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  • 8.8: Jim Vejvoda of IGN caught some flak for giving the movie a 7.8 despite having said in his review that it's better than Age of Ultron (another film he reviewed) which he scored an 8.6.
  • Abandon Shipping: The interactions between Tony and Steve on this movie make it clear that, when it comes down to it, Cap would always side with Bucky. The relationship between them took a big hit, platonic or not.
  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Because of the story's government versus anti-government plot, people were already politicizing the story and thus the characters since it was announced. Following Cap's actions in Winter Soldier (in which he entirely shut down a government agency when half of it proved corrupt and the other half inept to stop it), MCU Cap has already been branded a hardcore libertarian icon.
    • The initial trailers implied that Tony was fighting against Cap simply over different approaches to heroism, while the film shows that they really come to blows over Bucky. Regardless, it's disputed whether their conflict was also fueled by whatever grudges the two have had since the first Avengers flick.
    • A lot of the parts revolving around Bucky have this trope in-universe as well as out. Steve believes Bucky is an innocent victim while others see him as dangerous due to his brainwashing, which can be activated by anyone who knows the proper trigger phrase.
    • Sebastian Stan has suggested that Bucky is lying when he says he remembers killing Tony's parents, because he would rather tell Tony what he wants to hear in order to make his death as quick as possible.
    • Iron Man's morality can certainly be called into question in regards to his ties to Spider-Man. Is Tony trying to help an Ascended Fanboy make a difference in the world with his powers, or is he simply trying to exploit the abilities of a Naïve Newcomer for the sole purpose of advancing his own goals? Furthermore, the fact that Peter Parker is a minor being brought into the conflict and that Spider-Man: Homecoming reveals that Tony didn't explain what was going on, only claiming that Cap had gone crazy (at least, that's how Peter interpreted it), also raise a completely different set of questions about Tony's moral compass.
    • Is Vision keeping Scarlet Witch company because he genuinely cares about her, or is he just following Tony's orders to make sure she stays put? And is Tony trying to keep her in his mansion because it's for her own good, considering that he's risked his reputation, business, and fortune to keep a visa-less foreign national who had just killed eleven people safe from various governments? Or is it because he's scared of her and her powers? The fact that neither Vision or Tony is doing anything to help a clearly distressed Wanda in captivity towards the end of the film really makes you wonder.
    • Is Helmut Zemo an Anti-Villain whose actions is somewhat justified and even somewhat tragic? Or is he a Manipulative Bastard who wants to see the Avengers' destruction, and gladly crosses the Moral Event Horizon in order to see it happen? This incarnation of him doesn't seem to care about HYDRA, saying that they deserved to be taken down. All he cares is to avenge the death of his family who perishes during the Battle of Sokovia, to which The Avengers is partly responsible, and when finally accomplishing that, clearly has no plans to do anything else and prepares to commit suicide. Further complicating this is the fact that T'Challa/the Black Panther is Pro-Reg not because of any moral stance, but simply because he wanted a chance to kill Bucky - and actually admits that he is Not So Different; he would have killed an innocent man out of misplaced vengeance if circumstances had been otherwise. He even admits to T'Challa that he feels sorry about causing his father's death during the bombing in Vienna.
    • Is Black Widow betraying Iron Man's team and letting Steve and Bucky escape because she honestly thinks Steve is in the right while Tony is mostly motivated by his own ego and flawed logic? Or is her allegiance biased herself because of her closer relationship with Steve than Tony, considering what they had gone through together in The Winter Soldier? She's also established in the beginning of the film that she supports Tony's decision to sign the Sokovia Accords but she also tries her hardest to convince Steve to change his mind without being too antagonistic, so the reason she lets him go at the airport might be because she really doesn't want to bring him in. And finally, at the ending of the film, she's gone into hiding when the government agents come to arrest her, but let her other compatriots behind to be imprisoned in The Raft until Steve breaks them out. Is this the sign of the "doing whatever it takes to survive, even by playing both sides" mindset that Tony accuses her of, or she genuinely cannot find a way to break them out on her own, considering the nature of the prison itself? Or is it because she knows all too well what the Winter Soldier really is (because she was similarly used as a tool and living weapon by nasty people), so she is actually more or less neutral in the whole conflict and willing to see that both sides have very good reasons for their actions? Hawkeye probably did something similar for her way back when, and saved her from possible execution or a life sentence in jail. So, she's acting out of loyalty to both Steve and Clint, and out of sympathy for Bucky while still agreeing with Tony's point that there needs to be safeguards against people like her?
    • Is Steve really fighting the Accords because he genuinely thinks that the Accords are wrong? Or is he fighting against them for more personal reasons that he can't, or won't, admit to himself?
    • Is Steve using Sharon as a Replacement Goldfish for Peggy? His interest in her does seem to increase once he finds out Sharon's parentage, and as his dedication to Bucky throughout shows, Steve tries to hold on to whatever he can from the past.
      • Steve's characterization in Avengers: Endgame adds a lot of evidence to this interpretation. Even seven years after her death he's still deeply in love with her, to the point that he'd rather return to the past just to be with her. In addition a cut scene from Endgame would have featured Steve living with Sharon after the Snap in what's supposed to be an unhappy relationship.
    • Did Steve leave his shield behind because he agreed with Tony's claims that he didn't deserve it or as a bitter "are you happy now?" gesture? The Russos claim that it's the latter.
    • Is Tony supporting the registration act for good reasons, or have remorse over the Sokovia incident and his confrontation with Miriam made him overly fearful and guilty?
    • Considering that in Black Panther (2018), T'Challa let Killmonger die on his own terms (albeit after offering him medical treatment), is his decision to not only spare Zemo but prevent him from killing himself more proof that he's gotten over his desire for vengeance, or an act of Cruel Mercy?
  • Anti-Climax Boss: Non-video game example, and intentional. When Zemo threatens to "topple an empire", the Avengers assume he intends to use the team of super-serum soldiers just like the Winter Soldier to overthrow an organization or something in the same vein. Turns out the "Empire" he was talking about were the Avengers themselves, but he doesn't want to fight them head-on as he knows he doesn't have the power to, so he instead manipulates events so that he appears to be attempting to create a One World Order and leaving clues for both Steve and Tony to find (in a manner that would ensure they find out at different points), feeding dissension from within rather than attacking the Avengers directly, so that when his plan comes together the Avengers destroy themselves. As for the soldiers themselves, he shoots them all in the head because he doesn't need more super soldiers around with a reason to fight him.
  • Ass Pull: How Tony Stark knows that Peter Parker is Spider-Man, much less where he lives, is never explained. The writers explained it in a later interview: Tony has been using his vast resources to keep tabs on the various metahumans and vigilantes that have been popping up. While this is slightly implied in the context of the movie itself, it doesn't make Spidey's entrance into the plot any less sudden and unexplained.
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Kevin Feige's statements as soon as the movie was announced that the movie would not revolve around the subject of unmasking and secret identities, which marks a significant point of divergence from the original Civil War comics, as most heroes in this verse don't actually have a secret identity to begin with. And the preview released at D23 seems designed specifically to assuage several of the fan concerns:
      • Captain America is clearly the central figure throughout, alleviating fears that the movie would be a Cap film in name only and that he would be overshadowed by all the other superheroes. At the same time the others do appear to be more than just glorified cameos.
      • Bucky will be a prominent figure in the plot, for those worried that he would be Demoted to Extra again and that the movie was going to pull a 180 on the previous film's Sequel Hook.
      • Iron Man has a clear and more understandable stance here developed from his experiences in Age of Ultron, suggesting that he'll avoid the situation in the comics where he was a Strawman Political with a Jerkass Ball.
    • The first trailer went further to please anyone concerned about source material, as it indicates that the main source of conflict has been changed from opposing political views (which would require a big Conflict Ball to make them take up action against one-another), and more about what to do with Bucky (who is a wanted man due to the crimes committed by the Winter Soldier), and Cap willing to go against the law to protect him, which gives both sides much more grounds to stand on.note 
    • The first trailer also eased many of the worries that this was a Captain America film In Name Only. Prior to this, it had become commonplace for fans to dub the movie "Avengers 2.5", and there were rumors that it was effectively an Avengers movie. The Russo brothers even mentioned that the trailer's strong emphasis on Cap and his supporting characters was meant to convey that no, this is not another Avengers sequel.
    • Marketing example. There was a lot of outcry over the lack of merchandise for Black Widow and Scarlet Witch in Age of Ultron, to the point that it got coverage on mainstream news outlets and even Clark Gregg and Mark Ruffalo criticized Marvel over it. The big announcement for Civil War licensing made sure to mention that characters like Black Panther, War Machine, Black Widow, and Scarlet Witch would be heavily featured in the marketing and merchandise, seemingly going out of its way to highlight the fact that the female and minority heroes wouldn't be left out this time around.
    • Though his Badass Longcoat in Age of Ultron was better received than his Ultimates inspired initial look, Hawkeye's costume choices still got criticism for not being like his comic look, which was made worse when Jeremy Renner confirmed he wouldn't wear a mask and appeared somewhat reluctant about the idea. This quickly died down when his look for the film was unveiled, showing a new costume with a stronger purple coloring that greatly resembles his comic outfit, but with the MCU's aesthetics. Fan response has been rather positive as a result.
    • Likewise, a number of fans disliked the War Machine Mark II armor from Age of Ultron since they felt the slimmer, more streamlined suit was a poor fit for a character known for his bulky armor and insane amount of firepower. The new Mark III armor has gone over well with fans since it once again sports a bulkier, more heavily armed design closer to the one Rhodey wore in Iron Man 2.
    • There is very little romance in the movie, and Natasha still acts like a professional despite Bruce's departure. The Black Widow/Banner romance was one of the most polarizing and heavily criticized aspects of Age of Ultron. The relationship is only hinted at in a few lines of dialogue. Attempted with The Big Damn Kiss of Steve and Sharon which occurs in the midst of the movie far away from main events. While it was also poorly received much of it was for the opposite reason, suggesting the directors overshot in an attempt to deliberately course-correct over the above.
    • In Iron Man 3, Tony destroyed all of his suits and vowed to quit the superhero business. Then in Age of Ultron he was back to being Iron Man as if it never happened, which a lot of viewers accused Marvel of engaging in Canon Discontinuity. In this film Tony not only explicitly acknowledges his backtracking, but reveals that the broken promise severely damaged, if not outright destroyed, his relationship with Pepper.
    • Scarlet Witch's "Sokovian" accent is heavily toned down compared to her previous appearance in Age of Ultron, likely in response to criticisms that it was too over-the-top and Narmy. Some viewers have praised the fact that her voice sounds like an actual person this time around. Others have noted that it's still largely inconsistent.
    • Wanda is made an outcast and called a public menace for causing the deaths of several aid workers, in response to viewers who saw Wanda as a Karma Houdini in Age of Ultron who was allowed to join the team despite essentially being the mastermind of the villain's plot. The deaths are also accidental on Wanda's part and she is shown to feel genuinely guilty afterwards, due to viewers saying Wanda's lack of remorse for the deaths she caused in Age of Ultron made her harder to root for.
    • Phase 2 was criticized for straining to justify Superman Stays Out of Gotham. The situation at the film's end will likely make all of Phase 3's cases of this much easier to swallow than the first two could get.
  • Award Snub: After Captain America: The Winter Soldier became the first Captain America-based movie to earn an Academy Award nomination, Disney gave Civil War the largest "For Your Consideration..." campaign yet for Cap's series. Unfortunately, it failed to persuade the Academy to nominate Civil War for anything. Also surprising, Civil War ended up receiving less Oscar recognition than the less-beloved Suicide Squad (2016).
  • Base-Breaking Character: Zemo. Some say he's another generic, forgettable Marvel villain with a convoluted, nonsensical plan, some say he's one of the best in the franchise with more sympathetic motivations than other villains in the series. The differences from the comics version as well is also a point of contention.
  • Briefer Than They Think: For all the complaints about Zemo's character, some of the more commonly cited is the fact he's not depicted as an expert swordsman or a Nazi/member of HYDRA. In actuality, he was typically a Non-Action Big Bad who at different points became better at hand-to-hand combat and learned swordsmanship in order to lead the Thunderbolts (and was stated repeatedly to only be 'kinda good' by normal standards, being outclassed by more talented fighters easily), while his explicit Nazi connections were actually phased out during the Thunderbolts run as he went through Character Development and a Heel–Face Turn. His membership with HYDRA in fact is a very recent invention (2014) after undergoing Villain Decay when he slipped back into villainy and suffered a great deal of Badass Decay with it. So, while all those traits are true to his character, they're from different iterations of Helmut's character.
  • Broken Base:
    • Who was right regarding the Accords? Captain America or Iron Man? The debate continues to rage on ferociously to this day, and completely intentionally so. According to the directors on the DVD commentary, the film went through several test screenings and the final cut was chosen for causing the test audience to divide between Team Cap and Team Stark 50/50. It's tagline even says: Whose side are you on?
    • The choice to make the conclusion of the Captain America trilogy a Civil War adaptation rather than focus squarely on Cap and his entourage. Especially given the fact that Tony Stark is such a Base-Breaking Character in his own right. Naturally fans of Tony or the other heroes making guest appearances are overjoyed, especially since they each get their own Moment of Awesome, but fans of Captain America and his primary supporting cast are understandably miffed at all these other characters taking up screentime for what is Cap's last solo outing.
    • Zemo's plan seems to be a big one. For a lot of people his plan made no sense at all, relied heavily on luck and chance, and only worked because everything was handed to him. Others however follow the plan easily once it all comes together, and find that he did a lot of hard work piecing the different aspects all together to make it work, taking advantage of coincidental things others wouldn't think to use. A third group find that its true his plan was messy and convoluted, and was indeed based on lucky breaks, but he was charismatic enough that the film worked anyway.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal: The Winter Soldier killed Tony Stark's parents. Not only is the car crash shown at the very beginning, but it's unlikely that Zemo would go to such lengths over any random car crash. However, the video of the Winter Soldier graphically beating Howard Stark to death was still unexpected and emotional.
  • Continuity Lock-Out: Civil War is probably the most continuity-heavy MCU film to date. In addition to continuing plot threads from Age of Ultron and the previous two Captain America movies, it incorporates references to a bunch of other MCU films like Iron Man 3 and Ant-Man. The Russos even said in an interview that there was an unspoken assumption that if you're going to see Civil War, you've probably already seen most of the other MCU movies anyway.
  • Die for Our Ship:
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Pre-release, Black Panther had received a lot of attention thanks to his cool, comic-accurate costume and badassery (outrunning Captain America, roundhouse kicking Winter Soldier in the face, and casually shrugging off bullets). Upon the release of the movie, he's considered one of the best things about it.
    • Spider-Man only has a supporting role in the plot, but he's seen by many to be the film's Breakout Character alongside Black Panther. Spidey shone in every scene he appeared in, from his witty dialogue, excessive nerdiness, and how he's probably the live-action Spidey that's truest to the comics. And bear in mind that this is the already popular Spider-Man we're talking about here. Notably, he and Black Panther are the characters who come out with the happiest endings.
    • Ant-Man is less involved in the main plot than many of the other superheroes, but many viewers consider him to be one of the film's most memorable characters alongside Black Panther and Spider-Man, in no small part due to his turn as Giant-Man.
    • Although Zemo caught some flak for only superficially resembling his comic counterpart and being an Adaptational Wimp in terms of fighting ability, the fact that he is basically an average Joe going up against the Avengers has endeared some viewers. He also receives more character depth (and proper motivation) than the typical MCU-movie villains, doesn't die, and more or less achieves his goals at the end of the movie, all of which have made him an interesting character for a number of viewers.
    • Ayo, the Dora Milaje woman who got up in Black Widow's face. She returns for Black Panther (2018) as well as Avengers: Infinity War.
      Bodyguard: Move or you will be moved.
  • Fandom Rivalry: With Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, being films with similar concepts released within a few months of each other by rival comic books franchises. The fact that many early reviews of this movie contain snide references to Batman v Superman is bound to exacerbate the rivalry. Fans of that movie have especially reacted negatively to the largely favored reaction this film has gotten from critics and reviewers, some of which has resulted in Hype Backlash. It also helps the rivalry that both films feature similar villains — a non-costumed, non-powered chessmaster playing the two sides against one another because of familial issues — however, while Zemo has been largely praised for his depth, charisma and how well his plan worked, Luthor has been generally cited as one of the worst aspects of BvS. It's gotten to the point where certain fans of the former are known to be very hostile towards this film and its fans, with a lot of nitpicking involved, especially concerning Zemo.
  • Franchise Original Sin: In this film, Peter Parker is introduced as an Ascended Fanboy of the Avengers, especially Iron Man who becomes his mentor figure, provider of his first "true" costume, and parental substitute of sorts. However, his past with Uncle Ben is still alluded to as his superhero motivation in such a way that people familiar with the Spider-mythos will understand that Uncle Ben's death is being referred to even if he isn't named. Also it would make sense that Peter wouldn't just tell his whole origin to someone he just met, even if that someone is his idol. Spider-Man: Homecoming further develops Peter and Mr. Stark's relationship but still only alludes to Uncle Ben indirectly via Aunt May's troubles. Unlike Civil War, however, Peter comes across as much more of a fanboy and Avengers-wannabe who admits to Tony that "I just wanted to be like you." Tony tells him to be worthy of the suit he gave him, which comes up in a key scene homaging a sequence from the comics... where Peter was thinking about Uncle Ben and Aunt May instead. This began to rub Spider-fans the wrong way since it seemed Uncle Ben's importance was being rather downplayed in favor of Mr. Stark. This continues in Avengers: Infinity War where Uncle Ben isn't even alluded to and Peter fights at Mr. Stark's side for much of the film. Then Peter dies in Mr. Stark's arms, saying his name. Many Spider-fans were turned off by now, comparing it to the first Sam Raimi Spider-Man movie where Uncle Ben dies saying Peter's name, and seeing the later scene as a weird mirror which shows Uncle Ben's virtual erasure from the MCU.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • The jokes about Black Panther constantly picking on Bucky from the trailers become this in the actual movie, as it's a case of You Killed My Father.
    • Tony's "whose girlfriend is better" banter with Thor in Age of Ultron turns into this when Pepper is revealed to have left him sometime after that movie. Double awkward points since the reveal by Kevin Feige that Thor and Jane broke up between The Dark World and Thor: Ragnarok.
    • Tony's holo-tech being called "B.A.R.F." and him muttering "I gotta figure out a better name for it" becomes this after Spider-Man: Far From Home reveals who really created it and that the name was the worst thing Tony could've called it.
  • Genius Bonus: One of the benefits from eating plums is improving your memory. That might be the reason why Bucky bought them when he's in Romania.
    • Wanda’s line about not being able to control other people’s fears, only her own, is the definition of the philosophy of stoicism.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: Japan seems to love this movie. This might have something to do with Spider-Man's appearance, as he's considered a national icon in Japan and is one of the most beloved superheroes there. Cap and Iron Man are also well-liked in Japan.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Rhodey surviving being blasted down, yet being crippled, due to his chest arc reactor being destroyed becomes this after the Free Comic Book Day issue of Civil War II was released the day after the movie got released in the US, as Rhodey is killed by getting smashed in the chest by Thanos.
    • To a lesser extent, Ant-Man holding Rhodes back by the legs after he turns into Giant Man makes the scene a lot less funny now that Rhodes is paralyzed.
    • "Congratulations Cap, you're a criminal." and Cap taking a stand against registration in this film becomes this after the reveal in the comics that thanks to the Red Skull causing a Cosmic Retcon, Captain America is a member of HYDRA.
    • Peggy's funeral can be seen as this, after her show was cancelled the week after the release of this movie.
    • Let's face it, knowing that innocents are being killed left, right, and center during the big set pieces of The Avengers, Avengers: Age of Ultron and other past MCU films sort of reduces the fun aspect of those movies in retrospect. In particular, the crowd fist-pump moment in the first Avengers film where Cap tells Hulk to "smash!" is rendered as this now that we know that by doing so, a lot of innocent bystanders would be killed.
    • Black Panther's entire storyline after the release of his solo film which shows how his cousin Killmonger was consumed by vengeance after his own father was killed.
    • Hawkeye jokes that he retired for a while and everything falls apart. He didn't appear at all in Infinity War, and Thanos killed half of all life in the universe. When the trailers for Endgame confirmed his return - looking much darker and more tormented - many fans joked "Thanos is screwed now!"
    • Cap's letter at the end is meant to be a Ray of Hope Ending, showing how after everything the Avengers are not fully broken and there is a chance that the team can come together when it is needed. Avengers: Infinity War shows that the letter was mostly futile with the Avengers still being broken throughout the movie and Word of God is that the split is why Thanos won. It will take six years before the Avengers fully get back together.
  • He's Just Hiding!: Even though Crossbones blew himself up in an attempt to kill Captain America in a murder-suicide at the beginning of the film, Frank Grillo himself hinted that he may return regardless. This has somewhat died out after it was revealed his return would be in flashbacks in Avengers: Endgame, suggesting he really is dead.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • During The Avengers, Cap and Tony got in an argument, where Cap kept telling Tony to put on the suit so they could go a few rounds. They finally got their long awaited match-up in this film. It turns out Cap can fight the suit on even ground, but gets overpowered once Tony analyzes and adapts to his fighting style.
    • In Boseman's first major role in 42, there's a scene where one of his teammates tries to console him amid a torrent of racist jeers from the fans by saying that they're a bunch of "crackpots still fighting the Civil War." Conversely, in an early Fantastic Four comic, the titular team is teaching Black Panther baseball. 50 years later, Boseman - the actor for Jackie Robinson - is now playing Black Panther.
    • There's a line of dialogue in Ant-Man where Spider-Man's powers are alluded to, but it was originally written as a throwaway gag and was not meant to foreshadow his inclusion in the MCU (since the Sony-Marvel deal didn't actually happen until after Ant-Man finished principal photography). Now it almost seems like a deliberate Brick Joke, considering that both Spider-Man and Ant-Man show up in the same movie for the first time.
    • The 2007 film Knocked Up has several characters reference Spider-Man 3 (which came out the same year), including the character played by Paul Rudd (the actor portraying Ant-Man).
    • While the film's logo originally presented "Captain America" in large letters above the "Civil War" tagline, changes made to the logo since then have caused it to read more as if it says "Marvel Civil War", with "Captain America" as a visual afterthought. Guess what people have been calling the falling-out between Marvel CEO Ike Perlmutter and Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige, which is believed to have been incited by this movie?
    • Black Panther outrunning Captain America (to the point where Cap is forced to commandeer a vehicle) comes off as a sort of accidental Brick Joke, given the notorious "On your left!" scene in Winter Soldier.
    • The appearance of Spider-Man in the trailers came right after the announcement that J. K. Simmons, who played J. Jonah Jameson in the Spider-Man Trilogy, was joining the DC Extended Universe for the Justice League movie, this also makes more hilarious the memes where Jameson states he's leaving for Gotham since he's tired of waiting for pictures of Spider-Man.
    • During the chase with Black Panther, Steve manages to steal a car. It's not the first time, or the second.
    • In this film, Spider-Man is a young hero who latches on to Iron Man as a mentor. One of the phony trailers from Tropic Thunder has Robert Downey Jr.'s character playing a monk who has an affair with a novice, played by former Spider-Man Tobey Maguire, hailed even at the time as the closest we'd ever get to canon superhero slash fic.
    • The tactics Spider-Man uses when he fights Giant-Man are more than reminiscent of those utilized by the 104th Training Corps. Perhaps he's acting based on prior experience?
    • Hilarious in Foresight, to a degree. As of this movie, Martin Freeman plays a character in the MCU. This is only a few months before his best-known acting partner, Benedict Cumberbatch, will play the role of Doctor Strange. One wonders how many Sherlock and Hobbit jokes will come out of that. Even better, the film also stars another actor known for playing Sherlock Holmes....
    • In the comics, Tony Stark handed Peter Parker a copy of the Super Human Registration Act bill, which was still about to be discussed in Congress. He complained that it was as big as a Harry Potter book, and that he preferred to wait for the movie adaptation. Which he did: Spider-Man joins the MCU precisely when the movie adaption of the Act hit theaters.
    • The whole Empire Strikes Back gag got even funnier when Tom Holland revealed a year later that he'd actually never seen the original Star Wars trilogy—or even earlier in the commentary for the movie.
    • When Secretary Ross asks Cap about the whereabouts of Hulk and Thor, the film originally played it as an Armor-Piercing Question that underscores the importance of responsibility. After the release if Thor: Ragnarok it's hard to take the line seriously anymore, because the audience reaction is now "They're having kick-ass adventures on Sakaar together!".
    • Peter says that Aunt May would freak out if she knew he was Spider-Man. Cut to the end of Spider-Man: Homecoming.
      Aunt May: ''WHAT THE F-"
  • Ho Yay:
    • Steve and Tony from the first trailer, "Sorry, Tony, [Bucky]'s my friend." "So was I." Cue the jokes about Tony being (un)friendzoned. Add to the fact someone put the first trailer to Adele's "Hello", a Break-Up Song. Makes the whole movie out to be a bad breakup between Steve and Tony with Steve choosing Bucky over him.
    • The entire trailer is one long tribute to Bucky and Steve's relationship, establishing that Steve is more than willing to go against the entire world for the sake of his friend. It even ends with them teaming up to beat the crap out of Tony. The Russo Brothers have even stated how the movie is like a "love story" between Steve and Bucky. In the film, Bucky even acknowledges Steve's devotion. Couples as a Tear-Jerker.
    • Add to the fact that Sam and Bucky are referred to as "Cap's Two Girlfriends" on set.
    • "Give me back my Rhodey!" from Tony when Giant-Man grabs Rhodes out of the air mid-flight. Serious Business in the middle of a lighthearted action sequence.
    • Also, the scene where Tony is cradling a seemingly dead Rhodey in his arms. It obviously escalates the conflict.
    • At the end of the film, it looks like Rhodey is the only one Tony still cares and worries about. And then you remember Tony is no longer dating Pepper.
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • The first clip of the film released showcased Steve flying into frame from 400 feet away, drop-kicking a thug, then dispatching another thug by kicking a goddamn car into him. No seriously, he literally kicked a car hard enough that it hit a guy behind it and threw him back. It really has to be seen to be believed.
    • There's Bucky grabbing a speeding motorbike from under its driver, throwing it up in the air, spinning the bike round and speeding off in the other direction, all in one move.
    • Ant-Man becoming Giant-Man. Spider-Man actually says "holy shit" in response.
  • Inferred Holocaust: A retroactive example. According to the death tolls shown on government monitors, only 274 people died in the climactic battles of The Avengers, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, and Avengers: Age of Ultron, with $495.6 billion in damages. However, Daredevil establishes that hundreds died in New York (whereas this movie claims that the casualties were only in the double digits). Furthermore, the damages to New York mentioned in-film are said to have cost under $20 billion to repair, yet experts claim that this vastly underestimates how badly such an attack would wreck the city, which would cost $160 billion alone. So if the data's that far off, then it's not hard to imagine how much worse the area was damaged than the government's reporting.note 
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • The announcement that Baron Zemo will be in the movie has garnered a lot of interest; as some fans have been waiting ages for the character to be introduced into the MCU.
    • Some fans that aren't interested for the movie being a Civil War adaptation are still seeing the movie simply because it will presumably wrap up the Winter Soldier subplot.
    • Another group is hyped up for the debut of Spider-Man in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
    • Fans who are clamoring for diversity in the MCU are looking forward to see Falcon, War Machine, and the introduction of Black Panther.
    • Fans who aren't interested about Captain America and his cast are still interested in watching the film because of the appearances from the other heroes, such as Iron Man, as well as characters who aren't likely to get their own solo films or a sequel to them anytime soon, such as the Scarlet Witch, Vision, Hawkeye, and Ant-Man.
    • And, of course, there are many who are just clamoring for the epic 6 vs. 6 airport battle.
    • Basically, the film has a Godzilla for just about everyone.

    Tropes M to Z 
  • Magnificent Bastard: Helmut Zemo proves his stripes as one of the greatest manipulators of the franchise. Overcome with grief over losing his family during the Avengers battle with Ultron, Zemo decides to enact vengeance against them. Knowing he is no match for them in strength, Zemo instead devises an intricate plan to break them up. Launching an attack on a UN conference, Zemo frames Bucky Barnes for the attack which starts a manhunt against him. After Bucky is captured, Zemo impersonates a UN interrogator to activate Bucky's Trigger Phrase which will put him under his control to give him information on the death of Tony Stark's parents. Finally, Zemo leaks this ruse to the media, counting on Tony Stark following Cap and Bucky to the Hydra compound in Siberia so he can accomplish his real plan: show Tony evidence that Bucky killed his parents, causing him to fly into a murderous rage and attack Bucky and Captain America, permanently fracturing the Avengers in a way they may never fully recover from. By the end, in spite of being captured by T'Challa, Zemo still accomplishes what he wanted and gracefully accepts his capture and even offers to let T'Challa kill him to avenge the death of his father. Zemo stands out in a world full of super-powered beings, aliens, sorcerers and cosmic entities with only his intelligence and able to cement himself as one of the work's most successful villains, being the man who broke the Avengers.
  • Memetic Mutation: Has its own page.
  • Moral Event Horizon: Zemo crosses the line when he bombs the UN convention, killing T'Chaka and numerous others, just so he could draw out Bucky to continue his plan. It's somewhat softened by the fact that he did try to get what he wanted from Bucky's old handler first specifically noting that if he doesn't then he'll have to resort to "bloodier methods" that he doesn't truly want to, and when he sincerely apologizes to T'Challa for what he did, but it still shows his blatant Revenge Myopia — inflicting upon others the same pain he uses as an excuse for his actions in the first place. Then he tries to weasel out of being punished for his actions by committing suicide, but fortunately T'Challa stops him from doing so to make him face justice for his crimes.
  • Narm:
    • The shot in the leaked sizzle reel of Team Cap doing a Tom Cruise-styled run together earned its share of laughs for being unintentionally silly looking. The fact that it ended up being the thumbnail of the first official trailer hurt matters.
    • Bucky shambles up the stairs after incapacitating several heroes in a rather comical fashion similar to a gorilla.
    • The subtitles in the beginning are rather... unfortunately placed. Specifically, smack dab on Bucky's crotch. Even funnier if it's in Spanish, as at one point it's covered with the word "Homo".
    • The Russos recalled that while watching the film in a theater, they found the audience laughing at multiple moments that weren't intended to be funny (though this is less the fault of the film than it is the audience being conditioned to Whedon-style comedy beats from the Avengers films). In particular, they noted that Tony one-shotting Sam offhandedly after Rhodey's crash drew a round of laughter from the audience, despite it being a very dark scene for all intents and purposes.
    • The giant title cards are incredibly jarring and rather than set a dramatic scene, come across as a bit funny.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Spider-Man's "Hey, everyone." line in the trailer is badly mixed and sounds like a deadpan, shy young teen in the midst of an action scene desperately trying to sound nonchalant and cool, but that's perfectly fitting for his character (well, except maybe for the "badly mixed" part). The actual film avoids this by having him say the line after he lands and introduces himself to Captain America.
    • EXILE ATSUSHI's "Itsuka Kitto", the Japanese theme for the movie, sounds incredibly off and, as mentioned in Narm above, probably fits a Japanese drama or a shoujo anime more. However, there are a number who have gone on to declare that the song is Steve and Tony's "bromance theme".
    • The dramatic shot of two armies charging at each other across an empty space is always Narm Charm on account of being the classic example of Rule of Cool Hollywood Tactics, but even more so in this instance, when the "armies" consist of exactly six people apiece.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Many fans have questioned why characters like Spider-Man and Black Widow would even consider joining Iron Man, ignoring the fact they were on his side in the comic, at least initially. In fact, in the years right before Civil War, Tony Stark and Peter Parker developed something of a mentor/student relationship, which you see the start of in this film as well.
    • As mentioned above, one of the arguments used against the idea of Widow joining Iron Man and not joining Steve and Clint is her friendship with them, but they tend to ignore that during the Civil War comic, many friends and even families were split during the conflict regardless of how strong their bond were (Example: the Fantastic Four).
    • With this 15-year old version of Spider-Man being the youngest movie incarnation of the character as of yet, there are some fans who think he's way too young to be a crime fighter going up against supervillains, and that it would make more sense for him to be in his late teens or an adult. Others point out that Peter Parker also became a crime fighter at 15 in both the main 616 and Ultimate Marvel continuities and was already fighting multiple supervillains at that age.
    • Some fans have joked that Scarlet Witch's new costume makes her look like Jean Grey in X-Men: The Last Stand. In the comics, red, flowy outfits were always Wanda's thing, while Jean generally favored body-hugging green-and-gold (70s) or blue-and-gold (90s) costumes. In fact, Scarlet Witch's Civil War outfit has some similarities to her look from X-Men: Evolution.
    • There are some fans who are mad that Zemo won't have a mask and will only play a major role in later films. This is actually consistent with the comics, where Helmut Zemo was originally a fairly handsome one-shot antagonist before being disfigured and reimagined as a much bigger threat by later writers.
    • Iron Man being just as important as headliner Captain America. In the 60s, before Iron Man or Captain America had their own individual books (post-defrosting, in Cap's case), they split the former-anthology title Tales of Suspense for four years straight. In something of a reversal, Tales of Suspense was a de facto Iron Man book (including the first appearances of Black Widow and Hawkeye as villains) that made room for the recently thawed Cap.
    • Not only does Operation Galactic Storm predate the Civil War comic, it even predicts part of the divided lineup in this movie (Captain America, Hawkeye and Scarlet Witch on one side, Iron Man and Vision on the other).
  • One-Scene Wonder:
    • Alfre Woodard as Miriam Sharpe in her confrontation with Tony Stark. Stark's actor Downey suggested Woodard for the role, knowing she would be a stand-out in her performance that would impact the storyline.
    • Martin Freeman as Everett K. Ross, who's assigned to guard Zemo, and is more than willing to dish out some pain.
    • Marisa Tomei as Aunt May, who's physically present in one scene (inspiring many compliments by Tony) and in The Stinger.
    • T'Challa's female bodyguard Ayo who tells Natasha "Move, or you will be moved."
  • Ron the Death Eater: Both Captain America and Iron Man get this depending on which side of the Broken Base you fall on regarding the two sides. Cap is a selfish treacherous Manipulative Bastard with zero moral principles other than his own happiness, everyone else be damned, and Iron Man is a murder-crazy fascist sellout who wants to crush the entire Avengers team under his boot and heel. Expect to see whichever side one does support also getting the Draco in Leather Pants treatment as well.
  • Signature Scene:
  • Special Effect Failure: For a film of this magnitude, the failure actually occurs in scenes that should not necessarily be effects heavy.
    • The 3D version of the film has one in an early scene where Steve is watching the news. For a few seconds, part of the bottom of his chin is rendered on a different depth plane than the rest of his face, making it look like a random patch of skin is floating off of him.
    • In the build up to the airport fight, with Team Iron Man trying to talk Steve into surrendering, the insert shots of Tony and Natasha are unusually tight and lit differently than those focusing on different characters, implying that they were pick-ups shot in front of a green screen rather than on location.
    • At times, Iron Man's head appears to have separated from his body due to the suit being entirely CG in this film. Particularly egregious because in previous MCU films, Robert Downey Jr. would at least be wearing a physical helmet and, occasionally, a physical chest piece for close-ups. The shots were on a green-screened set, but the suit was largely CG over the aforementioned chestpiece and the VFX team had to alter the lighting on his face, hence the 'floating'.
    • The sweeping shots of both teams during the big showdown has Natasha cut and moved rather awkwardly down the line in order to fit Spider-Man (who wasn't present in the shot shown in promos) into the lineup.
    • During one of the fights, a stunt double's face is clearly seen for a moment.
    • The CGI for Spider-Man can be extremely obvious, due to the color red being infamous for processing horribly on film. The previous films averted this by giving Spider-Man’s suit a darker shade of red and a raised, 3-D webbing pattern, which MCU Spidey lacks.
  • Spiritual Licensee: A variation within its own franchise: Civil War is considered by many people to be the "true" second Avengers movie rather than Avengers: Age of Ultron due to its much better reception as well as its more meaningful events and consequences in-universe (especially regarding the Avengers as an organization), all while retaining the Loads and Loads of Characters of the Avengers movies and introducing a character (Spider-Man) more significant than the newcomers in Age of Ultron.
  • Spoiled by the Format:
    • Home viewers who watch with subtitles enabled will learn a key character's identity very, very early in the film, simply because the subtitle on a scene in his motel room states "Helmut Zemo practicing Russian" as he reads aloud.
    • At the film's climax, Tony seems to finally be on Cap and Bucky's side and the three are teaming up to find and stop Zemo (with Black Panther following). However, there's way too much time left before the movie ends, and we haven't even seen the cool Cap and Bucky vs Tony fight we were promised in trailers. And then Zemo plays back the mission report from December 16, 1991...
  • Squick: Several critics and a lot of viewers were unhappy with the romantic beat between Steve and Sharon, with one from GameRadar even describing it as "slightly icky and completely unnecessary." Considering that Sharon is Peggy's grandniece and the former had just died from old age and Alzheimer's, their sudden hooking-up can come across as rather skeevy and inappropriate. Then there's the Replacement Goldfish angle. Hayley Atwell, Peggy's actress, didn't like it either.
    • Made more squicky by the ending of Avengers: Endgame when Steve goes back in time to be with Peggy since she's now (an alternate timeline (?) version of) his grandniece. He likely saw her grow up from childhood.
  • Strangled by the Red String: While it's thankfully not at the level of the oft-derided Bruce/Natasha storyline from Avengers: Age of Ultron, Steve's romance with Sharon was panned as rushed and poorly developed with little buildup beforehand, on top of what little they do have being tinged with undertones that many in the audience found Squicky. The fact that Sharon in the MCU has been a consistent case of "They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character" and hasn't been fleshed out in the last movie or this one also hurts.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!
    • Thanks to the smaller scale of the MCU, the film featured far fewer characters on either side compared to the comic, where both sides had a larger number of secondary characters (many of whom were fan favourites). As a result, some have complained about the smaller teams leaving out popular characters while also reducing the scale of the conflict.
    • Many have complained that the inciting incident for the Sokovia Accords isn't as justified as the prompt for the Superhuman Registration Act. The latter revolved around a disaster caused by the New Warriors picking a brawl at a villain hideout to film a reality show, resulting in hundreds of civilian casualties that might have been prevented if the heroes had taken precautions when they had the chance (e.g., quietly evacuating the surrounding neighbourhood and calling in reinforcements). Whereas in the film, it was caused by an unfortunate snap-judgement made by Scarlet Witch attempting to get Crossbones away from a crowd while he was blowing himself up (which managed to save the people on the ground only to move the explosion to a nearby building).
    • Despite only having one scene, many complaints and jokes were thrown at the casting decision of Aunt May for her Adaptational Attractiveness compared to the character's usual portrayal. Unshaved Mouse defended the decision in his review of the film - pointing out that the character as originally conceived lived through two World Wars and six decades of bad food and housing conditions in 20th century New York. If May in this incarnation is the same age as her actress Marisa Tomei (51 at the time of filming) then she had to be born in the mid-60s at the earliest - and people these days do age much better anyway.
    • Helmut Zemo is, rather than a Germanic Baron, a military captain from Sokovia, and his father was a farmer rather than a Nazi supervillain. Though he retains the character's personality and intelligence, a lot of the changes garnered a lot of vitriol from some fans. Fans of the character's time with the Thunderbolts, however, tend to be more positive, due to it playing closer to his characterisation during that time. The fact he lives throughout the film and is set to return later also helps reassure fans bummed at him not forming the Masters of Evil or Thunderbolts, or learning swordsmanship, since he can do those things in later films.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Some early critics have said that Zemo's role isn't befitting a villain of his prominence, though this is consistent with the statements about him playing a bigger role in future movies. For what it's worth, his motivations are explored much more in-depth than most other MCU villains, he more or less wins, and he doesn't die at the end of the movie, setting him up for later appearances.
    • Brock Rumlow suits up as Crossbones for all of one scene before he blows himself up.
    • While it makes sense considering the likely fallout from Tony's full-on return to the suits in Avengers: Age of Ultron, having Pepper Potts absent from the movie, and explaining her absence by explicitly stating that she's left Tony, is a bit of an anti-climax for one of the series' longest-running characters who was consistently well-liked in the fanbase. Add to that the fact that Iron Man 3 heavily hinted at Pepper taking on her Rescue identity from the comics, and you could be forgiven for thinking that her role would be even more significant going forward, rather than marking her last on-screen appearance. Though in fairness to the writers, this may be more of a case of Real Life Writes the Plot, as Gwyneth Paltrow seems ambivalent at best about returning to the franchise,note  but is now too recognizable in her role for fans (and co-stars) to just accept Pepper being re-cast at this stage.
    • Even though she receives a slightly larger role than in The Winter Soldier, Sharon is still very underdeveloped as a character, considering her level of prominence in Cap's supporting cast in the comics. Many feel that her romance with Cap especially suffers as a result of this, as Strangled by the Red String goes into further detail.
    • The film draws on the Winter Soldier solo comic's plot a team of sleeper agents trained by the Winter Soldier. They're made stronger than the Winter Soldier, but are killed offscreen rather than being activated as in the comics.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Age of Ultron ended with the Avengers forming an almost entirely new team, consisting of Cap, Black Widow, Vision, Scarlet Witch, War Machine, and the Falcon. Their next appearance here only has Cap, Black Widow, Scarlet Witch, and Falcon participating in the opening mission before the team splits up onto opposing sides which disbands the new Avengers, meaning we never get to see the full new lineup fight together as a team before breaking up.
    • The Reveal that Bucky is not the only product of HYDRA's Super Soldier program, but there are five more elite enhanced soldiers who are described by The Winter Soldier himself as even stronger than he is, and that all of them together possess abilities that would allow them to take over a country within a day if given the order. These soldiers could've turned out to be Captain America and The Winter Soldier's toughest opponents yet and provide a convenient means for Iron Man and Captain America to drop their hostilities to team up and fight them, but instead Baron Zemo kills them all off while they are in stasis, effectively eliminating them as a threat. Tropes Are Not Bad in this case, since it enhanced Zemo's better qualities and helped deliver the Nothing Is the Same Anymore premise of Phase 3.
    • Multiple characters warn Tony that Ross will turn on him, constantly telling him to "watch his back", with the implication that Ross may start imprisoning all the Avengers and not just the ones who sided with Steve, but while Ross does refuse to listen to Tony when he discovers proof that Bucky was set up, he still allows Tony to leave unhindered and unfollowed (by Ross's men anyway) and tries to call him when Steve shows up to break out his team from their prison.
    • The movie does a rather good job at adapting the debate between Tony and Steve over how superheroes should be handled, removing much of the things that didn't work in the comic and making sure Both Sides Have a Point... but the debate is never really resolved; in fact, it's more or less forgotten after the airport battle so we can focus on the Bucky subplot, and isn't even the reason Cap and Iron Man fight in the climax. One could make the argument that the Sokovia Accords are actually superfluous to the movie as a whole, as ultimately they have little to do with why the characters end up fighting each other. The plotline surrounding Bucky and Zemo drives the majority of the film, and it could easily exist without the Accords.
  • Tough Act to Follow: It had the dubious honor of following Captain America: The Winter Soldier, which is in the running for the best movie of the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe. Remarkably, despite all the controversies surrounding this film, many consider it to be as good as, if not better than The Winter Soldier. Now, as the first movie of Phase Three, it serves as this for every subsequent movie, including Avengers: Infinity War.
  • Uncanny Valley
    • Spider-Man's mask, like that of Deadpool, has expressive mechanical lenses.
    • Marvel's age-modifying technology is as exceptional as ever, but there are just a few moments when teenage-Tony's skin looks a little too smooth.
  • Unexpected Character: Thaddeus "Thunderbolt" Ross being announced in the film also surprised many, since it's been eight years since his last MCU appearance.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?:
    • Ever since Captain America: The Winter Soldier, there's been a growing fanbase for Cap in the libertarian community. Even before this movie was released, they were already hailing it as a must-see to see Cap stick it to government regulation, incompetence and oversight. Post-release, this has resulted in somewhat of a Broken Base as some fans were unconvinced that Cap (despite his good intentions) did the right thing, and feel that Tony and the government, despite being flawed, ignorant and at times hypocritical, still had a good point.
    • Thunderbolt Ross presents the concerns the UN has about the Avengers as "a group of US-based [...] individuals who routinely ignore sovereign borders, inflict their will and are frankly unconcerned with what they leave behind" reflects some real-life opinions on the United States' foreign policy, especially with the onset of The War on Terror.
  • Win Back the Crowd:
    • Kevin Feige's statements as soon as the movie was announced that the movie would not revolve around the subject of unmasking and secret identities, which marks a significant point of divergence from the original Civil War comics, in the face of the comic's notoriously poor reputation, a lot of which stems from the issue of secret identities being considered a flimsy Conflict Ball (most heroes in this verse don't actually HAVE a secret identity to begin with).
    • Spider-Man's role in this film was intended to do this in regards to the cinematic portrayal of the character, given that his The Amazing Spider-Man Series had been suffering from diminishing returns and more middling critical reception than the first two films of Sam Raimi's Spider-Man Trilogy. Following the release of the film, Tom Holland's take on the character is almost universally regarded as the best out of the three in spite of the limited screen time, in and of itself justifying the decision to reboot the character a second time.
    • After two very divisive sequels, this film seems to have reminded some fans who were turned off of the character why exactly they fell in love with Tony Stark in 2008.
  • Win the Crowd:
    • The first trailer did a lot to dispel people's fears about the movie:
      • Cap is still the focus of the film, giving the film less of an "Avengers 2.5" vibe.
      • Bucky and Cap's friendship forms a major source of conflict, almost on the same level as the registration act itself.
      • Tony comes across as having good reasons for supporting the registration act.
      • Even people who otherwise disliked the trailer loved the scenes of Black Panther kicking ass.
      • Scarlet Witch is shown alongside Team Cap, assuaging anyone concerned by her lack of presence in the released art. The fact that she's flying is just the icing on the cake.
      • Falcon taking down two soldiers at the same time and being a total badass after getting hit with The Worf Effect during Ant-Man.
    • The fact that the second trailer manages to give all the heroes some degree of focus has helped allay fears that some characters would just be glorified cameos.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?:
    • Bucky's new uniform, which some fans have joked about for looking cheap and resembling a North Face jacket with the sleeve torn off.
    • Zig-Zagged with Spider-Man's new costume.
      • Many people love how the aperture-like moving eyes manage to copy both Steve Ditko and John Romita's eye styles from the 1960s (and a few compare it to the obscure Japanese Spidey). Some others, however, deem the moving eyes a case of Uncanny Valley, especially in the context of the more down-to-earth MCU, and have compared the overall look to that of the cheesy 1967 cartoon. There is another group of people who Take a Third Option and admit it's cheesy, but think that's perfectly fitting for the character. In any event, all indications are that the eye effect is actually an in-universe mechanism built into the suit. As he stated he wore goggles with his home-made costume to deal with the sensory input overload of his new powers, it's possible the eyes of the new costume adjust to accommodate his needs
      • Many people love that the webbing on the suit isn't raised as in the Raimi trilogy and Amazing Spider-Man 2, making it Truer to the Text, while others prefer the raised webbing.
      • Many are bummed about the black portions breaking up solid red and blue areas such as his arms and legs, unlike any other movie Spider-suit. Others just accept segmentation as part of the MCU aesthetic (see Captain America).
  • The Woobie: When Peter friggin' Parker is, as the Fridge page puts it, the least tragic character in the film, there's going to be many, many names here:
    • The poor hotel room service lady who delivers breakfast as usual to who she thinks is a nice guest, only to find a body in the bathtub. Her scream sells the scene.
    • Rhodey after he gets paralyzed trying to stop the Quinjet.
    • Peggy Carter dies from complications with Alzheimer's, out of action for a long time and unable to stop the turmoil that follows her funeral.
    • Sharon Carter for having her aunt die, being forced to assist in Captain America being taken into custody, getting attacked by a brainwashed Winter Soldier, and deciding to help Cap and him at a great personal cost.
    • Wanda. The movie is essentially a Trauma Conga Line for her after her mistake in Lagos, which was only partially her fault because she was left with little time to deal with Rumlow but still manage to minimize the damage, that kicks off the Sokovia Accords. She then has to deal with the people of the world expressing their hate and fear for her, during which she's essentially placed under house arrest by her own friends, and after that she's locked up in an ultra high-security prison restrained by a straitjacket and, unlike the rest of the captured Avengers, a shock collar for helping Captain America and Bucky stop Zemo.
    • Maria Stark when, on what she thinks is a usual trip to the airport, gets caught in a car accident, watches her husband brutally beaten to death as he's begging for her not to be killed, then has his body dumped by the killer next to her (to stage the "car accident"), and is then strangled to death next to her husband's corpse.
    • Bucky remembers everything he did while brainwashed by HYDRA, then it turns out he's become the centerpiece of a scheme meant purely for destroying the life of his friend and is put back under brainwashing by Zemo to kill Cap.
    • Tony is clearly uncomfortable with all the tension among the team, and with Pepper breaking up with him he comes across as desperately trying to salvage what little family he has left more than anything else. Then he has to witness what happened to his actual family, and learn one of his closest friends knew and lied to him about it, and watched another of his closest friends be crippled and almost killed in battle. Worse, he has to watch his parents murdered by someone standing right in the room with him; and as mentioned above, Cap's way of handling the situation doesn't exactly help Tony's state of mind, to put it mildly.
    • T'Challa. He loses his father within five minutes of being introduced, and nearly kills an innocent man when going on his Roaring Rampage of Revenge.
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