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Angel Wars is a CGI Religious Edutainment program created in the mid-2000s.

The Archangel Michael and his squad of angels square off against the machinations of The Legions of Hell to stop their attempts to corrupt or harm humanity — or the angels, themselves. Alongside three veteran adult angels under his command, he has two young recruits hoping to earn their wings who get quite a bit of focus: a headstrong showoff swordsangel named Eli and an analytical by-the-book marksangel named Kira. Their clashing personalities make for almost as much drama as their millennia-long war against the demons.

Despite being a Short Runner, the series has an extensive wiki with details about the characters, and the various vehicles, weapons and starships the angels had at their disposal. It was that kind of show.


Tropes:

  • 20 Minutes into the Future: The setting is clearly in Earth's near future, with one human character taking a piloting test flying a spaceship to the moon.
  • A God Am I: A demon named Graven wanted the humans on an island to worship him, and used a powerful artifact to reactivate a volcano to flood their village with lava.
  • The Ace: Swift and Paladin as a team function as an Ace; when they get in their vehicles to attack a hellish pocket dimension while The Seven holds the entrance, they put Kira in charge of steering The Seven and Eli in charge of its point-defense turret, ordering him to take care of anything that gets past Swift and Paladin. Eli complains that nothing ever gets past them.
  • Airborne Aircraft Carrier: The Seven has shades of this, even though it's more of a Cool Starship. The environments it flies through tend to look like blue skies with white clouds, and it carries other flying vessels inside it like Paladin's Fly-Cycle and Swift's Merk-7 Artillery Chariot.
  • All There in the Manual: There are a lot of supplementary materials explaining things about the various vehicles the angels use in their fight against the demons.
  • Archangel Michael: Unsurprisingly, he's The Captain of their squad. This version is a wise Reasonable Authority Figure with astonishing amounts of patience and forgiveness.
  • Ascended Demon: It's heavily implied this is a possibility, as Michael attempts to convince his former friend to accept forgiveness. The closest the series gets to having one of these on-screen is an imp named Que cooperating with The Seven's crew to defeat a powerful demon and getting released for good behavior, even given the option to remain on The Seven and work with its crew.
  • Bait-and-Switch: In one episode, Eli and Kira have a mission to protect a messenger angel who's travelling through a demon-infested city so he can deliver a message to a mortal. They stand out in the open and taunt the demons while the messenger angel runs away, making it look like they're trying to create a diversion, but the demons ignore the guardians and chase the messenger. It looks to the audience like the angels' plans have fallen to pieces, but this is actually what they were hoping would happen: the guardians were the ones holding the message, and the messenger using his Super-Speed was the real diversion.
  • Bald Black Leader Guy: Swift is higher-ranked than the main characters, on top of being Large and in Charge. Downplayed in that Michael and Arianna both outrank him.
  • Beware My Stinger Tail: Gargoyle-type demons called ripwings have the ability to stab targets with the sharp point of their tails and electrocute them.
  • Be Yourself: One of the aesops of the series: demons are corrupting a scientist into trying to please a vain fashion executive by reinventing himself and using a supernatually-cursed and unstable cosmetic formula. The angel snaps him out of it by telling him to be himself.
  • Beyond the Impossible: A sword that was played up to be unbreakable called Caliburn did in fact break when Paladin tried to use it to hit an invulnerable demon called Discord. Paladin regarded this as a colossal failure on his part.
  • BFS: Michael's sword is enormous, and isn't by any means the only large sword in the narrative: Morg, a Fallen Angel, also weilded a large sword as an angel, and yet another sword of Heaven's purest elements called Caliburn functions as a MacGuffin.
  • Blind Seer: One angel made a Deal with the Devil to get extra-sensory perception. This led to him losing his wings and his eyesight, and ending up a shrivelled shell of his former self that had trouble navigating his island prison. He stayed out of the heaven-vs-hell conflict for the most part, but when Michael offered to help him across the water to escape the island in exchange for information (and demonstrated that the blind angel did not have super-senses that made up for his blindness at all), he took Michael up on the offer.
  • Blue Boy, Pink Girl: The main characters' superiors, Paladin and Arianna, play this trope straight with the embellishments on their armor. The main characters themselves practically invert the trope by taking colors from the opposite sides of the color wheel, with Eli having yellow embellishments and Kira having green ones.
  • Bowdlerise: Neither angels nor demons call hell "hell" in this series; they call it "the Underworld". Possibly justified by the fact that a lot of angelic terminology is different from human terminology.
  • Character Development: Eli is skilled, but also smug, a showoff, self-centered, stubborn, and tends to act without thinking. Quite a few episodes hand him a slice of humble pie to sand down his rough edges, until the final episode has him focused entirely on the mission, showing none of these flaws. Michael even discusses this in the first episode, saying God prefers to forge His creations in fire.
  • Combat Tentacles: One demon named Shadow uses this to capture and fight off angels.
  • Convection, Schmonvection: Swift flew inches above an active lava flow while battling a demonic Sorcerous Overlord and his minions, unharmed by the lava's searing heat. Justified in that he's a spirit, generally not conforming to the laws of physics because he's not physical.
  • Cool Starship:
    • The de facto home of the protagonists is a heavenly mothership called "The Seven", Michael's flagship. It has a hanger bay full of other sleek military vehicles, something like a holodeck, Teleporters and Transporters, and much more.
    • Another starship is The Awes, about the same size, under the command of the archangel Ramuel. It's equipped with a divine Wave-Motion Gun.
    • A fallen variation of this is The Appollyon, the flagship of a Fallen Angel named Morg. Morg rebelled against Satan (not intending to help God in doing so, either), who in turn chained Morg up in his own disabled flagship to be imprisoned permanently as punishment.
  • The Corruptor: Plenty of demons meet this description, entering the minds of humans and convincing them to make bad decisions. Some even attempt to corrupt angels!
  • Council of Angels: They're mentioned a few times as being responsible for deciding who gets promoted to the office of archangel, but they're never shown on-screen.
  • Covered in Gunge: Eli and Kira fight a monster that's implied to be a manifestation of human discouragement whose primary attack is to launch sticky slime at targets, immobilizing them and even making them hard to see. When the two of them manage to Attack Its Weak Point, it explodes, and covers them in slime again.
  • Cyberpunk: Environments in the human world borrow a lot from this aesthetic, showing a gritty, corrupt, and sometimes dangerous world full of reasons for humans to be cynical, sad, and even wicked. All the better for Heaven to intervene.
  • Damsel out of Distress: Downplayed, but not for lack of effort, strength, or skill on Arianna's part: Morg kidnapped her and bound her, but she was able to manipulate the Dumb Muscle demons guarding her into using their axes to destroy her bonds. Morg cornered her before The Cavalry arrived just in time to stop him from killing her, but boy did she do well for being unarmed, alone, and tied up! It's no wonder she's second in command to the Archangel Michael himself!
  • Deadly Dodging:
    • Eli and Kira rush right into a battle between two powerful demons, and right in between them, Eli kneels to pray for help—and the act of kneeling is itself an example of Deadly Dodging, causing the magic the two demons were shooting at the angels to hit each other squarely, defeating both demons. Eli admits this wasn't even what he'd been aiming for, and credits God for the victory.
    • Archangel Michael dodged a sword swing from Eli's Superpowered Evil Side, letting Eli's sword slice into an electrified sign to electrocute Eli. This electrocution removed the corruption from Eli and disintegrated his corrupted wings. Michael didn't even have to use his own sword to win.
  • Deal with the Devil:
    • It's not clear exactly who or what convinced Eli to accept a false set of wings, but it looked exactly like Eli, albeit with black embellishments on his armor. And after Eli accepted the deal to save a human with his new wings, he did manage some good heroics, punching well above his weight in the guardian department. But the wings made him more irritable, less caring, amplified his existing flaws, and he seemed to be addicted to their use. When his darker impulses were in control, his armor's Tron Lines went from yellow to black, and his skin took on a darker and grayer tone.
    • Morgan tried to exchange a heavenly artifact with The Dragon for power, but the demon he entrusted it to betrayed him and kept it.
    • Another angel named Jaza gave up his wings to The Dragon in exchange for psychic abilities. He ended up a shrivelled Blind Seer as a result, trapped on an island, alone until Michael took him off the island in exchange for information.
    • It's heavily implied that most examples of Fallen Angel in the 'verse are a result of this in one way or another.
  • Disney Villain Death: The final shot of Morg is dropping off a ledge into a green abyss. Considering that this was happening inside a collapsing pocket dimension of Hell, it's clear that we're not supposed to expect to see him again.
  • Does Not Like Guns: Que claims that guns make him nervous, though it's entirely possible he was lying about this: the context is that he's handcuffed to an angel who's operating The Seven's ventral gun turret, and his claim might have been a trick to try to get free. Then again, he never (intentionally) uses a gun on-screen, so there's no real way to tell.
  • Do Not Call Me "Paul": A demon named Ogrud Jr. hates his father so much, he prefers to be called "Og" over taking his father's name.
  • The Dragon: Satan is called "The Dragon" in-universe, but is not an example by this wiki's definition; that said, some villains do have seconds-in-command:
    • Krak ruled over a demonic pocket dimension called the Valkawa Nethercell, and had a jester minion who did announcements for him. After Morg challenged him and beat him, the jester worked for Morg.
    • Slitherhook led a very large army of ripwings, and was able to see distant battles for himself even while he was at his home base through an eye implant on his second-in-command, who was appropriately named Oculus.
  • Easily Forgiven:
    • Upon being defeated, the Fallen Angel Morg is given an option to repent and re-join his former friend Michael, in spite of the chaos he wreaked. He chooses a Disney Villain Death over repentance.
    • Zig-zagged with Eli: in one episode, he and his partner get given a boring assignment as punishment for a refusal to follow orders, and Kira gets so fed up with his faults that she tells him she plans to ask for a new partner once their punishment is over. But in another episode, Eli gets a pair of demonically-made artificial wings that drive him insane and make him try to out-and-out kill his teammate. After he loses the wings, neither she nor their superiors seem to bear any grudge against him for it or even punish him for the incident; they just focus on the idea of him earning heavenly wings the proper way.
  • Eldritch Abomination: In one episode, the angels-in-training try to travel underground to avoid being detected by demons patrolling a city. While underground, they confront a monster made of trash that attempts to eat them. Unlike other monsters in the series that're implied to be manifestations of negative human emotions, there isn't even any implication about what this monster is, why it's there, or why it's acting as if it can get nourishment from eating an angel.
  • Elite Mooks: Gargoyle-type demons appear in later episodes that're heavily implied to be a great deal more powerful than Obsidian Minions, called Ripwings.
  • Emotion Eater: Demons apparently can be this under some circumstances; a demon named Morg was empowered by a human's negative emotions, but it took a great deal of setup to hook Morg up to that human's emotions. By the same token, some positive human emotions, such as hope, can be repellant or even lethal to demons.
  • Enemy Civil War: It seems like the demons are hampered by this being their default state, with factions vying against each other and demons battling each other.
  • Evil Former Friend: Michael and Morgan were once very good friends, and even after all the evil he does as Morg, Michael tries hard to get his friend back. Morgan refuses to have anything to do with it, preferring to rule in hell rather than serve in heaven.
  • Evil Is One Big, Happy Family: Inverted! Demons often compete against one another and try to grab power for themselves, with even some cases of sons rebelling against their parents. Angels, all being under God, do not have these factions, and are much stronger for their unity.
  • Evil Will Fail: Discussed and invoked: Swift and Ramuel were captured by Ripwings and tied up while their leader gloats to them, pointing out how the city is covered in a smog that's the spiritual manifestation of human despair. Swift defiantly tells the Ripwing leader that what the demons have built can be torn down more easily than he thinks. Swift turns out to be spot-on; once the anawims deliver a message of hope to one mortal girl, the hope manifests as a World-Healing Wave and destroys the smog and the ripwings.
  • Exactly What I Aimed At: During his showdown with Discord, Paladin did not make the same mistake twice: instead of directly hurling his starblades at Discord, he hurled them at the engine pylons. Discord taunted Paladin, telling him that he'd missed, and Paladin shot back "No, I didn't!" Cue the starblades boomeranging back, striking the harmonious engine pylons, and playing music that obliterated Discord's armor.
  • Excalibur: Technically the sword is called "Caliburn", but the idea is there: it's an unbreakable sword made from Heaven's purest elements, and is the key to defeating a demon named Discord.
  • Eye Beams: A Nephilim named Og (yes, really; he insisted on being called "Og" over being called "Ogrud Jr.") had the ability to fire wide orange magical beams from his eyes; he used these to battle his own father.
  • Fallen Angel:
    • Unsurprisingly given the setting, these serve as antagonists. In particular, Morg is an angel who fell some time after Satan did, and he's just as rebellious against Satan as he is against Heaven.
    • Some fallen angels are more or less neutral in the heaven-versus-hell conflict, but they can be pretty pathetic, such as a Blind Seer who needed Michael's help to escape an island.
  • Family-Friendly Firearms: Kira's gun looks like a crossbow and shoots energy discs. Justified in that the angels aren't fighting the kinds of fleshy targets that bullets would harm.
  • Fire-Forged Friends:
    • After a dangerous mission where Eli and Kira have to work together to destroy a monster, they admit they make a good team despite their contrasting personalities.
    • It's heavily implied God Himself invoked this trope by putting the two of them on missions together, based on a discussion Michael had with Arianna after he sent them on their first mission.
  • Fluffy Cloud Heaven: Heaven is typically depicted either as blue skies with white puffy clouds or as full of bright golden clouds. This helps contrast the grittier human world. It's also worth noting that, when The Seven was heading toward a hellish pocket dimension to stop it from doing any damage, the skies in front of it were dark and full of lightning.
  • Foolish Sibling, Responsible Sibling: Eli and Kira have this dynamic, even though they aren't called siblings in the show. Eli keeps wishing to showboat, ignores orders, resorts to violence quickly, and acts without thinking or analyzing the situation, while Kira is much more by-the-book and analytical.
  • Fragile Speedster:
    • Paladin's Fly-Cycle has terrific speed and agility, but very low armor compared to, say, The Seven.
    • Eli's and Kira's wing boards are also considered vehicles by the supplementary materials, and they have great stealth and agility and medium speed, but zero armor or firepower.
  • God: He never appears in person, but prayers to Him are directly answered on-screen, and angels call Him "The Maker".
  • Good Angel, Bad Angel: A variation of this happens; it's only possible for one angel or one demon to influence a human mind at a time, meaning the angel needs to get rid of the demon before it's possible for them to influence the human.
  • Guys Smash, Girls Shoot: The main characters' team acts this way, with Kira armed with a crossbow that fires energy projectiles, and Eli armed with a katana. Inverted with their superiors, Paladin and Arianna, who fight with throwing stars and a spear, respectively.
  • Hammer of the Holy: Swift's weapon of choice is a hefty one-handed hammer, which also has the ability to cast Deflector Shields. It even comes back to him when he throws it for ranged attacks.
  • Hates Being Called Cute: When Paladin was an anawim, he frequently worked with a cherub mechanic named Paddy who repaired and maintained the machinery of The Awes. Cherubs, in this 'verse, are short angels with fairy-like wings, and Paddy in particular was also fat on top of this, and had a medium-deep voice. Paladin came up with a plan to lure an enemy demon into a trap, and had Paddy serve as the bait; when Paddy asked why, Paladin told him it was because Paddy was cute. Paddy took offense to that, and told him the next time Paladin called him cute, he'd give Paladin a "two-wrench tune-up".
  • The Heartless: There are several monsters the guardian angels have to contend with that don't appear to be demons per se, including giant glowing bugs that humans can't see or feel. It's implied that these are manifestations of negative human emotions.
  • Hell is That Noise: A demon appropriately named "Discord" has a tendency to make a loud nose that's described in-universe as "every wrong note being hit at once", making this a much more literal example than most.
  • Helmets Are Hardly Heroic: Zig-zagged, in that the protagonists have high-tech retracting helmets that they often take off, but also sometimes put on if they think they'll need them.
  • High-Tech Heaven: The show depicts angels wearing sleek, glowing armor and piloting ships with heavy energy weapons. And any angel who hasn't yet earned their wings must settle for using a Hover Board. Of course, the demons in the setting have ships and jetpacks, too, but they also mix in magic.
  • Holy Burns Evil: A variation: negative human emotions tend to manifest as things like smog or monsters, but positive ones also manifest as light and fresh air. Hope, in particular, is very repellant to demons, to the point where some bottled hope creates a dome of protection for two unarmed messenger angels.
  • Holy Hand Grenade: Several energy weapons are said in the supplementary materials to fire divine energy.
  • Holy Halo: The angels themselves do not have these, but the aesthetic of glowing metal rings is a common feature on their vehicles.
  • Holy Is Not Safe: One character suggests taking The Seven down to Earth to help out when a guardian's fight doesn't go well. Paladin shoots this idea down, as their heavenly engines would wreak havoc on physical matter.
  • Hover Board: Angels in training are called "anawim", and they need to use "wing boards" to fly until they manage to earn their wings and graduate from being anawim.
  • Humans Through Alien Eyes: Angels do not always have the much cultural knowledge of humans, and a couple of angels-in-training even need to have the concept of advertisements explained to them.
  • The Imp: A character named Que is called an imp in-universe, a spiritual entity that can be considered a demon, but isn't necessarily one. He has his moments where he helps the protagonists with gadgetry or useful information, but he also has moments where he helps demons.
  • In Mysterious Ways: God's ways are mysterious even to angels; more than one great victory is scored over demons in ways the angels had never expected.
  • Intangibility: Angels and demons can typically walk right through solid matter. It's implied that human prayer can make this more difficult for demons to accomplish, though.
  • Invisible to Normals: Humans lack the ability to see angels and demons unless the demons are specifically taking on a human form. It gets pretty ridiculous to see a giant demon's footprints crushing holes in the pavement in a city—the demon's father even calls him out about attracting unwanted attention.
  • It's All My Fault: When he was an anawim, Paladin attempted it hit an invulnerable demon with an unbreakable sword, resulting in the sword breaking. He blamed himself for this, though an angelic mechanic told him the sword broke so it couldn't be used for evil.
  • Jesus Taboo: Downplayed, in that very little of real-life religion makes it into the series, apart from an empty church being the location of a showdown with a high-ranking demon and one brief shot of The Bible in The Seven's library, though this is justified in that angels' relations with God are very different from those of humans. Averted in the supplementary materials, which provide each angel-character's favorite Bible verse, and state that "The Refiner" is what the angels call Jesus Christ, explicitly including Him as part of the 'verse.
  • Kansas City Shuffle: One episode has the in-training angels pitted against a demon-occupied city, with their high-priority mission being to deliver a message. Messenger angels have Super-Speed but can't fight, while guardian angels count as Mighty Glaciers in comparison, able to fight but lacking that speed. Knowing that the demons are targeting the message, the guardians taunt the demons to try to get their attention while the messenger runs away; the demons notice the messenger and pursue him, not even bothering to fight the guardians. This is exactly what the angels wanted the demons to do: the guardians were the ones carrying the message, and the messenger was empty-handed, and only ran to act as a diversion and attract the demons away from the message. By the time the demons figure out what's going on, it's too late to stop the message from being delivered.
  • Kirk Summation: Michael is very good at giving these. Justified in that he's become very wise, having had millennia of experience leading heroes into battle, with all the mistakes, lessons, and experience that comes with it.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: Eli's flaws include self-centeredness, showboating, ambition, pride, stubbornness, and especially rushing in without thinking his plans through. This gets him beaten up more than once, and his superiors are well aware of these flaws.
  • The Legions of Hell: The angels are frequently seen conflicting with them, though it is worth noting that some of them work for rogue demonic overlords instead of being in a chain of command that ultimately answers to Satan.
  • Let's Split Up, Gang!: Eli has a tendency to walk or fly away from Kira during missions on Earth. Considering Earth is a world with devils filled, this usually goes about as well as you'd expect, and Kira is constantly calling him out on this behavior.
  • Macross Missile Massacre: Demonic ships have this capability; when one was devastated by an angelic Wave-Motion Gun, it managed to return fire with a wide barrage of missiles.
  • Magma Man: A demon named Discord has this aesthetic, and has the ability to encase angels and starships in obsidian. However, he has sound-related abilities instead of fire- or heat-based abilities.
  • The Maker: One of many differences between angelic terminology and human terminology is that they call God "The Maker".
  • Make Some Noise: A demon named Discord had magic that allowed him to encase angels in stone if they were near enough while he was using his awful-sounding sonic abilities.
  • The Masquerade: To some degree, the invisible war between angels and demons is kept secret from humanity. When one demon goes on a rampage and causes collateral damage, his father calls him out on attracting unwanted attention, though the negative consequences of this for the demons and angels never gets touched on.
  • Mighty Glacier:
    • Supplementary materials describe The Seven has having excellent firepower, armor, and range, but low agility and speed.
    • The Merk-7 flying artillery chariot that Swift pilots also qualifies as a downplayed example compared to The Seven, having high firepower, medium-high armor, and medium-low speed.
  • Mooks: One-eyed hunchbacked demons in armor are frequently-reused character models; in-universe, they're called Obsidian Minions.
  • More Dakka: Several angelic vehicles have this, in particular the hover-tanks. Interestingly, the barrels rotate vertically instead of rotating along the axis of the line of fire, probably just to look cool.
  • Nephilim: An aging demon lord who wanted to retire used his magic to reanimate the bones of his son, which had been mistaken for dinosaur fossils by humans and placed in a museum. He was explicitly referred to as a nephilim, and his father stated that his son was a cousin of Goliath's when a minion asked if that particular rumor was true.
  • No Flow in CGI: Most characters' hair is pretty short, befitting the low budget of a Religious Edutainment production. About the only flow you'll see is Eli's long bangs flopping around, Arianna's long ponytail, or Shadow's Combat Tentacles.
  • Non-Indicative Name: There are two angels who outrank Eli and Kira who fall into this trope so neatly, you'd think someone on the production staff made a mistake about who is who, and then they just ran with it: one is named Swift and the other is named Paladin. One is a Large and in Charge Bald Black Leader Guy with the ability to cast Deflector Shields and weilds a large hammer. The other drives one of the fastest vehicles available, and was already the fastest angel in his whole fleet, even before he earned his wings. ...Respectively.
  • No Ontological Inertia: A demon named Discord looks like he's made of living volcanic rock, and has the ability to encase angels and angelic ships alike in obsidian. But when he's destroyed, the obsidian crumbles, freeing both the ships and their crews.
  • One of the Kids: Paladin has his moments of this, valuing fun on his missions, and exchanging quips with Eli. He never puts fun ahead of the mission or the safety of his teammates, though.
  • Only Six Faces: One of the ways they helped keep the budget down was they usually only had faces for main characters, and even then, they were sometimes copies of other characters—for example, Normal Kuburt's face was clearly a stretched clone of Eli's. And whenever the animators could get away with having helmeted faces, they did so: firefighters' helmets and space suits were examples for humans, and combat helmets for angel Red Shirt characters and demon Mooks were practically ubiquitous. And, of course, those helmets were also clones of each other.
  • Order Versus Chaos: While the overall conflict is definitely Good vs. Evil, shades of this sneak into the narrative. In particular, there's a demon named Discord who is ultimately defeated by harmonious music improvised from heavenly starship engines' pylons. Apart from that, some demons rebel against Satan because they don't think he's chaotic enough.
  • Our Angels Are Different: These angels are very humanoid, wearing sleek armor with glowing embellishments, and each has a signature weapon. They ghost through most physical matter, and are generally Invisible to Normals. There's no sign of flaming wheels covered in eyes or any Angelic Abomination variations in this series, though they do have advanced technology on their side.
  • Painting the Medium: This is one of the more literal examples of "painting the fourth wall": a demoness walks past a sign written in glowing demonic runes, pauses to read it, shatters it with magic to show how little she respects the message, and then the pieces of the sign temporarily flow onto a corner of the screen in the shape of English writing and stay put relative to the camera during a pan shot, which lets the audience see what the runes said.
  • Promotion, Not Punishment: As an angel-in-training, Paladin breaks an important piece of equipment that's the key to defeating a powerful demon named Discord who was so dangerous, he almost took over a whole angelic fleet. Paladin manages to come up with a plan to survive the situation, killing Discord and freeing the heavenly fleet in the process, but expects an upbraiding and punishment for having broken something that was supposed to be unbreakable. Instead, he gets a speech about what he did right, and earns his wings.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: Michael turns out to be this, being very forgiving of failure, showboating, mistakes, and even treachery in some conditions.
  • Satan: He doesn't make an appearance in the series proper, nor are any plots explicitly stated to be started by him in play. But the ramifications of the war he started in Heaven and the way other demons act show he's got a powerful effect on the plot and the setting. He's called "The Dragon" by the angels and demons in-universe, but he doesn't fit that trope at all as far as this wiki is concerned.
  • Shiny-Looking Spaceships: The Seven has this aesthetic, befitting a heavenly flagship. So too does The Awes.
  • Sickly Green Glow: Demonic magic and negative human emotions given form tend to be glowing green. That said, Kira's Tron Lines and her energy weapon blasts are also green, so green isn't an inherently evil color by any means.
  • Sorcerous Overlord: At least two high-ranking demons have this aesthetic, and unsurprisingly, they do indeed wield magic:
    • Graven was a demon who wielded a staff that housed a heavenly MacGuffin called a "Foundation Stone" to take control of a volcano on an island to try to cow the islanders into worshipping him. He was able to use this staff to fire magic blasts that were more effective than usual at fighting angels.
    • Ogrud was a hovering overlord of a type of demons called "slither demons" and wielded a pendulum-like talisman whose magic was powerful enough to revive his long-dead son as an invisible undead giant.
  • Spiteful Suicide: Morg/Morgan decides to plunge into the abyss and die rather than being saved and redeemed by Michael.
  • Succubi and Incubi: A demon named Cubus had the ability to make herself look like an attractive, wealthy, and powerful human woman visible to humans, and used all these traits to tempt a scientist into using a sabotaged cosmetic product on himself. Interestingly enough, she herself wasn't an Emotion Eater, or at least she wasn't the one consuming negative human emotions in the episode she was in; she was drawing on the scientist's negative emotions and using them to empower another demon who she was working with by way of an elaborate machine.
  • Superpowered Evil Side: Eli gains a pair of wings that he didn't earn—that were offered to him as part of what's heavily implied to be a Deal with the Devil. They make him more powerful, but also more rebellious, self-centered, and unwise, dramatically worsening the flaws that he already has.
  • Super-Speed: Messenger angels do not fight, but they get their wings much sooner in their training than guardian angels, and they are fast.
  • Sword Beam: In his Superpowered Evil Side mode, Eli has the ability to send out waves of golden energy from his sword.
  • Taken for Granite: A demon named Discord has the ability to encase his enemies in volcanic rock. One angel-in-training gets partially hit by this attack, but an angel mechanic is able to free him from the rock with a hammer and chisel.
  • Technobabble: The supplementary materials are full of this, inventing units of measure wholesale for things like the speed or firepower of spiritual vehicles, e.g. "hawkpower" for measuring the speed or power of a Hover Board.
  • Teleporters and Transporters: The Seven is equipped with a teleporter. Sadly, demons are able to create interference that stops the teleporter from working properly.
  • Terraform:
    • Humans have begun to do this in-universe; one of the robots being smuggled to the moon in one episode was labelled as a terraforming robot.
    • Morg attempted to weaponize this: a Foundation Stone he'd managed to steal back from another demon was stated to contain "the promise of a new world", and he used demonic magic to turn the stone into a missile that was aimed at Earth. Arianna managed to sabotage the missile and detonate it while it was still launching from the moon without triggering its terraforming effect.
  • This Is Going to Suck: A demon who was inhabiting a human's mind had one of his Combat Tentacles wrapped around an angel's Hover Board against his will. The angel took a moment to show this to him, and this was the demon's reaction.
  • Took a Level in Badass: A messenger angel undergoes a variation of this trope: messenger angels don't fight, but after overcoming his fear and rescuing a guardian angel from a monster made of trash with his speed, he fearlessly volunteers for a dangerous game of keep-away to improve the odds of succeeding in a high-stakes mission.
  • Tron Lines: The embellishments on the angels' armor take the form of sleek glowing lines.
  • Wave-Motion Gun: A class of Angelic ships are equipped with enormous front-facing cannons that fire Divine energy.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: Discord mowed through a whole fleet of angelic ships before anyone figured it out, but his weakness was harmonious music. Until Paladin deduced this, Discord was an invincible, unstoppable foe.
  • White and Gold are Divine: Angelic armor is typically either silver or, in the case of Archangel Michael, gold.
  • World-Healing Wave: A single girl's revived hope, due to an answered prayed and a delivered message, has this effect from the angels' and demons' perspective. It clears out a fog of despair that had been choking a whole city, also killing demons in its path.
  • World-Wrecking Wave: One of the demonic flagships of the demon Discord had this capability; when used, it had the effect of coating the angelic starships with lava that quickly hardened to obsidian, encasing the crews and ships alike in stone. After this, Discord and his minions simply boarded the ships and commandeered them as his own.
  • You Have Failed Me: In his backstory, Paladin was expecting to get punished for his role in shattering Caliburn when he goes to Archangel Michael after his fleet got out of trouble. Fortunately for him, this version of Michael is a Reasonable Authority Figure who gives him a brief speech about how failure is sometimes inevitable, but the important thing is how you respond to it. Paladin then earns his wings, but he should've seen this coming from how he'd just saved his whole fleet, really.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness: Inverted in terms of what happens in-story, but played straight in terms of the you-only-live-because-I-have-use-for-you attitude: a Sorcerous Overlord demon named Ogrud resurrects his dead son as an undead giant when Ogrud decides he wants to retire, hoping to hand over his job to his son. Note that Ogrud was well aware that his son was suffering torment in The Underworld for the millennium that he'd been dead, and that the magic he used to raise him didn't take much visible effort at all; the one and only reason he resurrected his son was for his own selfish benefit. It's little wonder that his son wanted nothing to do with him.
  • You Shall Not Pass!: A sick boy in a hospital is apparently the intended recipient of a divine message that Eli and Kira have spent the whole episode trying to get delivered, but before they can deliver the message, ripwings start to ghost through the walls of his hospital room. Without a trace of his usual ambition, bloodthirst, showboating, or self-centeredness, Eli draws his sword, puts himself between the human and the demons, and flatly tells them in a dead-serious tone, "You won't touch him." Subverted in that he never has to fight the demons: they suddenly find themselves unable to ghost through the walls, which is implied to be because the boy's sister came next to his bed and prayed for him. Then the message is delivered, triggering a World-Healing Wave that kills the ripwings.
  • Your Soul Is Mine!: This doesn't happen on-screen, but it's stated the The Dragon (the name that this world's version of Satan goes by) eats the souls that demons deliver to him.

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