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For tropes that apply specifically to the HYYH/WINGS/LOVE YOURSELF storyline and characters, go to the BU page.

For tropes that apply specifically to the webtoon, go to the SAVE ME page.


  • Archive Binge: They have a lot of content. Even after you listen to their entire official discography, you can go listen to the mixtapes and a lot of Soundcloud-only songs. And even then, there's hours and hours of additional content, like variety and reality shows, interviews, videos from BANGTANTV and their social media accounts, and an entire music video canon. It's like a rabbit hole. Enter at your own risk.
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  • Archive Panic: They have a lot of content.
  • Award Snub: Didn't receive a single nomination for the 2018 MTV VMAs (not even Best Choreography); this was after the period that gave us "DNA", "Mic Drop (remix)" and "Fake Love". To rub salt into the wound, another (American) boyband's performance was introduced in the award show as "America's favorite boyband" despite never even charting in the US, while those three songs did.
  • Broken Base:
    • Big Hit Entertainment and Bang PD, in general. Are they a company who takes good care of BTS, or do they exploit them because they are profitable? Are BTS overworked, or do they work such insane schedules because they themselves wish to please the fans? Whether the times BTS did express (minor) disagreements over certain decisions of the company should be cause of concern or have been blown out of proportion by certain portions of the fandom also remains somewhat of a topic of discussion.
      • There's a lot of evidence (Burn the Stage, interviews, personal tweets and Fancafe posts, BTS' very informal attitude and teasing towards Bang PD in general) that they have a much less vertical relationship with him than what would typically be the case, and that they do what they do out of genuine enjoyment or self-imposed goals.
      • It's also well-known that Bang PD was the one who told BTS to "tell [their] own stories". As this old interview reveals, his method was very intentionally not controlling them: he simply asked them to develop and grow as artists and to display a true interest in music, giving them assignments and letting them decide the rest (schedules, lessons) by themselves. He also refuses to be called "BTS' father", preferring to be seen as a hyungnote  and crediting BTS and fans for their achievements.
      • RM and other members are also seemingly aware of these concerns; they have asked fans more than once to please trust them, stating that they love what they do and that they all participate in decision-making. There's RM's "Album of the Year" award speech at the 2018 MAMAs as well, where he went out of his way (off-script) to directly thank Bang PD at length, crediting him as the one who believed in BTS from the start when no one else did.
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    • American Hustle Life: An educational experience for the boys to interact with L.A. culture? A cringey, mildly-xenophobic show where the boys constantly get put in uncomfortable situations? All of the above? A growing consensus seems to be that it was crucial for BTS's growth in their interaction with black culture and one of the keys for their later success, but it's still hard to watch for many.
      • Certain elements (like the kidnapping Candid Camera Pranknote  and Coolio's harsh treatment of the members), are still contested regarding whether they were actually funny, tasteful or necessary.
    • Suga's famous Hong Kong lyric in "Cypher Pt. 3", which roughly translates to "As you know, my voice turns people on. Whether you're a man or a woman, my tongue will send you to Hong Kong". Since "going to Hong Kong" is Korean slang for an orgasm, interpretations from fans are divided on whether or not Suga is implying he is bisexual in that lyric, or simply boasting about his rap skills by comparing them to sexual prowess.
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    • Speculating the sexuality of the members in general is a huge base-breaker in the fandom, as it is for all celebrities. Justified curiosity, or disrespectful rumour-bait?
    • Your ARMY experience will vary depending on the social media platform you use the most. Twitter ARMYs (where the fandom is the most organized) are the most critical of fans from other platforms, especially Facebook and Instagram ARMYs, where the fandom is far less regulated and therefore stereotypical "toxic/obsessive fan" behavior abounds (see Yoko Oh No below), while Twitter ARMYs are seen in some places as overly combative or records-obsessed. There's an increasing amount of fans crossing over into other platforms in both ways, though.
      • To a much lesser extent, Youtube ARMYs. Youtube is one of the main platforms (if not the main platform) where people learn about BTS, the fandom and its in-jokes; it's also one of the main sources of the so-called "no jams" behavior (see Discredited Meme and Never Live It Down below). Some fans also have a tendency to upload songs with often-reposted-and-uncredited English translations (affecting views in official videos), even when it's completely unnecessarynote  - these are, however, also an important entry to the fandom, especially in the case of Soundcloud-only songs like "DDAENG".
    • BTS, Kpop, and the coverage of both in Western media. Should BTS' achievements in the US be considered wins for Kpop as whole, like many articles like to present it as (often recommending other Kpop groups in the same breath)? Should BTS' success be seen as a sign for other Kpop artists to also cross into the US mainstream? Or should BTS be seen as a phenomenon on their own?
      • On one hand, BTS' success could be seen as an opportunity for other Korean idol groups to obtain more visibility in the US market - which some of them have done, to some extent -, as well as a way to bring more diversity to the pop music industry via Asian representation; reducing the phenomenon to only one group would then be limiting access for other artists, as well as falling into exceptionalism. Not to mention that introducing Kpop in general along with BTS is pretty much unavoidable for a largely unfamiliar audience.
      • On the other hand, the atypical nature of BTS compared to most Korean idol groups, the growing divide between ARMYs and the rest of the Kpop fan community, and the vast difference between BTS's steady climb in the US charts versus what other Kpop groups have managed to achievenote  might indicate that BTS's success doesn't exactly guarantee that other Kpop groups will be able to do the same. Having BTS constantly presented by Western media as part of a "package deal" with Kpop has also been criticized for equating all groups in artistry and quality merely for being from the same country and language, instead of treating BTS as artists in their own right.
      • Media's promotion of Kpop based on BTS' success has also been questioned by some for presenting it as Asian representation while only focusing on Korean idol groups, ignoring other Korean artists, artists from other Asian countries, and Western artists with Asian roots.
    • Even more controversially, "Kpop". Being a long debated term in itself (notably originated in, again, Western media), it has come to be associated with idol groups rather than Korean pop music in general, with the Korean idol industry at large having a reputation of manufactured music and controversial practices that has unfortunately bled into the perception of BTS in the West. This is why many ARMYs prefer to distance BTS from the term, embracing claims from Korean critics that BTS are "beyond" or "more than" idols or Kpop. However, given BTS' proud self-labeling as both idols and artists, other fans have argued that it's no point in trying to separate BTS from Kpop, as they are still Korean idols who make Korean pop music - and that it would just be perpetuating the stereotypes that BTS and other artists are challenging.
      • This is made more complicated by the habit of some people (including, once again, Western media) of either only focusing on idols in their coverage of Korean music, or labeling anything from South Korea as Kpop, regardless of genre. For example, even though RM's mono. could easily be classified as "indie" or "alternative", it still appears in Apple Music under the "K-pop" category, leading to wrong assumptions from radios and potential listeners.
      • On the other hand, as it was already made clear in "IDOL" and their interviews in the Grammy studio and Entertainment Weekly, there's also the fact that BTS themselves don't mind the label of "Kpop artists" or labels in general. Suga even explicitly accepts the term, though he defines it as a music/visuals/dance package rather than a music genre.
  • Cargo Ship:
  • Discredited Meme: While you'll be forgiven if you're a new fan, old jokes like "you got no jams" and "infires man" won't exactly make you popular on Twitter, as they've been repeated to death in social media. The fans who still rely on them (most often seen in places like Youtube or Amino) are referred to on Twitter as, appropriately enough, "no jams" (though it's also sometimes used to refer to other types of less-than-ideal fan behavior).
    • Certain ones, like calling certain members old nicknames like "god of destruction", "alien/4D", "horse" or "mom/eonma/pink princess", are seen as horribly Flanderizing or outright insulting in various ways, with members vocally expressing dislike for some of them. The fact that they've been very prevalent in fan-made "introduction to the members" videos partly explains the less-than-positive perception of Youtube ARMYs on Twitter. See also Never Live It Down below.
    • Adding "-eu" to the end of words, since it makes fun of their accents.
    • Jokes about Jin and RM's dancing skills, which not only have proven to be actually hurtful to them according to interviews, but have also become very outdated; both members have been able to keep up with the rest when dancing as a group even since debut, and they have improved a lot since.
  • Earworm: A good number of songs. Just some examples are:
    • "We just sing it like click click bang bang"
    • "Wae nae mameul heundeuneun geonde"
    • "Hetgallige hajima" "Neo ttaemune neomu apa"
    • "I need you girl!"
    • "Wonhae mani mani"
    • The "DNA" whistle.
    • "DID YOU SEE MY BAG? DID YOU SEE MY BAG?"
    • "YOLO YOLO YOLO ya/YOLO YOLO ya/Tangjinjaem tangjinjaem tangjinjaem"
    • "I'm so sick of this fake love!/Fake love!/Fake love!"
    • The saxophone melody (and the "oh-oh-ooooh"s that repeat it) will ensure that you'll have a hard time getting "IDOL" out of your head.
    • Suga and J-Hope's Japanese song "Otsukare" is this in spades. "Otsukareeee... samadeshitaaaaa".
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: Regarding songs, Cyphers 2 and 3, "Tomorrow", "Bapsae/Silver Spoon", "Whalien 52", "Butterfly", "House of Cards", "Magic Shop" and "Outro: Tear" are some side-tracks that are very popular in the fandom.
    • "Pied Piper", "134340", "Love Maze" and "Paradise" are fan-favorites that have never been performed on tour (and with the exception of "Pied Piper", never performed live).
    • All of the solo tracks for the LOVE YOURSELF series ("Serendipity", "Singularity", "Euphoria" and "Epiphany" for the singers, "Just Dance", "Love" and "Seesaw" for the rappers) are incredibly popular in their own ways. "Euphoria" even appeared in the "Bubbling Under 100" Billboard list after Answer was released!
    • Fans have begged for the Soundcloud-only tracks like "DDAENG", "4 o'clock" or "Promise" to be released on Spotify and paid platforms - or even as singles - due to their charting potential.
      • Jimin's "Promise" managed to shatter the record for most streams on Soundcloud during the first 24 hours. This record was set by none other than Drake, who was surpassed again with V's "Scenery".
    • From MAP OF THE SOUL: PERSONA, there's "HOME", "Mikrokosmos" and "Dionysus".
    • From the non-music side, Min Yoonji. The Aloof Dark-Haired Girl played by Suga for a one-off sketch in Run BTS! is incredibly popular in fanart, and many fans want her to return.
      • Kim Army (an Adorkable BTS Fangirl as portrayed by RM for the "House of ARMY" sketch) is also popular. She's often portrayed and/or shipped with Yoonji in fanart.
      • To a lesser extent, Kim Army's mother (hamtastically played by J-Hope) also appears often on fanart.
    • The BT21 characters have reached a Cash Cow Franchise-in-the-making level of popularity, even reaching non-fans.
  • Epic Riff:
    • The instrumentals from "Blood, Sweat and Tears" are among the most recognizable ones from BTS' entire career, and perhaps from Korean pop as a whole.
    • The saxophone in "Dope"'s chorus.
    • The opening instrumentals of "Baepsae/Silver Spoon", which repeat at various times.
    • The opening and drop of "Save Me".
    • The "BWOOONG"s from "Not Today".
    • The whistle in "DNA", the melody in "Mic Drop", and the recorder on repeat in "Go Go".
    • The synths in "FAKE LOVE".
    • The saxophone melody (again) from "IDOL".
  • Fandom Berserk Button: Being a Korean boyband from a small company, there are layers upon layers of prejudice that fans constantly have to correct, such as:
    • Any assumptions based on Girl-Show Ghetto: that they're only popular because of their looks, that their work has no depth whatsoever, or that their fanbase is made exclusively of teenage girls and fans of One Direction who jumped ship during their hiatus, when there are fans of all ages, genders and music tastes.
    • Saying that they're puppets exploited by their company and that they have no creative input in their content.
    • Accusing them of having gone through plastic surgery (or worse, being surgery "addicts") solely based on the fact that they're Korean and/or rumors created by antis. Some fans have counter-proof in the form of pictures of the members as children/teenagers in hand, just in case.
    • Accusing them of plagiarizing other groups based on old superficial comparisons between things like clothes, concept images, one lyric taken from a Twitter account (that was done unintentionally and was quickly apologized for), and hair, especially if the thing they're accused of plagiarizing actually came out after the fact or is only similar for reasons beyond the members or the company's control.
      • Similarly, accusing them and the company of sajaegi or chart manipulation through self-buying based on accusations from other fandoms in 2015-2016, which had to be disproven in court.
    • Saying that they're racists/misogynists based on stuff from 2013-2014. See Never Live It Down below.
  • Fandom Rivalry: BTS and EXO fans do not get along, which is unfortunate because the two groups seem to actually quite good friends (or at least civil) in reality.
    • While rivalries are awfully common in Kpop, BTS' rising popularity (rivaling and even surpassing bigger established groups) and increasingly louder fanbase (in the sense of "BTS brought me here" becoming a meme due to being so widespread) gathered negative sentiments against the group and their fans among some Kpop circles since 2015 (some say even before), with some even acting out against BTS themselves, the worst incidents note  involving fans of EXO and Big Bang. The fact that there's also a growing portion of ARMYs who declare themselves fans of only BTS (and maybe some other Korean artists) and not of Kpop as a whole partly as a consequence of the above - not to mention a new wave of fans coming from Western "stan Twitter", with all that entails - hasn't sat well with some Kpop fans. It's better to leave it at that.
      • It should be noted that some sections of the BTS fandom are friendly with other Kpop fandoms, ranging from fans who are multi-fandom, to ARMYs who also like a select number of artists (who may or may not be idols), to ARMYs who are indifferent to Korean idols, to a vocal portion of ARMYs who actively listen only to BTS. Whether they also view the industry or other fandoms positively also varies; a good portion of fans on Twitter might like certain Korean artists, but are very critical of the Korean idol industry and refuse to engage with Kpop fandoms (at least with most of them).
    • Many ARMYs fight with older generation Kpop fans who claim that BTS did not pave the way for other Korean artists to become successful in the west and credit artists like BIGBANG and Wonder Girls instead. Not even the fact that artists like PSY, Tablo, Ailee, and Sunmi (ex member of Wonder Girls) have explicitly credited BTS for opening the doors for Korean artists has stopped the debate - with some Kpop fans turning against those artists instead.
    • The relationship between fans of BTS and BLACKPINK on Twitter became tense in 2018 due to various factors, including Hype Backlash among newer ARMYs towards BLACKPINK (due being lauded in certain circles as the most feminist Kpop group or "the female BTS"), media practices in part of YG that were questioned by ARMYs, and Blinks reusing tutorials without permission. All of this quickly devolved into some people in both fandoms dissing each other's groups and some ARMYs even starting to (very vocally) criticize various rappers in female Kpop groups. The fact that a few Blink accounts - many of them male fans - accused ARMYs of being "anti-feminist" or "men-obsessed" for not supporting BLACKPINK (even if they did support other girl groups) did not help matters.
      • A similar case occurs with LOONA. While - like with BLACKPINK - there's a good number of fans of both groups, Hype Backlash reactions from some ARMY Twitter accounts (only exacerbated by the incidents with BLACKPINK) weren't received well by a Vocal Minority among Orbits, which has retaliated through trolling and spamming (and mocking an ARMY's appearance, in one case). This (once again, mostly male) vocal minority, which has resorted to insults to the members even in positive LoonARMYs tweets (such as one comparing a picture of LOONA member doing a cute pose to J-Hope doing the same), has really soured interactions between both fandoms and only worsened the Hype Backlash, even after other Orbits have apologized.
      • Some fans of other groups (but particularly the above girl groups) have also started to create Twitter accounts or change their existing ones to make deliberately offensive tweets while posing as ARMYs, which really hasn't made things better.
    • Some One Direction fans reacted badly to James Corden calling BTS "the biggest boyband" (as well as many comparisons of both groups made by the media), even trending a hashtag to show who really remains the biggest. Several have resorted to claiming that BTS' fandom is only made of fans of One Direction who jumped ship during 1D's hiatus - even though many ARMYs never listened to boybands at all before BTS. Some ARMYs have responded by either arguing back... or posting memes in 1D-related hashtags.
  • Fountain of Memes: To be expected, given their presence in social media. Their peculiar personalities and use of facial expressions have made them a goldmine of memes and reaction images, as seen here.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • With the Beyhive on Twitter, after a strange sequence of events. After realizing that LOVE YOURSELF: Tear was very close to beating Post Malone in getting a #1 on Billboard 200, a popular Twitter account (from what's known as "black Twitter") called other Beyhive accounts to stream BTS' album to "defeat" Post Malone. This led to many of them (including said popular Twitter account) finding themselves actually liking the songs in the album, with ARMYs happily welcoming and introducing them to BTS; what's more, Tear actually debuted as #1, to the delight of both fandoms.
    • A lot of BTS fans like or at least respect BROCKHAMPTON, helped by both groups making Shout Outs to each other (and BROCKHAMPTON's creative assistant being a Jimin fan).
      • Same goes for Little Mix, who (like both groups) are also characterized by the members' creative control over their music and have also tackled social issues in songs (with Little Mix and one of the members' personal account following BTS on Instagram).
    • Twitter ARMYs generally get along well with fans of Ariana Grande, with many ARMYs liking both.
    • From the Korean side, one of the few cases where both fandoms consistently act friendly (or at least civil) to each other is Wanna One's, particularly after an incident in the 2017 Melon Music Awards involving members of another fandom harassing Wannables. It helps that both groups are atypical in the industry (BTS more-so in content, Wanna One in format), and consistently act friendly towards each other in award shows, with some members occasionally hanging out together and some Wanna One members being fans of BTS. When BTS confirmed their attendance to an award show at the last minute, meaning that ARMYs would not be able to go due to all tickets being sold out, Wannables decided to do the BTS fanchants in ARMYs' place. Aww.
      • There's some degree of this on Twitter with TWICE - another group with songwriting credits in their music that has developed a hatedom in spite/because of their massive popularity - with both fandoms generally staying out of each other's way and congratulating both group's achievements, helped by TWICE's Jihyo stating that BTS "paved the way" for Kpop artists in the West.
      • A similar relationship occurs with fans of with GFRIEND, another group that has managed to gain massive popularity despite coming from a small, non-Big 3 company, and also notorious for having very difficult choreography. Helped by both groups coming from sister companies and their CEOs being friends... as well as their collaboration in the infamous "Family Song".
      • Along with the above, many ARMYs on Twitter are also fans of or at least respect certain girl groups with members who write their songs and/or have more unusual images and music (especially from non-Big 3 companies), such as EXID (which has an ex-underground rapper as a member), Mamamoo (who have highly skilled vocals and show a less conservative form of femininity by Korean standards) and, most recently, (G)-IDLE (another group with a skilled rapper).
    • Then there’s the case of GOT7, Seventeen and Monsta X, which is more complicated. In some circles, the relationship between ARMYs and those fandoms is quite friendly; with friendships existing between members of BTS and members of these groups (plus a collaboration at the 2015 MAMAs in the case of GOT7) and these three fandoms having a reputation for being friendly and open in general, fans often have found one through the other and a good number of multi-fandom Kpop fans like at least more than one of them. In other places like Twitter, however, the relationship between BTS’ and these groups' fandoms is mostly neutral; while they’re not actively hostile, conflicts do arise now and then, with the three having a history of siding with other Kpop fandoms more often than not on Twitter disputes.
  • Genius Bonus: Several of their lyrics, music videos and performances make references to science, literature, philosophy, and psychology.
    • "Whalien 52" is based on the Real Life 52-hertz whale, a specimen also known as the "world's loneliest whale" due to the unusual frequency of its call.
    • WINGS in its entirety is inspired by and references Hermann Hesse's Demian. The "Blood, Sweat and Tears" music video has a lot of visual references to key characters and scenes, and features a passage from the book read by RM. The teasers and the "Intro: Boy Meets Evil" comeback trailer are all also introduced by Namjoon reading different passages.
    • The title of the song "134340" is a reference to Pluto's new name after it stopped being considered a planet. The rest of the song has similar references to Pluto, Greek Mythology and astronomy in general.
    • "Paradise" has the lyric "Marathon, marathon/ Life is long, travel slowly/ 42.195". 42.195 km is the official distance of a marathon.
    • "DDAENG"'s lyrics are filled with a plethora of Korean cultural references, including many to the 섰다 card game. It also has the lyric "Frogs live up to their name/ Hope you die inside a well", which is a reference to the proverb (which itself came from a tale) "a frog in a well", referring to a person with narrow/limited views, who believes that what they see and know is the whole and absolute truth.
    • Both the LOVE YOURSELF series and MAP OF THE SOUL: PERSONA album reference Carl Jung's Map of the Soul and the four steps of the process of individuation, namely Persona, Ego, Shadow and Self.
    • The first track of MAP OF THE SOUL: PERSONA, "Intro: Persona", is based on the concept Persona (a social face or mask the individual presents to the world), which RM relates to his own double-identity as "Kim Namjoon" and his persona "RM".
      • The music video also features him wearing a jacket with the phrase "Pay no attention to The Man Behind the Curtain", a quote from The Wizard of Oz (said by Oz after he's exposed to be a man rather than the wizard he pretended to be).
    • The "Boy With Luv" music video heavily references the film Singin' in the Rain, including the "Broadway Melody" scene in the climax. Not only does the film also follow the theme of personas - with Lina Lamont being a Bitch in Sheep's Clothing and a case of Nice Character, Mean Actor and needing to have her acting and singing voice dubbed by another woman during the Rise of the Talkies -, but the "Broadway Melody" scene also has a self-contained story in itself where persona, fame and pursuing your own passion appear as themes, as pointed out here.
    • Dionysus is the Greek god of (among other things) wine, drinking, grape-harvest, fertility, religious ecstasy and theater. The track "Dionysus" (also from PERSONA) is about BTS dealing with fame, talking literally about drinking but also about getting "drunk" on art, fame and creation. It also mentions a "thyrsus" by name, a symbol associated with Dionysus.
      • The concept pictures of Version 4 of the album show the members posing with grapes, also associated with Dionysus.
  • Germans Love David Hasselhoff: The group was notoriously quicker in growing an international fanbase than in their home country, including countries like the US, Philippines, India, and the South American region, with the crowd reaction to BTS in KCON 2014 in LA being one of the earliest signs. In Korea, the general public and the media (aside from idol-centered shows) only started to really pay attention to BTS around 2017, particularly after they won a Billboard Award and especially after the success of LOVE YOURSELF: Her, BTS' debut in US television, and their performances at the MAMA and MMA award shows.
    • Their arrival in Chile in March 2017 led to some of the first comparisons by media to Beatlemania. According to the New York Times, the concert tickets were sold-out in record time (2 hours!) despite no publicity in TV or radio and no radioplay besides Kpop-focused Internet radio stations. Fans even got the loudest screams ever recorded on the Movistar Arena... in a moment when BTS wasn't even performing.
    • J-Hope is said to be very popular in Latin America, especially Brazil.
    • While all the members have their fans in the US, the rap line seems to be very popular in the US fandom in comparison to Korea, especially with rap fans. Similarly, V is very popular among R&B fans due to "Stigma" and "Singularity", with both groups often converging.
      • BTS' Hip-Hop/R&B influenced-music and respect for both genres and their culture in general have gained them a lot of black audiences.
  • Girl-Show Ghetto: Almost par for the course for a Korean Boyband. BTS tends to be dismissed by Western media and the general public as just another group of pretty boys followed by a mindless, screaming Groupie Brigade who just like pretty faces - despite the fact that the first thing most fans will name as a reason to love BTS is their music and lyrics (which often talk about social and political issues, some of which are even taboo in Korea), with BTS' music being much more strongly influenced by Western Hip-Hop (as well as other genres) than by Western boybands or even other Kpop groups. Not to mention that, while the visible majority of fans are female, the fandom is very diverse in genders, ages and nationalities.
    • A review of LOVE YOURSELF: Tear by The Guardian infamously had one paragraph of the whole thing dedicated to the album itself, saying that fans obviously cared more about the visuals than the music and basically implying "who cares?".
    • Several articles have been written on Western society's dismissal of BTS as something without substance based entirely on their mostly female fanbase and the members' lack of adherence to "manly" standards of beauty and conduct (such as their use of make-up), revealing Double Standards against female fanbases that in this case also intersects with racism and homophobia.
      • Western media has a role too in perpetuating this prejudice by basing their coverage of BTS on these preconceptions; notably, many US interviewers have focused almost exclusively on the size of the fandom and its presence in social media in their coverage, asking BTS questions like "what is the craziest thing your fans have done?" (which BTS deliberately turned around into praising fans instead). All of this only helps the issue of female fans constantly having to justify themselves due to the "crazy groupie" stereotype.
    • The more outspoken nature of the fanbase and its sheer size has also resulted in pre-conceptions of the fandom as an aggressive, overprotective mindless (girlish) horde. The Youtube comment section for Anthony Fantano's (mostly positive, if at times harshly worded) review of LOVE YOURSELF: Tear is an amusing example of this. A good part of the comments are along the lines of "run! The fans will burn you alive if you say anything bad about BTS!". The other part, meanwhile, are ARMYs... respectfully thanking Fantano for reviewing the album, with some of them even agreeing with his criticisms.
  • Growing the Beard: While the albums before it were far from bad - many tracks of that era are beloved to this day -, it's maybe around the The Most Beautiful Moment in Life series where they really established a solid identity, expanding their predominantly Hip-Hop/R&B sound into other genres to build a diverse-yet-still-coherent pop soundnote , as well as introducing grander, darker, more mature narratives into their music and concepts and more ambitious storytelling - including the introduction of the BU. It was also the point where BTS finally ditched their eyeliner-heavy "bad boy"/Pretty Fly for a White Guy image in favor of a more natural look and attitude.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Their debut era, which the members regard as intense, due to extreme dieting, packed schedules, and very little money when compared to their current situation. Especially after listening to "Sea" (released in 2017), which explicitly describes how much they suffered and how they were told they wouldn't make it.
    • In early 2016, BTS had a few days of leisure time, and posted occasional updates on social media of what they were doing. ARMY fans joked that Suga hadn't posted anything, and wondered if he was spending the break asleep. However, after a few days, Suga tweeted this. Yeah, instead of using the break to rest, Suga went back to the Kobe concert venue in order to sort out his thoughts and come to terms with the guilt he felt from not being able to perform. Not exactly a happy vacation.
    • V confessed, at a fanmeeting, that his grandmother, who had taken care of him for many years when he was young, had passed away while he was performing overseas in Manila. The footage of those performances have comments filled with condolences.
    • Anything from 2015 to late 2016, knowing that the members did suffer from the criticisms and accusations of plagiarism and sajaegi they kept receiving during those years. The highly emotional HYYH ON STAGE: EPILOGUE concerts in particular can get soured by the knowledge that they were immediately followed by the "plagiarism boys" hashtag incident (as in, it trended #1 on Korea during and after the concerts). Indeed, a VCR from the final concerts of the WINGS Tour confirmed that yes, the members saw all of that.
    • FACE YOURSELF (particularly "Let Go"), parts of the 2018 BTS Festa and possibly anything from early 2018 can become either this or Heartwarming in Hindsight, after the members revealed at their 2018 MAMA Artist of the Year Award speech that they struggled a lot emotionally at the beginning of the year under the overwhelming pressure to continue giving flawless performances, to the point that they talked about disbanding.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • Incredibly high in BTS' music videos, either due to story (from the BU), the increasing rate of Visual Effects of Awesome, or both. Particular videos where this can happen are "I NEED U (Original version)", "Dope", the WINGS teasers, "Blood, Sweat and Tears", "Not Today", "Mic Drop (Steve Aoki remix)" and "Fake Love".
    • BTS' live performances at Korean award shows and year-end shows are also full of this. Some examples:
      • 2016 Mnet Asian Music Awards (MAMAs): Jungkook hovering mid-air, Jimin dancing blindfolded in synchro with J-Hope to "Intro: Boy Meets Evil", and V's wing scars.
      • 2017 MAMAs: The Visual Effects of Awesome intro, followed by a non-stop, highly demanding 15-minute performance (including an extended version of "Mic Drop" at the very end).
      • The transition from "DNA" to "Not Today" (with great use of camera angles) in the 2017 year-end SBS show.
      • 2017 KBS year-end show: The 20-minute "ALL. LIVE. BAND." performance. Including a short choreography nostalgia-trip, performances of side-tracks from WINGS, and most notably, a rock version of "DNA", and a grand finale with "Not Today".
      • 2018 Melon Music Awards: The members replicating the "E" version concept picture from LOVE YOURSELF: Answer with a seamless transition to "Fake Love", plus the jaw-dropping dance performance by J-Hope, Jimin and Jungkook performance of traditional Korean dances followed by a version of "IDOL" with traditional Korean instruments.
  • Ho Yay / Shipping: A given for a Korean boy band. All of the members seem to have No Sense of Personal Space. (see Broken Base above, though). Now with their own page.
  • Internet Backdraft:
    • There are several topics regarding incidents in the past that are sore points for the fandom and still provoke arguments on Twitter with other Kpop fans. It's gone up to the point that many ARMYs on Twitter have declared that they are not a part of the Kpop community:
      • The accusations of plagiarism and sajaegi note  thrown at BTS in 2015 and 2016; this included an incident in May of 2016 where several fandoms successfully trended the hashtag "plagiarism boys" in Korea right after an important concert (meaning that BTS and the media saw it). The rumors still circulate among fans of other Kpop groups (and sometimes in Korean media) despite being disprovennote . Expect fans - even accounts trying not to cause trouble - to react strongly to people spreading accusations on Twitter on present day, and antis to keep bringing them up whenever they can.
      • Similarly, don't accuse BTS of racism or misogyny for mistakes made in their early years (especially RM), as they've already taken responsibility for them, apologized and changed accordingly. Especially if (as it's become common in Twitter) you only use it as a counterargument in order to defend another idol's actions when said idol hasn't even addressed said behavior.
    • In mid-2018, Billboard K-pop journalist Tamar Herman (already a divisive writer among fans) wrote an article where she stated that ARMYs were asking for an exemption from obligatory military service for BTS, citing a petition directed to the Blue House as proof. Not only is this a controversial topic in Korea note , but it's a massive case of Critical Research Failure: the topic only arose from one Korean politician proposing exemption based on artistic contributions, doing so due to "requests" (without mentioning the source), which media linked to the petition. Moreover, said petition had no more than 14 signatures at the time the article was published, half of which were from ARMYs who only signed to leave comments disagreeing with it. Not only there was an overwhelmingly negative reception from fans, but now, whenever there's a new Billboard (or Forbes) article about BTS, an ARMY on Twitter will go check if the article was written by Herman and, if so, tweet screenshots so others don't have to click on it.
  • It's Popular, Now It Sucks!: BTS' popularity and entrance to the international mainstream starting from 2015 has led increasingly more people (mainly Kpop fans) to declare that the group has become "too big" - with some even saying they liked them better as underdogs - or that other groups are equally or more deserving of their success. It quickly reached the point that whenever a popular channel/Twitter account/anything makes a video or a post about BTS, it will invariably be bombarded with comments talking about BTS being overrated and/or asking people to check other ("better") Kpop groups.
  • LGBT Fanbase: While LGBT+ fans are far from rare for Kpop groups, the fact that BTS often makes comforting/empowering music about social issues with an underdog narrative, the support that members have expressed for the community and LGBTQ+ fans on several occasions examples , as well as their "androgynous, fluid style", it's not surprising that a sizable portion of the fanbase is part of the LGBTQ+ community.
    • An LGBT+ flag was seen on the concert in Paris with messages written on it, with the biggest one being "Thanks for showing us reasons to love ourselves".
    • Oddly enough, Jin and especially Suga are said to be really popular among LGBT+ fans, including lesbians. As this tweet theorizes:
      yoongi and seokjin have so many lesbian fans because yoongi is to lesbians what lady gaga is to gay men while seokjin is to lesbians what jeff goldblum is to also lesbians
      • A fan went to a BTS concert in 2018 holding a banner with the inscription "Lesbians (heart) Jin".
    • This article also mentions Suga (again), Jungkook and especially RM as popular among lesbian/queer female fans, both due to their aforementioned support towards the community and the group's lack of adherence to heteronormative standards in their appearance and behavior.
    • Every single member seems to get this to some degree in various sides of the community - for example, some parts of Twitter proclaim J-Hope as a bisexual icon.
  • Memetic Badass: Jin is a powerful chaotic deity who will do whatever he wants, unconcerned and unfettered by the forces of other members, BigHit, TV producers, or earthly beings in general. Except Jungkook's.
    • Roughly speaking, 1 in every 3 fanart pieces featuring Yoonji will portray her with a lethal weapon.
  • Memetic Mutation: They have their own page now.
  • Minority Show Ghetto: Being a Korean group that sings and raps in Korean, BTS' break in radio in the US and other countries has been made notoriously difficult due to a combination of this trope and Girl-Show Ghetto. With BTS constantly being framed as a "social media phenomenon" and/or a pre-teen fad, radios have been reluctant to play their songs, often outright ignoring requests or demanding thousands of retweets for a single play - which often ends up being in the middle of the night. Collective organized efforts had to be made to even get "DNA" and "Mic Drop" in US radio, but the reluctance has persisted - even after "Fake Love" debuted at #10 in the Hot100 chart and 2 BTS albums debuted at #1 in Billboard 200.
    • And that's not even getting to the various comments people in international media have made mocking or criticizing BTS purely based on racial stereotypes - that they all look the same, that they had plastic surgery, that they're company slaves... (none of which are true, by the way)
  • Misaimed Fandom: "House of Cards" and "Singularity" have gained some reputation as "sexy" songs (down to apparently appearing in a "sex songs" playlist on Spotify). Both, however, have decidedly unsexy lyrics: "House of Cards" talks about a Destructive Romance where the parts delude themselves into maintaining it even though its end is imminent, while "Singularity" talks about trying to keep a loved person happy through a Stepford Smiler façade and going through a Loss of Identity.
    • There's a ridiculously large amount of people and media pieces that treat BTS as boyband whose music is entirely manufactured as in an assembly line, when a simple look at their music and lyrics show their anything but.
    • Songs like "HOME" (which is about BTS and their fans) or even "Spring Day" (about loss of a loved one, especially a friend) are sometimes wrongly referred to as romantic songs - yes, even with the line "You know it all, you're my best friend" in the latter.
  • Narm: The commercial they did for LG was okay enough... until an unexpected English dub version appeared. The less than enthusiastic voice acting ("My eyes. It's so bright.") and the fact that the English actors kinda, but not quite sound like them made the dubbed version the butt of jokes from fans.
    English!J-Hope: (animatedly gesturing so the others come over)
    English!J-Hope: (monotone) Guys.
  • Never Live It Down:
    • If you were to learn about the BTS members from most of the popular "introduction to the members" Youtube fan-made videos (at least, most of the pre-2018 ones), you'd probably get a heavily Flanderized impression of the members, due to selective editing in compilation videos repeatedly emphasizing only certain moments and jokes to fit one narrative. Some jokes have become Discredited Memes purely because of this, as you can see above.
      • RM is one of the most affected by this; you'd (almost) be forgiven for thinking his entire personality consists of being 1. smart, and 2. clumsy. The most egregious part, though? "Expensive girl", which, despite the fact it's actually a cover note  he did back when he was 18, some fans in Youtube keep recommending to newcomers instead of much more representative work like RM or mono..
      • Likewise, other members get reduced into one-note caricatures of themselves in certain circles due to this: Suga is Flanderized as "savage" and "cold/heartless" for being quieter and snarkier (with one of the most popular videos being a compilation of members being "lowkey terrified" of him despite a lot of evidence to the contrary); Jin with Team Mom as his sole trait for being into cooking and taking care of the younger members; V as a Cloud Cuckoolander (ignoring, for example, his artistic sense), and so on.
    • In a different way, the group's and particularly RM's hair/fashion choices and attitude and less than sensitive lyrics and comments from their early years. He has acknowledged these and quite explicitly refers to them as Old Shame, making efforts to improve along with the other members (he even has his lyrics reviewed by feminist scholars now, as well as songs with Gender-Neutral Writing), but many Kpop fans surely won't let anyone forget it. You'd be surprised by the fact that he went as far as changing some lyrics for the US performances of "Fake Love" due to the words for "I" and "you" sounding like the N-word, considering how much his name keeps popping up in any discussion about Kpop idols having problematic behavior (see "but namjoon" in BTS' Memetic Mutation page).
  • Nightmare Fuel: The concept images for the "S" version and the "E" version of LOVE YOURSELF: Answer are pretty unsettling. The former has the members in narrow rooms, surrounded by cameras, hands, or eyes coming from the walls, creating a claustrophobic atmosphere heavy on Paranoia Fuel. The "E" version has each one of the members inside a small bubble containing pretty flowers in what (judging by the members' poses) is clearly a Gilded Cage to a big, empty exterior; if you look closely, you'll see that the flowers in Jungkook's bubble are dead. The group picture in the "E" version shows the members inside a closet like dolls, tied to the cupboards.
    • Interpretations of the images as representations of how the members feel in their lives as idols - as well as the similarities between the "E" version in Answer and the "O" version in LOVE YOURSELF: Her- add a heavy dose of Fridge Horror.
  • Periphery Demographic: Though the group's music is mostly aimed at people in their teens and 20s, the fandom is very diverse, with fans of all ages and genders - reader statistics for articles about BTS on Naver often shows a majority of readers in their 30s and 40s (which, for other idol groups, typically would be teenagers by far), not to mention the attention BTS has gotten from critics, producers and celebrities like John Cena (a very vocal fan of the group).
  • The Producer Thinks of Everything: BTS and BigHit have been able to include Foreshadowing for album concepts/themes/songs and even story elements from the BU in their music, music videos, concept images, photoshoots, interviews, concerts, award show performances and speeches, commercials, selfies, etc., sometimes years in advance; an example of their long-term thinking is their reveal that the LOVE YOURSELF series - which was officially announced in the second half of 2017 and continued through 2018 - was planned since March 2016, even before the end of the The Most Beautiful Moment in Life era. It has come to the point that fans have become suspicious of anything that could be a clue to the point of paranoia.
  • Some Anvils Need to Be Dropped: One of the main things that makes BTS who they are - and one of the reasons they are so popular - is their continuous effort to give a voice to young people from Korea and around the world regarding social issues, some of which are even taboo in their country.
    • Songs like "No More Dream" and "N.O." directly criticize the way social expectations pressure young people into giving up their dreams to pursue respectable life goals.
    • "Spine Breaker" criticizes consumerism among teenagers - particularly the padded jacket craze in South Korea, where said jackets as well as other expensive clothes and accessories became a mark of social status, leading some teens to force their parents to spend hard-earned money on them just to become the cool kids.
    • "Tomorrow" and "Lost" reassure people who are lost in their paths in life and encourage them not to give up, something particularly relevant in a highly-competitive society where mental health is barely an afterthought.
      • Similarly, "Paradise" talks about life not having to be a race, and states that having a dream is not a requisite to be happy.
    • "Dope" and "Baepsae" address the demonization of younger generations by media in an age that social and economic hardships have made working and living conditions harder in Korea, something that can also feel relatable for young people in other countries (i.e. millennials). "Baepsae" also explicitly talks about social inequality and work exploitation.
      • "Go Go" addresses the younger generations' tendency to overspend as a way to cope with an increasingly bleak future, considering that attempting to save up on money under these working and living conditions would hardly do much in the long run, anyway.
    • "Am I Wrong" calls out people who are indifferent towards the news and what's going on around the world, with Suga's rap ("we're all dogs and pigs/ we become dogs because we're angry") referencing the remarks from a government official from Park Geun-Hye's administration saying that South Korea should have a cast system where the majority would be treated "like dogs and pigs".
    • The message of the LOVE YOURSELF as a whole seems to be Exactly What It Says on the Tin; however, it does it in the sense of finding your sense of self-worth not in trying to please others or only showing them your "good" side, but in accepting yourself with all your flaws and past mistakes and using them instead to grow as a person - a message also prominent in RM's UN speech. This message is particularly relevant in a context where mental illness is still taboo in South Korea and other countries, with not only fans finding comfort and encouragement in it, but the members themselves showing their own learning process to find self-love.
      • "Magic Shop" and Jimin's "Promise" follow up on this message by encouraging listeners to find happiness and growth within themselves; that is, encouraging fans not to depend on BTS emotionally, but to also direct the love they've given to BTS to themselves.
        you gave me the best of me/ so you'll give you the best of you
    • Members have used their platform to send other messages that fans have also found encouraging, such as Jungkook encouraging fans to get out of unequal relationships, or Jin saying that other people having a hard time doesn't invalidate your hardships and doesn't make it any less okay to ask for help.
  • Tastes Like Diabetes: If you came solely for songs like "Fire", the Cyphers or the mixtapes, jumping to their softer songs like "24/7=Heaven", "Embarrassed", "Just One Day" (and its music video) or "Converse High" can be... jarring. Most of their work is somewhere in the middle of both extremes, though.
  • Tear Jerker: See here.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: BTS' experimentation with their sound, which has changed from mostly Hip-Hop and R&B to also include other genres such as moombathon, EDM and Latin pop, has inevitably gathered this kind of reactions in some circles, especially regarding the LOVE YOURSELF series. That said, there's a particularly strange kind of criticism directed at the aforementioned series, which is that BTS now is "too Western" or "not Kpop enough" note 
  • True Art Is Angsty: The EDM/electrodance/funk-heavy LOVE YOURSELF: Her was criticized and dismissed by some for being Lighter and Softer than fan-favorites The Most Beautiful Moment in Life and WINGS, which were a lot gloomier and explicitly tackled topics like depression and toxic relationships. This is partially a case of Misaimed Fandom, with some people (mainly non-ARMYs) even ignoring the actual lyrics and themes of the series (including the Cerebus Syndrome that occurs both in the series as a whole and within Her itself) and going as far as criticizing "Go Go" for only being about "partying". That said, even the fandom itself wasn't as keen initially on the album as with the next albums in the series, and the title song "DNA" still remains somewhat divisive for fans.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: Aside from their music and choreography, BTS are notorious for their music videos, which have often and increasingly (as their budget becomes higher and higher) fallen into this.
    • The videos featured in the BU have particularly become very visually impressive throughout the years. See the BU YMMV page for examples.
    • "Dope" features an Epic Tracking Shot (disguised as The Oner) that quickly and almost seamlessly transitions between different shots of the fast-paced choreography, with various costume-changes in between. Some people have been surprised to learn that RM was filmed using a green-screen for his verse.
    • "Spring Day" is a gorgeous video, using slow motion, low shutter speed, sets, Scenery Porn and saturated colors for a poetic, emotional effect.
    • "Not Today" has a much more epic feel, with an Epic Tracking Shot at the beginning, wide-shots showing off the larger-scale choreography and the Scenery Porn, a set in the featuring a huge triangular block of ice (or mirror), and, again, slow motion.
    • "Mic Drop (Steve Aoki Remix)" makes full use of the choreography with a dynamic use of wide-shots, close-ups, and camera movement while adding just the right effects, featuring powerful visuals such as an enormous holographic version of Steve Aoki looming over the group dancing, or a dark room exploding in slow motion (backup dancers Jimin and Jungkook included) right behind Suga during his verse. The biggest example, however, is the shot where an explosion goes off in the background... in sync with the music and choreography. And it's not CGI; they really filmed it that way!
  • Yoko Oh No: Averted in Twitter regarding Suran (a female singer who has collaborated twice with Suga note ); when news came out of BigHit denying dating rumors between the two, the reaction was pretty light-hearted (with jokes like "congratulations on your first dating rumor!"). Played straight on Instagram, however: even a while before the dating rumors, Instagram fans were already attacking Suran for posting a picture with the caption "S(heart)S"note . Many Twitter fans were not happy to see Suran having to apologize for the rumors, so they went on Instagram to leave her positive comments.
    • This was almost entirely averted with Jpearlnote , who many Instagram fans received with open arms when Jpearl acknowledged the Suga/Jpearl jokes... until Jpearl clarified he was straight, leading to other fans again having to swoop in to leave him positive comments. This, of course, speaks of Double Standards among the Instagram side of the community.

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