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Western Animation / Numb Chucks

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Dilweed and Fungus ain't smart, it's true. But that won't stop them from doing kung-fu!note 
Numb Chucks is a Canadian animated comedy currently airing on YTV in Canada. It was created by Phil Lafrance and Jamie Leclaire (Of Crash Canyon infamy) and developed by Jono Howard (An Ed, Edd n Eddy writer) The series focuses on two well-intentioned but incompetent woodchucks who try to use kung fu to protect their hometown from criminals.

The series first premiered on YTV on January 7, 2014 and the first season began airing on Boomerang in the United States on January 10, 2015.


This series features examples of:

  • Amazing Technicolor Wildlife: A lot of the characters are reasonably brown and yellow, though of brighter shades, but there are those with colors irregular for their real life counterparts like Quills, a purple porcupine, and Buford, a blue sheep.
  • Arrowgram: In "Kung Fear", the Chucks want to contact the lint monster. Not having its phone number, they decide the best way to do so is to shower the town with Arrows on Fire with notes tied to them.
  • Arrows on Fire: In "Kung Fear", the Chucks attempt to contact the lint monster by showering the town with flaming arrows with notes tied to them.
  • Autocannibalism: Quills munches on her, well, quills when she's nervous.
  • Big Ol' Unibrow: Buford is probably the only character in the show to have this.
  • Butt-Monkey: Hooves and Buford (though the latter sometimes has it coming). Dilweed and Fungus, to a lesser extent.
  • The Cameo: Duck's picture appears in Hooves' high school yearbook in the episode "Chuck Be a Lady". Hooves can be seen with a jigsaw puzzle of the Banana Cabana in the episode "D.E.R.P."
  • Catch-Phrase: Buford has "Oh, crudbuckets!"
  • Chained to a Railway: In "Hunk O Chuck", Fungus is Mistaken for Dying. To help him cross something off his bucket list, Dilweed kidnaps Burford and dresses him as a woman before tying him to the railway track so Fungus can fulfill his ambition of rescuing a damsel who has been tied to railroad. Hilarity Ensues.
  • The Chew Toy: Again, Hooves and Buford.
  • Child Prodigy: Crispin while just a little kid, has a massive vocabulary and is incredibly mature for his age. In contrast to his father The Mayor, who is so brain-dead that he never speaks and is borderline feral.
  • Companion Cube: In "Huh Brother Where Art Thou?", Dilweed spends a year hiding in a closet to win a game of hide-and-seek. During this time, he draws a face on a bucket and adopts it as his new best friend (and continually loses staring contests to it).
  • Cool Old Lady: Grandma Butternut
  • Counting to Potato: In one episode, the Chucks give a countdown that runs "Five...four...ten...blueberry".
  • Deadpan Snarker: Buford can be this at times whenever he deals with Dilweed and Fungus.
  • Disproportionate Retribution: "Ghosts Of Chucks Past" shows that Buford's hatred for the Chucks began after they unknowingly closed their door in his face.
  • Dogged Nice Guy: Buford towards Quills.
  • Dirty Old Woman: Grandma Butternut towards Hooves (with a particular liking for his backside).
  • Dumbass Has a Point: Quills wanted to join the Pokey Awards but all of her quills got stuck on Dilweed so she suggested that he pretend as her but he's worried that that would be cheating. Fungus pointed out that it wouldn't be because it's technically her quills, earning a Jaw Drop from the two. Rendered moot when Fungus himself tried to join the contest in an even more unconvincing disguise as Quills than Dilweed's.
  • Expy: Buford and Hooves seem to have respective traits from Squidward. Buford is a Jerkass, Only Sane Man and Deadpan Snarker. While Hooves seemed to have adopted Squidward's love for gardening, relaxing and being fancy. It's like Squidward's two sides separated and became individual characters.
  • Fanboy: Dilweed and Fungus both adore their idol, Woodchuck Morris. Heck, in one episode, they were willing to buy a Woodchuck Morris fart in a jar (which was really Buford's fart in it) from Buford in exchange for every single thing they owned.
  • Genki Girl: Quills, to a lesser extent.
  • The Ghost: Subverted: While Woodchuck Morris appears on television and within hallucinations and/or visions. It is doubtful he will ever appear in person in the show.
  • Gravity Is a Harsh Seamstress: In "Fan Boy", Dilweed gets flung through the air and crashes through a clothesline. He emerges with a towel tied around his neck like a superhero.
  • Grossout Show
  • Hidden Depths: The Chucks know the difference between a city, a hamlet, and a township.
  • Hoist by His Own Petard: More often than not, Buford's attempts to humiliate the Chucks end up rebounding on him.
  • Idiot Hero: Dilweed and Fungus, naturally.
  • Idiot Houdini: In many episodes, the Chucks get away with mass destruction and hurt others around them due to their stupidity. Buford and Hooves are the main victims of this.
  • Jerkass: Buford. He's pretty much rude to everyone else except Quills and seems to hate Dilweed and Fungus. He's also too lazy to help his grandmother with the groceries.
  • Knife-Throwing Act: In "Couch Potato", Quills performs a blindfolded knife-throwing act using her quills as the knives and an annoying reporter as the target girl. As she has never done this before, it leads to a nasty accident (off-screen).
  • Lazy Bum: Again, Buford.
  • Lethally Stupid: If the Chucks do something, someone will get hurt.
  • Mistaken for Dying: In "Hunk O Chuck", Buford convinces Fungus that a giant tree is going to grow out of his nose at sundown, and it is played exactly like this trope.
  • Only Sane Man: Buford, despite being a Jerkass, seems to be the only person in the show who doesn't believe that the Chucks are actual heroes. Him and maybe Hooves. Quills is also aware that they're not right in the head but she's too nice to entirely avoid them.
  • Rip Van Tinkle: In "Fan Boy", Dr. Sinister is freed after being frozen in wax as part of Buddy's collection. He advances menacingly on Buddy, vowing that he is about to do what he has been dreaming of doing for the last three: which turns out to be finding a washroom.
  • Sibling Seniority Squabble: The Chucks couldn't remember who's older in "Age of Ignorance" and argued about it. It's Dilweed, by fifteen seconds.
  • The Smurfette Principle: Quills, along with Granny, are the only females of the main cast.
  • Squashed Flat: Bufords suffers this in "Intelligence Not Included," after being run over by a steamroller.
  • Stalking Is Funny If It Is Female After Male: Grandma Butternut stalking Hooves is clearly portrayed as wrong, but for whatever reason he never bothers to stop her.
  • Used to Be a Sweet Kid: Buford, surprisingly.
  • Villain Protagonist: Dilweed and Fungus in some episodes. See Idiot Houdini above.
  • Volumetric Mouth: Fungus can open his mouth wide enough for Dilweed to walk inside.
  • Whole Plot Reference: The episode "Orange is the New Black Belt", beside the obvious, is a reference to A Clockwork Orange. Dilweed and Fungus were sent to prison after a ban on kung-fu and were subjected to a variant of The Ludovico Technique where they are forced to watch a movie with Woodchuck Morris doing un-kung-fu-ey stuff to redirect their interest to knitting. It didn't work as intended as they knitted violent objects, like a working rocket launcher.


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