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All spoilers on this page for Infinity War or the 18 Marvel movies that preceded it are left unmarked. The only marked spoilers involve spoilers for other works. You Have Been Warned!


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    Tropes A to L 
  • Alternative Joke Interpretation: Stan Lee's cameo has him as the driver of the school bus Peter Parker is riding on. After the kids panic to distract from having him become Spider-Man, Lee says "You act like you've never seen a spaceship before." People have come up with two interpretations for this line: he's either referring to the invasion from The Avengers (2012) or the fact that his other cameos have had him travelling through space.
  • Americans Hate Tingle: In Japan, the film got eclipsed by Case Closed's 22th Non-Serial Movie Zero the Enforcer despite Infinity War premiering on the former's 3rd week. Western superheroes as a whole aren't as well received in Japan and it's been noted that the local advertising for it is a complete mess.
  • And You Thought It Would Fail: Minor case regarding critical reception. Shortly before the film came out, Mark Millar opined that Thanos would be a weak Big Bad since he is a CGI villain, citing the mixed to negative reception to Doomsday, Steppenwolf, and Ultronnote  who were all CG-created as well. When the film came out, Thanos was generally considered to quite-possibly be the strongest point of the movie, owing to both Josh Brolin's performance and the amazing efforts put into his CG.
  • Angst Aversion: Most of the critical and fan response has been positive, but a number of reviews have opined that the movie often gets overwhelming and excessively depressing at times, such as the massacre of many Asgardian refugees, the deaths of Loki and Gamora, and the outright Downer Ending. This ended up being a source of some controversy in South Korea since, in a rather bad case of Woolseyism, Strange's line of "We're in the endgame now" is mistranslated/subtitled as "We're doomed", effectively killing a good portion of the audience's perception of the movie and the future of the MCU as a whole.
  • Angst? What Angst?:
    • Despite the fact that Thor lost everything he loved ranging from his family, friends, and home, while everything he did in Ragnarok was for naught, he's still able to make quips and get along well with others in a friendly manner without showing any brood or angst over it (even playing Misery Poker with Star-Lord). There is a moment when the facade begins to show some cracks and even Rocket realizes he's hurting. Thor infers it's better he channels all of his negative emotions into killing Thanos rather than give into his grief.
    • War Machine doesn't seem the slightest bit upset or angry to see the Falcon or the Vision despite them being indirectly (the Falcon) and directly (the Vision) responsible for him breaking his back, losing the use of his legs, and almost dying after the airport battle in Captain America: Civil War.
    • Bruce is perfectly okay with fighting alongside Scarlet Witch, the person he stated he'd be outright happy killing for traumatizing him back in Age of Ultron. Of course, in this case, it frankly wasn't the time nor place to bring it up if Bruce did have any qualms.
  • Anvilicious: Achieving a high-end goal almost always require a sacrifice. This idea is consistently conveyed across the entire film between both the protagonist (Thanos) and the antagonists (The Avengers).
  • Archive Panic: To make most of the movie, you should have watched ideally all previous 18 movies, the first of which dates back to 2008. This gives a total runtime of over 38 hours. You could get by just on The Avengers (2012) (for the Tesseract, Loki's Scepter, and the Battle of New York), Thor: The Dark World (for the Aether), Guardians of the Galaxy (for the Collector, the Guardians themselves, and the Orb), Avengers: Age of Ultron (for the Mind Stone, Wanda, and Vision), Captain America: Civil War (for the introduction of Spider-Man and Black Panther, why the Avengers have split up, and why Wanda and Vision are shacking up off the radar), and Doctor Strange (2016) (for magic existing in the MCU and the Eye of Agamotto), but even then, you'd be missing huge swaths of information that are varying degrees of relevant. Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther (2018) are optional, but helpful, as the end of Ragnarok leads directly into Infinity War, and Black Panther sets up Wakanda and its characters, where the bulk of the third act takes place. That's still, at a minimum, over twelve hours of movie-watching to understand this movie.
  • Award Snub:
    • Despite being herald by many as one of the best Marvel films and an incredible achievement, the film was only nominated for one Oscar, that being Best Visual Effects, and it lost to First Man for best visuals, something most viewers felt was odd given how one of the praises for Infinity War was how good it looked, while First Man looks less impressive as by comparison. Josh Brolin not being even a nominee for Best Actor rubbed people the wrong away as well, as many felt his performance as Thanos is what brought him to life as a character.
    • A lot of people feel that Scarlett Johansson did not deserve many of the Best Actress audience awards for this movie due to her character having very little screentime or plot relevance compared to other actresses like Zoe Saldana or Elizabeth Olsen.
    • Given Black Panther's Best Picture nomination, those who thought this film was better felt it should have gotten the nomination too, if not instead of.
  • Big-Lipped Alligator Moment: The ‘Invisible Drax’ scene has absolutely zero relevance to the rest of the movie and only serves to add some comic relief for an otherwise emotionally intense scene.
  • Cargo Ship:
  • Catharsis Factor:
    • Thor making a Dynamic Entry and driving Stormbreaker right into Thanos's chest at the climax of the film can feel wholly deserved after watching the Mad Titan lay waste to every hero in his way up until that point. Unfortunately, the attack doesn't prevent Thanos from carrying out his Badass Fingersnap, bringing on the Downer Ending, and getting away a Karma Houdini.
    • Just seeing Iron Man's team fighting alongside the Guardians is worth the price of admission all by itself. Then there's the fact that they come the closest to actually beating Thanos, even though they fail at the last minute. The fact that Iron Man then goes one-on-one with Thanos, holds his own for more than a few minutes, and actually makes him bleed is equally satisfying to watch.
    • The Children of Thanos are all such bastards that it's extremely satisfying whenever one of them is given a gruesome death scene.
    • As it turns out, The Red Skull suffered a fate worse than death. Seeing him so broken and a shell of his former self is very deeply satisfying after all the atrocities he committed in World War II.
  • Continuity Lock-Out:
    • The first trailer, at a bare minimum, requires audience familiarity with The Avengers, Guardians of the Galaxy, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Captain America: Civil War, Doctor Strange, and Thor: Ragnarok, since most of the on-screen action (the divided Avengers, the Tesseract, the Power Stone in the Gauntlet, Vision and the Mind Stone, Doctor Strange, Wong and the Sanctum, and the coda with Thor and the Guardians) depends on audience knowing them.
    • Likewise, the Infinity Gauntlet that Thanos sports has only appeared on-screen in the credits of Age of Ultron, while its only other quasi-appearance was an Easter Egg Freeze-Frame Bonus in Thor that was retconned in Ragnarok. And that's not including the fact that all the films listed above in turn also require familiarity with their predecessor films, particularly Thor and Winter Soldier in order to make sense. In other words, in order to have context for everything going on in Infinity War, you need to have watched the previous 18 MCU films.
    • People who haven't seen Captain America: The First Avenger in particular will be wondering what the hell is the significance of that weird noseless red-faced guy who was guarding the Soul Stone. (Or: "What is that guy from Diablo II doing there?")
    • This proved relevant to the critical response, since most of the negative reception was drawn from critics who lacked the emotional connection to the franchise and characters. This has led to subsequent discussion about the merits of the MCU as individual films versus a larger cinematic universe. James Gunn criticized these critics' reasoning, likening it to a viewer watching a TV series for the first time and starting with one of its later seasons.
  • Crack Pairing:
    • Thanks to ending the movie stranded together, Tony/Nebula is seeing a surge in popularity.
    • Thanos and the ratio 1/2, thanks to his obsession with balance. It's gotten to the point where his comic counterpart's obsession with death (which was also pretty infamous) has become all but overshadowed.
  • Crosses the Line Twice: Even the "Avengers: Infinity War" title in the end credits turns into dust, and the last thing at the end of the stinger showing people elsewhere turning into dust is "Thanos will return" instead of the usual "[X/The Avengers] will return". They're basically rubbing salt in the wound after The Bad Guy Wins. This can feel darkly humorous as well as depressing.
  • Death of the Author: Despite Word of God stating that Hulk refusing to emerge as way to assert his agency to Bruce and force him to fight his own fights, his refusal has been interpreted as the result of the trauma of suffering his first defeat at the hands of Thanos.
  • Discredited Meme: Despite fan demand, the Russos refused to use a "No shit, Sherlock" joke involving Iron Man and Dr. Strange, as it would be "too obvious". Cumberbatch himself said it would be "corny".
  • Draco in Leather Pants: While Thanos is given more depth than one expects, and there is a certain amount of sympathy in his backstory (although just how much is up to interpretation), many people seem to forget that, regardless of his motivations or whether Evil Is Cool, he is still a genocidal madman who willfully murders half of the population of the universe as soon as he possesses the means to do so. In particular, they offer him a lot of sympathy because he's sad after Gamora dies, completely ignoring the fact that he himself willingly sacrificed her for power.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse:
    • Out of all the Children of Thanos (called the Black Order in the comics), Ebony Maw (the only one named in dialogue, just as "the Maw") is considered to be the most popular. His telekinetic powers make him unique among his group who are primarily fighters, and his role as a Hammy Herald gives him the most fleshed out personality of all of the Order. Comic book fans were disappointed by him being the first of the Order to die.
    • The Stonekeeper, AKA the new form of the Red Skull, appeared only briefly but was a massive hit with audiences thanks to his cool personality, mysterious powers and role, and the sheer surprise of seeing him back and in such a different form.
  • Estrogen Brigade:
    • Chris Evans' bearded look has drawn a lot of attention, with many noting the Beard of Sorrow trope fails to signify its intent on account of how much it suits him. Quite a few fans are actually disappointed he won't have it in the sequel.
    • This is nowhere more evident than in the reaction to the character posters for Captain America and Bucky that show their backsides to the camera.
  • Evil Is Cool:
    • Thanos, in the eyes of the fans, definitely lived up to the hype that had been building him up to be for the past six years since his debut in The Avengers. The movie already starts off with him giving a brutal beatdown to the Hulk with minimal effort, so much so that it actually left the Hulk too scared to transform back for the rest of the film. From there it goes From Bad to Worse for the heroes, where despite a couple of Hope Spots, Thanos ends up dealing one No-Holds-Barred Beatdown after another to everyone from Badass Normals to Reality Warpers alike on his way to The Bad Guy Wins. It helps that Josh Brolin gave an incredibly charismatic performance and Thanos was given surprisingly deep characterization and many scenes dedicated entirely to himself and his philosophy, making the movie about him as much as it is about the Avengers.
    • The Children of Thanos are seen as this as well. Their intimidating and unique designs, plus their variety of powers, show that they are not just Thanos's "hype men", but legitimate threats on their own.
  • Evil Is Sexy:
  • Fanfic Fuel:
    • When did Wanda and Vision start meeting each other in secret, and how did their relationship progress?
    • How were the likes of the Defenders, the Runaways, and any other MCU TV heroes affected by half the life in the universe being wiped out?
    • The 14 million alternate futures that Doctor Strange saw are ripe for speculation.
    • In pre-release interviews, Tom Holland claimed that "a lot had happened" to Peter in the interim between Spider-Man: Homecoming and this movie, and that Peter had grown up a lot as a result. Indeed, Peter in this movie is much more competent than he was in his solo outing, leading some fans to assume that he had numerous street-level adventures against some members of his classic rogues gallery in the interim. Since all of the villains that have been used for non-MCU Spider-Man movies are off the table for future movies, Lizard, Sandman, and Electro are popular choices for bad guys in those fanfic adventures.
    • The above "untold adventures" notion can be applied to many of the other MCU sub-groups; It has been over a year in-universe since we last saw Dr Strange, two years of wandering for all of the erstwhile Avengers members besides Tony, about the same span since T'Challa opened Wakanda to the world, and a touch less than 4 years since the Guardians offed Ego. The latter case in particular pleads for expansion, canonical or otherwise.
    • At the film's end, Nebula is apparently going to be dropping Tony back on Earth before flying off to wherever she goes from here. They should have some interesting things to talk about on the way.
    • How Nebula and Tony will even get back to Earth from Titan is ripe for speculation.
    • How exactly did Thanos take the Power Stone from the Nova Corps in Xandar, and the Reality Stone from the Collector? And just how decimated is Xandar after Thanos' raid?
    • In an unusual example, the film's conclusion has become this for several other fandoms. In the weeks following Infinity War's release, it became a common fanfic trope to take a list of characters from a particular work, flip a coin for each one to see if The Snap erased them, and have the survivors deal with the aftermath.
  • Friendly Fandoms:
    • Some Warhammer 40,000 fans really enjoyed the movie thanks to the bleak tone, Thanos being considered a close analogue to the God-Emperor of Mankind and his minions' aesthetic resembling something straight out of their setting: Ebony Maw being similar to a Water Caste Tau, Corvus Glaive and Proxima Midnight looking close to Dark Eldar, and the Outriders resembling Genestealers.
    • Surprisingly, a bizarre friendship has formed between MCU fans and American Horror Story fans due to the eigth season of that show having similarities such as a large crossover ensemble cast, return of old favorites, world-ending stakes and going unexpected routes. It helps that Ryan Murphy fully embraces and approves the comparisons, going so far as to reference it on instagram.
  • Fountain of Memes: Just about everything Thanos does or says in Infinity War has become popular on the Internet.
  • "Funny Aneurysm" Moment:
    • The joke in the second trailer about Okoye wanting a Starbucks in Wakanda became a little uncomfortable after an incident prior to the movie's release in which two black Starbucks customers were arrested after an employee called the police on them. The reaction to this was so strong that Starbucks announced they would close 8,000 locations for a day to put their employees through racial sensitivity training.
    • People have joked that Super Smash Bros. Ultimate overtook Infinity War as the biggest crossover in history. It can be hard to look at back when we find out that the World Of Light story mode starts as the same as the film's climax.
  • Harsher in Hindsight:
    • Dr. Strange's final lines, "Tony, there was no other way" becomes this after Avengers: Endgame when it's revealed that the single timeline where Thanos was defeated depended on Tony Stark performing a Heroic Sacrifice. What Stephen is doing in his final moments is apologizing to Tony for setting him on the path to his death.
      • And before that, Dr. Strange tells him if its between saving Tony and the Universe, he would save the Universe. Which puts a darker light on Strange giving Thanos the stone to spare Tony, because he wasn't saving Tony — he was actively setting up Tony to be sacrificed for the Universe in the long run.
    • The ending scenes on Titan become even harder to watch when you realize that those who get dusted feel like no time has passed between that fight and the final battle in Avengers: Endgame, where Tony sacrifices himself. From their perspective, it feels like they've lost Tony within minutes of when they were all fighting alongside him.
    • During the Avengers' brief skirmish with the Guardians of the Galaxy on Titan, Star-Lord offhandedly mentions that Thor, the link between the two groups, wasn't that good-looking and needed saving. This seems like a petty insult for the God of Thunder at the time for stealing Quill's thunder, but it now seems like unintentional foreshadowing come Avengers: Endgame, where Thor has become a gross, alcoholic overweight slob whom Rocket and Hulk need to rescue from his own destructive lifestyle.
    • Infinity War had the Alternate Aesop Interpretation that Love Is a Weakness, due to Thanos being willing to sacrifice Gamora but the Avengers repeatedly stating that they "don't trade lives". This becomes really hard to take because the Avengers ultimately end up having to sacrifice even more lives in Endgame to set things right, including some of the lives they'd previously refused to before. Not counting all of the lives and irreversible harm which had been done by the Inferred Holocaust caused by the Snap, on the other hand the lives the Avengers sacrificed in Endgame were their own doing "Whatever it takes" to save and protect the universe they love.
    • Gamora attempting to perform a Heroic Suicide to prevent Thanos from getting the Soul Stone is now for naught, as Endgame shows that a person committing suicide in front of the person who loves them counts as a sacrifice, whether they want it or not.
    • The sight of Spider-Man tearfully hugging Tony and crying "I don't want to go" before being erased from existence took on a much darker tone after Sony and Marvel got into a brief conflict over the character's rights following the release of Spider-Man: Far From Home, leading to Spider-Man's fate in the MCU being put in jeopardy for over a month.
  • He Panned It, Now He Sucks!: Lacey Baugher of The Mary Sue got quite a bit of flack for her article on how the movie "failed its women". Especially with her accusation that Gamora's arc was an overlong Stuffed in the Fridge plot.
  • He's Just Hiding!:
    • Thanos lampshading the character's Joker Immunity doesn't do much to dispel any notions that Loki may have cheated death again. Hell, they joked about it twice, and he's had his death faked in two previous movies. Rule of Three?
    • Some fans believe that Ebony Maw survived being Thrown Out the Airlock by Iron Man. The last we see of him is being frozen as he's left floating and frozen in space, but not explicitly shown to be killed by the vacuum of space given his telekinetic powers. The film earlier showed that Thor could survive being thrown into space and left there for a few hours, so why not Ebony Maw?
    • It's also suspected that Gamora is still alive inside the Soul Stone, which is actually the child Gamora who Thanos sees at the end, and will be freed in the sequel. Likewise it's been theorized that many of the dead characters are actually inside the Soul Stone and could be freed, since several such "dead" characters have additional movies confirmed in the future. Jossed in Avengers: Endgame where it's confirmed that there is no saving someone who was sacrificed for the Soul Stone.
    • Not to mention thoughts that, like in the comics, the fingersnap will be undone in the next film.
    • An example played for laughs; people believe that Drax simply went invisible by standing still rather than being erased from existence.
  • Hilarious in Hindsight:
    • It only took 10 months for another space-faring crossover to have Chris Pratt's inappropriately-timed rage result in the removal of himself, his friends, and countless innocents (including a crimefighter played by Cobie Smulders) from their world; Queen Watevra Wa'Nabi in particular suffers the LEGO equivalent of disintegration when her pieces separate. Except, after Lucy takes a jab at "those things with a downer cliffhanger ending", these disasters actually get resolved. Bonus points for Pratt voicing a Star-Lord Expy, and some lampshading on WB's inability to include any Marvel characters. Avengers: Endgame adds more bonus points, since both it and TLM2 have someone from another time period arrive to destroy the universe, only to vanish after the people he removed return to rally against him.
    • Drax says that Thor's "a man" based on his impressive physique while Quill's less impressive build makes him "a dude". Come Avengers: Endgame and Thor now looks like the Dude.
      • Also, Rocket tells Quill "You're one sandwich away from fat!" And then in Avengers: Endgame, Thor is the fat one, while Quill remains the fit one!
  • Hollywood Pudgy: Rocket says that Quill is just "one sandwich away from being fat". This is Chris Pratt shirtless. Additionally, Chris Pratt used to be pretty fat, and lost a lot of weight specifically to get in shape for the role of Star-Lord. Unshaved Mouse took issue with this comment:
    "Chris Pratt has the kind of body that it is literally impossible to maintain unless a movie studio is paying you vast amounts of money to do nothing all day but train and eat grilled chicken and broccoli and now you’re trying to tell me he’s some kind of land whale you shut the hell up with that nonsense."
  • "Holy Shit!" Quotient:
    • Thanos beating the Hulk down effortlessly within the first couple minutes of the film. The Worf Effect it may be, but used effectively.
    • Every time Thanos gets a new Infinity Stone, thereby becoming exponentially stronger, and making it even more of a dire prospect for the heroes to stop him getting them all.
    • The Red Skull is the Soul Stone's keeper. You saw nothing like that coming.
    • Doctor Strange's duel with Thanos, featuring Strange pulling a Doppelgänger Spin and Thanos creating a mini-black hole.
    • While Thanos shows off multiple feats of power with the Infinity Stones during the battle on Titan, he outdoes himself by instantly shattering a huge portion of Titan's moon and telekinetically throwing the broken-off chunks at the heroes.
    • Everything after Thanos arrives on Earth, from his one-sided curbstombing of the remaining defenders, him using the Time Stone to reverse Vision's Heroic Suicide and brutally taking the Mind Stone from him, and finally, the erasing of half the population in the universe.
    • Stormbreaker powering through a beam from the Infinity Gauntlet with all of the Infinity Stones and lodging itself firmly in Thanos' chest. Thanos himself admits to Thor that, had the attack been a headshot, Thor would've killed him. What this means in regards to Thor's power with the weapon is so huge it almost feels as if the movie didn't do it enough justice.
    • The casualties of the Snappening taking out some of the heaviest-hitters — including Black Panther, most of the Guardians of the Galaxy, Doctor Strange, and Spider-Man — are bound to take anyone who was just expecting B-list characters to die for a loop.
  • Ho Yay: Drax is extremely appreciative of Thor's muscles and good looks. He refers to him as a cross between a pirate and an angel.
    Drax: You [Peter] are a dude. This... this is a man. A handsome, muscular man...
  • Inferred Holocaust: According to this video, the Earth would suffer extremely in the aftermath of the Thanos snap removing 50% of all life from the planet. One can only imagine how other planets, even ones more advanced than Earth, would fare as well.
  • Iron Woobie:
    • Thor. He just keeps losing something in every film, yet he keeps going. He's lost his girlfriend, his best friend, his mother, his father, his friends, half of his people, his hammer, his realm, half the people he swore to protect, and his beloved younger brother. The guy has so little left after the film.
    • Thanos himself. It's implied that he doesn't like what he is doing but genuinely feels like it's the only way to solve the Overpopulation Crisis. Throughout the film, he loses everyone close to him (The Black Order by being killed by the heroes and Gamora by throwing her off a cliff to get the soul stone), respectively. Despite all this, he doesn't stop until he gets all the Infinity Stones and kills off half of the universe's population with his Badass Fingersnap. He might be a Villain Protagonist and without a doubt the most dangerous person within the MCU by far, but it's hard not to feel bad for him.
  • It's the Same, Now It Sucks!: An interesting example in that it stems from apparently reversing changes that had already been made. Thor gets a new cybernetic eye from Rocket and builds Stormbreaker to essentially be his replacement for Mjolnir, which many fans felt undermined the Character Development that he went through in Thor: Ragnarok, despite his character arc in that movie placing emphasis on not repeating Odin's mistakes. The latter is justified in-universe by Thor seeking a new weapon forged specifically to combat Thanos and the Infinity Stones, since the opening of the film demonstrated he can't beat Thanos on his own, though many see it more as a case of Marvel and Disney wanting to maintain the idea of Thor having an iconic weapon.
  • It Was His Sled: Thanos wins, the heroes lose horribly, and Thanos succeeds in wiping out half of all life on the universe. In other words, a similar event to the original comic book storyline.
  • Jerkass Woobie: Thanos himself, from A Certain Point of View. He was the only one who spoke about a decisive way to save his homeworld, Titan, which got destroyed due to an Overpopulation Crisis. Then, he became a Galactic Conqueror to avert this, which further cemented hatred for him in a galactic scale, to the point that every associate of Thanos ended up betraying him one point or the another. Then, when finally he moves to collect the Infinity Stones to enact his plan, he has to sacrifice Gamora, possibly the only person he actually cared for, in exchange for the Soul Stone. He also loses the rest of his 'children' and his Badass Army to the Avengers, while himself nearly dying at the hands of Thor. When he does wipe out lives of half the universe, he seems to realize how fucked up his plan was, even though he actually won.
    Gamora: What did it cost?
    Thanos: Everything.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
    • It was theorized the release date for Infinity War was moved up from May to April after the Super Bowl to try and capitalize on the success of Black Panther, as T'Challa and Wakanda feature heavily in the climatic act.
    • The subset of MCU fans who feel Evil Is Cool and who tend to go Rooting for the Empire heavily anticipated this film for the coming of Thanos and the promise of his iconic Badass Fingersnap. They were not disappointed.
    • The fans that wanted to see their preferred hero in action and specifically their interactions with other heroes they meet for the first time.
  • Like You Would Really Do It:
    • Though Kevin Feige and the Russos have indicated that deaths in Infinity War will be permanent, fans were skeptical even before the film's release. The sheer breadth of the film's body count makes it seem highly implausible that so many popular and marketable characters will truly be Killed Off for Real; in particular, Black Panther and Spider-Man sequels have already been announced, as well as a third Guardians of the Galaxy film in which Gamora is confirmed to appearnote , despite all three characters being among Infinity War's casualties — indeed, many have said that they could believe that the deaths would stick up until Black Panther died, given how much of a cultural phenomenon his single movie is. While there may be some permanent fatalities in Avengers 4, most fans are expecting that the bulk of the deaths in this film will be undone somehow in the next. Heimdall and to a lesser extent Vision are the only ones nobody is really all that skeptical about. The filmmakers defended this decision by saying that only killing off the second string heroes (the ones who don't have solo movies and thus don't benefit from Contractual Immortality) like Vision, Scarlet Witch, Falcon and Bucky would've been seen as a cop out, since the audience would know the big name characters still had Plot Armor. After a couple months, Dave Bautista ripped off the band aid by stating in no uncertain terms that he'd be back in both the next Avengers and Guardians films.
    • Also, for a specific example: the fake-Thanos dying on Knowhere. No-one would really think that the film's Big Bad would die that early and certainly not that easily. The scene itself doesn't go along with it much either, as while Gamora instinctively reacts as if he really is dead, Quill's reaction is a quiet "That was easy..." as if he can't believe it's really over either.
  • Love to Hate: Ebony Maw. He might be fairly despicable and a Jerkass but his Faux Affably Evil demeanor and his role as a Hammy Herald to Thanos as well as having the most fleshed out personality of the Black Order has made him pretty popular.

    Tropes M to W 
  • Memetic Badass: Hawkeye zig-zags between this and Memetic Loser. Due to his complete absence from the film, many fans joked that the writers had to take Hawkeye out because his presence would single-handedly turn the tide against Thanos. Many fans have even edited posters that makes Hawkeye the sole focus of the film. Even Robert Downey Jr. played along with the joke that he would be the one who will defeat Thanos.
    • Thanos already had this reputation among comic fans, but the massive wide success of this movie kicked it into high gear, no doubt due to not only his incredible fighting prowess but to actually winning. It's gotten to the point that "Thanos" has become synonymous with "Invincible Villain" among casual audiences and comic fans alike.
    • Building off his reinvention in Ragnarok, Thor has become this, thanks to coming agonizingly close to one-shotting the aforementioned Thanos with Stormbreaker.
    • Doctor Strange wasn't previously seen as this in his solo film, but he receive a massive boost in popularity due to holding his own against Thanos almost single-handedly against Thanos for longer than anyone else except Thor, and his visually spectacular Wizard Duel against the Mad Titan is unsurprisingly seen as one of the highlights of the entire film.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Hawkeye's complete absence from any promotional material, to the point that Jeremy Renner himself started posting fan-made images fixing this, threw him right back in this territory after he clawed his way out in Age of Ultron. Though the week of the film's release, Kevin Feige himself said this is actually the best thing that could have happened to him, as he's gone from the guy people make bow and arrow jokes about to someone everyone's clamoring to know the whereabouts of. It's even worse now that he was nowhere to be seen in the film itself and is only mentioned in a throwaway line.
    • Star-Lord has unfortunately fallen into this as well, due to how he's being unfavorably compared to Thor by the rest of the Guardians to the point he tries mimicking Thor's voice to preserve his own masculinity. To rub salt to the wound, him accidentally screwing up the battle on Titan that cost the heroes' victory and led to the film's Downer Ending has led him to be the subject of mockery by the fans.
    • Wong returning to guard the Sanctum after the first battle scene caused him to fall under this trope, as well. Fans saw this as him chickening out on fighting Thanos (as he is the only character introduced who could have fought him in the climax but didn't (the Dwarf King was still at his forge, Pepper was in New York)) and this caused fans to associate him as someone who ghosts out on others.
  • Misaimed Fandom: Hulk shows up in the prologue of the film, fights Thanos, gets defeated and then sent back to Earth. From that point on, Hulk refuses to get out of Banner. It was intended by the authors to mean that Hulk is tired of being used as a weapon or an attack dog, but lots of fans misinterpreted that Hulk had chickened out after being defeated for the first time.
  • Moral Event Horizon: If his previous atrocities such as his abusive treatment of Nebula weren't enough, Thanos shows the audience that he is already beyond the line by massacring the last remaining Asgardians onscreennote , and the Xandarians and Dwarves offscreen in search for the Stones and ultimately culminating in murdering numberless of beings across the Universe, proving once and for all why he is the Mad Titan. And if none of that does it for you, try Thanos throwing Gamora, the one person he truly loved, to her death for the sake of power. Even he knows there's no going back after that.
  • Most Wonderful Sound:
    • A Theme Music Power-Up is utilized fist-pumpingly well when Steve and friends enter the movie to save Wanda and Vision. As Steve strides out of shadow, the Avengers theme starts playing.
    • The Jabari Tribe's signature chant from Black Panther can be heard when T'Challa's party arrives at the battlefield, M'Baku pumping up his men (and the audience) for the imminent war. Later, when the Wakandans are on the verge of triumphing over Thanos' army, M'Baku begins leading the Jabari in another round of their chant.
    • T'Challa also leads the entire army in a war chant of "Yibambe" note  before charging into battle.
    • Likewise, the long-awaited arrival of Thor, Rocket, and Groot is set to the Avengers theme.
    • In a movie that's dark and ominous almost the whole way through, the cheerful '70s bounce of "The Rubberband Man" by The Spinners as the Guardians make their first appearance fits this bill.
    • One word...snap.
  • Narm: See here.
  • Narm Charm:
    • Yet again does the Rule of Cool "armies charge each other across an open plane" get busted out in the MCU (Wakandan military and Avengers vs Outriders and Thanos on the outskirts of Wakanda). However, at this point, it's essentially become the screenwriters' Creator Thumbprint, so it's hard not to smile.
    • For how over the top Ebony Maw can be, such moments are part of his overall appeal to the fans.
    • It may look a bit goofy but the sight of Peter Dinklage CGI'ed into a 10-foot-tall dwarf has become one of the biggest crowd-pleasing moments of the film.
    • Thor swinging Rocket's ship around may be the silliest thing to happen in this movie, but the fact that it leads to the reignition of a dying neutron star turns it into pure awesome.
    • Gamora's death is rather awkwardly cut to prevent a hard R rating, but that doesn't keep the scene from being heartfelt as the movie's Signature Scene.
    • Quill takes a moment to tell Gamora she should’ve stuck with his plan, and she yells that they shouldn’t talk about this now, considering that Thanos is holding Gamora hostage. This moment should feel like unnecessary Guardians humor. Instead, both Quill and Gamora are completely hysterical as they say it, and it’s heartbreaking to see.
  • Older Than They Think:
    • Thanos justifying the culling of half the universe as preventing overpopulation is frequently cited as an invention of the film. It is in fact taken directly from the comics. The difference is that the film attempts to use this to make Thanos sympathetic and more understandable to general audiences, i.e. he wants to ensure the surviving half stays alive due to having twice as much resources. The comics made it clear that he was tasked with the culling by Death herself who desires a sustainable "harvest", i.e. all life dying would be the end of Death itself so culling half prolongs the process and ensures more deaths over time. This is a double-edged sword because Thanos's logic then no longer applies.
    • Thanos being bald under the helmet is canonical in Jim Starlin's The Infinity Gauntlet and likewise while the sleeveless tank-top outfit in the film is unique to the MCU he did wear a similar ensemble in the finale of that story (albeit a sleeveless peasant tunic to go with the whole Cincinnatus conclusion) and later a sleeved tunic in Annihilation. Thanos also wore a similar sleeveless top in his very first appearance, though it was quickly changed to his more iconic look in subsequent issues.
    • It may be shocking that a major icon like Spider-Man was a casualty of Thanos's finger snap, but he was also killed in the original Infinity Gauntlet storyline too, albeit under different circumstances (he was directly killed in battle instead of wiped from existence). Black Panther, on the other hand, shares the same fate as his comics counterpart.
    • Many fans have criticized Star-Lord's Hair-Trigger Temper decision upon hearing that Thanos killed Gamora, costing the lives of half the universe including his own, as out-of-character for him. However, in Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2, he did something similar to Ego when he found out that Ego killed his mother, impulsively shooting his father in a moment of Tranquil Fury.
    • The ability to travel between dimensions is one of the many powers possessed by both hammers in the comics that the movies have ommited. Movie Stormbreaker is closer in power but still lacks the truly ludicrous range of abilities the comic versions have exhibited.
    • More esoteric than the above examples, but this isn't the first time a man named Peter said "I don't want to go," when faced with his imminent death (though that Peter was Driven to Suicide instead).
  • One-Scene Wonder: Red Skull only appears during one scene as the guardian of the Soul Stone, but seeing how he guides Thanos and explains the need to kill a loved one to him, resulting in Gamora's tear-inducing demise, it's a very memorable scene.
  • Only the Author Can Save Them Now: By the end of the film, with all the Infinity Stones in hand, Thanos executes his famed Badass Fingersnap and outright exterminates half of all sentient life in the universe — including several prominent heroes who are or were confirmed to get upcoming films in the MCU. There is no indication just how the few surviving heroes might go about reversing the damage, and for the time being, they are all left on the far side of the Despair Event Horizon while Thanos gets to kick back and enjoy life as a Karma Houdini.
  • Only the Creator Does It Right: Presumably why James Gunn was brought in as an executive producer to make sure the Guardians sound and act like they do in Guardians of the Galaxy and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.
  • Paranoia Fuel: The Erasure scene. Since not everyone erased disappears at exactly the same moment, nothing guarantees you won't be the next person that crumbles in dust. Especially for those who are not Avengers and have no idea why people just randomly disappear besides making the potential connection with the attack in New York.
  • Rewatch Bonus: After Avengers: Endgame, the scenes where Doctor Strange finishes looking at the 14,000,605 and all of his actions afterwards gain new meaning as we now know he knew he was sending Tony Stark down the path to commit a Heroic Sacrifice.
  • Ron the Death Eater: Because of the infamous scene in which Star-Lord botches up the team's plan into defeating Thanos, viewers have been considering him to being a complete asshole for it. However, even if Star-Lord overreacted at the wrong time, his reaction was justified because his love-interest got killed by Thanos and could not help but (understandably) lose his anger at him. It helps that he does show regret afterwards, as opposed to being smug or completely ignorant of his actions. Also, fans are overlooking that after everything he went through in his last two films up until that very point, it actually becomes hard to blame him for what happened. There's also the fact that Thor later makes a mistake that is just as costly (even the Russos consider it as such), but it generally gets overlooked by the fandom.
  • Rooting for the Empire: Either you're turned off by the heroes' grim predicament, or you're actively rooting for Thanos to win because, after six years of buildup and given Josh Brolin's impeccable performance, and him being a Villain Protagonist, you feel he pretty much has to win to live up to the hype, even if this is only the first part of a two-part story. The fact he actually does get to win at the end is seen by many as a refreshing breather, and in many viewings has left entire audiences silent and gripped. There are some who do side with Thanos' overpopulation solution, as well.
  • She Really Can Act: After several films of being a stone-cold serious Defrosting Ice Queen, many reviewers have noted with surprise and praise Zoe Saldana's performance as Gamora in this film. Her scenes with Thanos — crying with grief when she thinks she's killed him, begging Peter to kill her, realizing that Thanos means to kill her for the Soul Stone — all give her a range of emotion previously unseen.
  • Signature Scene:
    • From the first teaser trailer, only shown to those present at the Marvel panel at the D23 2017 expo and San Diego Comic-Con (meaning everything from the trailer was spread through word of mouth): The one thing that every person and news outlet has mentioned? Thanos throwing a moon at the Avengers.
    • From the first official trailer, the group shot of the reformed Avengers and Black Panther leading the Wakandan army against a horde of Outriders.
    • The second official trailer has Captain America holding off Thanos with the Infinity Gauntlet.
    • The first fight scene of the movie, where we see Thanos effortlessly beating down the Hulk.
    • Thanos tearfully sacrificing Gamora to get the Soul Stone.
    • The Battle of Wakanda and the Battle on Titan.
    • Thor with Stormbreaker arriving into Wakanda and nearly killing Thanos.
    • Thanos's fingersnap and all of his victims turning into ash one after the other.
  • Special Effect Failure:
    • One shot of Mantis has Pom Klementieff's normal eyes visible rather than Mantis' fully-black eyes.
    • The leadup to the the Wakanda battle has some very shaky visual effects in places. The green screen effects are very noticeable but Bruce in the Hulkbuster armor stands out as looking very fake and photoshopped in.
    • When Gamora is plummeting to her death, while screaming out for Thanos, during a close-up, it's clear that Zoe Saldana is laying down on possibly a green screen floor, with her right arm just out of camera shot, presumably supporting herself off the floor.
    • When Okoye and Black Widow move to fight Proxima Midnight, the angle with which Okoye points her spear makes it pretty obvious it is a resin prop.
  • Spoiled by the Format: A number of the characters who died in this movie have sequel movies of their own already announced. So you have to know they'll be coming back somehow.
  • Squick: Thor opening his eye socket to insert the optic implant. Granted, it's a very quick scene, but you get to see the insides and it's still gross enough. His cybernetic eye also twitches a lot trying to correct itself which can be unnerving too. And then Rocket adds that he should have washed it first.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!: As with all comic book movies, a few things have made comic readers disappointed.
    • Remember that line in The Avengers about Thanos courting Death? Just a Mythology Gag after all. There is no mention of courting his Mistress Death, as he wants to kill half the universe's denizens merely to stop overpopulation, in order to save the remaining half. This motivation is actually explored in the comics, but even then it's intrinsically tied to Thanos's love for Death; he wants to ensure more deaths in the long run, not save more lives. The changes have drawn some criticism, mainly because removing Death from the equation and just making it about saving lives invites Fridge Logic regarding the long-term success and feasibility of Thanos's plan. (For instance, given that the human population alone grows exponentially, Thanos only set Earth back a couple decades if he removed half of it, even taking the extra losses from the ensuing chaos into account.) In short (upcoming Reset Button aside), it's contested if movie Thanos accomplished anything in the long run unlike comic Thanos. Related to this is that the limits of the full-power Infinity Gauntlet were not clearly established, so you have people thinking stuff like why he doesn't save more lives by increasing the universe's resources instead of halving the universal population. In the comics, it could create matter out of nothing, but the movie doesn't say either way.
    • The Ebony Maw in the Infinity crossover is a powerhouse who manages to play the Illuminati and Thanos himself like a fiddle, and continues to manipulate Thanos for a long time after. In the film, he instead appears to be completely subservient to Thanos, and is written out early.
    • The MCU's downplaying of Peter Parker's relationship with Uncle Ben in favor of his invented hero-worship/student-mentor one with Tony Stark continues, with Uncle Ben not even getting implied allusions like in Civil War and Homecoming. Some Spider-fans were put off by Peter's death scene with Mr. Stark's name on his lips, comparing it to Uncle Ben's death in the first Sam Raimi movie where he dies saying Peter's name. It's like a weird mirror showing Uncle Ben's virtual erasure.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: Considering the movie has a cast over thirty characters strong, it's to be expected some characters get the shorter end of the stick compared to others.
    • Many fans feel that Drax is underutilized in the movie. His motivation to kill Thanos for the murder of his wife and child is only briefly addressed, when it could have been an opportunity to explore his relationship with Thanos. Instead, he is primarily used for the movie's comic relief alongside Mantis. What's worse, he gets erased from existence by Thanos's Badass Fingersnap which means it would not be explored in the sequel either.
    • The Children of Thanos in general. Praised for their sinister designs and how they are connected to Thanos, many fans were left disappointed at how quickly they were eventually dispatched by the heroes one by one. Perhaps the worst offender is Ebony Maw. In the comics, Maw was the Wild Card among them, with ambitions to usurp Thanos himself and actually succeed. In the movie, however, he's the first to get shafted before he could contribute more to the plot. In general, they only existed to play their part as antagonists for the Earthbound heroes until Thanos arrives, and get to do little else to explore their characters.
    • Unlike the other victims that were killed by Thanos, Falcon barely has any screen time. Worse, he is separated from the people who were closest to him (Black Widow, Winter Soldier and Captain America) when he disappears.
    • Black Panther and his fellow Wakandans feel underutilized. Many have pointed out this was a sign that the Black Panther movie's monster success wasn't quite anticipated by the studio and thus the part of T'Challa and his fellow countrymen were kept minimal in Infinity War.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Plot:
    • Thanos's (half-)massacre of the Asgardians rendered much of what happened during Thor: Ragnarok virtually pointless. Loki and Heimdall are both killed, while Valkyrie, Korg, and Miek are nowhere to be seen. Word of God states that Valkyrie, alongside half the Asgardian refugees that made their way to the escape pods, survived at least.
    • The destruction (or half-destruction?) of Xandar, which the Guardians of the Galaxy saved in their first movie, happens off-screen; when Thanos shows himself at the very beginning of this movie, he already has the Power Stone. The creators have gone on record and stated that they intentionally left it out to prevent the movie from becoming too repetitive.
    • Corvus Glaive and Proxima Midnight were stated by their actors to be married to each other similar to their comic book counterpart. This was not mentioned in the film (along with their names, only in the credits) and them being killed off prevented any kind of development.
    • Although it's somewhat justified by the two-year Time Skip between movies, the difficulties that Rhodey must have had adjusting to his cybernetic legs after being crippled in Civil War are completely glossed over, as are any enmity he would have had with Sam Wilson and the Vision, the two people who are directly responsible for his crippling injuries. Instead the movie completely ignores the fact that the last time he saw those characters, they were beating the shit out of each other, he just greets them like well-loved old friends, and Rhodey is back to walking and fighting as normal.
    • Similarly, the movie completely glosses over explaining how the Vision went rogue, joined up with Scarlet Witch, and formed a romantic relationship with her (even though the Sokovia Accords mean he's technically supposed to be hunting her down and bringing her to justice), something that could easily have driven the plot of a whole movie on its own. There's not even a cursory mention of how the last time they were together onscreen, they were on opposite sides of a major battle.
    • Fans who wished to see Loki team up with the Avengers were disappointed when he was killed off before reaching Earth or even having any interaction with any of the other Avengers (besides Thor and Hulk, of course).
    • Having Banner meet up with the rest of the Avengers mere seconds after Ross leaves feels like a serious waste given that they're arch-enemies who haven't met onscreen in literally a decade.
  • Too Cool to Live:
    • Scarlet Witch and Doctor Strange, two heroes who did the most damage to Thanos when he almost had all the Infinity Stones besides Thor and Iron Man, are among the heroes who were erased from existence by Thanos.
    • The Children of Thanos. They were powerhouses and had potentially interesting and complex stories ripe for exploration, only to be quickly dispatched one by one by the heroes in the movie. Word of God even stated that they were shafted out of fear they could overshadow Thanos himself.
    • Loki and Heimdall, two of the most popular Asgardians, are among the only heroes killed by Thanos whose deaths are not expected to be undone.
  • Tough Act to Follow: A milder case than most, since while the movie has been overall very well-received, some reviews have stated that it doesn't quite meet the level of its acclaimed Phase 3 predecessors, like Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther, due to its massive scope. It currently has an 83% Tomatometer on Rotten Tomatoes, which is lower than for those movies (and the first two MCU movies the Russos directed, The Winter Soldier and Civil War) though not significantly. On the plus side, it does have a higher Tomatometer and audience rating than Avengers: Age of Ultron (83% vs 75% and 93% vs 83%, respectively)
    Critics' consensus: Avengers: Infinity War ably juggles a dizzying array of MCU heroes in the fight against their gravest threat yet, and the result is a thrilling, emotionally resonant blockbuster that (mostly) realizes its gargantuan ambitions.
  • Uncanny Valley:
    • Invoked. The cybernetic eye Rocket gives to Thor looks somewhat off in several shots.
    • In general, the mo-cap for the Children of Thanos isn't as polished as what was done for the Mad Titan himself, and has a few moments that look off. Carrie Coon's Proxima Midnight is, for the most part, a phenomenally seamless mo-cap performance, but in the exchange with the heroes at the Wakandan barrier, the close-ups certainly fall into this during her speaking lines.
  • Unexpected Character:
    • Given that they're relatively new, were used almost exclusively by a single writer in the comics and are, well, dead, nobody was really expecting the Black Order to appear in anything else ever again. Despite the name change to "the Children of Thanos", they appear in Infinity War.
    • A meta example with casting. While Carrie Coon was a surprising choice for Proxima Midnight, nobody was expecting Michael James Shaw to be revealed to be Corvus Glaive, especially when you consider he's best known for the Constantine TV series and that fans were pegging Peter Dinklage to voice Corvus.
    • Nobody expected Red Skull to show up as the guardian of the Soul Stone, especially since the character hasn't appeared since Phase 1 and had been gone for so long that many fans began to presume that he was dead.
    • More like an unexpected spell, but those well-versed in the comics may be surprised to see Doctor Strange bind Thanos with the Crimson Bands of Cyttorak, given the namesake of the spell is the deity that empowers the Juggernaut, a character Marvel Studios did not have the rights to as of filming. That this version of Strange doesn't engage in Calling Your Attacks like the comics one probably helped.
  • Visual Effects of Awesome: This film wasn't nominated for Best Visual Effects at the 91st Academy Awards for nothing.
    • Thanos was explicitly designed for this film to be the most realistic, physics-abiding CG creation in MCU history and it shows. His movements have genuine weight to them and as shown in close-ups, the little details come out — his arteries pulse slightly over the exposed muscles in his arms, and his purple skin is even slightly marred with scars, freckles, and age spots!
    • On the scenery side, there's plenty of beautiful shots in the movie, but the Forge of Nidavellir stands out, especially when Thor and Rocket restart the Forge and by spinning the gigantic wheels around the Forge itself. The scenes where the star turns bright again and where Thor opens the focusing lens of the forge are just stunning to watch.
    • The victims of Thanos's fingersnap disintegrating into ash looks stunning and the ash seamlessly interacts with the environment and the actors very well. For how prevalent the meme is, none of the variants have managed to replicate the original effect.
  • What Do You Mean, It's Not for Kids?: Oh look, a movie with all of our favorite Marvel Cinematic Universe characters joining together! Seems like a fun family outing, huh? Not only is this movie Darker and Edgier than your average PG-13 superhero film, but the film ends with Thanos collecting the Infinity Stones and wiping out half of the life of the universe. Because of there being no family-friendly films in theaters the week this was released, many parents opted to take their little ones to this, ending in many children leaving the theater in tears.
  • Woolseyism:
    • The French dub has Tony use "Voldemort" as an insult to Ebony Maw in place of "Squidward". This is likely because Squidward's French name, "Carlo", is so ordinary that the joke would fly over French audiences' heads. The same applies to Squid's German name, "Thaddäus". This translated joke arguably works even better than the original, since Ebony Maw does actually look more like Voldemort than Squidward.
    • The French dub also uses "crise d'arborescence" as a pun on "crise d'adolescence" to describe Groot, well, being a treenager.
    • The Dutch subtitles have Rocket call Groot an "eikel", which means both "acorn" and "jerk".
  • WTH, Costuming Department?:
    • Thanos's new outfit has garnered mixed responses, with some thinking it looks cool, and others joking that it looks like he's wearing gym clothes or a tank top.
    • Natasha now sporting bleached hair has drawn ire of fans, especially since she is now blonde and uses batons, a lot like a certain other Marvel character especially since said character already exists in the MCU.

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