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Wild About Hurry is a 1959 Merrie Melodies short starring Chuck Jones' iconic duo, Wile E. Coyote and the Road Runner.
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After two failed attempts to catch the Road Runner with a boulder dangling from a rope and a rocket, Wile E. Coyote plots six more to do the bird in, like a slingshot, a clam-shaped rock over an outcropping, a rocket sled not unlike the one seen in "Beep Prepared" two years later, bird seed and iron pellets as well as a magnet and a grenade strapped to a roller skate, a bowling ball through a pipe and a massive steel ball.


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Tropes:

  • Accordion Man: Though he doesn't compress and decompress like one afterwards, Wile E. suffers this when he hits a rock arch after his rocket crashes into a plateau.
  • Acme Products:
    • For his first scheme, Wile E. orders an ACME Giant Rubber Band (much like the one from "Whoa, Be-Gone!"), wraps it around a slingshot and prepares to launch himself at the Road Runner. However, he merely face plants on the ground when he does so.
    • For his third scheme, Wile E. orders several items from the ACME Shopping Center, including 5 miles of railroad tracks, one rocket sled, 8,000 railroad ties, 24,000,000 spikes and 90,000,000 feet lumber (it is unknown what the sixth item is). But when he activates his rocket sled and slides down onto the tracks, he breaks through the curved railroad and crashes to the ground, followed by a few broken planks.
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    • In his fourth plan, the Coyote mixes ACME Bird Seed and ACME Iron Pellets for the Road Runner to consume and sets out a hand grenade and a magnet on an old-fashioned clamp-on roller skate, which predictably goes off on him instead.
    • For his final plan to catch the Road Runner, Wile E. climbs into an ACME Indestructo Steel Ball and slides down a plateau to try and roll the avian over. He misses, however, and soon gets himself into a series of predicaments (including a dam, a waterfall, railroad tracks and a mine field) which then repeats again.
  • Binomium ridiculus:
    • COYOTE (Hardheadipus oedipus)
    • ROAD RUNNER (Batoutahelius)
  • Credits Gag: Chuck Jones' director credit appears on a rocket that Wile E. is about to ride, and falls apart once it takes off.
  • Everything's Better with Spinning: While on the falling clam-shaped rock, Wile E. manages to slow its descent by running right on the spot, but it also causes it to drill through the ground and into the tunnel of an approaching train. Once the train passes and the Coyote emerges, the rock is reduced to one foot-sized piece, and Wile E. strolls off, but during this, he then spins not unlike a certain ravenous Australian marsupial.
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Mistress: When the Coyote tries to tip a rock over a cliff in an effort to flatten his soon-to-be dinner, it sticks neatly to the edge and barely reacts to Wile E. hopping on it to get it to budge. Eventually, when he resorts to stomping violently on it, it then falls off and takes him with it.
  • Hammered into the Ground: Wile E. attempts to give the Road Runner a fatal concussion by dropping a bowling ball through a pipe over a cliff. However, the ball misses and somehow bounces back through the pipe to hit the Coyote in the face, where it later hammers him into the pavement when he falls down and becomes stuck.
  • Here We Go Again!: At the end of the cartoon, when the Road Runner watches Wile E., who is still in his Indestructo Steel Ball, roll past by him to repeat the series of accidents earlier, he holds up a sign with this very phrase and makes his exit.
  • Hollywood Magnetism: While the Road Runner is busy feasting on the bird seed and iron pellets, Wile E. brings out a magnet and a grenade strapped to a roller skate. However, the magnet is so strong that it breaks the skate in half and leaves the grenade behind to explode on the Coyote.
  • In-Scene Title Text: The title of the short appears on a boulder at the beginning that Wile E. fails to crush the Road Runner with.
  • Pun-Based Title: Of Eubie Blake's song, "I'm Just Wild About Harry".
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