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  • Acceptable Targets:
  • Anvilicious: Given how its leaders are commonly portrayed, one gets the feeling that the Arrowverse writers may not like the military very much.
  • Arc Fatigue: The shows have an unfortunate knack for dragging out storylines or withholding reveals for way too long:
    • Arrow:
      • The reveal of Sara's killer in Season 3 took nine episodes — it was Malcolm Merlyn, the most obvious candidate. Though he did it by brainwashing his daughter Thea, to give it a bit of a twist.
      • In Season 4, Team Arrow was clueless for 3/4 of the season on what HIVE's Evil Plan was. Turns out it was to nuke the world.
      • Season 5 dragged out The Reveal of Prometheus and Vigilante way too long. Prometheus's identity was revealed in Episode 15 (though this is mitigated somewhat by the unmasked Big Bad's extremely positive reception), while Vigilante's identity was held over until Season 6 (due to the actor being unavailable).
      • Season 6 quickly became infamous for the schism arc — the surviving new recruits of Team Arrow from Season 5, leave Team Arrow to start their own team when they felt Oliver betrayed their trust. Even when Oliver gives them a sincere apology they refuse to come back, which makes the already difficult job of protecting Star City that much harder; naturally events mean the two teams have to work together, but they keep insisting they will never rejoin Team Arrow even with the knowledge that a divided Team Arrow is exactly what the Big Bad wants. It ends with "Collision Course'' on a very sour note: the two can never be reconciled as the choices each team has made thoroughly destroyed whatever remained of their friendship. That being said, the two teams did eventually reconcile...in the last three episodes of the season.
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    • The Flash:
      • In Seasons 2 and 3, the true identities of Zoom and Savitar were dragged out way too long — though general agreement was that the latter was worse, especially since just about all the fans had guessed his true identity long before the actual reveal. For perspective, Zoom's identity was revealed in episode fifteen. Savitar's was revealed in episode twenty. Out of a twenty-three episode season.
      • The identity of the Man in the Iron Mask that Zoom had imprisoned was hidden until the last episode of the season. That being said, it was less grating than the above examples since he wasn't integral to the plot and didn't show up in as many episodes as Zoom did.
      • Ralph's constant cycle of becoming a hero, becoming dissuaded, being pep-talked into heroism again and then promising that he's determined to stop De Voe before promptly getting scared again so he can repeat the whole scenario in a later episode has proved extremely unpopular.
      • It took the team seventeen episodes (nine after the reveal) to learn of Nora’s relationship with Eobard.
      • Orlin Dwyer's role as the villain of the season was dragged for too long, since Team Flash missed good opportunities to arrest him.
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    • Legends of Tomorrow:
      • It takes ten episodes for the Legends to figure out that the mysterious evil speedster they're fighting is Eobard Thawne. They could've figured it out much sooner if they had just bothered to ask Barry. It doesn't help that Martin Stein was there during the fights with Reverse-Flash, as well as Eobard's true face being revealed.
      • Captain Cold was well advertised to join the Legion of Doom, but he didn't show up until episode 15...out of a seventeen episode season!
    • Supergirl:
      • Kara and her team learning Sam is Reign long after it was already revealed to the audience.
  • Archive Panic: If you want to avoid Continuity Lockout, especially with the crossovers that get bigger and bigger each year, you'll need to watch all four main shows, which is a total of over 250 episodes, all of which are about 40 minutes long. And that's not even counting the animated spin-offs and tie-in comics, or the shows that were not part of the Arrowverse before Canon Welding happened. Even worse, if you're planning to binge watch, you'll need to find out which order certain episodes across shows aired in so you don't end up watching the crossovers Out of Order. It's especially infuriating if there's only one or a few characters you really care about. And that's if you only decide to stick with the main shows - if you include stuff retroactively added in, you've also got Birds of Prey (13 episodes), Constantine (also 13 episodes), The Flash (1990) (22 episodes) Smallville (217 episodes and the comic season 11).
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  • Ass Pull: In a world where Death Is Cheap whether it be via time travel or occult artifacts, we are treated to several very weak explanations as to why Laurel Lance can never ever come back to life despite all of the above being viable methods; they all amount to it that it would be "wrong".
  • Author's Saving Throw:
    • Ray Palmer developing his shrinking tech, since a lot of fans complained he was too much like Tony Stark.
    • When Constantine got cancelled despite a decently sized fan campaign to save it, the series was retconned into being part of this setting and John Constantine himself guest starred in Arrow Season 4, and later made a regular in Legends of Tomorrow.
    • Katie Cassidy returning to full time status in Arrow Season 6 as Black Siren, since many fans were upset how the production team treated her and Laurel. Subverted to an extent as many fans are still angry that they just didn't bring Laurel back — especially since "Flashpoint" in "The Flash" Season Three or the Spear of Destiny in Legends Season Two provided them with the perfect opportunity to do so — and they came this close to doing it in the Legends finale too.
    • Producer Todd Helbing's directly addressing the increasingly darker tone Season 3 of "The Flash" took, and openly assured the fandom Season 4 would be returning to its Lighter and Softer roots that had made the show so popular in the first place. Although the execution became controversial as time went on. See Dork Age below.
    • After the dismal reception of Arrow Season 6, Beth Schwartz took over as showrunner after the wildly unpopular Marc Guggenheim and Wendy Mericle were fired/Kicked Upstairs.
    • An especially wide-reaching one after the Bury Your Gays on Sara Lance in the Arrow Season 3 premiere. The fans went after this so brutally that the crew actually fully acknowledged that they shouldn't have done it and brought Sara back as a major character on Legends, and from then on the entire 'verse has been one of the most openly sexually inclusive settings in entertainment history. Plus, it even affected their work outside the 'verse, like Greg Berlanti directing Love, Simon.
  • Base-Breaking Character:
    • Ray Palmer in general. After initially being controversial for stealing plot focus and romancing Felicity, he settled in this role in Legends thanks to his Ditzy Genius tendencies either making him an annoying Idiot Hero or an endearing Nice Guy nerd.
    • Felicity Smoak, for the same reasons as her entry in Arrow - half the fanbase love her quirkiness, chemistry with Oliver, and the light-heartedness she brings to the team. The other half think she's a Spotlight-Stealing Squad who is the subject of Character Shilling on all the other shows, to the point of complaining when she's announced to guest-star. Unfortunately, the writing team's (lack of) skill made her become The Scrappy for the entire Arrowverse fandom after the 2017 crossover.
    • Laurel Lance worked up from The Scrappy in earlier seasons to gaining more fans after becoming the Black Canary, however a fair portion of the fanbase was frustrated with her becoming an Instant Expert compared to the rest of the character's training (going from first outing to mask in barely half a season) and general recklessness endangering Team Arrow (jumping into conflicts in Season 3 and reviving Sara in Season 4). Despite becoming more sympathetic she was killed off at the end of Season 4.
    • Barry Allen himself, quite possibly being the most controversial of the show leads. Causing Flashpoint and the resulting What the Hell, Hero? treatment split fans between those who felt he was getting too harshly criticized and those who felt he wasn't being criticized enough. Beyond that though, people are split between those who feel he's a likeable character who's mistakes are reasonable, and those who feel he's a selfish idiot that really can't be trusted with the power he has.
    • Oliver Queen, who since the beginning was criticized for being a rather blatant Batman Expy who suffered massively from They Changed It, Now It Sucks! as a result, not to mention the fact many just found him rather dull and boring, being another brooding Anti-Hero. Other fans however adore him for his sheer badassery and how tortured his life is making him The Woobie, not to mention his near-constant shirtlessness in the early days. This extends to his actor, Stephen Amell; while there are some who consider him one of the strongest actors the shows have owing to several really emotional performances, others consider him one of the weakest due to his comparative lack of range compared to the other actors and leads.
  • Better on DVD: Despite the writers best efforts the shows' timelines have a tendency to not match at times when airing on broadcast TV; watching them on Netflix or DVD allows them to sync better.
  • Broken Base:
    • Legends. While may fans are thrilled that Ray got his own show, the announcement that Captain Cold and Heatwave would be starring too was met with less enthusiasm since they are both prominent Flash rogues and many fans would prefer if they just stayed on that show for the moment.
    • How often the characters cross over. While many enjoy the shared universe, Oliver showing up in the Flash episode Rogue Air caused some criticism because it didn't mesh well with Arrow's timeline of events.
      • Related to the crossovers - while many enjoy them in general, some fans feel that they are too many cases of They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character for the regulars on their own shows when the crossovers happen, or leaving out characters that would make perfect sense. The was keenly felt in the Invasion crossover in particular when Iris, a reporter, wasn't at a press conference held by the President, most of the heroes weren't at the victory party, and some of the Legends characters were inexplicably missing from their own show for a lot of that episode.
    • "Duet", the musical crossover. Not the musical performances themselves mind you, everyone is in agreement that the heavy vocal training and talents of high class Broadway/West End/Musical actors like Victor Garber, Jermey Jordan, John Barrowman, Jesse L. Martin, Carlos Valdes, Melissa Benoist and Grant Gustin are very apparent and applauded, but the fact that the Arrowverse has a Musical Episode in the first place is very polarizing. Depending on which fan you ask, it's either loved or hated, there is no in between.
  • Canon Defilement:
    • Quite a lot of comic fans have began to see these shows as this, due to the massive liberties being taken regarding characterisation and backstory, not to mention the number of villains who are In Name Only, which only got worse as the quality of the shows' writing plundered. Particular sour points are the Adaptational Wimp and poor use given to Black Canary, the often-insulting usage of Wally West, who's Demoted to Extra in seasons adapting stories where he was the main character, as well as the Vanilla Protagonist treatment given to Barry and Oliver as they avoid lasting development as characters.
    • Among the show's own fandom, this is largely how Marc Guggenheim's tenure is viewed. After taking over Arrow when Andrew Kreisberg jumped to The Flash, the show was hit by such an infamous degree of Seasonal Rot, particularly as the show became overly focused on the Romantic Plot Tumor of Oliver/Felicity, a haphazard attempt at giving Merlyn a redemption arc that just made him come off as more unsympathetic, and a story that just didn't make sense.
  • Complete Monster: The franchise now has its own page.
  • Continuity Lock-Out: If you don't watch all the shows there might be some viewer confusion, namely: Laurel showed up in an episode of Flash so Cisco could modify her sister's sonic device into the Canary Cry, and when she uses it on Arrow there is no mention how she got it.
    • Deathbolt is a Villain of the Week in an episode of Arrow who appears in the penultimate episode of the first season of The Flash.
    • Vandal Savage appeared on the Flash first, so those only watching Arrow have a harder time following.
    • Eobard Thawne is the Arc Villain of both The Flash Season 1 and Legends Season 2.
    • The Invasion crossover event depends on you being caught up with Arrow (Seasons 1-5), The Flash (Season 3), and Legends Of Tomorrow (Season 2) as some recurring plots from those seasons, specifically Flashpoint and Time Aberrations, play a part in the main plot. This is avoided with Supergirl as the plot of her second season doesn't affect the plot.
  • Creator's Pet:
    • Felicity Smoak. She's blatantly loved by the show-runners and most of the writers, especially on her home turf, has more screen-time than anyone other than Barry Allen and Oliver Queen, has made more crossover appearances than any other character period, is generally treated as infallible even during times that she is being selfish, and is talked up by every other hero in the universe, as well as the other characters.
    • Dinah Drake, the the second Black Canary. Many fans see her as a Replacement Scrappy for Laurel, and many were unhappy that she was picked to join Team instead of Black Siren, and a lot of Character Shilling was done to make the audiences fall in love with her — and the production team go out of their way to build her up on social media. They even had Vigilante's identity be suddenly tied to her just to make her relevant. Sara and Laurel, both suffered the indignity of being Stuffed into the Fridge the season after they each became the Canary; Sara was the Canary in Season 2 only to be killed in the Season 3 premiere, while Laurel became the Black Canary in Season 3 only to be killed off three-fourths of the way in Season 4. By contrast Dinah became Black Canary II in the second half of Season 5 and managed to come out of Season 6 still alive.
    • Mon-El, Supergirl's love interest in Season 2. He got far more focus than the main character of the show herself; coupled with the fact the production team admitted he was only paired with Supergirl so she could "fix" him, and later they teased that his return to National City is a big arc in Season Three makes you wonder if the writers forgot who the show is suppose to be about.
  • Dork Age:
    • Season 4 of Arrow is widely regarded as the absolute low point of the Arrowverse, even by Stephen Amell himself. The other seasons to get anywhere close to the same amount of flak are Season 3 and especially Season 4 of The Flash.
      • The second half of Season 6 of Arrow have been regarded as even worse, thanks to a much maligned arc where Team Arrow and the New Recruits have a parting of the ways and spend most of their time fighting each other than the actual Big Bad that completely consumed the season; it got to the point where after the ratings started to drip to less than a million that Guggenheim and Mericle were finally given the boot — Beth Schwartz will take over as show runner for Season 7. Mericle is leaving completely, while Guggenheim has been Kicked Upstairs to the role of "executive consultant".
    • Season 4 of The Flash is seen as the low point of this series. To compensate for the mediocre reception of Season 3, Todd Helbing sought to bring the comedic tone back, but fans were not pleased with the result since it was more of a juvenile Denser and Wackier tone rather than a balance between drama and humor. Other points of contention were lazy, inconsistent writing, characters lacking lives outside of S.T.A.R. Labs, Ralph Dibny becoming a Spotlight-Stealing Squad with an inconsistent character development, and countless Idiot Ball moments to help prop up the villain as the smartest man alive. While there are debates over whether or not this season is worse than Season 3, it is certainly a case of Seasonal Rot when compared to Seasons 1 and 2.
  • Ear Worm: The shows' respective theme songs are really catchy.
  • Eight Deadly Words: The ’Verse's sixth year infamously featured new characters who got so much focus that they effectively sidelined many of their respective show's original cast members. For Arrow, it's the New Recruits aka "New Team Arrow". For The Flash, it's Ralph Dibny aka Elongated Man. Said larger focus over the established characters did not sit well with many fans and are largely blamed for their respective shows' aforementioned Dork Age.
  • Ensemble Dark Horse: John Constantine. His show got cancelled after one season and ended on a major Cliffhanger but he's still one of the most popular heroes in the verse; he was eventually made a member of Legends of Tomorrow.
  • Fan-Preferred Couple:
    • Although shipping can get serious the one couple everyone seems to be behind is Cisco and Laurel. Not only do they have similar powers, but there was genuine chemistry between them when they first met.
    • SuperArrow, aka Oliver Queen/Kara Danvers. It initially started out a meme, as a joke ship people supported in response to their widely hated official ships on their respective show. Then came Crisis on Earth-X, where it became an Ascended Meme when it turned out that their Earth-X counterparts were married. Oliver-X and Kara-X had more chemistry than Olicity and Karamel ever did, and after the infamous ending to the aforementioned crossover, people started shipping SuperArrow seriously.
  • Fanon Discontinuity: Many fans prefer to ignore the more notorious examples of Seasonal Rot within the franchise, which has led to Arrow Seasons 3, 4, and 6 along with the second halves of both The Flash Season 4 and Supergirl Season 3 being ignored and dismissed.
  • Fandom Heresy:
    • Give any praise to Marc Guggenheim as a showrunner and writer (especially for Arrow) and you are either gonna get burned at the stake, ridiculed, or both at the same time. The same goes for his Arrow co-showrunner Wendy Mericle, and Flash showrunner Andrew Kreisberg after his sexual harassment allegations.
    • If you're the type of fan who watch the shows mainly/only for Shipping then it's best if you don't say it to comic and casual fans.
  • Fandom Rivalry:
    • As per usual, there's the traditional DC/Marvel rivalry, with fans of the Netflix Marvel Cinematic Universe shows on the other side.
    • There's also a rivalry between the DC Extended Universe. It was exacerbated when Warner Bros. announced a Flash movie with Ezra Miller playing the Scarlet Speedster (who will also be Barry Allen, according to Phil Lord) just two weeks after the Flash show premiered - a move that was criticized by not only Stephen Amell but by DC's rival Marvel as well. Later continued when the Suicide Squad (2016) film started shooting, as the Squad exists on TV as well. The fact that Arrow's versions of Deadshot and Amanda Waller had to be killed off did not go over well with the fanbase.
      • It got worse in 2017 after the Flash finale when Barry is forced into the Speed Force to keep it collapsing. Considering this happened only a few months before the Justice League movie premiered and the DCEU's proper debut of it's version of Barry Allen, it seemed that fans fears that WB would force the Arrowverse producers to get rid of Barry to make way for the movie version had been confirmed, at least until subsequent trailers for Season 4 confirmed that Barry would return and remain the lead of the show.
    • Within the larger fandom itself, there's something of one between Legends and the other shows, primarily The Flash. Some Flash fans blame Legends for stealing, and then killing off, Captain Cold, and later for 'stealing' Wally West, where his appearances got scrutiny for being 'out of character'. Legends fans by contrast regularly mock The Flash for its Seasonal Rot and note that Wally was far better received on Legends, owing to the fact he acted more like his comic and DCAU counterparts and that he could shine without being overshadowed by Barry.
    • Fans of the comics and fans of the TV shows tend to...disagree. A lot. Thanks to They Changed It, Now It Sucks! and They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character/Plot, there's a few fans who hate the shows for how they could become an ink-stained adaptations for the characters. For fans who love the shows through thick-and-thin that didn't read the comics first, they dismiss a lot of the criticisms and actively wish for them to become an Ink Stained Adaptation, either for familiarity or because they think the shows are better from what they've heard of the comics.
  • Franchise Original Sin:
    • The shows' habit of making Ascended Extras out of minor (sometimes In Name Only) comic characters and Canon Foreigners were widely praised at first. Overtime however, this habit's led to important characters from the respective shows' source material getting shafted (either being Out of Focus or downright Demoted to Extra). This habit actually originally came from Smallville, which showed some heroes other than Superman and some of them became very important in the latest seasons (like Oliver Queen), but Smallville is generally seen as having done a far better balance between focusing on Superman and giving the other heroes their own stories.
    • The shows are often noted for the Darker and Edgier treatment given to Green Arrow and, to a lesser extent, The Flash post-season 2. Quite often some fans will defend this by pointing to the Mike Grell era or other points in the comics where Green Arrow was rather dark. Of course, even during those periods he wasn't as dark as on Arrow, and even still those are small blips on a character history stretching back to the 1940s.
    • In general, several of the problems fans complain about in later seasons had already existed in the series of Arrowverse from the beginning: minor or even original characters gaining more prominence than popular heroes and villains from the comics, an excessive focus on romantic plots, the scripts hiding the reveal of the villains' plans to the final stretch, pacing problems, too much "villain of the week", etc. The big difference is that the series were new and the writing was much better. But when even after several years the writers kept insisting on the same mistakes, it is impossible not to notice them.
  • Gotta Ship 'Em All: Every characters have been shipped in many ways including some crossover like Laurisco/Blackvibe.
  • Growing the Beard:
    • For Arrow, fans consider either mid-to-late Season One when the Power Trio of Oliver, Diggle, and Felicity is formed and when Oliver has his first adventure with Slade Wilson in the island, or Season Two when Oliver decided to stop killing in order to honor Tommy's memory, bringing him more in line with his comic book counterpart, as well as the introduction of characters and fantastical elements (Barry Allen, Sara Lance, the League of Assassins, Mirakuru, etc) that would later form the wider Arrowverse.
    • Season Two of Legends of Tomorrow, abandoning any attempt to have a sensible story in favor of going completely nuts with the fact that they're writing a story about a time-traveling superhero team, jettisoning the widely panned Hawk characters, and replacing the underwhelming Vandal Savage with the Legion of Doom made up of fan-favorite villains from Arrow and The Flash.
    • While still a divisive series, Supergirl's reception improved in Season 3 after the romantic relationships were downplayed and the plot about Reign improved the more unclear villainous storylines on past seasons.
  • Harsher in Hindsight: The fandom's preference of Andrew Kreisberg over Marc Guggenheim, when it was announced that Kreisberg was suspended and eventually fired from his roles as show runner and producer after a wave of allegations over sexual harassment and creating a very toxic work environment. Not that Marc Guggenheim is actually vindicated, especially since he apparently knew what Kreisberg was doing according to Grace DeVoll (the writer of the Arrow web miniseries "Blood Rush").
  • Hypocritical Fandom: Given the resentment many Arrowverse fans have towards the DCEU, sometimes this comes up when discussing the problems the DCEU has. In particular, its not uncommon for fans of the Arrowverse, particularly ones that still look at it fondly even during its Seasonal Rot, to talk about the DCEU as if its a failure that should just be rebooted, citing the poor reception its gotten from fans of the source material and overall poor reviews. However, should one bring up the Arrowverse's Seasonal Rot or point out how it has also gotten a poor reception from much of the comic fandom and has had a slipping critical reception, they'll often get upset about the insinuation.
  • Just Here for Godzilla:
  • The Law of Fan Jackassery: Even ignoring the Seasonal Rot, the very vocal toxicity out of the general fanbase has become a major factor behind the Arrowverse being considered Snark Bait online.
  • Memetic Loser:
    • Barry Allen. His powerset makes him one of the most powerful heroes on Earth and when he gets down to business, he can take down heavy hitters like Zoom and Savitar. However, what most people remember him for are his humiliating defeats against opponents who aren't anywhere near as fast as him and seemingly being unable to dodge their attacks when he should easily be able to do so, while being totally reliant upon his STAR Labs Crew to hold his hand and talk him through all his battles. Even in VS threads across the internet where CW Flash is involved, it's not uncommon to see a majority of people vote against Barry in favor of his opponents(some of whom Flash should be able to defeat theoretically) while making jokes about how CW's Flash is the "fastest jobber alive."
    • Ray Palmer in some circles. Redditors keep a "Ray Palmer Fuck-Up" counter in the Legends of Tomorrow Sub-reddit. They actually got rid of the counter because they couldn't keep count anymore.
    • The Legends as a whole seem to be this, as there's a lot of buzz about them being ineffective losers who've failed at every mission. In actuality, the only actual 'failures' they've had was the attacks on Savage in the 70s and the 50s, and assassinating Per Degaton, while the team has succeeded in foiling Savage's plot with the Soviets, halted his experiments in the 50s, stopped his use of the ATOM drones, as well as saved the future Star City from Grant Wilson, defeated the Stillwater gang, and defeated and deprogrammed Chronos, the Hunters, and the Pilgrim, and captured Savage while he's at the height of his power. However, their failures are just more memorable.
    • In particular, Rip's apparent ineptitude at time travel, given his repeated failure to kill Savage before forming the team, and his poor management skills when leading the team, has been the subject of much humor among fans. It was later revealed that the Time Masters had been actively sabotaging his attempts to kill Savage, but even afterwards the team still has a tendency to ignore his plans and just do their own thing (during a mission to protect the King of France from being assassinated, Sara slept with the Queen of France).
  • Replacement Scrappy:
    • Zoom and Savitar the respective Big Bads of Seasons Two and Three of "The Flash". Neither of them could escape Eobard Thawne's shadow as there was nothing to really distinguish them from Reverse-Flash. Zoom does have his fans, but is still very similar to Thawne in his mysteries and his last moments were criticized. Savitar had a lot of potential that was wasted due to poor pacing and in the end lacked the menace Thawne and Zoom had. They are also seen as one of the reasons why Seasons Two and Three are seen as weaker than Season One — It's the Same, Now It Sucks! came into full play, which is why the Big Bad For Season 4 is specifically not a speedster.
    • Dinah Drake the new Black Canary in Arrow Season 5, whose powers are the result of the STAR Labs Particle Accelerator. Mainly because she and Laurel's Earth-2 Counterpart - Black Siren both have similar backstories; they went down a dark path after the men they loved died, Dinah's former police partner and Earth-2 Oliver. Yet Oliver doesn't try to redeem Black Siren after his initial attempt, and then Dinah is introduced at the end of the same episode, and her appearance comes off as a very Contrived Coincidence to make her the "perfect replacement" for Laurel, not to mention she's given a lot of Character Shilling at Black Siren's expense. While Dinah's not a bad character per se — she's pretty likable and badass, many hate that she's the product of lazing writing.
  • Romantic Plot Tumor: One recurring problem with the shows is that the romance aspect has a strong tendency to overtake the plot. This is felt in Arrow and Supergirl specifically. The Flash (2014) show runners saw this problem and downplay this to avoid the same problem(s).
  • Scapegoat Creator:
    • Of the three major producers, Marc Guggenheim gets the most hate due to several reasons, namely:
    • Franchise creator Greg Berlanti, himself because he lets Marc do whatever he wants and remain as a show runner mainly because the two of them go way back, despite all the criticism Marc's decisions generate compared to Andrew Kreisberg who only manage two despite both of those shows being the highest rated ones in the franchise (in spite of their own Seasonal Rot); even when Guggenheim was fired as show runner after Arrow Season 6, he's being kept on as an "executive consultant". Many fans also dislike him for turning a blind eye to Andrew Kreisberg's sexual misconduct and still letting Guggenheim keep his job despite knowing what Andrew was doing and not stopping it. He was also the one who wanted the much-maligned double wedding for Crisis on Earth-X, though he admittedly might not have been in charge of its actual execution in the actual episode.
    • Wendy Mericle also gets a fair share of dislike not only for being Guggenheim's "accomplice" in Laurel's death but also for being ignorant of the source material she's paid to adapt - Notoriously, she claimed Tobias Church's dragon Scimitar was from the comics, even though he's a Canon Foreigner.
    • The Arrow writers since Season 3 in general are largely disliked for being as incompetent as Guggenheim and Mericle or a Yes-Man to them.
    • The above-mentioned Andrew Kreisberg himself naturally became one after his sexual harassment was revealed, with quite a few fans saying he was probably behind a good deal of the franchise's questionable treatment of female characters given the way their characters and stories were handled when he was in charge, and the way he spoke about and treated women according to sources.
  • The Scrappy:
    • By Season 6 of Arrow, you can add Curtis, Rene, and Dinah Drake to the list. Oliver spied on them to root a mole who was Agent Watson's star witness; even though Rene was The Mole. Even Oliver gives them a sincere apology they refuse to comeback, opting instead to Start My Own, even though they are perfectly aware that Cayden James wants them divided. Striking out on their own doesn't make things harder for Cayden James, in fact it makes his conquest of the city easier.
    • Vandal Savage is widely considered one of, if not the worst villains in the Arrowverse. This started when the crossover episodes combined him with the jealous priest Hath-Set from Hawkman and Hawkgirl's origin stories. This results in a Romantic Plot Tumor that takes away much of Savage's trademark Wicked Cultured nature, as the show instead focuses on his Villainous Crush on Hawkgirl. Plus he's not nearly as old (and thus less experienced) as the comic version who was a caveman. While Legends of Tomorrow tried to reemphasize his malevolence and cruelty, Casper Crump ultimately fails at bringing the necessary menace to the role despite his acting chops (Savage's Adaptational Wimp status certainly didn't help). Savage is looked back upon by both fan and the writers as one of the biggest problem with the first season of the show.
    • While previous major villains in The Flash are polarizing, Orlin Dwyer (Cicada) is the most hated one, and not in a Love to Hate way. Despite having little motivation and not being strong enough to maintain the tension, he was kept for too long and he only escaped so far due to Team Flash's incompetence. Chris Klein's utter failure to make Orlin terrifying makes him look even worse.
  • Seasonal Rot: An ongoing problem seems to be is that the longer the shows are on the air they tend to decline in quality — Arrow Seasons 3, 4 and 6 and for The Flash it was parts of Seasons 2 and 3, and most of 4 and 5 (especially the second halves of the latter two), Legends Season 4, and Supergirl Season 2 (though it's more debatable among critics and fans whether or not it was an improvement over Season 1) are prime examples. Season 3 of Supergirl also left many unimpressed, but the fans are far more forgiving about that one as the remaining crew had to completely retool its second half on the fly after Andrew Kreisberg was fired, not wanting to use his story plan and thus have to pay him — during the first half, many believed it was on track to being the best season of Supergirl thus far.
  • Snark Bait: Thanks to the above, the shows have devolved into this by 2018 in terms of their online reputation. Legends seems to embrace it by just being so silly that it ends up in on the joke (to the point the final battle of Season 3 is between the Big Bad and a stuffed teddy bear the fandom had turned into a meme), but the more the other shows tried to be serious, the more they've been mocked for using what are typically seen as stock formulaic plots and clichéd writing.
  • Ship-to-Ship Combat: Shipping in this verse can get really ugly. Just go to their respective shows' pages to see why.
  • Star Trek Movie Curse: Interestingly, the third and especially fourth seasons of both Arrow and The Flash are widely hated by fans (as mentioned in both Dork Age and Seasonal Rot above). Legends averted this for its third season while Supergirl would have if it wasn't for having to completely rewrite the last few episodes (and the real life reasons behind those rewrites have made it so most of the fandom gives them a free pass for it). It was then interestingly inverted for the two shows regarding their fourth seasons, with Season 4 of Supergirl being quite well received and Season 4 of Legends getting lots of flack (although still not nearly as much as the fourth seasons of Arrow and The Flash got).
  • Supercouple: Barry and Iris have become this for the entirety of the Arrowverse, for many reasons. Most importantly, the popularity they have with both the fandom and critics, supported in large part by the strong chemistry Grant and Candice share. Also unlike some other couples on tv, the writers take great pains to ensure that the two sidestep or hurdle over pitfalls that usually stagnate other couples having the two face, aside from supervillains and issues as part of a superhero team, very real life problems head on and overcoming them together, simply by relying on one another. It came to a front that their long teased and heavily built up wedding became the focal point and catalyst of Crisis on Earth-X. Not to mention the fact that the two had been best friends all their lives, the heavy elements of destiny in play when it comes to their relationship and in-universe recognition as one of the Arrowverse's greatest love stories. What else can be said of a romance that has spanned multiple earths, at least three timelines and withstood death itself, supercouple indeed.
  • They Changed It, Now It Sucks!:
    • Good god yes is this a popular sentiment. Especially as Seasonal Rot kicked in for Arrow and The Flash, the shows have alienated a lot of the older comic fandom, in large part because of the massive creative liberties taken with the main characters, their love interests, families, and supporting casts. While at first the shows weren't particularly controversial (largely, while they were different, the 'early days' approach meant people were open to changes on the assumption they'd grow into being more like the comics), however the increased Pandering to the Base treatment lead to the shows swerving the opposite way that many comic fans jumped ship.
    • Completely and utterly averted in the case of Legends of Tomorrow however. The show is by far the one that has the least to do with any comics, yet it is also often called the best of the bunch, due to the sheer zaniness and utter fun it contains.
  • They Wasted a Perfectly Good Character: The shows have a tendency to take interesting, complex characters from the comics and reduce them down to one-shot characters that don't last past one episode. Plastique from The Flash was a big one.
    • Among main-cast members, Wally West and Black Canary are easily the worst examples, due to them being highly beloved characters in the canon, arguably more popular and iconic than Barry and Oliver themselves, yet were reduced to being Locked Out of the Loop, almost in-name-only civilian characters-turned-under-used sidekicks that were unceremoniously dropped from the show. Not helping matters is how a lot of their history and characterisation was given to other characters (Wally having a lot of his unique traits being given to Barry, while 'Dinah Lance' was effectively turned into three characters, with the one actually called Dinah Lance being the least like her). A major point of criticism among comic fans is their treatment.
    • Captain Boomerang. A prominent member of The Flash (2014) Rogues in the comics is reduced to a standard Villain of the Week during the first Arrow and Flash crossover between the two shows and his beef is more with Team Arrow than Team Flash. A likely case of Exiled from Continuity - he's appearing in Suicide Squad (2016) as a major character, similar to Deadshot and Katana, but hasn't been mentioned in interviews because the show's version was a much smaller role.
    • Komodo in the comics had a rather large role in the Green Arrow mythology, framing Oliver in his alter-ego and in his public identity making him lose his wealth, and actually killed Oliver's father at one point. In the show, he's essentially there to be a Red Herring for the murder of Sara and nothing more. Though to be fair, the character was introduced in the New 52 and the comics' version was an Expy of the show's version of Malcolm Merlyn. It's also possible that he might return since unlike some other villains, he's still alive.
    • Black Siren, Laurel Lance's Alternate Universe Evil Counterpart got hit with this as well. When she was reintroduced in "Who Are You?" it seemed like the perfect opportunity to set her up as Arrow's version of Catwoman. Then she's captured at the end and we get Dinah Drake (no relation to the Lance sisters' mother), the fourth person to take up the Black Canary mantle. She landed pretty firmly in the Replacement Scrappy hole.
    • After multiple cameo appearance by Rick Cosnett since his character's Heroic Sacrifice, one has to question, why have we yet to see one of Eddie's doppelgängers, particularly one named Malcolm Thawne/Colbalt Blue, especially strange given Barry's been to multiple Earths.
  • Unacceptable Targets: Despite her character being The Scrappy, Emily Bett Rickards is generally seen as this except among the more notorious trolls, with many even sympathizing over her being forced to play a previously-beloved and now widely despised character through no real fault of her own.
  • Unfortunate Implications: With An Accent has criticized the Arrowverse for their "white feminism". With An Accent denounced Supergirl, Arrow and The Flash of doing a disservice to minority women for committing "counterfeit diversity" (as in, casting white women as women of colour), showing them as unsympathetic villains most of the time, and treating them unfairly in comparison to white women.
  • Unpopular Popular Character: Laurel Lance, the Black Canary; originally not very well-liked, fans eventually warmed up to her and were outraged when she Stuffed into the Fridge like Sara before her...and the production team refusing to ever bring her back to life, despite the Arrowverse being filled with occult artifacts and time travel, no matter how badly the fans want it to happen. It got worse when her Earth-2 counterpart Black Siren, the fan favorite to be her successor as Black Canary was snubbed over in favor one Dinah Drake, a metahuman who happens to have Laurel's mom maiden name and Black Siren's power set. Many speculate that Black Siren becoming a regular in Season 6 was done by the production team to appease the fans and stop their complaints.
  • Vindicated by History: Again, thanks to the growing number of seasons for each show, some past seasons that were initially derided when they first aired are better received with age, especially when even worse seasons air after them. Notable recipients include Arrow Season 3 and The Flash Season 3, both of which were followed by even more reviled seasons, as detailed under Dork Age above.
  • Win Back the Crowd: Arrow Season 5 after the weaker Seasons 3 and 4, mainly due to a "back to basics" approach, a downplay on the romance, a very well-received flashback arc dealing Oliver's time with the Bratva, a very credible Big Bad, more focus on Oliver and breaking the trend of the Big Bad trying to destroy Star City. The season's only real flaws are the introduction of the new recruits (most especially Tina Boland) and them taking the spotlight from the previously established characters other than Oliver and Felicity. Relatedly, Arrow Season 7, Supergirl Season 4, The Flash Season 5, and Legends Season 4 have also all gotten surprisingly positive critical receptions (though audience reception was far more mixed concerning the latter two), which is giving further hope to the Arrowverse eventually moving out of its Snark Bait reputation online.
  • WTH, Costuming Department?: The shows tend to have problems when attempting to have the actors interpret older versions of their characters, since the make-up often fails to conceal the obvious youth of the actors.

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