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Get Your Cape On! note 

"Get your cape on
And let's take flight
We can be who we like
Get your cape on
Now's the time
Save the world from crime
Get your cape on
We're DC Super Hero Girls!"
Opening theme
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DC Super Hero Girls is a 2015 Web Animation series created by Warner Bros: Animation, DC Comics, and Mattel. Along with the animated specials, the webisodes are tie-ins to the girl-centered DC Super Hero Girls franchise.

At Super Hero High, Principal Amanda Waller and her staff focus on training the iconic, adolescent versions of well-known DC Comics superheroes (and villains) during their formative years to become the next generation of heroic protectors. The school's newest student, potential Themyscira ambassador Diana, must learn the ropes of high school with her new-found classmates through their united friendship.

Webisodes and behind the scenes videos can be found on their YouTube page here. The main site is also here. Not to be confused with the Lauren Faust-developed television series of the same name scheduled to air on Cartoon Network in 2019, which has a completely different continuity based more on Faust's Super Best Friends Forever shorts.

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     Characters featured 

DC Super Hero Girls provides examples of:

  • Adaptational Heroism: As the line is aimed at young children, a number of characters who are traditionally villains or very aggressive anti-heroes are portrayed as straight heroes, including Harley Quinn and Poison Ivy. Explained with different backstories (e.g. without her abusive relationship with the Joker in her past, Harley's more "hero" than "anti"), onscreen conversions (e.g. Blackfire's Heel–Face Turn in Intergalactic Games), and mentions of past reforms (e.g. much of the faculty comes from a program Waller runs to help former supervillains reform).
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  • Adaptational Jerkass: In the Lego Galactic Wonder special, Hippolyta has a more condescending and somewhat demeaning personality to her personality, as opposed to her more innocently insensitive behavior in the main series. Just like the main series, she gets better, and she still loves her daughter.
  • Adaptational Modesty: Since the show is aimed for a younger audience, many characters are covered up. For example, Wonder Woman wears jeans, Ivy has pants underneath a skirt, and Starfire's regular outfit covers more. Harley wears a modified version of her regular outfit instead of her New 52 outfit.
  • Adaptation Relationship Overhaul: In most canons, Starfire and Blackfire are the Cain and Abel. In this franchise, that lasts a single movie, and they get along well after Blackfire's Heel–Face Turn.
  • Adaptational Personality Change: Several characters are a lot nicer than their villainous, or Good Is Not Nice, counterparts in the comics:
    • Amanda Waller here isn't a total 180 from Suicide Squad, but she's certainly a hell of a lot nicer.
    • Harley Quinn is more flighty than psycho.
    • Miss Martian is usually a peppy Plucky Girl but she's now a shy Shrinking Violet.
  • Adaptational Villainy:
    • The Hits and Myths trade paperback had the "Birds of Prey" (a band made of Black Canary, Magpie and Black Condor) as villains.
    • Lena Thorul is basically a female version of Lex here. (In other versions, the reason she's called Thorul instead of Luthor is to distance herself from her evil brother. She's not always squeaky clean, but she isn't a villain.)
  • Adaptational Wimp: Trigon is far less powerful than any of his counterparts with the possible exception of the one from Teen Titans Go!. Although it seems he's taken a level in badass since his debut if this teaser is anything to go by.
  • All There in the Manual: The graphic novels go more in depth with the characters and their backstories.
  • Alternate Continuity: The Lego projects seem to be this. For example, the girls know Lena is evil even though the projects first came out a month before the Intergalactic Games movie, where they find out. The Female Furies in the main series are working under Granny Goodness, while Lashina is their leader in the Lego series. There are also some of the voice switches from the main series.
  • Amazon Brigade: The main seven superheroines naturally fit this. The Female Furies are commonly used as enemies, too.
  • Animation Bump: During the climax of Hero of The Year.
  • Audience Surrogate: Jessica Cruz knows nothing about the Green Lantern Corps, hence Principal Waller has to explain all about the Green Lantern mythos to her and the audience.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: Supergirl (blonde), Wonder Woman (brunette) and Batgirl (redhead) are the main characters. They fight supervillains together and are extremely close.
  • Berserk Button: NEVER try to potentially hurt Ma and Pa Kent, for Supergirl will make you regret it. Black Canary and Dark Opal both learn this firsthand.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: It's pretty much a recurring theme to have the characters brainwashed in some way. For example:
    • In the "Super Hero High" movie, Granny Goodness and the Female Furies activate the Amethyst, brainwashing everyone. The only exceptions are Batgirl and Supergirl due to their special earrings. This goes on for only a few minutes.
    • A major climax during the "Hero Of The Year" movie has Dark Opal and Eclipso activate a black gem that brainwashes Commissioner Gordon, Hippolyta, and the Kents. Earlier on, the Master Alchemist was hypnotized into helping them. The former part lasts one scene while the latter part takes up a good third of the movie.
    • "Seeing Red" has everyone acting like jerks due to red Kryptonite. Starfire is the only one unaffected since she's Tamaranian.
    • The Lego "Galactic Wonder" special has Queen Hippolyta and her army get hypnotized by Dark Opal's mind control gem during the climax. Then the tables turn on her when she's hypnotized.
    • It's pretty much the focal point of the Lego "Brain Drain" movie. Katana and Bumblebee start out hypnotized, and stay that way until the end of the movie. News footage showed Batgirl, Supergirl, and Wonder Woman being hypnotized info committing felonies. The 40 minute mark showed everyone else at Super Hero High being brainwashed from Dark Opal's mind control gem.
  • Briar Patching: Starfire does this in "Seeing Red" to get to the red Kryptonite- as it makes the students angry and spiteful, Starfire says the useful actions would make her angry, so they comply.
  • Cain and Abel: Siren and Mera in Legends of Atlantis.
  • Call-Back: Harley's fail montage from "Fall into Super Hero High" contains clips from the last episode.
  • The Call Knows Where You Live: The Green Lantern ring was pretty relentless in following Jessica.
  • The Cameo: Some of the other students attending Super Hero High are Arrowette, Sandman, Plastic Man, Huntress/Tigress (Paula Brooks), Jinx (based off of her Teen Titans incarnation), Fire, Animal Man, Hawk, Dove (Dawn Granger).
    • Students from other schools include Blackfire, Lobo, Sinestro, Bleez.
  • Cast as a Mask: In the Lego Supervillain High movie, Principal Taller, the principal of Uber High, is voiced by Tara Strong, while Lena Luthor, who's secretly her in disguise, and orchestrated everything, is voiced by Romi Dames.
  • Combat Stilettos: Defied. One of Wondy's early costume designs has high heels, and they only serve to trip her up and get stuck in the ground, proving extremely impractical.
  • Crowded Cast Shot: Featured in "Welcome to Super Hero High", with 35 heroes included no less.
  • Damned by Faint Praise: In graphic novel "Space Out", Green Lantern Jessica Cruz botches her first combat simulation. Coach Wildcat tries to reassure her: "Don't worry about it, kiddo. It wasn't the worst first try I've ever seen."
  • Decomposite Character: In the comics, Oracle was Batgirl's new identity while she was in a wheelchair after being shot by the Joker. Here, Oracle is Batgirl's computerized assistant.
  • Darker and Edgier: Though Legends of Atlantis still has its comedic moments from the show, it features PTSD, actual scary instances of near death (particularly Aquaman (though he was said to be asleep forever) and Wonder Woman in the Cold Open), and a teen supervillain (not counting Lena Luthor) who was evil from the get-go. No heart, just mad for power.
  • Denser and Wackier: Than the typical modern DC animated content. It's taken to a whole new level with the Lego projects.
  • Disappointed in You: Ivy says this to one of the plants in her Hero of the Month video.
  • Divergent Character Evolution: Miss Martian was created as a Supergirl expy. The two go to the same high school in this series. Supergirl keeps her standard personality while Miss Martian is much more shy than usual.
  • Domino Mask: Batgirl wears a large, black domino mask and a hood instead of her usual cowl.
  • Eat the Camera: "Franken-Ivy" has a blink-and-you'll-miss-it scene where one of Ivy's plants gets out of hand.
  • Engineered Heroics: Cheetah does this enough times that people eventually stop believing her.
  • Everyone Went to School Together: At least a large amount of DC characters did in this continuity. Superman and Batman aren't shown, but Word of God is that they're both alumni.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Sinestro goes from stern headmaster of Korugar Academy in "Intergalactic Games" to actively kidnapping Wonder Woman, the Flash, Starfire and Supergirl to rebuild its student body in "Ring Me Maybe" and get beaten by brand-new Green Lantern Jessica Cruz.
  • Face Your Fears: In "Ring Me Maybe" we see Jessica Cruz chosen to succeed Hal Jordan as Green Lantern, and she must do this against Sinestro.
  • Friend to All Children:
    • Wonder Woman's Hero Of The Month episode showed her saving a falling child.
    • In the Intergalactic Games movie, Starfire is shown ditching an event to help to save people from a blazing fire, including a little girl.
    • In "It's A Superful Life", one scene has Big Barda reading a Christmas poem to a child in the hospital, and said child is very touched by it.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: In a very mild case of Family-Unfriendly Violence, during the one-hour special Super Hero High, Gorilla Grodd leaps in front of Batgirl to block her from being struck by an arrow. Said arrow strikes him instead and is lodged into his shoulder.
  • The Ghost: Both Superman and Batman are confirmed by Word of God to be full-fledged heroes but haven't shown up both times Superhero High were in danger.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Big Barda, Blackfire, and Black Canary all get onscreen redemption arcs, Ivy is implied to have been a villain or at least a delinquent before coming to Super Hero High, and many of the school's faculty were once supervillains.
  • Heroes Love Dogs: Krypto the Superdog and Ace the Bat-hound are Supergirl and Batgirl's dogs, respectively.
  • High School A.U.: To the regular DCU- here, the canon is rather confusing, as many characters' well-known backstories are left unknown or outright invalidated by their appearances here.
  • "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight: In "Out of the Bottle", Art teacher Miss Moone has been taken over by her evil split personality, and Harley Quinn tries to reach her out:
    Harley Quinn: Ms. Moone, I know you're in there. So listen up!
    Enchantress: (wheezing) June Moone is no more. I consumed her!
    Harley Quinn: Yeah, right! That's exactly what someone who didn't actually consume Ms. Moone, but was scared that my maneuvers might work, would say!
  • I'm Okay!: A running gag in the webisodes.
  • In Spite of a Nail: In this universe, the Kryptonian Science Council actually heed Jor-El's warnings but Krypton blows up before the evacuation fleet is ready, and Superman, Supergirl and Krypto the Superdog -and possibly Zod and his men- are the only survivors. And even though Zod isn't banished to the Phantom Zone he still despises the House of El.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Most characters who went through Adaptational Heroism have become this, most notably Harley, Frost, Blackfire, and Gorilla Grodd, among many others.
  • Jet Pack: Batgirl always carries around a bat-shaped jetpack.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: "Quinn-tessential Harley" can serve as a rather unsubtle commentary on the character's popularity out-of-universe.
  • Lighter and Softer: When compared to the DC Animated Universe, Young Justice, DC Universe Animated Original Movies, or even the Toyetic Batman Unlimited, the webisodes have yet to have any of the heroes engage in typical superhero-ing adventures. Even Krypto the Superdog (or more appropriately Super Best Friends Forever) had more instances of action or peril. Apparently an intentional decision. According to Shea Fontana and Aria Moffly, the webisodes are going to focus more on the comedic and "problem-solving through rational thought" aspects of a superhero High School A.U.; the graphic novels and direct-to-video movies will feature more traditional superhero escapades. Later episodes also add more action.
  • Malaproper: Starfire, being an alien and corresponding with her solo series, doesn't entirely understand English syntax and doesn't understand the meanings of common expressions.
  • The Man Behind the Man: Lena turns out to have been backed by Brainiac.
  • Multicolored Hair:
    • Harley Quinn mixes her classic design and New 52 designs together by having mostly blond hair with red and blue highlights.
    • Bumblebee has two different shades of brown hair with strawberry blond highlights.
  • Mundane Utility: When not superheroing, yeah. Slice of Life episodes also tend to work this way.
  • Never Say "Die":
    • Killer Frost is just called Frost here. Justified in that this version isn't a supervillain, so "Killer" wouldn't make much sense as part of her name.
    • Similarly, Killer Croc is just called Croc, though he's still called "Killer Croc" in the credits.
    • Averted with Killer Moth, likely to emphasize his silliness and the contrast between his actual image and the image he'd like to convey.
  • Not Hyperbole: Carol Ferris was born flying. Literally.
    Carol: Take it from me, there's nothing to fear. And I should know because I was born flying. Literally. I was born in a private jet flying over the Atlantic because my parents were needed in London for a Ferris Air board meeting that could not wait. And neither could I.
  • Parental Bonus: Pretty much all of the lesser-known elements of DC Comics mythology that crop up everywhere, as most kids won't know what they are while older viewers will.
  • Pair the Spares: Subverted in the ending of "Date with Disaster". Both Principal Waller and Commissioner Gordon lose their dates to the dance at Super Hero High so Gordon suggests that they dance with each other. Waller politely declines the offer.
  • Rogues-Gallery Transplant: Happens a lot, largely to characters who were originally spun off of others (for instance, a lot of Batman villains are Batgirl's enemies here), but also because they dig into obscure enemies to make up for all the big-name ones turned good. If you were watching this series blind, would you know that the Double Dare Twins were Nightwing villains?
  • Save the Villain: Done in the Hits and Myths trade paperback when the "Birds of Prey," here a band made of Black Canary, Black Condor and Magpie, steal the Batplane of Batgirl, but run out of fuel in mid-air and are about to crash-land onto the farm of Ma and Pa Kent.
  • Scales of Justice: Fittingly the courtyard of Super Hero High has a statue of Lady Justice, complete with her scales.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: In "Intergalactic Games", Sinestro and the villain students (except Blackfire) fled Earth rather than help the heroes fight Brainiac. As a result, they automatically forfeit the game.
  • Secret Identity: Surprisingly averted. In this universe's Metropolis, "everybody's free to be whoever/whatever they are, so there's no need for secret identities and everyone can just let their flags fly". Emphasized when Barbara announces she's decided to become Batgirl by suiting up on stage, in front of her schoolmates. Lucius Fox does mention having one, however.
  • Shout-Out:
  • Sick Episode: In "Cold Blooded", Frost comes down with a cold, and she keeps accidentally freezing things every time she sneezes. Later on Batgirl, Ivy, and Bumblebee spend all night trying to make her feel better. In the morning, she thanks them for helping her feel better, at which, they become sick.
  • Single-Stroke Battle: Wonder Woman and Lena Luthor do this in Intergalactic Games twice, both times costing Lena the arms of the robot she's piloting.
  • Slapstick Knows No Gender: Almost every female character is subject to Amusing Injuries in almost every Web Episode.
  • Small Role, Big Impact: Dr. Fate only appears for one scene in the Lego Supervillain High, but his appearance helps set up the climax.
  • Social Media Before Reason: Part 1 of "Nevermore" has a teenager try to take a selfie in the middle of destruction that Raven accidentally caused. Batgirl is understandably annoyed when rescuing her.
  • Spinoff Sendoff: One of the last comics for this version has Zatanna show the girls an alternate universe of the girls which turns out to be the 2019 version of the series. Amusingly both Harley and Ivy are a little put off that they're villains in that universe.
  • Spiritual Successor: The show seems to be the combination of Gotham High (a pitched-but-never-materialized DC animated show starting adolescent versions of the Batman cast) and Super Best Friends Forever.
  • Stealth Pun: In "Fall into DC Super Hero High", Frost accidentally freezes her slice of pizza and gets it stuck to her tongue, and Catwoman helps her pull it off. In other words, "cat got your tongue".
  • Stepford Smiler: The main characters look as cheerful and happy-go-lucky as they come. But in Out of the Bottle, Harley Quinn mentions she goes to a therapist (in fact she has enough traumas to fill a dozen of books... some of them brought about by a green-haired jerk bullying her in kindergarten), and Wonder Woman, Supergirl and Batgirl admit they're going to a therapist, too. The group concurs that "It's hard to be a super hero without a little mental health help."
  • Superhero School: Super Hero High tells us this trope in its name. Though it's not above teaching supervillains (they seem to be infiltrators or will defect later in life, though, if they aren't simply good versions like Ivy and Harley).
  • Thick-Line Animation: The animated versions have colored outlines, as opposed to the usual single black variant.
  • This Looks Like a Job for Aquaman: Happens when new student, Mera, has trouble fitting in and finding a use for her water manipulation powers until she defeats Firefly, who just happened to be setting fires next to the city waterfront.
  • Vile Villain, Saccharine Show: Brainiac is a deadly serious, deadly dangerous No-Nonsense Nemesis.
  • The Wildcats: Referenced by making Wildcat the gym teacher.
  • Wolverine Publicity: Supergirl is prominently featured in the opening credits from the beginning of the webisodes, despite not actually appearing at all until the first special. It may have something to do with Supergirl (2015).
  • Would Hurt a Child: The Intergalactic Games movie shows Lena Luthor willing to hurt the same little girl Starfire saved when inside her Mecha.

Alternative Title(s): DC Superhero Girls 2015

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