Follow TV Tropes

Following

YMMV / Dance Dance Revolution

Go To

You mean these subjective tropes were placed in the wrong section? Can we try this again?


Try Extra Page!

  • Adaptation Displacement: Songs that get ported from other Bemani series suffer from this, with many fans assuming that they debuted in this game. This is especially bad with any song in EXTREME, since most Konami originals from that game are widely considered DDR classics no matter where they came from.
  • Advertisement:
  • Americans Hate Tingle: The various announcers of the series are seen as an iconic staple of the series by Japanese players, but Western players see them as annoying nuisances more than anything else and long for the option to turn them off in arcade versions.
  • Anticlimax Boss:
    • Genom Screams on DDR Extreme was a 8 on Single Heavy, but a 10 on Double Heavy. It was generally considered to be a mis-rating; on DDR X's new rating scale it was re-rated to 12, which is about the equivalent of 8.
    • When "The Disappearance of Hatsune Miku" was announced, people wondered how the chart was going to handle the song's infamous 240BPM 12ths. Cue disappointment when they discovered the Challenge charts were both 16s, with not a single 12th or 16th in sight. In fact, most agree the Single chart is only a 15 at best. Compare, for example, Sound Voltex where the song's hardest chart is rated 18 out of 20.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
      Advertisement:
    • 3rd MIX received criticism for requiring a secret code to unlock Maniac/SSR difficulty for 3rd MIX songs, and on top of that once the player enters SSR mode they cannot play songs of any lower difficulty. 3rd MIX PLUS instead allows Maniac to be selected from any mode from the song select.
    • 4th MIX was praised for its large songlist but criticized for only allowing the player access to a subset of those songs during a given credit, based on the genre they pick. 4th MIX PLUS fixed this by adding an "All Music" folder.
  • Base-Breaking Character: The announcers as a whole. Either they add flavor to the game and are a good source of memes, or they're obnoxious as hell and the lack of an option to disable them in arcade games is a Scrappy Mechanic.
  • Best Known for the Fanservice: One of the things 3rdMIX is well-known for is introducing German Europop group E-Rotic into its tracklist, with tracks that are as raunchy as the group's name implies.
  • Breather Boss:
      Advertisement:
    • BOOM BOOM DOLLAR (K.O.G.G3 MIX) from 3rd MIX is generally regarded as easier on Expert than on Difficult. Despite having more notes, its ending section is easier on Expert, having more repetitive "running" patterns rather than the hell of crossovers on Difficult.
    • Xepher in DDR SuperNOVA (This is taken up a notch in "The Last" Stellar Joint because it's the easiest boss), On The Bounce in X, and Kimono Princess and Roppongi EVOLVED in X2 are distinct examples of this. On the Extreme cabinets, Sakura, Bag, and Genom Screams on Double were significantly easier than the other 10s, and most people found at least one 9 to be harder than any of them. Bag is only hard without speed mods, stirring debate as to whether one is "supposed to" use speed mods (plus the song's rhythm didn't quite match up with the chart's, but that was a flaw with the game engine).
    • For an 18, "嘆きの樹" note  from DDR 2014 is the only one to lack BPM changes or stops. That doesn't mean it's easy, of course.
      • Following the above mentioned song is "Prey" which appeared in DDR A three years later, only this time it is an 18 on Expert. And it is much faster and stamina draining than the last song.
    • In a similar way, Triple Journey -TAG Version- is somewhat easier than the other two event bosses from DDR 2013, Elemental Creation and IX. While Elemental Creation and IX have a fast BPM and lots of timing changes, Triple Journey has the lowest BPM (Not by much) and mostly lacks timing changes, with a half-speed segment at the very beginning that's pretty tame. Just keep in mind, it's still an 18.
  • Broken Base:
    • Bar usage. It's much harder to do well on harder songs without it, but some feel it cheapens the experience. Though most no-bar players switched to bar years ago, debate between remaining no-bar players and bar users has stayed quite vitriolic.
    • The notion of having Goods count towards combos. Many players tend to complain since it devalues Full Combos (though Great/Perfect/Marvelous full combos are still given distinct recognition in-game).
    • In general, DDR after EXTREME, particularly beginning with SuperNOVA. Some players stopped playing, citing the loss of the Dancemania license, increased crossovers from other BEMANI games instead of original songs, and increased focus on competitive, Perfect-Full-Combo-or-bust play over a more social DDR community as reasons to stop caring about the series. However, the series does still have enough of a following to keep going, with some enjoying modern DDR games because of the focus on competitive play and the increase in boss charts, as well as the variety of licenses and interface improvements over the years. The departure of Naoki from Konami and TAG becoming his successor with regards to the sound director position is also a make-or-break point amongst fans.
    • The announcer that has been used in the arcade releases since Dance Dance Revolution X has been split. While some have grown to like the announcer's sense of humor, others feel the announcer is obnoxious and trying too hard to be cool, so they prefer one of the previous two announcers.
    • DDR A and newer releases the Challenge difficulty behind e-Amusement. Some are fine with it since people too new to have e-Amuse accounts probably shouldn't play on Challenge difficulty while some feel that Konami is starting to get too greedy with e-Amuse.
    • Players are divided on whether scroll BPM changes for the sake of difficulty are fun or not.
    • The Marvelous timing being a standard in SuperNOVA 2 than just a nonstop exclusive. Many were so adjusted to Perfects as the highest rating, but Marvelouses being a standard divided players whether or not to continue improving skill-wise or withdraw from having fun with the game. Basically nonexistent now, since it's been fifteen years, but it used to be a big deal.
    • The DDR X rating system, which remains unchanged since, has caused a major split between players. While most mainline DDR players have accepted the 20-foot system, many custom chart makers still use the old scale over a decade later. Many people who use one scale don't know how to interpret the other.
    • DanceDanceRevolution A - A20 outside of Asia, having to be exclusive to Dave & Busters and Round 1. This would later cause many unexpected problems due to the COVID-19 (Cornoavirus) pandemic after mid-March 2020:
      • Most regions outside of Japan have faced various restrictions in terms of playing dance games. For example, when DDR A20 Plus was released on July 6, 2020, California (USA) placed arcades under lockdown on July 13, 2020. Meanwhile, Ontario (Canada) allowed regions with A20 Plus to reopen on July 24, 2020, only for Ontario to place York arcades (which had the sole working A20 Plus machine in Canada at the time) under lockdown on October 19, 2020.
      • Forced masking policies from governments and businesses, which can greatly differ from one location to another, further complicate matters. In May 2020, Dave & Buster's recommended and offered masks to the public, but only mandated them for employees; since July 2020, D&B mandated masks for the public. While masks may be taken off while eating and drinking, it's unclear if exercise on a dance machine counts as a mask exemption at D&B. Meanwhile, Round1 USA simply recommends face masks at their facility, although locations under a government mask mandate must follow the mandate.
      • Notwithstanding, the community is split because of their perspective of the virus. Those who post pictures or videos of themselves at an arcade are usually condemned and seen as potential "superspreaders" of the COVID-19 virus. Many forums and groups have banned arcade pictures during the pandemic.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: Several players will try to find the hardest song available in the mix they currently play, pass it, and then keep playing it over and over again. Some may break out of this habit by choosing new or random songs, but some don't. Repeated song play is common practice in Japan, but a major annoyance in the West.
    • Alternately, some players (mostly those who played earlier mixes) will try to find songs they remember (or similar) and keep playing them.
    • The same can go for speed mods. While most players these days accept speed mods as part of the game, since they make reading the arrows easier, players who don't learn how to "read slow" are in for a nasty surprise when they play bosses with dense sections at a quarter their maximum BPM.
    • Almost nobody in the US counts any scores on charts below Expert/Heavy/Maniac. Exceptions might exist for boss songs that have not had their Expert charts made available for play yet, and even then only if the so-far-unlocked charts are at least boss-tier charts (such as "Over The "Period"'s level 15 Difficult Single and Difficult Double charts). This is averted in Japan, where some players go for score even on Beginner charts.
  • Default Setting Syndrome: Any song that comes up first on the song select on a first stage tends to fall victim to this, especially when there are beginners and/or kids involved. Songs getting drilled into your head will ensue. "Graduation" on Extreme is the classic example, considering how widespread EXTREME was. On X, the default song became the updated version of "Butterfly", and X2 played with this a bit by having different defaults between regions; America got "Super Eurobeat (Gold Mix)" as default, while Japan got "more more more" as default.
    • In terms of characters, Disco has been one for most of the series.
  • Difficulty Spike: Across different eras and different regions, there have been many instances where the hardest official chart(s) legally available were much harder than then next hardest chart(s). One example is the North American version of DDR SuperNOVA; getting to the level of beating Fascination Maxx Oni and Healing-D Vision Oni wasn't practical without playing imported games, fan-made charts, Stepmania or other series such as In the Groove. This became less intense at some point in the X-era; the 14 rating bridged the gap between the hardest 9-footers (now 13's) and the easiest 10-footers (now 15's and hard 14's), and charts rated 15 and 16 became more common so there was a stepping stone to the hardest songs.
  • Face of the Band:
    • Amongst fans of "classic" DDR (specifically, pre-SuperNOVA), Naoki Maeda is this due to having contributed a very large portion of non-transplant Konami Original songs for the series.
    • Amongst fans of modern DDR, TAG falls under this due to being the current sound director.
    • As of DDR A, Yuichi "U1" Asami has taken the mantle of sound director, and his musical style is reflected in the abundance of EDM in the songlist. It should be noted that U1 has been on the team for about as long as Naoki, and has remixed many of his songs in the past (most famously under the 2MB name).
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • With Pump It Up, another Rhythm Game centered around stepping on panels. DDR players dislike the Fake Difficulty that Pump is notorious for (such as "jumps" of 3 or more arrows and Double charts that require the player to stretch their legs beyond reasonable limits), while Pump players feel that DDR's stepchart makers are too afraid to experiment and try out new kinds of charts.
    • With CROSS×BEATS, on the basis of "We want NAOKI back in BEMANI!" This seems to be a one-sided rivalry, as fans of CxB don't mind DDR much.
    • DDR players are rather incensed about Dance Rush, due to Konami's Milestone Celebration of DDR being a plug for that game. Things only got worse when a prominent DJ tweeted about wanting to see more updates in DDR only for Konami's English-language account to recommend he play Dance Rush instead.
  • Franchise Killer: Depends on region:
    • DDR SuperNOVA2 in Japan. Sales of SuperNOVA2 was catastrophically low compared to previous entries of the series. It wasn't until DDR X that revitalized the DDR scene in Japan. Meanwhile, DDR X outside of Asia...
    • DDR X outside of Asia, not because of the game itself, but because of the Bad Export for You fiasco surrounding the arcade hardware. In Asia, Konami offered upgrade kits for old machines as well as brand-new redesigned cabinets with HD monitors. In North America and Europe, however, Konami contracted things to Raw Thrills and Betson. Upgrade kits were available, but rare, while the common brand new cabinet was a cheap knock-off of the redesigned HD cabinets. Case in point: the pad was covered by one single piece of metal, with holes punched through it for the arrows, and the control panel on the cabinet was just blank metal with no decoration. The RT/Betson cabinets were inferior in quality to the Japanese ones, and broke as easily as peanut brittle, yet they were still thousands of dollars more expensive than upgrading an old cabinet would've been. This led to lots of arcades buying a new machine, only to find out it was crap. Making this worse is that a dedicated In the Groove 2 cabinet had been introduced to North American arcades some years prior, which was no longer on the market, but increased players' expectations for quality. While Betson tried to update the cabinets, the damage was already done. To this day, there are still old, broken-down RT/Betson DDR X cabinets scattered around North American arcades, and the next two releases after X2 did not receive international releases. However, Konami later partnered with the U.S. locations Dave & Busters, and Japanese arcade chain Round1, to offer DDR 2014 location tests. Successful tests led to the international release of DDR A, beginning with the United States launch on July 6, 2016, which used Japanese cabinets with localized software. The game was launched in Canada on December 5, 2016, at the Dave & Buster's location in Oakville, ON. The game was released in Europe on December 15, 2017.
  • Gateway Series: The earlier mixes of DDR are how many in North America discovered more obscure europop. At the time, the genre was tainted in that market by the scandal surrounding Milli Vanilli, and still is now because of western Europe's unmanly image in the US.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: DDR has a sizable competitive scene in the United States, thanks to large amounts of illegal EXTREME imports (the mainline arcades never had an official worldwide release until SuperNOVA), In the Groove helping fill the void between EXTREME and SuperNOVA, and the localized DDR A being a hit among competitive players, with many official world records being set by Americans. The 6th Konami Arcade Championship was the first time Americans were allowed to register, with one of the three American finalists for DDR coming out as champion.
  • Growing the Beard: The first console version of DDR for North America isn't terribly flashy, only having 27 songs from 1st through 3rd MIX. DDR KONAMIX introduced some improvements, with a 52-song list, use of the 4th MIX engine and thus allowing for 6-panel play and 2-player Battle mode. Then DDRMAX went and pulled out all the stops, putting in 71 songs from a wide variety of sources (Konami originals, Dancemania licenses, and Western licenses), keeping the "foot" ratings unlike the Japanese version of DDRMAX while having the Groove Radar at the same time, and even having Oni/Challenge courses which a. also aren't in the Japanese version and b. weren't introduced in the arcade version until DDRMAX2!
  • Harsher in Hindsight: It must have been really awkward playing DDR X in Japan a few years ago, when the announcer said "Is there an earthquake or something? 'Cause this party's a-crackin'!"
  • Hilarious in Hindsight: In the mid-noughties, Konami sued Roxor over In the Groove's patent infringement on this game as well as for the reuse of DDR cabs for ITG, and acquired the rights to ITG (i.e. killed it). Then in 2020, former DDR sound director Naoki Maeda, as well as Paula Terry who is well-known for her vocal work for BEMANI songs, would contribute songs to ITG's Spiritual Successor, StepManiaX. In other words, the faces of DDR are now providing songs to DDR's competitor!
  • Hype Backlash: In the early days of DDR, several songs got a lot of infamy for being picked a lot:
    • "Butterfly" was frequently picked due to being a catchy Europop song and being one of the easier songs to play, and thus became like nails on a chalkboard for many players waiting their turn.
    • "DYNAMITE RAVE" was a popular song for freestyles, and due to a lot of players attempting to freestyle and overusing basic techniques such as hitting the panels with their hands and knees without any sense of choreography, it not only became another song to dread hearing but also one to make it more difficult to impress people with freestyle routines.
      • It also was played on the high score list in the 3rd Mix attract mode. Every single time. So it was overplayed long before people started freestyling it.
  • It's Easy, So It Sucks!:
    • Bag's fixed steps on DDR X. Who wants to play that song now? Semi-averted with X2: the original steps with their old timing are available as challenge steps.
    • Also one of the main complaints surrounding DDR 2010.
    • For the longest time, particularly during the arcade version hiatus that lasted from 2002 (EXTREME) to 2006 (SuperNOVA), this was a common complaint, particularly from Pump It Up players who tend to respond with "I've seen much worse" and In the Groove players. In fact, part of the reason In The Groove came to be was the demand for harder charts.
    • DDR Winx Club got this reaction too. It seemingly uses the old rating scale, but in practice, the so-called 9-footers note  play like 5- or 6- footers. Players who were looking forward to playing a challenging chart to a Pop'n Music or beatmania crossover were disappointed. Disney Grooves suffered from the same issue, except that it didn't have such coveted crossovers.
  • Memetic Mutation: Take a look here, alongside other BEMANI titles.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The sound that plays upon achieving a Full Combo. Bonus points for a Perfect Full Combo, and even more so for a Marvelous Full Combo.
    • "EXTRA STAGE!"
      • "ENCORE EXTRA STAGE!"
  • My Real Daddy: Naoki Maeda, despite having left his position of DDR sound director to work on DanceEvolution before leaving Konami entirely to produce CROSS×BEATS, is still seen by many fans as the face of DDR despite the series' team having changed significantly since. Some fans feel that the quality of DDR games has declined ever since he left in 2013.
  • Nightmare Fuel: here.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Having 3+ notes at once. Dancing Stage accidentally had that with Uh La La La before Pump It Up, DDR Solo, and In the Groove.
    • Speed modifiers, thought to be introduced in DDRMAX, actually appeared in the two Dancing Stage feat. (artist) and the DanceDanceRevolution Solo spinoff games first.
    • The "9-foot" rating on the classic 1-10 difficulty scale, commonly associated with 3rdMIX, appeared in 2ndMIX CLUB VERSION first.
    • Difficulty level to 10. Disney's Rave first introduced that level, even though the installment had Schizophrenic Difficulty in general.
    • 5thMIX is thought of as introducing 60 FPS. Again, the Dancing Stage "artist" games did it first.
    • DanceDanceRevolution A is the first mainline game in which Goods increase score. This was first done in the Solo games, though unlike in the eAMUSEMENT Participation DDR games, they break your combo.
    • "AFTER THE GAME" from Konamix is thought to be a Bowdlerised version of "AFTER THE GAME OF LOVE" from 4th MIX, given that the former's debut game, which is a North America exclusive, was released after the latter's. "AFTER THE GAME" is actually the original version of the song, having been originally composed for NBA In The Zone '98.
  • Schizophrenic Difficulty: In Dance Dance Revolution X2 on the PS2, boss songs are unlocked in this manner. The first song is "Dance Dance Revolution", which isn't that hard outside of its jumps, then right afterward comes "Dead End (Groove Radar Special)", which is absolutely loaded with Fake Difficulty, and has only one chart, which is an 18. After that comes "Pluto The First", which is notorious for being one of the hardest 18-footers to this day and having even more Fake Difficulty than DEGRS. Once you've gotten past that, you'll find the remaining two 15-footer bosses, "Kimono Princess" and "Roppongi Evolved", to be very easy by comparison.
  • The Scrappy: Throughout its lifespan, the franchise has seen more than its share of less-than-stellar stepcharts alongside quality ones.
    • Any chart whose difficulty mostly comes from stepjump streams or forced doublesteps. To a lesser extent, charts that look like they have forced doublesteps to newer players without advanced technique.
    • End of the Century from 3rdMIX had one of the less well-received Maniac/Heavy/Expert charts on Singles. It was a cluttered mess of forced doublesteps and uncomfortably-placed jumps running at a relatively fast 171 Beats Per Minute, which is in stark contrast to the smoother flow that other songs had. The most insulting part is that this chart was originally rated an 8, or Exorbitant, in 3rdMIX. This was rightfully corrected into a 9 from DDRMAX2 onwards.
    • The song's memetic status aside, MAX 300 on Heavy/Expert is at the very least properly challenging. The X-Special is...not. Or rather, it's challenging, but for all the wrong reasons. Despite the smaller stepcount (523 compared to the 555 on Heavy/Expert for Singles), the X-Special chart is much more complex, comprised of constant crossovers and footswitches, 4th-8th note jackhammers at 300 BPM, and even jumps interspersed within streams, whereas the Heavy/Expert chart had none of these. Individually, these patterns can, with enough practice, be executed properly, but when put together, they become that much more aggravating. Some people really like this chart, but they're few and far between.
    • Daikenkai and The Least 100 Seconds. Daikenkai Expert and Challenge, both singles and doubles, suffer the same fate as End of the Century above. What made it worse is that early installments did not properly sync the song. The difficulty corrections did not get fixed until DDR X. The Least 100 Seconds Double Expert suffered the same fate as well and displayed Konami's lack of understanding on how to handle faster BPM songs that aren't boss songs.
    • Healing D-Vision received backlash for not properly placing the proper 1/6th and 1/12th notes on a song that has a 3/4 interval (1/3, triplets, or swing style). Instead, it place 1/8th notes and 1/16th notes as if it's a full 4/4 measure. All of the stepcharts, alongside other songs that did not properly use 1/3, did not get fixed until DDR X that finally utilizes all of the 1/3 patterns. The only reason why other songs didn't get noticeably touched was because Healing D-Vision was the first boss song as hard was Max 300 to mostly utilize the 1/3 rhythms with that many notes, its first original arcade chart ratings for both Difficult charts and Expert Single did not match the proper ratiing (this was fixed on an immediate update thankfully), and was unpleasant to play during Oni/Challenge courses.
    • DDR SuperNova 2's big 5 songs: Arrabbiatta, Unreal, NGO, Trip Machine Phoenix, and Paranoia Hades. The reasons are more than just boss songs that suffer the same messy stepchart quality as End of the Century and Daikenkai. It is already known that DDR's highest difficulty is 10 and can't go any higher. What did Konami do? They decided to rate the difficulties lower, but catastrophically pissed off the players without fixing this problem that it could have made them a Franchise Killer on its own. Players can understand that a chart was rated 1 level too low or high on the old 10 scale (see End of the Century above), but a wide majority of the big 5's charts were rated 2 levels lower than they should in almost all difficulties. At a time where developers can get the difficulty rating right, this is beyond unacceptable. It became an ascended meme that players could pass Max 300's Expert 10 chart, but can't get pass the first half of Paranoia Hades Difficult 8. The ratings was so bad that they actually threw away the old ratings system to the newer DDR X one and their difficulties are much more accurate, thus removing them from scrappy status.
    • No stepchart in the series is more hated than DEAD END (Groove Radar Special). Released as one of six additional charts for older songs in SuperNOVA2, the aim of the chart is to maximize every value on the Groove Radar. A novel concept in theory that resulted into a Frankenstein's monster of nonsensical patterns no ordinary human is expected to do on a whim. Extreme BPM fluctuations and stops across the board (itself a divisive idea already, as described in Scrappy Mechanic below)—ranging from 95 to 380 BPM—repetitive crossovers, awkward freeze arrow sections, 16th note jackhammers, including two 16th JUMP jackhammer bursts, and to add insult to injury, a closing section where the 380 BPM comes into play, all thrown together without rhyme, reason or any consideration for what the human body is capable of. One nasty kicker to this freakshow of a stepchart is that it is separated as its own song and difficulty, meaning that in a two-player set, if one were to choose this song, the other would be roped into playing it too. You know it's bad when it's taken a decade for anyone to achieve a Perfect Full Combo on it for the first time.
    • Horatio from DDR X, when the Shock Arrow feature was first introduced. Its console-exclusive Challenge charts were a poor implementation of an already-hated mechanic; it is, in essence, the Expert difficulty, but with each quarter beat on the 16th drills replaced with Shock Arrows. The idea is that players are to step on the center panel in order to avoid the Shock Arrows, but since the gap between the Shock Arrows and actual arrows are only a 16th note apart and the input window for Shock Arrows is too large, the charts don't work as they were intended to. Any tournaments that even had DDR X in it banned this chart for a good reason. In the mainline arcade releases, this is subverted by the fact that these charts never made it there.
    • Say hello to Pluto The First, the quintessential gimmick song of DDR. Its unconventional composition translates very nastily in gameplay thanks to the wide BPM range of 110-440, heavily restricting your choice of speed mods, and the copious amounts of unpredictable stops to really throw you off, making its charts among the hardest in their respective level ratings. Special mention has to go to the Challenge charts, which take the brokenness of Horatio to a whole 'nother level. Imagine having to deal with tightly-packed clusters of arrows at varying speeds AND Shock Arrows along with the consequences of triggering them (brief disappearance of subsequent arrows, combo drop, etc.) all at once. You will be hard-pressed to find anyone who enjoys this song, whether listening to it or playing it.
    • Bag Challenge. As mentioned elsewhere, its Challenge charts are the same exact patterns as the expert charts. The only difference is the sync, reset to its broken spacing from before X. Some players felt this was a waste of a slot that could have gone to a brand-new challenge chart.
    • A20's CHALLENGE Carnival event in December 2019 introduced brand new charts for seven pre-existing songs. The final unlockable charts for that event are Prey on Challenge. The excitement towards a more challenging stepchart for an already challenging song quickly melted away when the stepchart in question revealed itself...as filled to the brim with jumps in the same vein as Fascination ~ Eternal Love Mix and NGO. What made Prey worse were its faster speed of 210 BPM and the fact that none of the jumps properly match the song itself, thus the end result is an uninteresting yet still gruelingly painful affair that leaves players wondering what potential the song had.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The BPM of the chart changing by some factor of 2, even if in reality the music's tempo didn't change, or the chart completely stopping. Charts that overuse these gimmicks are usually Those Levels too, which doesn't improve the situation.
    • In older versions of the game (primarily any PlayStation-based versions for that matter), songs with triplets were at times harder to play than normal songs. This was not due to a player's inability to hit triplets, but rather a player's inability to hit triplets that were rounded to the nearest 64th note or so. The slower the song, the more obvious this became: "bag", "Ballad For You", and "I'll Make Love To You" are three of the slowest songs, yet are done completely in triplet style. The Windows-based engine on DDR X AC finally corrects this issue, but for those stuck with an older machine: assuming 12th notes, hit the last 12th before the quarter note just a tiny bit sooner than you would if it was a proper 12th.
    • This becomes an Ascended Glitch on X2 where "bag" gets a Challenge chart, which is just the Expert chart with an emulation of the previous glitch.
    • In spite of having the largest songlist of any game at the time, including the near-entirety of all mainline games' songlists up to 3rdMIX PLUS, 4thMIX only allows you to access songs from a single folder throughout your entire credit. This was fixed in 4thMIX PLUS with the All Music folder.
    • By default, even the current version still requires you to play double the price of a Single Play credit to play on Double Play. This is in contrast to Pump It Up and beatmania IIDX, both of which not only charge the same price between single and double modes, but even allow switching between the two between songs.
    • In the arcade versions, in an effort to munch more tokens and discourage players from playing beyond their comfort zone too often, if you run out of health during a song, not only does the song end immediately, but you lose all of your remaining songs as well. This changed in X3, which introduces a Quick Play mode where you can pay by the song rather than a set of stages, so not only do you have flexbility over how many stages to play, you won't waste money if you fail one of your stages. Sadly, Quick Play is only available if you're on a cabinet that is connected to the eAMUSEMENT network and supports the PASELI proprietary currency system.
      • With DDR A's release in the US, and the subsequent export of eAmusement cards, anyone with eAmuse can play all three rounds without failing out. There is no extra credits required for this, but you have to purchase an eAmuse card.
    • Many early games had oddball scoring mechanics that did not reflect the player's performance very well, often being heavily based on combo or some other weird system. It didn't help that these changed every game or two. Only from SuperNOVA onwards is the displayed score finally indicative of overall step accuracy, rather than punishing the player harshly for a single misstep.
    • The 8th Konami Arcade Championship had DDR finalists playing on the new 20th anniversary cabinet, with little opportunity to get used to the difference in screen height, screen angle, screen size, or the new pads. A lot of players were not pleased with this form of Fake Difficulty, feeling that the tournament was mostly just to shill out the new cabinet rather than answer the question of "who's the world's best DDR player"?
    • Speaking of the new cabinet, A20 has a bunch of tracks and features (such as Dan inintei) that are exclusive to the new dedicated cabinet, i.e. they're not available if you just upgrade an existing cabinet. It's clear that Konami wants to force operators to throw down extra money for the new cabinets when there isn't really any logistical reason for the new cabinet exclusives to be unavailable to upgrade kits. This is further compounded if you live in the United States, where the gold cabinets do get exported but use Japanese builds, with all of the PASELI-locking frustration that follows, while the official North American version is only available as an upgrade for A cabinets (the opposite problem of X).
    • While many console versions allow you to turn off the mid-gameplay Announcer Chatter, the arcade versions don't.
  • Scrub:
    • The safety bar on arcade machines was a major point of debate back in the first five years of the game's life, and arguments about it still pop up once in a while, with casual players and spectators deriding it as boring to watch, stupid-looking, and not how the game is "meant" to be played (never mind that official tournaments allow it) and higher-level no-bar players asserting that any feat, no matter the chart difficulty or score/grade, was invalid if the bar was used. While this fight mostly fizzled out over a decade ago, bringing it up again can still start a flame war in the 20's, and a lot of people who haven't played in 15 years will come back and assume it's still going on.
    • Speed modifiers were once regarded as "cheating" as well; that debate has since been inherited by the Guitar Hero community.
  • Self-Imposed Challenge: Due to the game's popularity and age, players have devised all sorts of ways to increase the challenge beyond what's in the game.
    • Playing versus mode by yourself.
    • "Freestyle" players (who were very prominent around the 3rd/4th Mix era in both Japan and America) try to perform an actual routine to the song with actual moves, often with spectacular results. A few even still exist in the 20's.
    • The all-great run (getting only "great" ratings on all steps, which means playing slightly off-rhythm).
    • Challenging your stamina by playing songs in quick succession (outside of the course modes) or playing a tough song repeatedly with little rest in-between. Of course, you need to be careful not to wear yourself out in a bad way when doing this. The ultimate example is probably O 4 MA playing MAX 360 Challenge, a 19-footer, 100 times (he stopped at 73 and finished the rest with 18-footer Expert).
    • Playing hard songs without using the bar. Just make sure not to die (or at least fall over).
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: The game was quite revolutionary when it was released in 1998 ("A dance game played with your feet?"). However, with the proliferation of motion sensor dance games in The New '10s such as Dance Central and even Konami's own DanceMasters / DanceEvolution, those who aren't already familiar with the BEMANI franchise find DDR to be outdated and irrelevant ("Why be restricted to stepping on four directional panels when there are games that make you use your entire body?") It doesn't help that many expert players hold onto the safety bar while playing and keep their feet inches from the center. These practices are essential in high-level competitive play, but look unappealing and nothing like dancing to those not familiar with the series.
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop: On Hottest Party 4 (CS) and DDR 2013 (AC), Goods no longer break your combo, nor do they drain your life meter on Extra Stages or the "Risky" option. However, it still doesn't affect scores until A rolls around.
  • Sequelitis:
    • Starting with SuperNOVA. Curious how it was the first core game in the series to be released after Guitar Hero...
    • DDRMAX, the sixth main arcade release, had some questionable changes. The game introduced 42 new songs to arcades, including formerly console-exclusive songs, but all previous arcade songs (122 in 5thMix, or 150 in 4thMix Plus) were removed. While 5thMIX removed almost as many songs (it would've had 190 without removals), MAX still gets all the blame. Difficulty ratings were also removed, but returned in DDRMAX2, along with 45 pre-DDRMAX songs, of which 15 must be unlocked by the arcade operator.
    • The new cabs designed for DDR X in the US. With poor pad quality and HD lag, it's no wonder DDR lost popularity in arcades.
      • This was allegedly fixed with DDR X2's American showing, but mixed reports have come in from different players and Tropers. Some corners were still cut, making some believe that no effort was put in at all.
    • Fans were disappointed at first by X3 vs. 2nd Mix for not having as much "new" content on launch, as much of it was imported from Hottest Party 4/2010.
  • Signature Song: "Butterfly" by the Swedish europop group SMiLE.dk, despite being a licensed song, is seen by many as the song of the series, and is commonly recurring within ; the group has had other songs appear on DDR in later installments as well, including "Golden Sky", "Koko Soko", and "A Geisha's Dream" (a collaboration with Naoki). Captain Jack is similar.
  • Small Reference Pools:
    • If you mention Konami and rhythm games to the average Western gamer, the first—and perhaps only—game that will come to mind is DDR, more specifically older (EXTREME and earlier) games. This is mostly due to the fact that DDR is the only BEMANI game to have more than a small handful of Western releases.
    • Most fans of old-school DDR think it's the only project NAOKI has worked on, ignoring Dance Masters and CROSS×BEATS, even though NAOKI plainly posts about these two games in English on his Facebook account (which is open to friend requests from fans and not just people he knows). Worse, some still think he works for Konami rather than Capcom even though he left in 2013.
  • So Bad, It's Good: beatmania IIDX fans, remember "GOLD RUSH"? Well it's here, and there's not one, but TWO new versions tailored for DDR!
  • Soundtrack Dissonance: Despite being a dance simulation game, the game has any number of songs that most would not typically associate with dancing, especially at a club. Examples include many of the rock songs, such as "JET WORLD", "Across the Nightmare", and "How to Cook Delicious Rice and the Effects of Eating Rice", and the Vocaloid/other "high-pitched anime girl" songs of 2013 through A.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
    • A patch for the first iOS version, DDR S, featured several Jimmy Hart Versions of past Konami Original songs, such as "Say It Again" (a remake of "HYPER EUROBEAT" by DDT and Naoki, never appearing outside of the game despite having a Dummied Out double chart), "Rescue Me" (a remake of "MEMORIES" by Fracus and Naoki, also appeared on HP4/DDR PS3, and made an arcade debut on X3 vs. 2nd Mix). Given that "MEMORIES" got removed on DDR X (which was released around the same time), presumably Rescue Me was created to replace it. But why?
    • Comparisons have been drawn between X3 vs. 2nd Mix's hidden boss song "Tohoku EVOLVED" and "MAX. (period)"; both are Darker and Edgier remixes of a previous boss song (Max 300, and London EVOLVED) by 2MB (though, with an additional 100KB in the case of Tohoku), their charts both start immediately at the beginning of the song, both have a section played at a very high speed, and both contain an inspirational message at the end ("Thank you for playing" at the end of Period, and the "CLEARED" screen instead reading "PRAY FOR ALL" on Tohoku)
    • The ending to version B of "London EVOLVED" sounds suspiciously similar to "CONTRACT", despite both tracks being done by different artists.
    • Older games occasionally had this happen with originals sounding similar to licensed music:
      • "My Summer Love" sounds shockingly similar to Ace of Base's "The Sign" (down to being in the same key, nearly identical progressions and similar vocal melodies.
      • "La Señorita" bears some similarities to Ricky Martin's "Livin La Vida Loca," even being about a similar topic. Funnily enough, a cover of Livin La Vida Loca was planned to be in 4thMix PLUS.
      • "MAKE IT BETTER" is an interesting example of this happening to a song that was actually supposed to be in the series. The original Dance Dance Revolution was supposed to have "MONEY" by the Ragga Twins, but got cut. MAKE IT BETTER would be added in the Internet Ranking update, and has a similar reggae-inspired sound like MONEY had, and it sounds like it samples MONEY, too. The similarity in the songs, combined with the lyric "Got no money..." has led people to theorize that MAKE IT BETTER was made specifically to replace MONEY.
      • A particularly bizarre example comes from the Japanese version of Hottest Party with DOUBLE TORNARD bearing resemblance not to a license, but to a cover of a license that was featured in the American and European versions of the game. Rhythm is A Dancer and DOUBLE TORNARD share similar structures, progression, key, bassline, drums, and styles in a way where they sound too close for it to be a coincidence. If you speed the former up to the latter's speed, they go together shockingly well to the point of even complimenting each other at parts, as heard "here.". And if that wasn't enough, DOUBLE TORNARD's charts bear similarities to Rhythm Is A Dancer's. Given that it wasn't in the Japanese version, it's likely DOUBLE TORNARD was created as a replacement.
      • In what is probably the most blatant example, the shop theme from EXTREME 2/Strike copies the majority of the chorus to Above & Beyond's "Satellite" note-for-note. Assuming the song was completed by the time KONAMI announced the game, Satellite got copied just a little over one year of it's initial release. It might even be sooner, depending on the game's production timeline. For comparison, the shop theme is "here," and the chorus to Satellite is "here (timestamped).
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: Love♥Shine, full stop. Its remix also qualifies, and probably surpasses it in this regard, too.
  • Tear Jerker:
    • Naoki Maeda's final songs he composed for the series before leaving Konami in 2013, "Everything I Need" and "You" sound really heartbreaking for an otherwise upbeat rhythm game.
    • Pretty much all of DDR A's Encore Extra Stage, Ace for Aces. As well as being the credits roll for the game, it shows the aftermath of Rinon using up all her energy for the Level A Galactic Strike, deactivating, and falling into the oceans of Earth as Yuni watches on.
  • That One Attack: Noteworthy examples:
    • The Maniac/Heavy/Expert chart for DYNAMITE RAVE had a rather nasty area in the form of a 16th triplet set that started with a jump. This was very awkward to play, as you’d have to use one foot to go from one arrow to another much faster than normal, and unless you anticipate this or if this is your first time playing the chart, you’re most likely going to miss one of or even all of the triplets. Admittedly, it was an error in the chart-writing process, but that didn’t stop it from reappearing in Dance Dance Revolution’s Challenge/Oni chart in EXTREME. And considering that that song is that game’s One More/Encore Extra Stage, where a single combo-drop is an instant game over...
    • Almost any sudden change in BPM, but the biggest (dis)honor goes to "Tohoku EVOLVED", which ends its charts with an increase to 1020 BPM — three times as fast as the charts' main scroll speed of 340 BPM — and a randomly-generated corner jump at that speed. The only way to hit it consistently is to bracket-jump with both feet to hit all four arrows at once, especially if you use a speed mod on the rest of the song. Hope you're not playing on a "battery" meter with one life left!
  • That One Boss: Way, WAY too many boss songs to count, so much that it garners its own page now!
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • The Festival/Extreme/Fusion interface, dear lord. Thankfully, they realized their mistake and went back to the "classic" song wheel (plus an early version of what would become SuperNOVA's UI design) for Str!ke/Extreme 2/Max.
    • Dynamite Rave's new steps on X2 and Hottest Party 3/Music Fit. The new steps don't have the same challenge as the older ones. Even the song itself, which debuted in DDR X with the old steps, has been changed for the worse.
    • This is the general opinion of the more "modern" Dance Dance Revolution interface on PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. Just look at their Facebook page and read the comments if you dare.
    • Many fans claim this after DDR stopped using Dancemania as its main source of licenses.
    • London EVOLVED's new Challenge chart on DDR X3.
    • Counting Goods towards the combo on HP 4 / HP 5 /2013 AC. Generally, higher-end players tend not to care though, since combo has no impact on grade.
    • When DDRMAX removed background dancers, a lot of complaints were raised, as the dancing characters are a major staple of the series. Eventually Konami put them back in console releases following DanceDanceRevolution EXTREME, and eventually put them back into arcade titles beginning with SuperNOVA.
    • There's quite the base split when it comes to "classic", EXTREME-and-earlier DDR and more "modern" DDR; fans of the former dislike the choices of licenses in newer games and the shifting of the overall community's focus from recreational play to competitive "Perfect Full Combo or bust" play.
    • The 20th anniversary cab is not well-liked amongst competitive players, especially taller players, due to the much different screen angle and height and the changes in timing.
  • They Copied It, So It Sucks!:
    • The Shock Arrow mechanic is a variation of the mines from In the Groove, except unlike mines, they always come up in groups of 4, are judged using the O.K./N.G. system, cause the arrows to momentarily disappear and fade back in when hit, only appear on designated Challenge charts, and have always been used more like a "hurdle" and never really on bosses (well, except for Horatio on X CS US and Pluto the First on X2 CS US). ITG's mines, on the other hand, let the charter really manipulate how players stepped instead of just making them put their feet in the center.
    • DDR PS3 and its "Chain Arrow" and "Groove Trigger" features seemingly rip off mechanics from Guitar Hero and the like. However, the Chain Arrow segments only add bonus points, a glass shattering effect, and forces a flat noteskin on the notes in question. Groove Trigger works like Star Power itself (bonus points for a period), except it reduces the lifebar by half.
    • The DDR 2013 update unveiled at JAEPO 2014 (typically referred to as "DDR 2014") introduces a new interface style, which some have derided as being a carbon copy of Gitadora. Yes, they're copying from their own franchises.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot: More like "They Wasted a Perfectly Good Soundtrack". The DDR Winx Club game features a ton of crossovers from Pop'n Music and beatmania out of nowhere, some of them fan-favorites that had never been on DDR before. The fandom rejoiced...until the game ended up being [1].
    • Walk It Out suffers a similar fate, with most of the soundtrack consisting of songs that never got into DDR, with music from fan favorites like the Sampling Masters, RAM, SLAKE and more.
  • Underused Game Mechanic: 3rd MIX features on-screen karaoke lyrics, a feature that has unfortunately since not been seen in most subsequent versions, including all mainline arcade versions (it was occasionally incorporated into the European Dancing Stage games, with Fusion being the only other arcade release to follow suit).
  • Unfortunate Names: Over the "Period". Intended to be the spin-off to Max.(Period) as the final boss ends up with a song title that sounds like it's referring to menstrual cycles.
    • There's also JERK IT OUT from SuperNOVA, intended to mean "let out some steam... go crazy" according to the band, but sounds like it's about A Date with Rosie Palms.
  • Unintentional Period Piece: Wanna see what dance club music was like in The '90s? 4thMIX PLUS and earlier for arcade cabinets and EXTRA MIX for consoles can help you with that.
  • Values Dissonance:
    • Solo 2000 made headlines in San Diego when a parents group demanded its removal from an arcade due to its background videos featuring a scantily-clad nurse and pills. They're probably talking about "I'm Alive" and "Get Off".
    • Somehow, just in the U.K., Hottest Party 5 got a "16+" rating from PEGI for "violence." By contrast, every other country got a "3+" on the scale (roughly an "E" on ESRB's scale) from the exact same organization. But why? It was just a single punch in the face in the "More Than Alive" music video. Did they think this was going to be Grand Theft Auto?
    • Playing the same song repeatedly for practice purposes is standard practice in Japan, but a good way to annoy players around the cabinet in the West.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: The "pretty boy" concept wasn't as famous in the US when the dancer Zero came out, so it was easy to mistake him for a girl.
  • Win Back the Crowd: After years of denied or stripped-down arcade releases and a lot of console releases of questionable quality, DDR A seems to have won back American players due to a localization that has nearly all of the content of the Japanese version, including eAMUSEMENT connectivity. The presence of American DDR finalists at the 6th Konami Arcade Championship certainly helps cement the idea that yes, arcade DDR really is back. This is still going 5 years later.
  • Woolseyism: In American installments, the "Boo" timing judgment got renamed to "Almost," and "Miss" to "Boo." This migrated to the Arcade on SuperNOVA (however, "Miss" was restored as part of the changes to the judgement scale on X2).

Top

How well does it match the trope?

Example of:

/

Media sources:

/

Report