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Asterix: The Mansions of the Gods (Astérix: Le Domaine des Dieux) is the ninth animated Asterix movie, directed by Alexandre Astier and Louis Clichy, and released in 2014. It is the first Astérix animated movie to be entirely made in CGI.

The plot is mostly based on the story of the same name — Caesar has a massive housing project built near the Gaulish village, with which he hopes to entice the Gauls to adopt Roman ways — but it also considerably expands the story, notably by building on the Roman couple designated to be the first inhabitants.

A sequel, The Secret of the Magic Potion, was released in 2018.


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Asterix: The Mansions of the Gods provides examples of:

  • Adaptational Attractiveness: Dulcia is slimmer and overall better-looking than her (unnamed) comic book counterpart (and is slightly more level-headed as well), looking actually more like Géraldine Nakache, her VA in the French dub. This goes along with the Adaptational Heroism the couple underwent.
  • Adaptational Heroism: The Roman couple that gets coaxed into taking residence in the title mansion ends up befriending and helping the Gauls (the husband is crucial in rescuing Getafix and the wife is briefly seen bashing Romans soldiers along with the Gauls). In the comic they were mainly comic relief and were scared by the Gauls into leaving the mansion to let Cacofonix move in (while it does happen in the movie as well, this time it's because the Romans throw them out and the Gauls learn it only afterwards).
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  • Adaptational Villainy: The slaves end up joining the Roman army and get punched by Asterix as a result. This did not happen in the comic. On the other hand, they give a fairly good reason for not using the magic potion to escape, in that it is much better for them to buy their freedom than becoming runaway slaves.
  • Adapted Out: Mrs. Geriatrix is noticeably absent.
  • An Aesop: On consumerism for instance.
  • Animated Credits Opening: Well, The Mansion of the Gods is an animated movie in CGI, but the opening (minimalist, and in 2D) has a quite different style.
  • Audible Sharpness: Dulcia's hair pin, when she pulls it off.
  • Bad "Bad Acting": The Gauls are not very good at faking being hit by an allegedly magic-potion-enhanced Asterix. However, while the Roman Centurion is obviously not fooled, his legionaries are.
  • Beleaguered Boss: The Roman centurion keeps trying to convince his troops that the Gauls are out of magic potion, but they've been beaten by the Gauls too often for them to believe it. When they finally come to him for orders, he's since Stopped Caring (helped by the fact that they've gone on strike to demand things like being ordered politely and better living conditions than the slaves who built the titular luxury condominiums). The fact that he's played by Alexandre Astier means Kaamelott viewers feel right at home.
  • Berserk Button:
    • You should know this by now, but... don't call Obelix fat.
    • Damaging a tree is a sure way to get bitten in the fundament by Dogmatix.
    • Obelix is touchy about the Magic Potion. When the slaves don't seem to be sufficiently grateful he barks and forces it on them, and when the Roman soldiers nearly help themselves to a fresh batch, he glowers at them from across the ladle.
  • Big Ball of Violence: The Gauls, as always, form one during their daily brawl. When Obelix jumps in, the dust cloud becomes a mushroom.
  • Blood-Splattered Warrior: Parodied with Obelix sporting the look... except he's covered in food.
  • Brick Joke:
    • Asterix and Obelix first appear arguing over who gets to catch a boar, later having much the same conversation (substituting a legionary for the boar).
    • When the heroes are still working with the magic acorns, Obelix drop one in Asterix's house and causes a tree to sprout right in the middle of it. At the end of the movie, Apeldjus hurls one of the leftover acorns directly into Caesar's box in the colosseum.
  • Butt Biter: Dogmatix, as usual. Squareonthehypotenus gets introduced to him when feeling his teeth imbedded in the buttock while marking a tree, which Dogmatix strongly objects to.
  • Canon Foreigner: Apeldjus did not exist in the comic.
  • Casting Gag: Alexandre Astier voices a Roman Centurion Surrounded by Idiots. This is pretty much his role as King Arthur in Kaamelott.
  • Chekhov's Skill: The husband of the Roman couple is a skilled mosaic maker and can instantly spot a flaw in a mosaic being made. This proves very useful later on.
  • Comically Missing the Point: Asterix tells the villagers that they've become avaricious morons. Unhygenix retorts that they've always been morons. He's... not wrong.
  • Cool Chair: Caesar's throne has a massive golden eagle on it.
  • Crippling Overspecialization: Obelix's parting gift to Apeldjus is a tiny menhir. He explains menhirs are the only thing he knows how to carve.
  • Darkest Hour: Unlike the original comic, the movie actually explores the consequences of the Romans almost fully converting the Gauls to their way of life, followed by an extended climax where the legions are prepared to raze the village, the Gauls have no potion anymore, and Obelix is weakened from starvation due to the disappearance of the boars. In fact, it's only thanks to Caesar ordering the food from the banquet to be thrown away... right in the hole where Obelix is trapped that the movie doesn't end with a complete Roman victory.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Alexandre Astier being the screenwriter, this is a given. Especially in his role as the centurion.
  • Death by Adaptation: Not actual death, but a different fate: the architect, the Roman Centurion and the Senator become gladiators as punishment for their failure. Although in the movie gladiators are handled as wrestlers, this is usually seen as a serious punishment in the Asterix verse and does not happen often in the books (and especially not to those three in the book the movie is based on).
  • Everything Makes a Mushroom: When Obelix jumps in the Big Ball of Violence caused by his fellow Gauls' daily brawl, the dust cloud becomes a mushroom.
  • Evil Is Not Well-Lit: Caesar's palace is huge and gloomy, with the regularly placed lamps barely providing any illumination.
  • Evil Laugh:
  • Evil Overlooker: Caesar in the movie poster.
  • Face Palm:
    • Asterix is facepalming on the poster in reaction to the idiocy of his fellow Gauls falling for the appeal of the Mansions of the Gods.
    • The Centurion double-facepalms as Cacofonix is singing and causing a panic among the civilians, and he can't even command his legionaries over the sound.
    • Ceasar pinches the bridge of his nose when a beaten-up Squareonthehypotenus welcomes him to a banquet in the middle of the chaos.
  • Gladiator Games: Treated as modern Professional Wrestling, complete with merchandise (children's toys) and complicated named moves that require both participants to work.
  • Graceful Loser: Caesar, like his book counterpart.
    Caesar: Oh well, Veni, Vidi, no Vici. Can't Vici every time. Alright everyone, back to Rome!
  • Grievous Harm with a Body: As usual, a common fighting tactic for Obelix. Notably in the climax, after emerging from the ground and giving the assembled Romans a Death Glare, he grabs a legionary by the leg and start hammering the others with him.
  • Growling Gut: Obelix's belly starts growling louder and more frequently to show that he's starving.
  • Hitler Cam: Various camera tricks are employed to make Obelix seem that much more terrifying, sometimes appearing to be three meters tall.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: Ceasar, by ordering to get rid of the banquet, which he has no time to indulge in, and the Romans by subsequently dropping all the food in the basement where a starving Obelix is imprisoned.
  • Hypocritical Humor: Apeldjus is several times seen playing with his toys, pretending them to fight. At one point, his parents wonder where he finds such ideas. The scene happens when the family is watching a gladiator fight.
  • Indy Ploy: When the Gauls are without any magic potion as the Romans attack, Asterix and later the others pretend that they do.
  • Killer Rabbit: A magic-potion-imbibed hen pitted against a Roman centurion.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: The Indy Ploy goes well until Vitalstatistix orders the Gauls to chase the retreating Romans. When they run out of breath, the Romans realize they haven't drunk any potion, and then the roles are reversed.
  • Loud of War: As usual, this is how Cacofonix is weaponized. Subverted in that where this was the final straw in the book, here it's interrupted by the Gauls, who just learned they can now live in the Mansions of the Gods.
  • Mama Bear: The wife of the Roman couple stops at nothing to find her son once she learns he may be in danger. This involves following a river up to its source on top of a mountain and back, apparently in the space of a few hours (and without magic potion).
  • Meat-O-Vision: Starving, Obelix hallucinates anthropomorphic boars when he meets the legionaries.
  • Metronomic Man Mashing: Impedimenta and Dulcia are seen slamming two legionaries in the ground back and forth during the final battle.
  • Mythology Gag: The movie contains many references to other Asterix books:
    • Asterix using a catapult to escape an army happens in Asterix and the Soothsayer.
    • People staging being under the influence of the magic potion occurs in Asterix and the Roman Agent, only this time, it was the Romans doing it.
    • A starved Obelix hallucinating wild boars happens in Asterix and the Great Crossing. This time, however, it is much more dramatic.
    • Obelix being granted a sip of the magic potion in order to perform an even more spectacular feat than usual is a famous scene in Asterix and Cleopatra (though here, toppling four buildings certainly beats destroying a pyramid door).
    • Obelix (and Dogmatix) bonding with a kid is taken straight from Asterix in Spain.
    • When slaves have drunken magic potion, the way they build looks very similar to the construction in Asterix and Cleopatra.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero!:
    • Getafix giving the magic potion to the slaves allows them to complete the mansion in no time — while it was supposed to be another way for the mansion not to be built at all.
    • The other Gauls also interrupt Cacofonix while he is on the process of getting them rid of all the Romans (which is what happens in the comic book).
  • Nice Job Fixing It, Villain!:
    • Had Caesar not decided to throw away the banquet, it would not have reached a starving Obelix who happens to be imprisoned in the basement.
    • Caesar does it earlier in the movie, too — having learned his ploy to lure the Gauls into Roman culture is working better than he'd ever anticipated, he overreaches and returns to the ham-handed militarism that has failed him repeatedly. His decision to eradicate the village with military force is exactly what the Gauls need to wake up and rally themselves.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome:
    • Obelix gorging himself on the whole discarded Roman banquet would probably have been a sight to behold.
    • We are not given to see the effect of a sip of magic potion on Obelix up close. Just the result of four buildings toppling down in short order.
  • Only Sane Man:
    • Asterix and Getafix, as in the comics, are the only villagers who don't get entranced by the Roman way of life (Obelix as well, but it's mainly because he's too aloof to notice).
    • On the other side, the Roman Centurion has a lot of trouble with his soldiers.
  • Pass the Popcorn: The Roman civilians are eating appetizers while watching the legionaries and the Gauls fighting at the center of the Mansion of the Gods domain.
  • Phlegmings: "Nobody calls me FAT!"
  • Rain of Arrows: The Romans begin their attack of the empty village with a thick volley of arrows. Asterix, the only one present, takes cover under a table. Unfortunately, an arrow ends up piercing his Magic Potion gourd.
  • Quieter Than Silence: When the heroes get back to the deserted village, a tumbleweed is seen rolling around. And no, those shouldn't be found in Gaul....
  • Security Cling: When a menhir thrown by Obelix almost crushes Petiminus on landing, he jumps into his wife's arms in fright.
  • Shout-Out:
    • Most of the dialogue could have come straight from Kaamelott, since Alexandre Astier wrote it. At one point, you hear a Roman soldier — dubbed by Frank Pitiot, no less, who plays Perceval in Kaamelott — muttering: "C'est pas faux", one of the series' catchphrases.
    • In the French version, Vitalstatistix at one point quotes Charles de Gaulle's "JE VOUS AI COMPRIS!" address to Algeria on June 4, 1958. (The English version goes for "YES, WE CAN!" instead.)
  • Getafix standing in front of his cauldron of magic potion as the Romans gather around... "YOU! SHALL NOT! PASSSSSS!" Subverted in that Cubitus just shoves him out of the way... and comes face-to-face with Obelix.
  • When the Gauls are about to drink the Magic Potion raining on them, Unhygienix lifts an unconscious Asterix above his head in the same posture as the iconic "Rafiki lifting Simba" scene from The Lion King.
  • In the English version, the Gladiator games at the end (featuring the architect, the Roman Centurion and the Senator) are called "Who Wants to be a Gladiator?"
  • Sidetracked by the Analogy: The members of Caesar's inner circle don't understand animal metaphors very well. Later, Caesar even pauses to make sure that they understood what "Imperial Eagle" implies.
  • Simpleton Voice: A recurring complaint from critics is that Obelix's voice is too childish.
  • Slave Liberation: Nope. The slaves use their newfound power to become free... legally. The leader even becomes a legionary by the end of the movie, which pisses Asterix off.
  • Stab the Sky: The statue of Caesar on top of the column at the Domain's center is in a triumphant pose with gladius pointing at the sky.
  • The Stinger: One last line from Cubitus over the end of the credits.
    Cubitus: And I said to him, I says, "our demands are not negotiable, perius."
  • Surrounded by Idiots:
    • The Roman Centurion. Voiced by Astier himself, who became famous for playing such a role in Kaamelott.
    • Check out Asterix in the movie poster up top.
  • Take That!: The Roman slave driver ("Giveusabonus" in English), is named in the French version "Travaillerpluspourgagnerplus", a play on Nicolas Sarkozy's favorite slogan ("Work more to earn more."). Again, he's a slave driver.
  • Theme Naming: Among the legionaries with speaking parts are Radius, Humerus and Cubitus.
  • This Is Gonna Suck: A legionary tries to take a sip of magic potion, only to come face-to-face with Obelix.
    Cubitus: Ah, I'm in a pretty pickle, aren't I?
  • This Is What the Building Will Look Like: The movie begins with what appears to be the village... then a giant hand appears out of the sky to pick up a building.
  • Title Drop: At the start, when the eponymous structure is named.

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