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  • Alternative Character Interpretation:
    • Krei is a lot meaner in the series than in the movie. Was he always like this, or did the events of the movie leave him feeling invincible? For the former, the movie always had him talking in public, so he had to be polite. On the other hand, he openly insulted Globby and had the audacity to blackmail Big Hero 6, both of which could've risked his safety. Either is still possible.
    • Obake gets that a lot.
      • The season 1 finale reveals that he suffers from a brain injury that makes him unable to tell right from wrong as a result of an experiment gone wrong. The revelation throws into question how much of Obake's actions are of his own will. Was he an unfortunate victim of circumstances where his accident was his Start of Darkness? Or was Obake already a science-obsessed maniac from young, and the accident was merely a catalyst that allows him to cut loose? Obake seems fully aware of his condition, but refuses to have it treated since he actually enjoys the freedom from a moral compass.
      • When Obake decides to seal his fate in his collapsing lair and refuses Baymax's aid, he takes off his chip from Baymax's system and pushes him to go save Hiro. Despite his inability to recognize right from wrong and his pleasure into villainy, Obake died doing the right thing. Did he regain some morals before dying?
  • Author's Saving Throw:
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    • Some episodes of the series show Hiro using his glove magnets in more effective ways than latching on to Baymax, which makes up for Hiro being the brainy, but powerless member of the team in the movie. Season 2 finally gives him his own distinct Weapon of Choice in discs he can throw around that attach to objects and that have a magnetic pull, giving him more combat utility.
    • In the original movie, some saw Yokai/Callaghan as Unintentionally Unsympathetic for his Never My Fault reaction when Hiro called him out on having caused Tadashi's death (as one would've expected Yokai/Callaghan, a vengeful Papa Wolf himself, to empathize with Hiro's situation). Here, Yokai/Callaghan (in prison, of course) finally gives a proper Heel Realization about what he did to Hiro and his family, and later even refuses to tell Chief Cruz Big Hero 6's identities out of gratitude for saving his daughter.
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    • For those who felt that Krei's depiction in Season 1 as a typical Corrupt Corporate Executive was out-of-character for how he was depicted in the movie, Word of God has confirmed that Season 2 gives him Character Development and Hidden Depths, which so far appears to be true.
    • Karmi starts off as a Base-Breaking Character. But as of Season 2's mid-season finale, the trauma she's been put through which caused her to be Put on a Bus caused a lot of fans to feel bad for her and appreciate her Character Development.
    • In "City of Monsters", we finally start exploring Tadashi's influence on the SFIT students outside the titular team by having Karmi tell Hiro how she admired him.
  • Awesome Art: The movie's CGI translates very well to 2D, keeping the same style while adding in some nice comic book style animation. It helps that the Creative Closing Credits of the movie already gave the series a template to work with.
  • Awesome Music:
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    • The theme song definitely helps capture the action sci-fi tone of the series.
    • The background songs that plays when High Voltage is on screen is definitely catchy. And then there's Barb's Villain Song from "Something's Fishy". While Big Hero 6 is far from a musical comedy like Tangled: The Series, Barb completely nailed that song.
    • "When Your Name Is Globby" from the episode "Nega-Globby" as Globby fights his Evil Counterpart and Honey Lemon defeats it with her upgraded chem-purse. Awesome song for an awesome scene.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Karmi. Fans either hate her for being a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing and being overly harsh to Hiro and Baymax to an extent with little provocation while being obsessively in love with Hiro's superhero alter-ego (not to mention making it unlikely for comic book character, Marys Iosama, to appear), or fans love her for her Friendless Background and potential for Character Development, not to mention frequent moments where she is Actually Pretty Funny (the absolute peak of which being the episode "Fan Friction"). Seems to have become less contentious in Season 2, where her Character Development has so far made her more amiable to Hiro and co. and the high stakes around her have made fans worried for her well-being. Look at Author's Saving Throw and Rescued from the Scrappy Heap.
    • Richardson Mole, Fred's comic book rival, is either too smug and annoying, or funny in an "I don't care what others think of me" kind of way. The episode "Big Hero 7", which is also divisive, didn't help matters.
    • Each member of the titular team is a base breaking character in their own way.
      • Hiro and Baymax are the most notable offenders. Some fans appreciate their relationship and quirks, while others are tired of them always taking the spotlight for majority of the series' episodes while their teammates are relegated to the sidelines. They felt that it was time for the teammates to shine, given that the movie had already delved into the two's relationship enough.
      • Wasabi and Fred both fall into this for one reason. Their hidden depths are downplayed in favor of making them a bigger source of comic relief than the movie, with one side being very annoyed with them and the other side arguing they still get plenty of time to shine.
      • Downplayed with Honey Lemon, but her more exaggerated perkiness either makes her annoying or she's still an engaging character.
      • One complaint some people have with GoGo is how she seems to go through character regression with her still softer moments being downplayed in favor of upping her tough side. With that said, she still has fans who appreciate when she's kinder.
  • Broken Base:
    • In a similar vein to the movie, the show having almost no basis to the comics it's based on, and not making any connections to Marvel characters, is either a good choice to let the show stand on its own, or feel that the potential could be better utilized with a Shared Universe.
    • The more overt and over-the-top humor is either funny or annoying.
    • The art style is also up for debate. One side thinks it looks like Flash garbage (even though this is hand drawn) and it's too simple and stiff. The other side doesn't mind it, and thinks it looks great, being reminiscent of the comic books it's based on. Those in favor of the latter point to The Spectacular Spider-Man, which has a simple, yet bold art style, and feel that the simpler art style here is to help make the action scenes more enjoyable to watch, like here.
    • Unlike most other action shows that utilize a core team, the titular team appears together in every episode. One side argues that there should be episodes that don't have all of the team together in order to enhance the quality of the more character-specific episodes, while another side argues that there are still plenty of episodes that give other characters time to shine even with the team together in every episode.
    • While not to the same extent as Tangled: The Series, the Cerebus Syndrome is a bit controversial. Put simply, the back and forth switch between the wackiness and drama either makes for a huge case of Mood Whiplash or it helps keep the show from going to either extreme.
  • Cry for the Devil: Obake may be a Mad Scientist who's willing to kill millions For Science!, but you can't help but feel bad for him when its revealed that he's suffering from a brain injury that makes him unable to differentiate right from wrong. You'll definitely feel sorry for him when his plan is thwarted and he suffers a Villainous BSoD that causes him to apparently be Driven to Suicide.
  • Designated Villain: Both Ned Ludd and Mel Meyer are not actual supervillains. They are both actually quite nice and good people, but both of their goals have a dangerous motive that puts them against Big Hero 6:
    • Ned Ludd is a technophobe hermit who due to losing his sanity over the years spent alone in the woods, saw Baymax as a threat against humanity and thought was doing the right thing by attempting to push him off a cliff. (thankfully, Character Development helps him in future episodes).
    • Mel Meyer is a good-hearted scientist who wanted his flexible display technology to be used for good things, not to attack people as Krei used said technology to create the Buddy Guards. Considering there was no way Mel could make a deal with Krei by asking nicely, who can blame him for trying to steal it back? Even Aunt Cass admits Mel had a reasonable motive.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Obake, a bombastic Evil Genius and Chessmaster who stays one step ahead of the heroes, and is voiced by Jim Moriarty.
    • High Voltage are the first female villains to be introduced, and have immediately received positive reception with their comical gimmicks and dance moves (including their own soundtrack).
    • Momakase is a skilled and badass ninja who can knock out an entire bunch of mooks like it's no biggie.
    • Then there's Hardlight, who treats real-life similar to a video game.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fan Nickname:
    • "Scone Daddy" or "Glowstick Man" for Obake.
      • The robotic copy of him that appeared in "Countdown To Catastrophe" is called "Robake".
      • His younger self is sometimes called "Emobake" due to Obake having an Emo Teen haircut.
    • "NBB" for Noodle Burger Boy.
    • Momakase is referred as "Knife Wife" or "Knife Mom" by her fans.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Perhaps the popular one is Hiro and Karmi, despite the latter being a Base-Breaking Character. This ship only became more popular after the events of "City of Monsters".
    • Many fans also ship Hiro and Trina, despite the fact that Trina is an evil android.
    • Then rivaling Hiro and Karmi is Hiro and Megan, because a lot of fans feel like they get along a lot better, and she's more relatable for Hiro than Karmi is.
  • Foe Yay:
    • Obake's fixation on Hiro can be interpreted as this. It also borders on No Yay territory, considering how Obake behaves like a stalker around Hiro, such as observing his everyday life to creating a robot girl that flirts with Hiro. There's also the fact that Obake is an adult and Hiro is fourteen.
    • Wasabi and Chris' relationship definitely counts, considering Wasabi is a hero and Chris is Liv Amara's right-hand man.
  • Growing the Beard: The pilot movie retreads a lot of ground (due to being an extended version of the film's epilogue), and first five episodes of the series proper are rather by-the-numbers. "Failure Mode" is the point where the series starts putting greater emphasis on the Myth Arc, and also becomes more creative with how the heroes and villains outsmart each other.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • In "Food Fight", Aunt Cass thinks Hiro is bot fighting again. Hiro does go back to bot fighting in "The Bot Fighter".
    • In "Issue 188", Wasabi jokes to Hiro to tell Karmi he has a clone so she doesn't doubt he's the superhero she's crushing on, to which Hiro replies Karmi will see through it. Then comes Season 2 where the Big Bad is an evil clone, and Karmi never doubted for a second of Liv/Di's true colors.
  • He Really Can Act: Andrew Scott is often known for playing slimy and despicable villains. However, fans were surprised by what an immensely heartbreaking performance he made in Obake's final moments.
  • He's Just Hiding!: How fans deal with Obake's supposed death. Helps that his fate is vague and they Never Found the Body.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight
    • One article released before the film compared Wasabi to Cyborg from Teen Titans. Jump three years later to this series, and he's voiced by Khary Payton, the voice of Cyborg.
    • Hiro's voice actor, Ryan Potter, is also playing Beast Boy in a live-action series about the Titans, though ironically this version of the team does not feature Cyborg.note 
    • One of the villains in the series is High Voltage, a pair of villians that attack with electricity by dancing. Sounds like they got inspiration from Electric Boogaloo.
    • The creators of the show are the same creators of Kim Possible, which had a crossover with Lilo & Stitch in its own series, and Lilo & Stitch has one of the most well-known cameos in the film.
    • While on that note, Mole's voice actor, Sean Giambrone, would be cast by the creators in the live-action Kim Possible movie as deuteragonist Ron Stoppable.
    • In "Baymax Returns", Honey Lemon tells Fred that she's not comfortable with having frozen someone. Later, in "Big Roommates" she doesn't seem to be as concerned when she accidentally freezes her roommate.
    • In "Baymax Returns", GoGo shoots down Fred's enthusiasm of getting the team back together by telling him superheroes and villains don't exist, but then in "Fred's Bro-Tillion", she learns Fred's dad was a superhero with many enemies.
    • In "Small Hiro One", Trevor Trengrove tricks Honey Lemon, Wasabi, and GoGo into helping create a machine to thrash their own asses.
    • A theory in the Kim Possible fanbase was that Kim was a robot built by her father, who is a rocket scientist. Big Hero 6: The Series is created by the creators of Kim Possible and Kim shares her voice actress with Trina, who turns out to be Obake's robot "daughter" who he built.
    • Not the first time Jane Lynch portrays a boisterous sarcastic woman named Sue.
  • Ho Yay:
    • Fred came up with names of ships in the team, including "Fredsabi", and says he thinks Wasabi will be a fan favorite because "he's so cool".
    • Chris, Liv Amara's assistant in season 2, seems to be quite interested in Wasabi.
    • Globby's relationship with Felony Carl in season 2. Globby's realization that Felony Carl is his Only Friend at the end of season 1 was accompanied with the line "If anything thing happens to me, tell Felony Carl he was my whole list," which in a slightly different context would be the closest the show has come to a Love Confession from anyone.
  • In-Series Nickname: Karmi calls Hiro's alter-ego "Captain Cutie". Characters in-universe and even fan of the series use the nickname as well.
  • Launcher of a Thousand Ships: Hiro is shipped with pretty much every girl in his age range, such as Karmi note , Trina note , and Megan note .
  • Les Yay: The series, mostly the "Big Roommates 2" and "The Fate of the Roommates" episodes, give us plenty of Honey Lemon/GoGo content.
  • Magnificent Bastard: Obake, real name Bob Aken, was once the top student of Professor Granville. After an unsupervised lab experiment ended in disaster, Obake was left with a brain tumor that left him incapable of differentiating right from wrong. Fascinated by artist/scientist Lenore Shimamoto’s work, Obake flawlessly manipulates both heroes and villains alike into acquiring Shimamoto’s research as well the secret identities of Big Hero 6, taking close interest in Hiro Hamada. He secretly observes and gauges the boy’s growth from the shadows, even going so far as disguising himself as Hiro’s dead brother. In the season finale, Obake reveals his grand plan to recreate Shimamoto’s failed experiment that caused the Great Catastrophe, and rebuild San Fransokyo into something “perfect”. He takes control over Baymax and captures Hiro in hopes of swaying him into becoming his protégé once the dust settles. Thwarted by the heroes, a heartbroken Obake lets himself go down with his collapsing lair, but not without freeing Baymax from his control to go back to Hiro and save the boy who he deemed his equal. A Visionary Villain whose charming brilliance is rivaled by his ruthlessness, Obake establishes as Big Hero 6’s most diabolical foe to date.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Once again, there are fans who say that Tadashi should return and be more focused on in the series (ex. he should have been The Sixth Ranger in "Big Hero 7" as opposed to Richardson) despite the fact that the Aesop of the story is to keep your loved ones in your thoughts while you move on with your life, with the series continuing that lesson by showing the characters moving on with their lives.
  • Moral Event Horizon:
    • Fans felt that Obake crossed it when he tricked Hiro into thinking that his dead brother was alive. This is even treated as one in-universe by GoGo and Wasabi, thinking that Obake really crossed the line this time.
    • It gets much worse in the season finale, where he plans on recreating the Great Catastrophe to make an artificial star, despite knowing full well it will destroy San Fransokyo and kill millions of innocents.
    • Liv Amara's clone Diane crossed it in "City of Monsters" when she forcibly turned her 16-year-old intern Karmi who idolized her into a monster and kidnapped Hiro and Baymax to force them to cure the real Liv Amara. When they succeed, she tries to mutate Hiro and then force the monster Karmi to kill him since He Knows Too Much.
  • Narm: Big Hero 6 apparently having secret identities despite their costumes clearly showing that they're the same person (except for perhaps Frednote ) and numerous characters already knowing who they are in the film. Though this is something carried over from the end credits of the film, as it was kept vague as to whether or not the media knew that Big Hero 6 were college students. Possibly a case of Status Quo Is God in case the movie gets a sequel that wants to address this.
    • Lampshaded in a big way in "Issue 188", when Hiro can't believe that fellow Teen Genius Karmi can't tell that Civilian!Hiro and Hero!Hiro are the same person, despite having seen both up close.
    • Comes back in "Countdown to Catastrophe" when each member of the gang gets a Dramatic Unmask after Professor Granville reveals that she knows full well that they're Big Hero 6. And later, Megan figures out Hiro's identity by connecting the dots from the SFIT fire, and matches Hiro's face out of costume to his face in costume.
  • Narm Charm: Karmi's fan names for the individual members of Big Hero 6. Some of them are genuinely cool, like Flamejumper for Fred, Speed Queen for GoGo, Red Panda for Baymax, and Chop-Chop for Wasabi, and then you have the low-effort Tall Girl for Honey Lemon and Captain Cutie for Hiro.
  • Never Live It Down: Obake was seen one time eating a blueberry scone. Because of this, the fandom on Tumblr constantly makes jokes about Obake having a scone addiction (who borderlines on a kink) and now nickname him "Scone Daddy".
  • Portmanteau Couple Name: It's lampshaded more than once in "Fan Friction". Karmi calls her pairing with "Captain Cutie" "Karmutie". Fred, who gives a bunch of ship names among the gang, like "Gogosabi", "Fredsabi" and Honeysabi. He also asks Momakase if her ship name with Obake is called "Momobake" or "Obakase". Though in the actual fandom, there's quite a chunk of these:
    • Karmi/Hiro = Karmiro
    • Megan/Hiro = Megiro
    • Trina/Hiro = Hirina
    • Karmi/Megan = Karmegan
    • Karmi/Juniper = Karmiper
    • Honey/GoGo = Honeygogo
    • Chris/Wasabi = Chrisabi
    • Cass/Obake = Obacass
    • Felony Carl/Globby = Felonyglob
  • Ships That Pass in the Night:
    • Cass/Krei (though sunk)
    • Cass/Obake is surprisingly popular, despite them interacting only once, in "Kentucky Kaiju".
    • Juniper and Karmi haven't met yet, but there's already a ship name and fan content for them.
    • Also Karmi/Megan, who did not meet since Karmi gets Put on a Bus at the end of the City of Monsters arc.
  • Rescued from the Scrappy Heap:
    • Karmi. She was a character with mixed responses in the first season due to her harsh behavior towards Hiro and Baymax. But as Season 2 goes on, Character Development hits her and considering she's in the middle of the Sycorax mess unbeknownst to her, fans now worry for her safety. This worry is justified when Liv gives Karmi an "upgrade" against her will in City of Monsters. After being Put on a Bus, people who previously hated her now appreciate her Character Development and hopes she comes back.
    • Chief Cruz, suprisingly. While not completely in the right for wanting to arrest Big Hero 6, "Fred The Fugitive" reveals his resentment towards superheroes and his overprotectiveness of his daughter, stems from the tragic loss of his father from when he was a child, by the hand of one of Boss Awesome's enemies.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Richardson Mole is hated in the fandom due to his bratty behavior and blackmailing tendencies (the peak of it being in "Big Hero 7") and his Ungrateful Bastard behavior towards Fred, who genuinely tries hard to put their rivalry aside to befriend him.
    • Chief Cruz for being the stereotype of the law enforcer who hates superheroes, despite the fact that Big Hero 6 had saved the city countless of times. His illogical deduction that superheroes attract supervillains (which is totally untrue) makes his hatred of superheroes seem to be out of nothing but spite. The hate towards him gets doubled when he shrugs off Big Hero 6 saving his life and still wants them arrested. Not only that, but his annoying Overprotective Dad tendencies towards Hiro for getting close to his daughter comes off as hypocritical considering that he tries to date Aunt Cass. However, see above for why he's been rescued.
  • Squick:
    • In "The Bot Fighter", Hiro falls for a girl named Trina, who seems to flirt with him, even kissing him on the cheek. At the end of the episode, she's revealed to be a robot sent by Obake to lure Hiro back into bot-fighting and away from heroics. Given that Obake has been behaving like an obsessed stalker toward Hiro for quite some time now, the implications of this Trina plan are particularly uncomfortable.
    • High Voltage eating raw fish in "Somethings Fishy".
    • Fred putting Wasabi's press juice back in his cup after it lands on the floor in "The Fate of the Roommates". There's a good view of a band-aid and a toe nail in it. Wasabi's reaction (running to the restroom to throw up) is definitely justified.
  • Take That, Scrappy!:
    • As annoying and bratty Richardson can be, karma fortunately always gets back at him:
      • He's on the receiving end of a lot of slapstick in "Big Hero 7" and gets his ass kicked repeatedly by High Voltage.
      • "El Fuego" has him threatened and beaten up by the episode's titular villain.
    • Hardlight kidnapping and constantly insulting Chief Cruz in the former's debut episode.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Several fans were very disappointed and a bit outraged with Khary Payton replacing Damon Wayans Jr. as Wasabi and and Brooks Wheelan replacing T.J. Miller as Fred, especially since everyone else of the original film reprised their roles. That's one of the reasons some fans tend to ignore the TV series.
    • Though averted depending on the fans, who love Khary Payton as Wasabi (since they loved his work in Teen Titans) and tend to prefer Brooks Wheelan over T.J. Miller, since Miller made a lot of controversy over the last 2 years.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • One lament that is carried over from the movie is that the series doesn't focus very much on GoGo, Wasabi, Honey Lemon, and Fred, instead continuing to focus mostly on Hiro and Baymax. Whenever the series does focus on them, they rarely get any lasting form of character growth, even in the episodes focusing on them.
    • Tadashi's influence on the cast and history at SFIT is rarely brought up. Particularly in "Obake Yashiki", the episode is centered more around the comedic hijinks of the team dealing with their Absurd Phobias rather than the emotional impact of Hiro facing an apparently Back from the Dead Tadashi.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Professor Granville and Obake's relationship is never explored in depth aside from flashbacks, and they don't meet each other until the final episode of Season 1. It's not helped by Obake dying afterward. Probably.
    • Baymax says Obake's condition is treatable. Wow, there's a ton of possibilities for Character Development! Too bad, he refuses to be treated and (most probably) dies in the Season 1 finale.
    • "City of Monsters" reveals that Liv Amara we knew is actually an evil clone Di, while the real Liv is terminally ill and in stasis. How does Granville, her old friend, feel about it?
    • We don't see Krei's reaction to the Liv that he knew was a clone all along.
    • Chris hitting on Wasabi could've been expanded. Did he really have a thing for him? Or was he faking it?
    • Monster!Karmi could've had a The Dog Bites Back moment and get back at Di for everything she's done to her.
  • Tough Act to Follow: While the show is well received by many people, its not as fondly looked upon as the creators' previous work on Kim Possible, with some people thinking its trying too hard to recapture the magic of what made it work. This could also be said for the previous works in between the two shows, but its really noticeable here.
  • Unexpected Character: Gordon Ramsay and Alton Brown voice characters in an episode parodying cooking competitions early on in the series.
  • The Un-Twist: Many fans had guessed that Liv Amara (or rather Diane) would be the Big Bad in Season 2. Perhaps expecting this to happen, the show does not make a big deal about this revelation and she's just casually shown to be the villain at the start of "Seventh Wheel".
  • What Do You Mean, It's for Kids?:
    • Obake's demise is quite dark. Then you remember it's a kid's show.
    • The scene where Karmi gets mutated into a monster seems straight out of a horror movie.
  • Win Back the Crowd: Of all the Marvel cartoons released this decade, this has garnered the most positive reception not only due to the movie's positive reception, but also how, just like the movie, Marvel has little involvement, leaving Disney itself to be more focused on crafting its own world with the series.
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