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YMMV / Baldur's Gate: Siege of Dragonspear

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  • Alas, Poor Scrappy: Skie, who usually ranks very high in lists of useless or annoying party members in BG I, gets Character Development and is so callously killed by Irenicus that one can't help feeling a little sorry for her.
  • Author's Saving Throw: A common quibble of the original games is how nonsensical the reputation system is for evil companions; they will object and complain as if being well-liked in the eyes of the public is a negative thing, when really the most efficient and pragmatic evil PCs will be played as Villains With Good Publicity and enjoy all the benefits such a thing entails. SoD goes a way to justify this behaviour, as evil companions will actually explain why they each want to avoid a heroic reputation when the meter gets too high. Viconia, for instance, believes that drawing too much attention to the group will get her imprisoned or killed.
  • Broken Base: The ending. Some consider it a good or at least decent ending that properly explains the "grim circumstances" Charname and the party left Baldur's Gate under while also explaining how Irenicus captured them, while others hate it, claiming it contains blatant Rail Roading, completely ignores your past accomplishments in favor of one accusation of murder, and gives you barely any opportunity to defend yourself, and it doesn't even matter if you do, because anyone who believes you gets overwhelmed by Skie's father who is mad with grief over her death.
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    • Some people have criticized the expanded experience cap, complaining it can severely upset the balance of Baldur's Gate II once the main character has been imported. Others are happy to walk into it at a higher level of power.
  • Captain Obvious Reveal:
    • When it's revealed Caelar Argent wants to open a portal to Avernus, it becomes painfully evident this is some sort of scheme orchestrated by devils. And, big shocker, it turns out to be the case.
    • Subverted in the case of The Hooded Man. While one would expect a last-minute unsurprising revelation that he's actually Irenicus, nothing of the sort happens, leaving his identity secret.
  • Complete Monster: Hephernaan is supposedly a cleric in service of the Shining Crusade, but is in truth the servant of powerful devils. Manipulating the Crusade's leader Caelar Argent, Hephernaan made her think she could save her uncle Aun from the Abyss, inspiring her to raise an army under the false belief of storming the Nine Hells. Hephernaan oversaw the deaths of thousands and a near-catastrophic war on the Sword Coast to lure in the Bhaalspawn to use their divine blood, intending on opening Faerun and all Toril to a Baatezu invasion that would see every living thing killed or enslaved to devilish torment forevermore.
    • See here for Belhifet.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • M'kiin the goblin shaman was a very well received addition to the companion roster, with an interesting backstory and a cool character kit.
    • Skie, despite being the opposite in the original title, also became this for some people after her Character Development. A common sentiment on the Beamdog forums after the game's release was that Skie would have made a much better party member than Safana.
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  • Hilarious in Hindsight: After the starting dungeon, Kivan's stated reason for leaving the party is because Tazok is dead, his lover avenged. Tazok actually turned out to be Not Quite Dead in the sequel.
  • Moral Event Horizon: In case you don't hate Hephernaan by the time you finally lay siege to Dragonspear Castle, you will after discovering he manipulated Caelar, her Crusader followers and Charname to allow him to reopen the portal to Avernus and unleash The Legions of Hell upon Faerun once more.
  • Overshadowed by Controversy:
    • The inclusion of Mizhena, a transgender cleric of Tempus. As a minor NPC, Mizhena would reveal that she was transgender if the player selected a certain combination of dialogue options. Despite that, many forum posts and Youtube videos were made, deriding the developers for the character's inclusion, often exaggerating how prevalent Mizhena's gender was. Forgotten Realms founder Ed Greenwood himself weighed in, arguing that the character's detractors were being too close-minded about a setting where changing one's gender is as simple as casting a spell or putting on an enchanted belt, though many ignored his opinion for various reasons. Players bombed the Steam page with negative reviews accusing the developers of forcing political propaganda, drowning out reviews that included actual criticism of the game's technical problems and divisive writing.
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    • Beamdog gave Minsc a click-on quote taking a jab at the GamerGate controversy. The line was removed, but accusations that the devs were needlessly politicising the franchise lingered.
  • That One Boss: The Final Boss is far and away the toughest enemy in the game. He hits like a truck and shrugs off damage from all but +3 weapons, which there are not that many of and which are rather difficult to track down without a guide. For some party combinations, taking him down on higher difficulties relies on Caelar doing most of the work. Assuming, of course, that she didn't join him before the battle started...
  • Scapegoat Creator: Among the game's developers, Amber Scott got the worst of the heat. She took credit for writing Jaheira and Safana's character bits. She also wrote a post on the forums proclaiming she put as much diversity as possible into her writings, which led to her receiving a great deal of online harassment.
  • The Scrappy:
    • Safana. Despite being pushed as a default party member (and the developers' stated intent to flesh the character out), she's actually irrelevant to the plot and rather than being given a little more depth or Character Development, if anything she comes across as much more of a bitch than she was in the first game, where she was merely considered a mediocre but harmless and tolerable party member. Her underwhelming and anticlimactic romance, which ends with her cheating on you with Voghiln regardless of how you treat her, is also seen as the worst in the game.
    • While her character throughout the campaign is merely divisive, Corwin's actions at the end of the game are so widely despised that she winds up in this territory. More specifically... She claims to have seen the player killed Skie, but this is not true in any version — a vision shows it was actually done by Irenicus, and she didn't show up until after the fact. She then tells the player that they should commit suicide to give Baldur's Gate peace because the city is in turmoil over the question of whether they're innocent.note  At the very least, the player character is able to throw her "suggestion" right back in her face.
    Charname: I take it back, Schael. You're not a traitor. I can handle treason. You're worse. You're an idiot.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character:
    • Skie, for some. With the young thief's upped level of confidence and competence between games, she could have been something of a Replacement Goldfish for Imoen, who doesn't feel strong enough to join Charname at Dragonspear. Sadly, Skie is not a recruitable character, and has her own arc independent of the party. Instead, Safana becomes the party's default thief, and her status as The Scrappy led many fans to strengthen their beliefs that Skie should have had that role instead.
    • Caelar and her lieutenants (other than Hephernaan) are generally considered to be underutilized and under-developed. Word of God is that there would have been an option for Charname to join Caelar that presumably would have fleshed them all out, but in the finished product the lingering hints to this path are instead an Aborted Arc, with Charname being Railroaded into conflict with Caelar regardless of which dialogue options they pick. There were also those who felt that Caelar's ultimate fate was not deserved, with several plans for mods for Baldur's Gate II that would bring her back, make her playable again, and potentially offer closure.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not Political?: One of the first issues tackled in the game is an ongoing refugee crisis, complete with several Corrupt Cop Flaming Fist enforcers persecuting helpless migrants. However, despite the fairly bleak presentation of authority in this conflict, the player is given the choice to side with the Fist and put their foot down on the chaos; in such a Charname's own words, personal tragedy is no excuse for breaking the law.
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