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  • Alternate Character Interpretation:
    • A few of the comments Trevor makes to the priests in Season 1 imply that they might not be priests, just soldiers, and thugs in robes. Trevor emphasizes that the knife one draws on him is a "thief's knife" and when he puts a call forth for the good priest his remarks imply that the others weren't properly ordained (that priest having the power to bless and consecrate water whereas the others could not). On the other hand, a number of the priests were seen serving the church before the country went to hell and it's clear that being ordained doesn't necessarily give them the power to ward off the demons, but rather their morality (the Bishop's ability to fend off demons being withdrawn from him by God because he was an evil man). They could still just be official priests and Trevor's comments were simply him trying to get under their skin or just could indicate that he doesn't think of them as "true" priests.
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    • Carmilla schemes with the Vampire Generals and it's clear they take issue with how Dracula is running the war. Yet when Carmilla launches her betrayal they're targeted as well and they stand by Dracula. Outside of Godbrand, whose treachery was explicit, the other Generals' allegiances are a bit more ambiguous. She might have simply led them along and betrayed them when convenient or perhaps they were only critical of Dracula but still loyal enough to him that she couldn't sway them.
    • How much did Dracula really respect Lisa's ideals? She was the only human he cared enough about to completely renounce his wicked nature for, but Dracula's accounts of what he'd been up to while traveling the world indicate that he really made no effort to understand her point of view. The only humans he ever put any notice into were the most horrible wastes of skin that he found, and the only ones he made friends with were misanthropes like himself. When he returns home and finds out that Lisa has been killed, the greatest leniency he gives anyone is to warn the woman mourning Lisa the chance to leave Wallachia—a kindness which ultimately will mean nothing given his plan to Kill All Humans everywhere anyway. While it's certainly true that Lisa was Dracula's Morality Chain that gave him hope in finding the goodness of humanity, Dracula apparently didn't try very hard when outside of her presence.
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    • Does Lenore actually think she's doing Hector good? No interpretation comes close to them being anything but a heinous manipulator, but the way she phrases giving Hector better living conditions makes it sounds like she genuinely believes in her own Fair-Play Villain status. On the other hand, it's quite possible she just wants him to be better cared for so she can sexually abuse him. Their last words on the subject in Season 3 are also debatable, as she tells Hector that she's just giving him "what he's always needed." Considering her fascination with him and pet-like perception of him, this could either be simple Victim Blaming or she could genuinely see him as inferior and believe this is what he needs. There's also Hector's own fascination with "pets" to consider: Isaac states that Hector sees the world in terms of owners and pets, considering his own Forged devils his pets, and that Dracula's campaign wouldn't erase humanity, just reduce them to vampire "pets." Does Lenore pick up on this, and think Hector needs to be a "pet" to fulfill his worth?
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  • And You Thought It Would Fail: When it was announced that Castlevania would be adapted into an animated series, many fans were skeptical. Even discounting the already dismal track record of game-to-movie adaptations, the skepticism rose when it was announced that Frederator Studios would be producing it since the company is better known for comedies aimed towards children. Furthermore, Konami, the original creators of the games, had just entered a major Dork Age resulting from their exit from the console game business and their firing of Hideo Kojima among other things, leaving people rather unenthused about Konami-related products in general. When the series premiered, however, it received rave reviews and developed a fairly massive following that ensured a second season.
  • Arc Fatigue: While season 3 was been well-received, some viewers think that not a lot happened. There is build-up for Carmilla and her posse, but it doesn't really go anywhere other than planning out how they're going to conquer Wallachia and enslaving Hector. Then there's Isaac's arc, which seems to abruptly stop after he acquires an army to rival Carmilla's and a transmission mirror big enough to send said army through. And then there are also some who think that the show should just switch its focus to another Belmont already.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • One minor complaint about Season 1 is the lack of recognizable music from the games, given Castlevania has several tracks that are deemed iconic. In the penultimate episode of Season 2, our heroes storm Dracula's castle with an orchestral remix of the popular track Bloody Tears.
    • Season 1 was criticized for either focusing on human mooks or generic demons without any recognizable foes from the series outside of the Cyclops. Season 2 ditches the humans entirely and gives a more diverse visual to the demons, whose appearance is pulled straight from enemies in the games like Slogra and Gaibon. They also focus more on the villains' point-of-view since Dracula only appeared in the first episode of Season 1 and adds a colorful rogues gallery with his generals.
    • Isaac's depiction in Curse of Darkness was an extremely problematic example of a gay character. Not only was he a maniac eager to aid in the slaughter of mankind,note  a rare example of a scantily clad male character but done so moreso for Fan Disservice reasons, a borderline Combat Sadomasochist, and the way the game made his sexuality explicit was by having him kiss Trevor on the cheek as he stabbed him. This version of Isaac's sexuality is handled much more subtly and not in any way linked to his siding against mankind, he has a much more sympathetic backstory, lacks the original character's abominable costume, and his motivation for siding with Dracula is much more sympathetic than "I'm an Ax-Crazy psychopath." His Race Lift also adds solid diversity to the cast, helped by Adetokumboh M'Cormack's excellent and soulful performance.
    • Carmilla in Season 2 talks big and has impressive ambitions, but she's Too Clever by Half and her one scheme backfires and wipes out most of her forces. Season 3 reveals that she works and rules alongside her three sisters, who acknowledge that her schemes are wild and baseless, but are capable of constructing a base around her dream.
    • Hector in Season 2 falls for Carmilla's plans, but learns by Season 3. He's Genre Savvy enough to know that Lenore is only nice to him to get him on her side, and attacks the moment she's in range. It takes her the whole season for her to gaslight and break him.
  • Awesome Art: Unlike Frederator's other cartoons, Castlevania adopts an Animesque aesthetic that adapts the game's distinctive character designs. It's so convincing that one could easily mistake it as an actual anime series.
  • Awesome Music: What better theme to accompany the heroes laying siege to Dracula's generals than a hauntingly beautiful arrangement of "Bloody Tears"!
  • Awesomeness Withdrawal: The cost of being a 2D hand-drawn series with a complex art style and scripts all written by a single writer (Warren Ellis, at that): it takes a longer time for new seasons to be made and released, with the seasons so far being shorter than what is typical. This can lead to withdrawal.
  • Base-Breaking Character: While many can agree that this adaptation of Carmilla is far more developed than in the games, the fanbase seems to be split on her. One side loves her for her smugness, political scheming and decisiveness, but the other side loathes her because of it (especially those who like Hector more).
  • Catharsis Factor: Among the Bishop's more noble deeds in the first three episodes, the viewer is treated to scapegoating, attempted bribery, terrorizing his own congregation, corruption, plotting to use the night hordes to accelerate his own rise to power, and, oh yeah, basically defiling the sanctity of the Church at every turn while going totally unchecked. Come episode 4, when a demon lieutenant stares the Bishop down, invoking Breaking Speech, Not So Different, and Your Approval Fills Me with Shame all at once before giving him a hellishly undignified death right at his pulpit, any viewer would be forgiven for standing up and cheering. It happens again in Season 2 when his shredded and half-eaten corpse is given multiple lingering camera shots.
  • "Common Knowledge": When Season 3 released, the fandom collectively assumed that Taka and Sumi were siblings. Their similar looks, personalities, and Like Brother and Sister dynamic almost certainly had a lot to do with it, but even after the director stated on Twitter that the two are not related, the misconception continued. Not helping is that despite their threesome sex scene with Alucard, the long discourse on beastiality that closed the series premiere means what barely counts as Brother–Sister Incest is hardly beyond the pale for this show.
  • Darkness-Induced Audience Apathy: Some criticism has been levied against season 3 for having plot developments that seem to exist to just make the story needlessly bleak, namely the reveal that the seemingly reasonable judge was actually a Serial Killer and the duo of Sumi and Taka that Alucard took in turning on him and forcing him to kill them, not to mention the threesome scene, which has strong overtones of Alucard being sexually assaulted.
  • Draco in Leather Pants: The Council of Styria, Carmilla, Striga, Morana, and Lenore, have gotten this quite a bit from the fandom after the third season. Their True Companions camaraderie with one another in this Crapsack World setting has made their goals come off as A Lighter Shade of Black. With Lenore in particular there was a vocal segment of the fandom who found Hector "deserving" of the abuse and deceit he suffered at her hands.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Lisa's only real screentime is in the first episode of both seasons, but she establishes herself as the type of Badass Normal, Neutral Good All-Loving Hero that'd be the type to make the cynical, evil dark lord Dracula fall for her.
    • Even for those not Rooting for the Empire, we have Blue Fangs, who became met with lovely reception for making the famous scene where he delivered his awesome "The Reason You Suck" Speech to, and afterwards killed, the despicable Bishop who was responsible for having Lisa executed and therefore enraging Dracula into beginning his genocide against humanity.
    • The nameless priest in episode 4, who's a genuinely Lawful Good man of the cloth who, despite being terrified, was an essential support unit in Trevor's plan to retake Wallachia.
    • The vampire generals from Season 2 (besides Carmilla and Godbrand, who are major characters) do not have a speaking role and boil down to background props, yet they really stand out among the fanbase due to their diverse appearances and having different ethnicities and backgrounds. Their awesome fight scene with the main trio where they each have distinctive powers and fighting styles also works in their favor.
    • Out of all his undead pets, Hector's pug Cezar who accompanies him receives a lot of love from the fanbase for being Ugly Cute - it also helps that he was based on one of the writers' pets who passed away before production. Considering what happens to Hector at the end of Season 2, some are hopeful of his return and that Alucard adopts him.
    • Mrs. Djuvara has gotten love as well for being one of the only people who not only believed that Lisa was a real doctor, but also grieving for her.
    • The Captain in Season 3 is a stone-cold badass who's unafraid of a monster horde, negotiates for the safety of his crew with nothing but his charm and logic, treats Isaac with dignity, and engages in a philosophical debate that gives the Forgemaster some new ideas to consider. He also has a really mellow Jamaican accent, and is voiced by master of subtle charisma Lance Reddick, but appears in all of two episodes.
  • Epileptic Trees
    • Due to the character’s absence in the series, many are assuming that Isaac will ultimately become the character of Death, due to both characters sharing a fanatical loyalty to Dracula and how Isaac’s powers in the series has some shades of necromancy rather than just summoning demon and creatures.
    • Before season 3, many believed that Sumi and Taka would have some sort of connection to the Hakuba family, who aided Julius Belmont in the battle of 1999 by sealing Castlevania in an eclipse, allowing for Dracula to truely die. This, however, was no the case, as they betrayed Alucard and were killed by the end of the season.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Dracula. I mean, c'mon. It's not just Dracula, but Castlevania Dracula. The addition of a very sympathetic backstory for his villainy certainly doesn't make it any harder to be on Dracula's side.
    • Isaac is a badass and skilled Forgemaster who serves Dracula with loyalty and efficiency, even deciding to raise his own army once his service to Dracula is done. Thanks to an incredible voice performance and a sympathetic motive, he's considered by many to be a highlight of the series.
    • The Council of Styria (Carmilla, Morana, Striga, and Lenore) are very popular with the fanbase due to their teamwork, cool designs, and varied personalities. Many have praised them as a very unique variation on a Deadly Decadent Court and love the way their strengths make up for each other's flaws.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
    • Season 2 gave us Carmilla who makes her voluptuous entrance in a skin-tight red dress. Being voiced by Jamie Murray also helps a lot.
    • Season 3 provides us with Lenore, one of Carmilla's sisters who is actually much kinder and approachable than Carmilla. On the surface. In reality, she is just as cruel, but simply much more subtle. As a bonus, she gleefully has sex with Hector and promises that they'll have a lot more as her Sex Slave. If Romanticized Abuse is your kink, there you go.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple: Instead of pairing them off individually, many fans have taken to pairing the protagonists together as a One True Threesome.
  • Fandom-Specific Plot: Season 2 ends with Alucard becoming sole-lord of both Castle Dracula (and all of the cosmic secrets and amazing technological innovations inside) and Castle Belmont (which is basically an Überwald Secret Government Warehouse and Great Big Library of Everything all rolled into one). The idea that Alucard puts these to good use to train a new generation of monster hunters is a popular one. It especially helps that he does just that in Season 3 with Sumi and Taka.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • Being a Dark Fantasy animated series with good production values, Castlevania gleans a lot of enjoyment from Berserk fans.
    • The show has a lot of overlap with Part 1 and 2 of JoJo's Bizarre Adventure fans due to the vampire theme, anime styled designs close to the franchise and Trevor himself being a playful Deadpan Snarker like Joseph Joestar.
    • The show has some fandom overlap with the 2018 reboot of She-Ra and the Princesses of Power, given the parallels between the romance of Vlad Dracula Ţepeş and Lisa, and the friendship between Hordak and Entrapta.
    • The series has the rare distinction of being a western animation series well-regarded by even the more hardcore anime fans (who tend to be rather heavy on gatekeeping). This can be attributed to it being arguably even more anime influenced than Avatar: The Last Airbender, as well as the animation being largely 2D hand-drawn, which is a rarity in the West these days.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • In-Universe, Sypha's joke about Alucard being a broody teenager after he reveals that he rapidly aged is funny at first, but then by the season's end, it really dawns on you that Alucard literally is a teenager. In short order, he's had to cope with his mother's death, being cast into a year-long sleep by his father, getting woken upon by Trevor and Sypha, and now undertaking a mission to kill his father. This was all without ever really coping with the grief of losing his mother. Once Dracula is dead, Alucard finally has the time to collect his thoughts and the very first thing he does is break down in tears.
    • In Season 2, Sypha teases Trevor about his attitude, asking why every story he tells is about him getting punched in the face by strangers. Trevor tells her that it's because "everyone else is a piece of shit". Sypha laughs this off at the time, but this comes back to bite her hard at the end of Season 3. Trevor and Sypha try to help a Town with a Dark Secret and even form a begrudging respect for the local Judge. Then the season ends with most of the town winding up dead, and when Trevor ignores Sypha's insistence of burning down the Judge's home like everyone else's, they learn that he is a Serial Killer and child murderer.
    Sypha: "This could not have gone more wrong. What happened?"
    Trevor: "We've spent a couple of months living your life. Adventures and victories. And now, we're living my life."
    • Season 3 has a scene where Saint-Germain snarkily tells the Judge that Trevor and Sypha drank with him because they "wanted to meet someone who's seen toilet paper", to which the Judge asks: "What the fuck is toilet paper?" Only a few weeks after the season debuted, the real world became gripped in a coronavirus pandemic that led many people to buy and hoard toilet paper, resulting in widespread shortages.
    • Another moment that was impeccably timed to the coronavirus outbreak is the opening scene of the Season 3 premiere, with Alucard going mad from isolation only a month after parting with Trevor and Sypha. This is because government agencies around the world called for people to self-quarantine to limit the spread of the virus, on top of many schools and businesses closing to stem the spread.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • There's a flash game where you play as a Belmont fighting a priest. Now, while the circumstances of that game were more comedic, one cannot help but think of the game when the Corrupt Church subplot kicks in.
    • Trevor and Dracula are voiced by Richard Armitage and Graham McTavish, respectively. The two previously worked together on The Hobbit trilogy, but while they played close friends there,note  here they're inevitably going to try and kill one another.
    • Anyone who watched the Japanese dub will notice Alucard is voiced none other than Shin-ichiro Miki, who was the voice actor for Zamasu in the Japanese version of Dragon Ball Super. The hilarious part is where Zamasu wants to commit genocide to all humans (like Dracula is doing, save a few), but in this series, Alucard wants to prevent genocide to the human race. The same goes for Ryotaro Okiayu (Trevor), who previously voiced Alucard in the games.
    • In the Mexican Spanish dub, Alucard is voiced by José Antonio Macías, who previously voiced another invincible anti-hero, except this time his personality is switched out with Trevor instead.
    • Peter Stormare voices Godbrand in this series. Godbrand is one of Dracula's highest ranking generals and also has a fancy towards Carmilla. Stormare not only voiced Dracula himself in The Batman vs. Dracula, but Dracula's ultimate goal in that story was to resurrect his bride, whom just happened to be Carmilla.
    • The original pitch for a Castlevania movie said it would not be an anime. The product we have now has an obvious anime influence.
  • Ho Yay: In episode 4, there's a scene after their fight where Alucard pins Trevor down and has his face lean in rather close to him. The fact that Alucard is, of course, still shirtless and straddles Trevor's thigh (which the camera angle draws attention to) doesn't exactly detract from this either. According to a tweet by a character artist, the scene was deliberately designed to be sexy. Interestingly enough, Season 3 actually shows that Alucard isn't straight, which retroactively adds to this.
  • Iron Woobie: Alucard, born Adrian Tepes, is Dracula and Lisa's son. In the first episode alone, with everything seemingly going well for his family after a happy childhood, the Church ransacks his mother Lisa's house, condemns her as a "witch" for being a practiced medic, and burns her alive at the stake. Once his father learns of her death, he snaps, his one reason to tolerate humanity gone. Adrian tries to reason with Dracula but is tossed aside and horribly wounded, forced to go into hiding as his father raises an army to wipe out mankind. Fast forward a year, and Alucard is awakened by Trevor Belmont and Sypha Belnades. After battling Trevor to see if he has what it takes to fight Dracula, Alucard swears to kill his own father. He remains stalwart and unflappable through the majority of the second season, but there are hints that he's in pure misery, like when Sypha talks to Trevor about him in the Belmont Hold, described by her as a "cold spot" that sucks all the joy out of everything around him. In the end, Alucard is the one to stop his own father, witnessing Dracula break down before him when their pitched fight takes them into Alucard's own childhood room, using a post from his old bed to stake him before Trevor finishes the job. At the end of it all, Alucard collapses into tears.
    • It becomes way worse in Season 3 where Alucard becomes close to two individuals who come to him in order to know how to combat and protect themselves after they were kept prisoner with others under the control of one of Dracula's generals. While all seemed good, they become dissolutioned with Alucard due to his refusal to show them how Dracula's castle moves (despite the system being broken) or even any magic, prompting them to trick him into having sex with him (as a way to "repay him" for being alone for so long) before tying him up and nearly killing him over apparently "keeping secrets from him", prompting him to kill them in self defense. By the end of it all, Alucard is left more broken and bitter at what happened, before skewering their bodies in front of Dracula's castle in pikes. Like his father.
  • It's Short, So It Sucks!: A common complaint among viewers, even among those who liked it, was that Season 1 was too short, being only 4-episodes long with 20 minutes each (not counting intro and credits). This stems from the project's origin as an animated film trilogy, each part running 80 minutes.
  • Jerkass Woobie:
    • Lord Dracula himself is a Tragic Monster much as he is in the games: a roaming, misanthropic monster who found a chance at happiness when he met the healer Lisa, only to witness Lisa cruelly taken and burned at the stake for supposed heresy. Left so broken and despondent he even turns against his own son Adrian—or Alucard—Dracula pledges to take humanity to the grave with him, reduced to depressed lethargy as he waits for an end long denied to him. Dracula's tragedy shines forth most prominently in the final battle where he completely breaks when his battle with Alucard takes him into his son's childhood bedroom: "I'm killing our boy."
    • Aide to Lord Dracula he may be, Isaac is presented as a much more tragic, vulnerable character than his caricatured video game iteration. Isaac was abused by his master when he was still a slave even despite his love for the man, and ended up being driven to killing his own master in a hysterical fury when his master cruelly persisted in his abuse after Isaac confessed his feelings. Even as Dracula's unflinchingly loyal ward, Isaac is still thrown to the dirt again when Dracula forces Isaac to leave as the heroes converge to kill Dracula, with Isaac's final scene heavily indicating he's finally done with being kicked around once and for all.
    • Hector, Dracula's other Forgemaster, has been mistreated by society and even his own parents for his powers, with only the dead animals he brings back to life his only friends. Much more vulnerable and naive than Isaac with standards Isaac doesn't have, Hector's own naivity is taken advantage of by Carmilla who convinces him to betray his own longtime friend Dracula, before doubling back and ending the second season reducing Hector to her beaten-up slave and pet Forgemaster. It only gets worse as it goes on, with him imprisoned in Styria, being hunted by Isaac and betrayed and Made a Slave by the one person he thought loved him.
    • Trevor Belmont. The surviving son of his family, who was disgraced and exiled, he wanders Wallachia while it burns, doing his best to stay drunk and well-fed. He feels Surrounded by Idiots where the church is concerned and is quite a Jerk with a Heart of Gold. He refuses to leave people who need his help because he doesn't believe in Bystander Syndrome.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Isaac is a Devil Forgemaster, Dracula's last friend and a ruthlessly competent general. An abused servant until he killed his master, Isaac believes the world will only know love once all humanity is purged. To this end, he helps Dracula by reviving corpses as monsters to serve in his army. When the brutal Viking Vampire Godbrand suggests deposing Dracula, Isaac effortlessly kills him. No one ever discovers Godbrand's death, with Isaac even telling Dracula that if anyone ever sought to betray him, Isaac would remove such that even Dracula wouldn't know. After Dracula's death, Isaac continues his war on humanity, seeking to build an army with his Devil Forgemaster skills. Utterly loyal to Dracula and one of the main reasons the Vampire Lord is a threat, Isaac is a human who can easily compete with all manner of monsters.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • Although the video game series' famous "wall chicken" only appeared briefly as an easter egg, the fandom has generally agreed that Trevor Belmont is exactly the kind of person who would eat Inexplicably Preserved Dungeon Meat that he found inside a wall, while Sypha looks on in disgust. Often with the quote "Just like mother used to make!"
    • "Floating Vampire Jesus".Explanation 
    • "Please. This isn't a(n) [website/pointless argument/anything on the internet] Have some class."Explanation 
    • "See? God hates me." Explanation 
    • "Lies? In your house of God?" Explanation 
    • Dracula's angry reaction to learning of Lisa's death, particularly the line "you will tell me why this thing has happened to my wife", is often brought up by fans of female characters who suffer some sort of tragedy or mistreatment.
    • "...oh my God. I'm losing my mind." Explanation 
    • What the fuck is toilet paper? Explanation 
  • Memetic Loser: Hector, Hector, Hector. Compared to Dracula's other Forgemaster, the extremely badass Isaac, all Hector's really pulled off is being manipulated by multiple different people, betraying Dracula, and getting imprisoned and beaten up by female vampires. While he's a tragic figure and a Jerkass Woobie, it's little wonder the fanbase took to considering him something of a punching bag.
  • Moe: Sypha Belnades. While she's not an out and out Cute Witch in appearance, she's still a Nice Girl with a sweet voice and an adorable accent who uses magic to help the innocent. Her blushing when Alucard asks if she knew about the future doesn't hurt, and her adorable enthusiasm with Trevor in the end of the second season affirms her huggability.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Dracula makes a good case against humanity (and it's hard not to sympathize with him), but the fact that he murders everyone makes it clear he's not willing to turn back from his wrath. After Lisa's death, he almost fatally injures his own son when the latter tries to stop him.
    • The Bishop quickly crossed it by having Lisa burned at the stake, seeing her as a witch when all she wanted to do was help people. If he hadn't crossed it then, then he definitely crossed it when he convinced an angry mob to kill the Speakers, blaming them for the attacks by Dracula's army.
    • Carmilla's already a remorseless, manipulative bitch. But she doesn't just cross it at the end of Season 2; she gleefully jumps right over it when she forces Hector to serve her by viciously beating him into a bloody, frightened pulp.
    • It's revealed at the tail end of season 3 that the Judge is a serial killer who keeps the shoes of his victims in a hidden shrine in his home. And they're all children.
    • Lenore crosses it big time when she tricks Hector into putting on a slave ring that forces him to obey every command from Carmilla's council, with the implicit intention of using it to turn him into her personal Sex Slave.
  • Narm:
    • Dracula's chuckle in response to Lisa's comment on garlic looks just plain goofy since it's just Mouth Flaps at its finest.
    • Glass managing to spike the Targoviste's Archbishop through the back in spite of him sitting. Even more silly is his lack of reaction regarding his injuries.
    • Dracula apparently becoming the medieval equivalent of a traveling salesman at Lisa's insistence. He's also addressed casually as "Mr. Tepes", which in reality means "Impaler" in Romanian.
    • Dracula inadvertently blows up what's left of Lisa's remains when he manifests as a giant flaming head right where her stake is. Then the first thing he says is to ask where his wife is.
    • When Dracula starts ranting to Alucard about Lisa's murder, it becomes difficult to take the scene seriously, what with the poorly-drawn fangs in Dracula's mouth that stick out as though someone glued toothpicks to his gums. Same applies to Alucard when he's fighting Trevor. Seriously, they almost look like rodent teeth at times.
    • Same problem naturally also plagues Carmilla in several side shots, though curiously not other vampires she talks with (i.e. Godbrand). Probably the animators have issues with characters turning to the right.
    • Downplayed, but still present, when Dracula comes back after a year and lectures the villagers for celebrating the death of his wife. He probably is intended to sound like Tranquil Fury, but since this comes right after such a dumb move on their part, you can easily interpret it as him being in disbelief that they might be that suicidal.
    • When blood begins raining from the sky, heralding Dracula's return, all of the citizens in the capital look at the sky in confused terror, except for one guy who stares straight ahead in wide-eyed horror. While this could easily be interpreted as him simply displaying his horror in stunned silence, his behavior almost makes him seem like the one person in the capital who understands exactly what's about to happen.
    • The entire exchange on bestiality.
    • When the Bishop hammies it up in front of Trevor:
      Bishop: You Belmonts never understood the power of the wooooord of Gooood!
    • The ridiculous bitch-slap one of the priests gives Trevor after finding out that he had sheltered the Speakers.
    • Trevor manages to not only pacify the Angry Mob but also turns it against the priests in just a few short sentences without providing any evidence. Though given how selfish and cruel the priests had been shown to be to random people, it probably wouldn't be hard to convince a bunch of abused villagers of their guilt. This is made worse by the fact that said mob immediately kills the priest in a violent way. Earlier in the episode, that exact attitude was pointed out as why people didn't deserve Trevor's help, making it a casa of Protagonist-Centered Morality.
    • The fact that just four goblins + Blue Fangs assault Gresit, despite the end of the third episode showing dozens of them, zipping back and forth through the air.
    • The swearing in general is often considered forced and it is hard to take some scenes seriously when a character suddenly drops some f-bombs casually, especially when it doesn't fit their character. It has also been seen as unfitting for as dark the games tend to be, swearing is often kept to a minimum and even then they rarely use words worse than damn.
    • The Season 2 finale is deeply moving, as Alucard grieves for both his parents in the empty castle, but the use of the Diddy Laugh for the memory of young Alucard almost ruins it.
    • In Season 3, when Isaac and his monsters disembark the ship, the animation makes the horde of terrible monsters look utterly slagged from the trip. They don't look like they're about to tear people apart; they look like they just really need a nap. Adding to that, while they are on the ship, the crew looks nervous at the horde of nightmarish monsters just kind of... chilling out around the ship, not even looking that menacing outside of their looks.
    • While its agreed that the entirety of Season 3 has lent itself to some beautiful scenery and fluid animation, the penultimate episode where the Infinite Corridor leads to Hell treats us to a scenic panning across the hellscape... using CGI that wouldn't look out of place in a Playstation 1 title. It doesn't help that Hell looks fairly generic from a design standpoint. You almost expect to hear a stock demonic laugh.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Blue Fangs ending his Breaking Speech to the Bishop with "Let me kiss you", right before killing him. While on paper this sounds like it'd be awkward, his distorted voice and the scene's atmosphere make it work.
    • Trevor saying good night to a tree he used to play in as a child should by all rights sound pretty dumb; but seeing how that line was preceeded by a recollection of what must have been the happiest memories of a profoundly unhappy life and the way he says it in a little-boy voice make the eyes kinda sting a little.
    • The swearing works a lot better when used in scenes meant to be humorous.
  • Nausea Fuel: Given the series comes close to Berserk and Gantz in terms of blood, gore, and visceral imagery, this is to be expected. A specific example is the scene where Dracula unleashes the hordes of Hell on a town, complete with blood, fire, and unborn fetuses raining from the sky and demons literally ripping people apart; not even the infants are spared.
  • No Yay:
    • At first glance, it seemed like Carmilla and Hector were going to have a Mistress and Servant Boy dynamic, what with her buttering him up to slowly becoming her ally in overthrowing Dracula. But then the other shoe drops and it becomes blatantly clear that she doesn't see him as anything other than pet. And then the second season ends with her literally beating Hector to a bloody pulp for simply questioning her.
    • The aforementioned subtext between Carmilla and Hector ends up becoming straight text with him and Lenore. Lenore takes an immediate interest in Hector but relishes in the Power imballance of their position. She ends up slowly Gaslighting him throughout the third season to make him co-dependent on her and tricks him into becoming her Sex Slave.
    • Many interpreted Alucard's relationship with Taka and Sumi as having a parental aspect to it. Hence, when they seduce an emotionally-damaged Alucard in an attempt to kill him, it's far more disturbing than it is sexy.
  • Older Than They Think
    • This series has been criticized for introducing supposed anti-Christian themes in a setting that's supposedly free from it.note  In actuality, holy-themed antagonists have always been a staple of Castlevania, albeit mostly as fallen angels and other divine beings working for Dracula, for unknown reasons.
    • The factor of Alucard being Bi the Way is also plausibly older than the Netflix series. There was a drama CD called Nocturne of Recollection that showcases abit of Alucard's life after Symphony of the Night, and it showcases he's had a possible relationship with one of the main antagonists within the CD, who is a man.
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Blue Fangs, a higher ranking part of Dracula's horde who spells out in no uncertain terms that everything the Bishop did only served the forces of hell, and God would be disgusted at what he's done before devouring him.
    • In the Season 1 finale, a Catholic priest who is actually good instead of being corrupt makes holy water that helps defend the town against attacks from Dracula's minions.
    • Season 3 has "The Captain", a snarky but charismatic ship captain who manages not only to save him and his crew from getting their ship stolen, but successfully barters with Isaac despite knowing full well that his small army of night creatures could tear everyone apart with no hassle. He also strokes up a meaningful conversation with Isaac, causing him to almost reconsider his "kill all humans" goal, with the Captain being respectful of Isaac's choices even if he finds them odd or unorthodox. He only appears for about two episodes, but he's one of the most memorable parts of the season.
  • One True Threesome: Seeing Trevor, Sypha, and Alucard become Fire-Forged Friends through season 2 has lead people to declaring they belong together more intimately.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Dracula is given a sympathetic backstory and makes a good case against mankind. So much so that many fans actually rooted for him.
  • Shocking Swerve:
    • Taka and Sumi's seduction and betrayal of Alucard. Not only did many find it disturbing, many felt it came out of nowhere and only served as an excuse to isolate Alucard and put him back where his arc started, only in perhaps a worse place. Worse yet, we have multiple scenes of the two conversing privately, and if one isn't reading heavily into their conversations, they only show a mild distrust of him, and certainly not a desire to kill him.
    • While it doesn't completely lack foreshadowing, many found the posthumous reveal that the Judge was a serial killer of children to be unnecessary, put in solely to shock the audience and further darken the season. That's not to mention its complete irrelevance to the plot at large, which means many question its mere presence.
  • Signature Scene: Dracula's Villainous BSoD ("I'm killing my boy.") is considered the moment that stands out the most in Season 2, and probably the entire series so far.
  • Slow-Paced Beginning:
    • There's quite a lot of exposition in Season 1, with the first two episodes mostly being dedicated to World Building. The third episode picks up about halfway through and the fourth is almost entirely action, making up for this.
    • Season 3 has also suffered from this to an arguably bigger extent as, aside from a few low-stakes fights and one-sided battles, the first eight episodes are filled with tons of exposition without much being done until the final two episodes where it truly kicks into high-gear.
  • Spiritual Adaptation: A lot of fans of Berserk would consider this to be a better adaptation of its themes than the official anime released in 2016.
  • Squick: The "threesome" scene in Season 3. Setting aside that watchers of Season 2 already know that Alucard is really a boy in a man's body, despite the fact that it was confirmed via twitter that Sumi and Taka are not brother and sister, the situation is noticeably uncomfortable due to them taking advantage of Alucard's emotional state. Still a messed up situation all around.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Besides Godbrand and Carmilla, none of Dracula's other vampire generals get any form of backstory or spoken dialogue. They're never even referred to by name, and only serve as cannon fodder once the heroes storm Dracula's castle. Season 3 gives some posthumous character (and a name) to one of his generals, a woman named Cho. But not much (she's just a cruel, evil ruler and nothing much beyond that) and she's still dead.
    • This can also apply to Godbrand himself, as the only other vampire general next to Carmilla to actually speak and have personality, but he is killed by Isaac only 4 episodes in and doesn't get to fight or even see the heroes.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • A justified example since it's not their story; the series glosses over Lisa and Dracula's relationship as it develops from an apprenticeship to a marriage, and eventually to a family. While we can see why Dracula fell for Lisa, due to her kindness, wit and bravery, it would have been cool to see her learning more science and Alucard's childhood. In addition, we don't really get a good look at the relationship between Dracula and Alucard; the only scenes they share are their clash in the first episode and when the son kills the father.
    • We see very little of Dracula's castle in Season 2 and when the heroes finally storm it, they quickly cut through some minor vampires in the entrance hall and immediately race to fight Dracula within the same episode. There is a lot of missed potential within the Eldritch Location of the games.
    • One especially persistent criticism of Season 1 was that outside of the cyclops, it really didn't use any recognizable monsters from Castlevania III or even other games. The appearances of Slogra, Gaibon, and Carmilla in Season 2 helped alleviate this, but fans have still been disappointed with how few iconic monsters from the games have appeared and hope Season 3 will bring in more (which, thankfully, it did).
  • Trapped by Mountain Lions: Alucard's storyline in season 3 is rather disjointed from the rest and ends up as a "Shaggy Dog" Story. Alucard befriends two young people who then turn on him causing the vampire to kill them in defense.
  • Ugly Cute: Hector likes to raise and play with zombie animals, which for all intents and purposes, act perfectly normal despite clearly missing several pieces.
  • Unexpected Character: Hector, the main protagonist of Castlevania: Curse of Darkness in the second season's trailer, was quite the surprising addition to the cast. He and Isaac, the antagonist from the same game, are Dracula's most trusted lieutenants, simply because they are still standing there while Dracula declares war on Humanity.
  • Unintentionally Unsympathetic:
    • The citizens of Wallachia are clearly meant to be seen as sympathetic later on, what with the horror and pain they're enduring thanks to Dracula's revenge. However, not only are they cruel and/or cowardly enough to stand by while an innocent woman is burned alive, but they're also stupid enough to go home and sleep when Dracula starts taking his revenge (instead of trying to flee or preparing to fight). With that in mind, it's hard to feel sorry for any of them but the children when Dracula's Roaring Rampage of Revenge gets underway.
    • Isaac in Season 3. He's supposed to be seen as sympathetic in that he finds humans who attempt to redeem his views on them, only to then find flawed humans who make him descend back into evil because of how bad they are. While this is justified for the final major example, that being the evil wizard he fights in the finale, the first two times he does this involve him slaughtering towns because the guards refused to let him and his monster army in. While the guards should have backed down, they still are justified in refusing to let him in since he's, ya know, leading an army of monsters, but Isaac acts as though this is a failing of humanity as a whole and rather than killing only the guards who attacked him, slaughters every single person his monsters can find. It makes it hard to find his arc and motives sympathetic since he's essentially responsible for his own situations going as bad as they did.
  • The Un Twist: Many found the reveal that Lenore betrays Hector and makes him her slave to be completely obvious, with many pointing out that it is spelled out in their very first meeting of the season that she clearly considers him inferior to her. Between the slave collar and her treating him like a dog, almost nobody was surprised that her High-Heel–Face Turn ended up being fake.
  • Video-Game Movies Suck: Not a movie, and there have been decent animated series adaptations of video games in the past (mostly Anime), but Adi Shankar flat out declared his intention to "end the streak of bad video game adaptations" with this series. He seems to have succeeded with the first season, which got fairly good reviews, to the point where Rotten Tomatoes themselves congratulated the series for being the first ever Video Game adaptation to have a Fresh rating on their site note . Praise came for the character of Trevor Belmont being delightful as a snarky asshole, for making Dracula sympathetic, and the action scenes being very intense, with high praise going to the demons descending and Trevor versus Alucard in episode 4. The second season managed to climb up to 100 percent thanks to it's vastly expanded cast, new and interesting characters, more great action sequences, and a heaping helping of game-faithful elements.
  • What an Idiot!:
    • The entire population of Wallachia. Dracula had explicitly told them that he would come for them in one year after they burned Lisa at the stake. And what did they do? They held a celebration to commemorate her death. Needless to say, the vampire was not amused. In the people's defense, the people of the capital weren't at the burning, they were going on what was likely a very biased report from the Bishop, and the Church explicitly upheld the position that believing any harm could come to them would spit in the face of God's absolute power. When Dracula shows up on the appointed day, he is appalled to see them celebrating the day of his wife's death simply to spite him, which only makes his revenge seem that much more justified.
    • Carmilla. She's... not as smart as she thinks. Everything that she does in season 2 made things much easier for the heroes (indirectly taking out a general, creating a holy river that wipes out most of the vampiric forces, sowing general dissent in Dracula's court) and she's lucky it all blew up in her face like it did because despite being told she didn't stand a chance against Dracula, she never factored actually having to fight him into her plans.
    • After Carmilla lied, imprisoned, beat, tortured, and basically treated him as less than vermin, Hector not only slowly trusts Lenore over the course of Season 3, after she showed she was just as ruthless and abusive as her elder sister, but ultimately speaks out the exact words that would bind him as a slave to her (while having sex with her). He's supposed to be a powerful magician and a former right-hand man to Dracula. He really should have known better.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Is it an animated series based off a game that was commonly enjoyed by kids, and animated by a studio known for making kid shows? Yes. Is it actually for kids? Absolutely not. Like other Castlevania entries such as Lords of Shadow reboot, it is far too dark and bloody to be for young audiences, with the producer Adi Shankar comparing it to Game of Thrones and calling it "R-rated as fuck". The first episode opens with with thousands of impaled skeletons, and goes on to show a woman burned at the stake with her charred body crumbling away, an entire city being wiped out by demons, and two men talking about how the first one happened upon a man screwing one of his goats.
  • What Measure Is a Non-Badass?:
    • Hector and Isaac. Isaac is sharp-witted, hypercompetent, and a badass fighter, so despite him being openly evil and seeking to wipe out humanity, he receives a lot of audience praise and sympathy. Hector, on the other hand, is equally sympathetic. As of Season 3, however, Isaac only grows in competence and fandom praise, whereas Hector is manipulated and brutally enslaved by Lenore, with many fans and critics alike dismissing him as incompetent and stupid.
    • Similarly, Lenore and Hector receive this. Lenore is a demure woman who is threatening and competent, effortlessly beating him in a Curb-Stomp Battle fight and stringing him along in her plans. Due to this coolness, many called her a highlight of the season and disliked Hector. This is despite her being a cruel and manipulative woman who openly states she intends to sexually abuse him.
  • The Woobie: Lisa Tepes, a woman that just wanted to help people with science. The Church manages to catch her while she's alone at home, destroy her equipment, and burn her at the stake without even a trial. She can only scream in her last moments to beg Dracula to not avenge her death, because her executioners are ignorant. Dracula doesn't hear her, due to being away from home, and he avenges her a hundred times over.
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