst Supers to use in the Crucible note , mainly because of how painfully slow it is compared to the rest and requiring to get up close and personal to be worthwhile; at least the other melee-focused Supers have something to compensate for (Strikers deal AoE damage and have accelerated movement while Fists of Havoc is active, Sentinels can throw shields and block attacks, and Stormcallers have a long reach with their Stormtrance). This has somewhat been mitigated by the "Go Fast" update, where the higher movement speed greatly works in the Arc Staff's favor and you suddenly have a fairly monstrous killstreak machine if you time your dodges right.
    • Dawnblades are the least used of the three Warlock subclasses due to their easily-depleted Super and unrewarding aerial gameplay; to add insult to injury, that last bit was cemented by Bungie intentionally making vertical plays bad to limit advantages over low skill players, so Dawnblades, whose top ability tree builds on aerial combat, were gimped from the start. As a result, there is hardly a situation where using this subclass over the others is an optimal choice, as the Voidwalkers and Stormcallers have more desirable perks and Supers going for them. Much like the Arcstrider, this turned on its head with the Go Fast update, where Daybreak got buffed to compete with other roaming Supers.
    • While nearly all of the subclass branches introduced in Forsaken received near-unanimous praise for their versatility in both PvE and PvP environments, the same can't be said for the Arcstrider's Way of the Current. While the modified super by itself is quite potent and allows for creative plays, the branch's perks greatly suffer from a lack of synergy, which is mind-boggling when you put it next to other subclasses that are outright broken.
    • Titans in general. While they can be very difficult to kill in PvP, their lack of utility affects their usefulness in high-level PvE content. The main issue is that almost anything that a Titan can do, a Warlock or Hunter can do just as well, if not better. Titans are good for Melting Point against bosses (a melee attack), but their supers are focused on clearing smaller enemies at close range and not dealing raw damage from a distance like Hunters Golden Gun or Warlocks Nova Bomb. They also lack a strong support Super, as Well of Radiance doesn't require that the Warlock hold up a shield and forgo dealing damage, and Shadowshot can lock down significantly more enemies much more easily than Ward of Dawn with Helm of Saint-14. A problem that isn't helped by the fact that Titans don't have an Exotic like Orpheus Rig, Skull of Dire Ahamkara, or Starfire Protocol all of which can gove near-infinite Super energy if used well. The closest thing that they have is Ursa Furiosa, which rely on blocking damage, or Doomfang Pauldrons, which require the Titan in question to clear huge amounts of enemies in order to extend Sentinel Shield's uptime by any significant amount.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: The Infinite Forest from the "Curse of Osiris" DLC. For all the hype regarding its unique Procedural Generation, the area ultimately serves as nothing more than a glorified passage from one objective to another, without any meaningful events going on as you wade in a hurry through the randomly generated platforms; the exceptions are locked gates requiring you to kill one or several yellow health enemies to proceed forward, but even then, it's treated as unnecessary padding. It got a marginally better reception with the Haunted Forest and Verdant Forest seasonal game types, being focused on speed runs instead of story development.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • After several months where the player base gradually moved away from the game due to multiple PR disasters and a weak expansion in the form of Curse of Osiris, the combination of the "Go Fast" sandbox update and the release of the Warmind expansion actually brought back a fair number of disgruntled fans, even though said DLC has its share of flaws. For this, Bungie added a few legendary weapons that actually felt unique and worth the grind, offered an intense gameplay mechanic in Escalation Protocol, and increased communications with the community regarding various feedback on making the game better.
    • After a couple of months following Warmind's mild success, Solstice of Heroes, coupled with the discovery of the Whisper of the Worm, catalysts for literally every Exotic weapon and the slew of previews of Forsaken, all helped bring back another portion of the disillusioned fanbase, if just for getting up to speed with the final weeks of Year 1 and getting ready for Year 2 starting in Fall 2018. This happens to come along with Bungie's renewed philosophy of actually making players feel powerful and moving further away from the grounded gameplay that made the core of Destiny 2's gameplay so contentious.
    • Forsaken completely revamps the game's mechanics to fall more in line with The Taken King DLC from the first game. Randomized stats are back, Exotics are rarer and have more unique effects, shotguns and sniper rifles can be used as secondary weapons again, cooldowns for ultimates are shortened, PVP is back to 6 vs 6 with the new Gambit mode added, there's more incentives to perform daily quests and explore the open world areas, and so much more. Many fans have declared that Forsaken should be considered the point where Destiny 2 finally became a true sequel to Destiny 1. This sentiment increased even more after the three Seasons (The Black Armory, Joker’s Wild, Penumbra) and the announcement of Shadowkeep and the jump to Free-to-Play, all of which led to the game’s player count soaring to new heights, as well as praise from gamers and professional critics alike.
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