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  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • With Stop 'n' Swop rendered impractical, but hints about it already dropped, Rare couldn't just ignore it. The solution was to add Banjo-Kazooie Cartridge enemies into Banjo-Tooie that drop the promised items when defeated. Also, when the XBLA versions were released, Stop 'n' Swop was re-added (with the massive delay lampshaded to hell and back) and Stop n' Swop 2 taking its place. As a bonus, the feature was used for Nuts & Bolts before Tooie got its port, so it was already getting some use.
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    • Banjo-Tooie and the XBLA port of Banjo-Kazooie scrapped the idea of making you recollect Notes and Jinjos every time you restart a level.
  • Audience-Alienating Premise: A big reason why Nuts & Bolts tanked in sales. Many old time fans were either furious or simply turned off by the fact that they were getting a new Banjo-Kazooie game after years of waiting, only for the art style and platforming of the original games to be completely thrown out for a borderline In Name Only vehicle based follow up. And the game's nostalgic factor and unorthodox gameplay had no appeal to a newer audience, especially since the audience in question was now part of the largely adult aimed Xbox 360 crowd instead of the more family oriented Nintendo crowd the original games aimed for, thus ensuring the game would flop.
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  • Best Boss Ever: While it's kind of easy if you know what you're doing, the Final Battle with Gruntilda in the first game is, in the opinions of some, how a truly epic Final Boss should be.
  • Best Level Ever
    • The 1st game had the pirate-themed Treasure Trove Cove, and players might often find themselves there because it had the cheat-code sandcastle. Another beloved level was Click Clock Wood with its time mechanics and bumblebee transformation. Mad Monster Mansion is also a great level, being both densely packed and wide open enough that, despite being comparatively smaller than the levels before it, it feels much bigger.
    • The 2nd game had many great levels, including the mini-game heavy Witchyworld, Jolly Roger's Lagoon being a water level done correctly coupled with the wonderful submarine transformation, and the gloriously difficult Hailfire Peaks.
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    • Nuts & Bolts has Banjoland, which is widely considered the best world in the game owing to the sheer number of Continuity Nods and Easter Eggs present, its music being an awesome medley of songs from across the first two games, and its wide-open design allowing for a lot of vehicle options.
  • Breather Boss:
    • As exasperating as Rusty Bucket Bay can be, Boss Boom Box is an incredibly easy boss who can be taken down in seconds by just spamming the Wonder Wing on him.
    • Old King Coal roams around the arena with brief pauses to heat up the room to make 90% of the arena hazardous while the fumes drain your oxygen, but you're safe in the higher platforms set across the arena and he is very susceptible to being sniped by eggs (especially Ice Eggs or Grenade Eggs). The heat mechanic will hardly be a threat most of the time, because not only will he stop heating the room once your oxygen meter gets low enough, but you can double said meter before the fight by saving Banjo's fish with the Bill Drill. Given that Old King Coal guards Chuffy, a train that is necessary to get inside Grunty Industries without exploiting bugs, the easiness of his fight is likely intentional.
  • Breather Level: Click Clock Wood in the first game is a refreshing change of pace from the madness of Rusty Bucket Bay.
  • Critical Dissonance: While critics gave mixed to positive reviews to Nuts & Bolts, fans of the series have bashed the game for not being the advertised big comeback for Banjo-Kazooie they had in mind (though this has gotten better).
  • Designated Villain: Conga, in the first game. Whereas other foes in the series either try and kill the pair over a Jiggy, one of Kazooie's usual insults, or for not handing over a pizza they don't actually have, he just chucks oranges at 'em for trespassing in his home. And unlike most bosses, three Jiggies involve causing his misfortune instead of one: there's one for making him attack the orange tiles, another one for stealing an orange and giving it to Chimpy nearby, who helps them out by raising a stump, getting them to where they can attack him with eggs for the third Jiggy.
  • Difficulty Spike:
    • The eighth world in Banjo-Kazooie, Rusty Bucket Bay, is this due to water that makes you drown on the surface. There are also difficult-to-get Jiggies like the one behind the ship's propellers (those propellers will kill you immediately if you touch them when they are active), the one inside the engine room, and the one guarded by the boss. It's also one of two areas in Banjo-Kazooie, the other being the Final Boss fight, with a bottomless pit (it's inside the engine room).
    • Mr. Vile in Bubblegloop Swamp is, for many first-time players, the first time the game provides a spike in the challenge; prior to this, most Jiggies are pretty straightforward or out in the open, and then you run into this guy who forces you through not one, not two, but three challenges with increasing difficulty for a single Jiggy.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Hot Grunty from the first game's game-over screen, Mumbo Jumbo agrees.
    • Mumbo Jumbo himself. In the first game, he started out as a weird shaman with an unexplained romantic history with Gruntilda who turned up in a handful of levels. In the second game, he became a playable character.
    • Jolly Roger, making him (along with Mr. Fit) one of the few minor characters to return for Nuts & Bolts with an expanded role.
    • Mr. Patch is probably the other most popular boss in the series. He's the second biggest enemy in the series, losing only to Stomponadon, with his arena alone being larger than the entire first world of Banjo-Kazooie. He's also fought entirely from the air. To top it all off, he's hilarious. These factors have all made him very beloved.
    • Big Al and Salty Joe, the Witchyworld employees who sells hamburgers and fries respectively, are quite beloved because of their hilarious dialogue, over-the-top bad hygiene and manners, and being overall good indicators on how decayed the amusement park really is.
  • Evil Is Sexy: Grunty becomes really beautiful when she absorbs Tooty's youth in the first game-over sequence.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: For various reasons, many fans like to pretend that Nuts & Bolts never happened...
  • Friendly Fandoms: With Ape Escape, the Sony Playstation's notable Collect-a-thon.
  • Goddamned Bats:
    • Most of the enemies in the original game are reasonably easy to defeat, but the giant snowmen known as Sir Slush are incredibly annoying in that they can only be killed while you're in the air (and require a special maneuver that's easy to bungle) but still present a danger while you're on the ground.
    • Those ghosts in Mad Monster Mansion. No golden feathers? You're screwed.
      • To a lesser extent the mummies and skeletons which can be briefly disabled with ordinary attacks but not permanently defeated without wonderwing.
  • Good Bad Bugs:
    • The first game's "Reverse Bee Adventure" glitch, which allows you to take your bee transformation in Click Clock Wood outside of the level's bounds. It breaks the game wide open. The only catch is that the glitch is extremely hard to pull off, and it can only be done once per save file.
    • Because of how hitboxes were coded in this game, it is possible to stun-lock Mingy Jongo with Dragon Kazooie's fire breath simply by never letting go of the button when it connects.
    • It's possible to survive failing an instant death panel in Grunty's Furnace Fun by being at the very corner of it when it's triggered, since rather than actually kill Banjo, it launches him into the lava but deals no actual damage. Since the game is under the assumption that Banjo was killed by it (and likely to prevent any panels from triggering by accident during the fall), you're able to move across the entire board without questions being asked.
    • Clockwork Eggs are very glitchy; since they don't actually start existing until their eggs hatch, they can be used to clip through very small gaps in walls (like the almost nonexistent gap between a window and the wall) to get to Jiggies or Cheato Pages the player shouldn't be able to normally reach so easily. Not only that, Clockwork Kazooies don't activate aggro from enemies so they can also be used to bypass obstacles that typically force Banjo and Kazooie back when they get close to it.
    • In Nuts & Bolts, there's an exploit that allows for decent Sequence Breaking in Showdown Town when used properly. Basically, put an item in the trolley (preferably something square), stand on the item, and use the wrench on the trolley. It allows the ability to fly past various obstacles that require trolley upgrades to pass normally, allowing access to many crates before the first world. Just make sure to move forward every so often to continue flight, and enter the vehicle when (crash) landing to avoid damage.
    • Another Nuts & Bolts glitch to get past the laser walls in Showdown Town, crates have a bit of a weird proximity sensor when it comes to the trolley. If you use the wrench to bring a crate behind a laser wall as close to the trolley as possible, and then lay the trolley on its side so the bed is right up against the laser wall, the next time Showdown Town loads (whether from exiting a level or even just loading and exiting Mumbo's Garage) the trolley will reappear with the laser wall crate either in the bed or nearby it, allowing you to get some of the best items in the game way before you're supposed to!
    • Yet another Nuts & Bolts glitch involves the wooden sail parts. Mumbo outright tells you that they provide thrust no matter which way they're pointing so you don't have to worry about wind direction. What he doesn't tell you is that one of those directions is straight up, making it possible to build an ultralight "glider" that can fly forever under its own power. Even better, one of the more annoying fixed-vehicle challenges in the Terrarium of Terror involves driving an impossibly slow car with sails built-in up a mountain. You can convert the car into a glider in the field (which conveniently pauses the timer until you're done) and just fly to the goal at the top in about one tenth of the time it would take if you did it the "fair" way.
    • An early glitch was found in the original Nuts & Bolts demo, which limited how much of Showdown Town players were allowed to access. By sliding down the rocky ledge next to the main ramp up to L.O.G.'s factory while pushing against the wall, Banjo can potentially clip through the geometry and land in a layer of water below. Swimming through this water would allow Banjo to move beyond the barriers blocking the way, and summoning the trolley once he was well outside the barrier would send him back to dry land, allowing demo players to explore beyond the barrier (and even play a level of Hero Klungo Sssavesss Teh World) well before the game was released!
    • There exists a glitch in the first game which makes the infamous propeller room Jiggy from Rusty Bucket Bay, widely regarded as the most difficult in the entire game, much easier to obtain.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: Nuts & Bolts has multiple lines of dialogue predicting the game would do poorly. It did indeed, to the extent that it killed any chance of another game being made and caused Rareware to be retooled into making Kinect games. One joke in particular stands out in this factor. One of the discs in Logbox 720 claims that Nuts & Bolts will likely be forgotten in 10 years. Even with Rare Replay, this seems to have become a sad truth.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • Beautiful Grunty retroactively resembles Mila Kunis, who would play the Wicked Witch of the West in Oz the Great and Powerful.
    • Nuts & Bolts also had the Lord of Games make a few disparaging remarks about how no one would like the old designs and gameplay of the previous titles, thus turning everything into a vehicle-focused game for his amusement. Yooka-Laylee, a Spiritual Successor to Banjo-Kazooie, and its large amounts of support show otherwise, perhaps in part due to what Nuts & Bolts did (with a Take That! to Nuts & Bolts in that project).
    • The Styracosaurus kid is shown to have a taste for meat despite being a herbivorous dinosaur. Not only do paleontologists now believe ceratopsians might have been partially-omnivorous, but a Styracosaurus was chosen for paleoartist Mark Witton's painting portraying this behavior.
    • At the end of Nuts & Bolts, Kazooie asks L.O.G. to give her and Banjo's old abilities back, claiming they may need them for another game. L.O.G. does so, though he warns that they might never get another game. It took 11 years of waiting, and it might not exactly be their game, but L.O.G. was ultimately proven wrong. Banjo and Kazooie put their old moves to new use in another game. One on a Nintendo console, no less!
  • Jerkass Woobie: Klungo is an unrepentant villain who makes it clear that he doesn't regret anything he did while working for Grunty, but the sheer amount of abuse she put him through makes you feel more than a little sorry for the big guy. Sure enough, it finally catches up with Klungo and he outright quits working for her. The next time we see him in Nuts & Bolts, he's much happier.
  • Magnificent Bitch: Gruntilda "Grunty" Winkybunion is an evil witch and the nemesis of Banjo and Kazooie. In the first game, Grunty tries to use a machine to steal the beauty of Banjo's sister and scatters the Jiggies and Jinjo people throughout the land, preventing Banjo from summoning the mighty Jinjonator to stop her. In the second game, after being resurrected, Grunty ruthlessly crushes her enemies: ripping pages from her sentient spell book for planning to betray her, and killing Bottles and the Jinjo King, leaving Banjo and Kazooie without their powerful allies to stand against her. In Grunty's Revenge, she kidnaps Kazooie and forces Banjo to travel through time to save her, coming to a Near-Villain Victory with her scheme.
  • Memetic Mutation:
    • WAHEY Explanation 
    • Kazooie is always pregnant. Explanation 
    • GUH-HUHExplanation 
    • Eekum BokumExplanation 
  • Moral Event Horizon: If her murder of Bottles, plan to suck out the island's life-force, familicide of the Grey Jinjos and constant beatings of Klungo weren't bad enough, Gruntilda crosses the line when she kills her own sisters for losing the Tower of Tragedy Quiz Game Show.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • The choir accompanying the appearance of a Jiggy.
    • From both Banjo-Kazooie and Banjo-Tooie, "Jinjo!" whenever a Jinjo is rescued.
  • My Real Daddy: No matter how long Microsoft's owned Banjo-Kazooie, you'll be hard-pressed to find a fan who doesn't think of them as a Nintendo property at heart thanks to the first two games, which were among the most popular games on the Nintendo 64. Doesn't really help that the guys in charge dropped the series like a hot rock after Nuts & Bolts, consigning the two to cameos and minor guest appearances for over a decade. A common refrain heard after Banjo and Kazooie were announced as DLC fighters for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate was that the two were back right where they belonged.
  • Nausea Fuel:
    • A lot of things Brentilda says about Grunty, such as:
      • "Grunty brushes her rotten teeth with mouldy cheese flavored toothpaste!"
      • "She also washes her hair with rancid milk. Yuk!"
      • "And she gets her clothes from the trashcan!"
      • "You'd be sick if you ever saw the sight of her STREAKY BROWN UNDIES!"
    • Every time Loggo the Toilet shows up, for obvious enough reasons. In Mad Monster Mansion in the first game, you have to get flushed down him while transformed into a pumpkin to collect a Jiggy in his septic tank, something so filthy even Grunty chides you for how disgusting it is. In Grunty's Industries in Tooie, you at one point need to unclog him using Kazooie's beak.
  • Polished Port: The XBLA ports of the first two games have massively less slowdown, crisply upscaled HD resolution support, and bring back Stop 'n' Swop (as well as a Stop 'n' Swop 2 that may befall the same fate as its predecessor). The only downsides are that the camera controls are permanently inverted and the option to skip dialogue has been completely removed, making the ports less ideal for speedrunning, and there's noticeable music sync issues with the game's cutscenes, especially in regards to Tooie's opening, which gets a whopping 30 seconds out of syncnote , and to date, there have been no patches released to rectify these.
  • Porting Disaster: The Rare Replay launch version of Nuts & Bolts runs worse than the Xbox 360 original. Fortunately, a patch was released to fix this.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Several fans have admitted to preferring the original game's bad ending to the good one, thanks to a combination of Evil Is Sexy, Mumbo potentially getting a girlfriend (never mind that said girlfriend is Grunty...), and Tootie's status as a Flat Character.
  • Sacred Cow: Given that they're both considered some of the best games on the Nintendo 64 and as such formed a huge part of many fans' childhoods, criticizing the first two games in a harsh manner online is not a good idea.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Canary Mary. This bird and her races are reviled by many players to this day for the rage they induced. See That One Sidequest below.
    • The Lord of Games from Nuts & Bolts, for shamelessly dissing one of the greatest features in the past two games (via his "Collect-a-thon"), and radically changing the formula of the game himself. Essentially, in universe, he's singlehandedly responsible for absolutely everything BK fans hate about the game. In-universe, he's also responsible for all of those one sidequests in the other games, including Canary Mary above which he personally scoffs at the player for. This may very well be an intentional Hate Sink Gone Horribly Right. Lastly, fans also hate him because he was created as little more than a Straw Character and a scapegoat by the developers as a way of trying to deflect the blame as to why the game turned out the way it did.
  • Scrappy Mechanic:
    • The Beak Bomb, mainly in the first game. In theory, it's a cool idea to give Kazooie a flying attack, but in practice it's very hard to aim it right, and the game's wonky flying controls and the small targets you aim for (such as the hats of the Sir Slush enemies in Freezeezy Peak and Click Clock Wood) do not help with this. In Tooie, the Beak Bomb's direction during use can be influenced more easily, which combined with more spacious levels makes it a bit more viable for faster travel when flying.
    • Collecting Notes and Jinjos in the original release of the first game. If you restart the level by dying or leaving, Notes and Jinjos reset with it, forcing you to collect them all over again unless you've already gotten them all in a previous run.
  • "Seinfeld" Is Unfunny: The original game sometimes gets this, if only because the gameplay is rather janky and unpolished compared to the sequel. The lack of well designed bosses other than the final one is also a retroactive disappointment.
  • Self-Fanservice: Kazooie, a normal albeit huge bird, often gets turned into an attractive Funny Animal in artwork, a practice that had increased in prominence after the duo's appearance in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Downplayed with Banjo who, while already an anthropomorphic bear, tends to have his muscles emphasized just an extra bit compared to canon.
  • Signature Scene: Grunty's Furnace Fun in Kazooie.
  • So Okay, It's Average: The basic response to the GBA games.
  • Squick:
    • Everything Brentilda tells you about Grunty in the first game. The hag's pretty much built on Squick.
    • Receiving both prizes from Canary Mary. The Jiggy was stuck under her wing for days, and the Cheato page was wedged in... somewhere. Kazooie is rightfully disgusted when Mary tells them where they've been.
  • Stuck in Their Shadow: Banjo-Kazooie is a little weird about this. Ask anyone who the star is, and they'll say it's Banjo, even though the titles of three out of five games also include his partner Kazooie. The second game, Banjo-Tooie, opts for a silly title pun instead of recognizing the second lead's name (it's even lampshaded by Kazooie herself at the end of the first game), and Banjo-Kazooie: Grunty's Revenge mentions her name even though she isn't available at the start. This is all especially odd because she does the great majority of the actual work (to the point Banjo can be considered The Load) despite living in his backpack: Most players use Talon Trot exclusively to move because Banjo is so much slower, and all of the good attack moves utilize Kazooie. She also flies him around, and he even swims slower than she does.
  • Suspiciously Similar Song:
    • The beginning of the Gruntilda's Lair theme sounds a lot like "The Teddy Bear's Picnic".
    • The "Click Clock Wood" theme resembles the song "Oh You Beautiful Doll".
    • The theme of Nuts & Bolts' world "Terrarium of Terror" sounds a lot like the main theme of Mars Attacks!.
  • That One Level:
    • Fans like Clanker just fine, but Clanker's Cavern is a tiny, three-room level with hardly any content that required a lot of swimming around. And getting to it involved two mildly difficult jumps in a row. At least it avoids most common sewer level pitfalls in the process.
    • Rusty Bucket Bay, mainly due to the engine room, which has annoying to avoid propellers and gears. It's also all above a Bottomless Pit, and thanks to the musical notes being record-based (changed in the XBLA port), you will lose all your notes if you don't anticipate how annoying this room will be. There's also a switch Jiggy, where you need to race across all the treachery and make it to the boat's motors under a strict time limit. General consensus is that it's best to get this room over with first and then tackle the rest of the level. There's also a lot of irritating spots where the camera suddenly shifts to a fixed view that make swimming even more difficult than it already is with the faster oxygen usage.
    • Click Clock Wood can be this to amateur players. It's the longest level in the entire first game, so if you slip up or miss any notes and come back later, you'll have to waste a lot of time getting them all back. Not helping is that the lion's share of the level is set very high up in the air and commands precision platforming, so one wrong step will send you flying all the way down to the bottom. And it's also home to one of the most elusive and easy to miss Jiggies in the game. The Xbox Live port mitigates the note collecting part, thankfully.
    • Hailfire Peaks would've probably been a fine level by itself if the fire side wasn't a literal hell to navigate through. The paths are narrow, the enemies are annoying and lava covers 80% of the level. In addition, until you take out the bosses, you'll be getting pelted with fireballs and blasts of ice the entire time.
    • In Nuts & Bolts, Terrarium Of Terror can qualify as this, as much of the level is maze-like in its design and there are a lot of pathways through the level that are small, leaving less space for vehicles to move through. Much of the challenges in that world also tend to involve pre-set vehicles and trips through one dome to another dome, often through an unconventional pathway.
    • For individual stages in Nuts and Bolts, L.O.G’s challenge “Six of the best” has a lot of Fake Difficulty for tasking you with something the game never expects of you beforehand, namely a vehicle that can do practically anything (namely carrying things, sumo, flying though hoops, and staying in a ring for an amount of time). Sure, you can roll back the clock by answering questions, but they are often about very small details and they don’t roll it back as much as you think.
  • That One Sidequest:
    • The Mr. Vile challenge in Bubblegloop Swamp, due to his Rubber-Band A.I. making his eating competition much harder than it needs to be. Worst of all, you have to beat him three times in a row, with the rules changing each round. If you've been to Gobi's Valley and learned how to use the Turbo Trainers, you can use the pair at the top of Mr. Vile's room to give yourself an advantage, but first-time players are unlikely to know this is an option.
    • Freezeezy Peak is a fairly easy level for the most part, but it has three annoying side challenges: killing all of the snowmen by using the Beak Bomb (a move with rather wonky controls) to hit the small targets on their hats, and the two races with Boggy. While Boggy is nowhere as brutal as Mr. Vile, he still abuses Rubber-Band A.I. and can be rather annoying if you don't know what you're doing.
    • Mayahem Temple is an easy level, but it's home to two Jiggies that involve precise tiptoeing to get, with even the slightest slip-up forcing you to start them over, so both demand a lot of precision and patience. Though if a player desires, both of these challenges can be bypassed with the Clockwork Eggs if you're willing to wait to get them.
    • Jolly Roger's Lagoon has the challenge where you have to protect Chris P. Bacon from a colony of fish as he takes photos. While using the homing egg cheat and grenade eggs can make it slightly easier, the fish randomly spawn from all angles and come fast, and even one bite at Chris will force him to start over, leaving little room for error.
    • Obtaining the trophy in the "Saucer Of Peril Returns" challenge in act 2 of Terrarium of Terror requires a large amount of precision on the player's part, but the shift in gameplay can be downright annoying and the speed of the bullets shot is often not fast enough to hit most of the targets, in addition to the pointer being slightly faster than needed at times. In this challenge, 430 points are required to obtain the trophy, but most players are likely to get the Jiggy on most of their tries.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: Replacing most of Banjo's moves with vehicles in Nuts & Bolts pretty swiftly divided the fanbase. The final game has been received positively, but wasn't too successful in terms of sales. Some detractors point out there's nothing wrong with the game mechanics themselves, in fact they're rather fun, it's the fact previous Banjo-Kazooie titles have nothing in common with them. This overlaps with They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot, as many feel the concept of two rivals building all manners of custom vehicles and competing against each other in huge levels sounds like a great game, just not suitable for a proper Banjo-Kazooie game.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Mingella and Blobbelda's roles can be summed as rescuing Gruntilda at the very beginning of the game and then participating in the Tower of Tragedy Quiz at the very end (where they get crushed to death no less), thus remaining The Unfought despite the game teasing a potential confrontation against them as well as Gruntilda.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Stop 'n' Swop. Technically not their fault, as changes to the N64's hardware in later models made what Rare was originally planning to do with it impossible (they had planned to have the players shut off the console and switch cartridges, as the N64 originally held memory within its RAM for 30 seconds after being turned off; however, newer models drastically reduced that time, to the point where it would have been impossible to use the mechanic on a newer console). Nonetheless, after all the endless speculating the (admittedly cool) sequel hooks at the end of Banjo-Kazooie prompted, the cop-out Banjo-Tooie had to use felt distinctly forced and was definitely a let-down.
    • Even defenders of Nuts & Bolts have admitted that the game might have gone better had the gameplay ideas been used for a new IP rather than for a Banjo-Kazooie game.
    • There was a scrapped mission from Kazooie of Tooty guiding Banjo to Mumbo Jumbo after Gruntilda turned him into a frognote . Had the mission come to pass, it not only would have made more use of Tooty, but she would have been helping her brother the way he helped her.
  • Ugly Cute: If you get a Game Over, Tooty's beauty-stolen form is surprisingly cute, seeing as how her cuteness was swapped by Grunty's hideousness.
  • Unwinnable by Insanity: As Washing Machine Banjo, it's possible to trap yourself in Grunty Industries (specifically at the bottom of the Air Conditioning Plant).
  • Values Dissonance: Some North Americans might take offense to Rare (a British company) designing Humba Wumba as an extremely stereotypical Native American. It's worth noting that in Nuts & Bolts, made under the supervision of American Microsoft, Rare drastically changed her design to be much less stereotypical. That said, it's unlikely only North Americans would think of her as stereotypical.
  • Viewer Gender Confusion: Kazooie can be very confusing, given her brash character and utter lack of feminine traits. Rareware apparently got sick of it, though, since the Revival gave her a few Tertiary Sexual Characteristics.
  • Vindicated by History: When it first came out, Nuts & Bolts was near-universally reviled by Rare fans for drastically differing from the gameplay of the previous two games (although professional critics were more charitable). Admitting that you liked it even a little bit would get you accused of Fandom Heresy and cause major backlash. However, the initial outrage has since cooled off and after giving the game a second chance, many fans have come to see Nuts & Bolts as still being emblematic of the fun creativity that Rare displayed in its hey-day and is in some ways even innovative in its design. Rare releasing a lot of mediocre games also helped fans further appreciate the game. While there's still some hate towards the title, far more people are willing to consider it a good game, just not an appropriate Banjo-Kazooie game.
  • The Woobie:
    • Gobi, a camel who just wants to find some water and a quiet place to rest, is constantly suffering abuse from our eponymous heroes and Gruntilda's mooks for some reason or another. By the time you see him locked up and put on display in a freak attraction at an amusement park in Banjo-Tooie, you can't help but want to cry for his constant misfortune despite the fact that it's necessary in order to progress.
    • King Jingaling also counts. The poor guy loses all of his subjects thanks to a giant tank that runs over part of his kingdom (one entire family of his subjects is killed in this way) and his reward for pointing Banjo and Kazooie in the right direction and giving them a Jiggy is to be zombified.
    • Clanker is a pitiful blend of Gentle Giant and Body Horror. He's obviously a very intelligent creature and probably used to be a regular whale before being gutted and encased in machinery. And in spite of his solitary confinement in his cavern, which would drive pretty much anyone completely insane, upon seeing Banjo swim in he simply offers a friendly welcome and asks if Banjo could please raise him to surface level. He's spent this whole time alone and imprisoned in a derelict cyborg body, unable to so much as breathe comfortably. It's even worse in Nuts & Bolts, where he has been disassembled and his parts used in the construction of Banjoland, but remains conscious and cognizant, albeit unable to actually move or communicate at all. It's arguably a fate worse than death.

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