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Minotaur Hotel is a Freeware adult gay furry Visual Novel written by MinoAnon, with coding and art done by nanoff, who's made his own work such as Boomer's Big Date and its related content. It began life as an erotic interactive story hosted on 4chan before becoming the Visual Novel it is now today.

You are a nobody just wandering around a desolate area when you suddenly meet an odd senile old man. This man has a small conversation before giving you a slip of paper. He tells you that it's a contract to own a hotel. You don't completely believe the man's words, but you go off to the supposed hotel anyways. When you arrive there, you find a wretched scene, an abandoned place that tells a story of something horrible that happened long ago. It is there where you meet him, Asterion, the Minotaur from ancient Crete (not Greek) myth. After he gets his bearings straight, he tells you of the hotel's purpose, what your role is now that you have the hotel's contract, and how he is now your servant. It is now your choice to either treat the minotaur with kindness and fulfill Asterion's wish to make the hotel for those who are lost, or submit to your carnal sin and abuse your newly assigned servant.

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This Visual Novel acts a little differently from most modern Visual Novels, functioning more like a Management Sim while still keeping the story focus of most Visual Novels. As you play through the game, several guests will come through the hotel's doors, and you can choose to hire some of those guests for various jobs. You have to manage your time with what guests you'll spend with during the day and what your workers will do on the job. You and the other characters are also uncovering a supernatural mystery along the way.

The game is currently incomplete, and updates irregularly. You can find the itch.io page here and the project's Twitter account here (The Twitter is NSFW).

Note: This game can be divided into three routes. To avoid confusion, the route where you treat Asterion well and eventually become romantically inclined with him will be called the "Main Route" (and will be the route the page will default to talking about, whenever there isn't a specific route being mentioned), the route where you abuse Asterion will be called the "Ruthless Route" and the route where you don't go through either extreme will be called the "Lukewarm Route".

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Minotaur Hotel provides examples of:

  • Abusive Parents: Storm's mom treated him like everyone else in the Hinterlands, which was like a monster. Storm then ran away from home several times before meeting P. Notably if you go to Storm's house after he's obtained the charm, Storm's mother won't even mention Storm. P is understandably concerned for Storm, but he tells him that it doesn't matter anymore.
  • Adaptational Wimp: Zeus is quite spineless in the game, going along with Athena's idea just to get the conflict over with, which Hera calls him out on in her own vote.
  • Adjustable Censorship: There's an SFW mode that removes all the sex scenes and covers genitals with either undergarments or a Gag Censor. There's also a separate version of the game that has SFW mode locked on.
  • Affectionate Nickname: Asterion gets called "Angus" by Luke, and "Moo" by the protagonist.
  • All Myths Are True: Greek mythology is the focus, but the main cast includes a Japanese dragon god, a Mongolian descendent of Pigsy and a Grootslang interpreted as Zulu. The Hinterlands arc focus on Brazilian folklore, including a tapir god (possibly Tapire-iauara).
  • And Now for Someone Completely Different: There are various interludes between chapters that are outside the master's point of view, with the most notable ones being the guest introduction scenes and the Hinterlands, a series of chapters that focus on the characters of P, a Peacock trying to find the titular hotel, and Storm, a runaway Minotaur who P finds in his quest to find the hotel.
  • Animals Hate Him: The labyrinth causes every living thing created in it (and in the Valley) to turn hostile to Asterion.
  • Author Appeal: Other than the initial concept of Asterion being submissive towards the protagonist and being very much a "bottom", the artist also admits that he's fond of the heavyset characters in the game.
  • Bad Boss:
    • Clement was not only abusive towards Asterion, but he barely bothered paying his employees and was very disorganized overall.
    • You can be one as well in the Ruthless route.
  • Beast Man: But of course! Asterion is explicitly half-human, while the other mythicals act very much human, using charms to blend into human society. Not having a charm can raise issues towards a mythical living in human society, as Storm, unfortunately, learns firsthand.
  • Because You Were Nice to Me:
    • In the main route, Asterion will become close friends with you for this very reason, as you're the first master to ever treat him like a friend.
    • Regardless of what actions you make, Storm will always become close with P for the sheer fact that he gave him a charm that makes him appear human.
  • Benevolent Boss:
    • Jean-Marie is held by Asterion as one of the best masters the hotel had, as the hotel was pretty damn close to achieving its goal when he was the master.
    • You can potentially be one, however, you first have to make it clear to Asterion that you won't hurt him, and that use your witts to deal with the hotel's issues before you can actually be seen as one.
  • Big Brother Mentor: Asterion used to have two such mentors that he had strong connections. First is Androgeos, his actual brother, who acted kindly towards Asterion despite his curse and even stopped him from being plunged into Tartarus during his after-life. The other is Phroneos, while not a blood sibling, he took care of Asterion when he was young, during which they grew a tight relationship.
  • Big Eater: As if Luke wasn't already a huge American stereotype, he can gobble down whole hamburgers and fries in one bite. How he manages to not get fat is anyone's guess.
  • Brainless Beauty: The game describes Luke as a "himbo" on at least one occasion, with him being both attractive and also a bit dim-witted.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: If you guess the Overseer's identity right, the narrator pauses showing Asterion getting out of the bed to rant to you/your character about justice and Athena Stealing the Credit.
  • Cast Full of Gay: Not as obvious as other furry Visual Novels, but it's still there. Luke makes it clear to everyone that he's gay, P outright states it, while you yourself have stated that you've had sex with a man before and that you're attracted to Asterion. Asterion is plainly attracted towards the Master in the main route, while Storm says that he wants to be in a relationship with P if he's been kind enough to him, though there's the possibility that he's still figuring out his sexuality. Everyone else has unclear sexualities.
  • Chivalrous Pervert: Luke is a shameless flirt and sex addict, but that doesn't change the fact that he legit cares about you and Asterion, and will do his best to be a good friend to everyone.
  • Conviction by Counterfactual Clue: Since Clément was Asterion's last abusive master, everyone assumes that the old man who gave you the deed (and sent you the illegible letter) was Clément. It's later revealed that Clément died months before your story started. Not to mention, the letter was signed with "P."
  • Cosmic Motifs: Important moments between the characters and in the plot happen during stargazing, and there is much emphasis on the meaning of Asterion's name.
  • Coolest Club Ever: If you picked Luke as your first employee, the hotel's restaurant will resemble a huge club complete with loud music and stripper poles.
  • Crossover Cosmology: Greek Mythology (and Cretan Mythology), Japanese Mythology, South American Mythology, Monogolion Mythology, African mythology, Christian belief, it's all real. Discussed in Robert's route where he discusses how people go into different afterlives depending on their beliefs, and that the land of Hades being basically closed off to anyone in the modern world due to how it's part of a dying religion.
  • Culture Blind: Wolf lives near a village, but he is shocked that humans who seem to be skilled hunters aren't welcoming of him, and Asterion, who looks and smells like his species' favorite prey, reacts badly when he jumps on and licks him.
  • Dark and Troubled Past: Both minotaurs have this in spades, with Asterion being framed and thrown into a Labyrinth while he was alive before becoming a servant for all eternity, while Storm was neglected by his parents and treated as a monster in his homeland. P also had a tragic past.
  • Dark Is Not Evil:
    • Hades is one of the few benevolent Greek gods.
    • Robert's hell apparently takes great strides to punish only the truly wicked. He is also rather pleasant.
  • Dating Sim: There's only one character you can romance in the game, and that's Asterion. How well you treat him will determine whether he'll fall in love with you, simply be good friends with you, or absolutely loathe you.
  • Deadpan Snarker: P is this in spades, constantly making sarcastic and passive-aggressive remarks, while the master is a more toned downed aloof version.
  • Death World: The valley. While only a little dangerous towards most people, towards Asterion, it's a Place Worse Than Death as terrible monsters come after him.
  • Defrosting Ice King: Asterion was never a cold person, per se, however, he never treated the masters as anything more than friendly bosses. Should you treat him right, however, he will start to trust in you and start to become more willing to become friends with the guests.
  • Disappeared Dad: Storm never met his dad, although Storm is pretty certain that he was human, which P doubts.
  • Drunk with Power: Even the kindest masters became more or less abusive towards Asterion eventually, Saint Joseph and Clément are stated to use charity as a means to get glory.
  • Downer Beginning: The place you start off isn't very pretty, and once you actually get to the hotel itself, it's in absolute ruin, indicating the foul event that destroyed the place, with the servant of the hotel being in a miserable weakened state.
  • Dramedy: Yes, this game deals with loss, trauma, abuse, torture, and violence. Yes, the protagonist meets Asterion in a cold room while he's barely breathing. Yes, several characters talk about their traumatic pasts and how they scarred them so deeply. And yes, the sheer amount of torment that goes towards Asterion and how it affected him is utterly heartbreaking. But at the end of the day, as long as you be kind towards Asterion and the guests, it still retains optimism and quirkiness to make all of that not matter, making it a game that can have both funny and sad moments at the same time.
  • Dysfunction Junction: With the possible exception of Robert, every mythical character in the game has some baggage to them. While some of them have only relatively minor issues, such as Kota longing for a lost person, and Luke desiring some more personal affection, other characters have incomprehensibly tragic backstories and personal problems, with Storm, P, and especially Asterion being the most notable cases.
  • Eagleland: Luke is a sex-crazed, military veteran American Eagle hybrid with a southern accent, a large family, and cooks burgers and fries if he runs the hotel's restaurant. There's practically no way this guy could be any more of an American stereotype.
  • Everyone Can See It: By the 15th chapter of the Main route, several people comment on the close relationship between you and Asterion, and how they're surprised they're not romantically involved. The protagonist is annoyed by this, not because he doesn't want to be with Asterion in that way, but because he doesn't want to force it onto Asterion unless Asterion himself says he feels the same towards the protagonist. Jean and Kota even have a private talk with each of you, encouraging you to go for it if you love each other.
  • Exotic Equipment: Discussed by P(edro) and Storm/Oscar. One of them is insecure about his genitalia looking not human enough, which prompts the other to tell him that he's fine the way he is, while the other has to explain to the other what a cloaca is.
  • Face of a Thug: Robert, considering how he scared the unsuspecting delivery man when his charm briefly malfunctioned. Storm is also this before he gets his charm.
    • Asterion says most people find him scary. It might be Informed Flaw or Values Dissonance, though: ancient and medieval masters were repulsed of him, but he is cute and charming to your character and the modern guests.
    • The wolf scares a human village and Asterion when he is just trying to befriend them.
  • Fair Play Whodunit: Secrets like the Overseer's or the old man's identity are gradually revealed during the story, but the clues are there from the start, and you are rewarded for figuring them out sooner.
  • Fan Disservice: You first meet Asterion naked. This wouldn't be a bad image if it weren't for the fact that he's malnourished and injured beyond belief.
  • Featureless Protagonist: Zig-Zagged. You never get to see what the protagonist looks like, aside from some translucent hands that appear in a cutscene. His personality, however, is fully fleshed out, though ultimately he's meant to be primarily an Audience Surrogate.
  • First-Episode Spoiler: The old man you meet at the beginning of the game? That man is Clement, the previous master who threw everyone out of the hotel and turned it into the mess it is at the start of the game.
  • First-Person Smartass: During the Hinterlands, P takes care of most of the narration and you get to see how much of a "cunt" he is, with how he plainly tells his opinion towards certain events and shows how much he hates himself.
  • Freakiness Shame: Your reassurances eventually make Asterion like his body and see himself as human rather than a monster, and reassure Storm in turn.
  • Gentle Giant: Once he fully recovers, Asterion is a tall half-bull person whose appearance scares off most people. However, once you get to know him, he's a deeply kind and considerate man who wouldn't hurt a fly if given a choice.
  • Gibbering Genius: Greta is a guest that's filled to the brim with enthusiasm towards science and the likes, helping the protagonist and Asterion with getting the wi-fi in the hotel working, but she's also very pushy, and doesn't often know when to keep her mouth shut.
  • Good All Along:
    • Argos/Dominikos was just there to provide Secret Test of Character. The only one who can hurt Asterion is the master. At a point he says he is Just Following Orders regardless of his own feelings about the matter and brings you some of the Olympians' votes in Asterion's trial to show him he is innocent and half of the gods were on his side.
    • P and his quest to find the Hotel initially frame him as a villain, but not only are his motivations shown to be sympathetic but when he actually gets his wish he gets what he wants at no expense to the protagonists.
  • Greater-Scope Villain:
    • The ancient gods, who created the labyrinth to imprison Asterion for all eternity, and make him a slave for any human that comes across him. The lack of free will Asterion has because of them combined with how he's been abused over centuries shows how ruthless the gods were towards Asterion. In the main route, it's in the best interest for the protagonist to figure out enough loopholes in the system to get Asterion out of the cycle.
    • Clement. Although there were mean and abusive masters before him, he's particularly awful in that he kicked out all the guests and employees out of the hotel, without paying them, and keeping Asterion in a cold room for over half a century. Not only did this remove all the progress the hotel has made over the centuries, but it also caused Pedro's grandfather to have a major falling out with his family and make everyone in it hate each other, on top of whatever happened to the numerous other guests and employees. His actions more or less kickstart the events of the game, as you would have never become the master and restore the hotel, and Pedro would have never started his journey to look for the hotel where his supposed inheritance laid. The worst part about him is that he's so old and senile at the start of the game, that doing anything to him (killing him, punishing him, imprisoning him, etc.) would be utterly pointless besides some small catharsis. It says something that even the hint that he's still alive is enough to send Asterion into a funk.
      • According to Pedro, he was an untreated schizophrenic and the previous Argos had manipulated him into blaming Asterion for his traumas.
  • Guide Dang It!: Getting the main route is easy so long as you treat Asterion with kindness and avoid any Kick the Dog moments. At the same time, getting the Ruthless route is also easy if you make Asterion distrust you and abuse him, though the game will make you feel really bad about doing that. However, there's also the "Lukewarm" route, which you can only get if you perform just one specific Kick the Dog action before treating as best as you could from then on. Most players wouldn't even know this route even exists, much less even play through, unless they looked at a guide (or looked at this page...). Justified, as it's more of something a player can accidentally run into than anything else.
  • Heal the Cutie: In the main route, Asterion goes from a Broken Bird who just saw everything he cared about fall apart before his eyes, to the all-loving, hard-working hotel-keeper who can't stop smiling.
  • Heir Club for Men: Only a man can be a master.
  • He Is Not My Boyfriend: After a certain point in the main route, people mistake you for being in a relationship with Asterion, and you have to correct them that you're not in a relationship with him (yet).
  • Hidden Depths: Luke is more sensitive and Asterion is more cunning than they let on.
  • High School Rocks: Storm, encouraged by P, wants to go back to school to get a decent job. In one of their car conversations at the Hinterlands, Storm romanticizes about high school as it was portrayed in movies, but P gives Storm a reality check and reminds him that Brazilian schools are nothing like those as portrayed in American movies. P then shares his experiences of graduating in a Cram School and that there were little to no extracurricular activities, and only hours and hours of studying, which P could luckily manage due to not needing sleep, no lockers, no cliques, not even groups for mythicals, no singing, no proms, and the tears on graduation mean relief than going to miss each other. P suggests on finding a less-Sucky School for Storm.
  • His Own Worst Enemy: P has severe self-loathing due to his family being largely dysfunctional after his grandfather got kicked out of the hotel, and his job forcing him to do some shady stuff. Storm, or rather Oscar, helps him realize that it's the only thing that's stopping him from being a good person.
  • Holding Hands: If you treat Asterion well, you engage in a bunch of moments where you hold Asterion's hand, each of them varying in affection and intimacy.
  • Hope Is Scary: Asterion wishes you would stop "pretending" and just abuse him already when he gets depressed.
    • Argos uses this as an excuse to help Asterion if you don't discover his secret.
  • Hot Springs Episode: P and Storm have one of these, where they go skinny dipping and enjoy themselves.
  • Humans Are Flawed: All of the humans are generally portrayed with less sympathy than the mythicals, with the possible exceptions of Phroneos and Androgeos, with many of them treating the mythicals as outsiders at best, and abusing them at their worst. Even the protagonist isn't exempt from this, as he is equally capable of bringing harm towards Asterion if he wanted to. That said, there are good humans, and the game shows that if the person has good intentions, and is given the opportunity, they can do great things, as shown with Jean-Marie and a main-route protagonist.
  • I Don't Want to Ruin Our Friendship: If Pedro and Oscar grow their bonds strong enough, then they'll have a scene where Oscar indirectly asks Pedro if he wants to be in a relationship. Pedro rejects, stating that even though he likes him, and is attracted to him, he can't in good faith start one with Oscar since there's such a big experience gap. He then tells him that he will reconsider it when Oscar's more mature enough to live on his own.
  • I Just Want to Be Normal:
    • Asterion doesn't outright state it, but it's clear that he wished that he was born a human and didn't have to deal with the trials his life gave.
    • Storm's whole desire, as he never had a charm that would let him fit into human society. Once P gives him such a charm, he's overjoyed to finally being able to appear human towards other people and restart his life.
  • Incorruptible Pure Pureness: Asterion retained his kindness despite all the abuse he has been through.
  • Instantly Proven Wrong: Of the Not What It Looks Like Variant. After Luke tells you that you and Asterion look like a "Lesbian Couple", you tell him that what's between him and you is not romantic, and they're just friends. Immediately afterward, Asterion asks if you can brush his fur again. The reaction Luke gives is hysterical.
  • Interspecies Romance: Potentially you and Asterion can end up in one. Pedro and Oscar also flirt with the idea, but decide it's better for them to be friends for the time being.
  • It's All My Fault: Asterion feels this way about himself towards the supposed mistakes he made in his life, despite the fact that he was young when he made them. He also feels ashamed of himself for thinking that he could give the hotel a purpose after Clement sabotages it. Obviously, you tell him that it's not his fault.
  • It's the Journey That Counts: Storm comforts P by telling him that even if they don't find the hotel, he still managed to give him another chance at life, along with whatever they did during the week (give peace to the dead souls that were in Nini's dream, remove the curse of the Hinterlands, etc.).
  • Jerkass Gods:
    • The Olympians are portrayed with little to no sympathy, with the exception of Hestia and Hades. Athena and Zeus in particular are at their absolute worst, since they're the ultimate orchestrators of Asterion's torment.
    • The tapir god in the Hinterlands arc is shown to be petty and a liar. He does have a Freudian Excuse in being the victim by both indigenous peoples and Christians.
    • The gods apparently have an old feud with the Grootslang, driving them to near extinction. Which pantheon this is has yet to be revealed.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: P is a self-proclaimed "cunt" who often talks like a dick, but he does genuinely care about Storm and wishes that he can do good in his life.
  • Kick the Dog: The main thing that decides which route you are in is how many times you send Asterion to the valley. Never send him to the valley at all and you're most likely going to get the main route. Send him once and you'll get the Lukewarm route. Any more than that and you'll get the Ruthless route. Why is sending Asterion to the valley such a terrible thing? The valley is filled with terrible monsters, and they will go after Asterion regardless of what he does. Convincing him that you won't ever send him to the valley in the main route is a big reason why he becomes very friendly towards you.
  • Lemony Narrator: The third-person narration used in most of the game is quite creative and sometimes a little humorous.
  • Like an Old Married Couple: Luke and Kota start off on the wrong foot when they first meet but eventually get into this type of relationship.
  • Loophole Abuse: The protagonist's main strategy in the Main route. A Smug Snake asking Asterion to come to the valley? Point out his Exact Words and avoid being forced to do a Kick the Dog. Asterion reminding you that you're a master and he's a servant? Tell him that they're only master and servant to the hotel, but that doesn't mean they can't be equals in other terms. The Labyrinth having an absurdly large contract that makes it difficult to modify and makes it easy for masters to exploit the systems for their own selfishness? Create a contract so that his arm would amputate should he ever send Asterion to the valley just so he can prove to Asterion that he wants to keep him safe.
  • Lovable Sex Maniac: Luke is a huge pervert and he doesn't hide it one bit, but he's also a fun guy to be with regardless of whether or not he's talking about sex.
  • Manchild: Storm tends to be pretty naive about most things, and would end up sounding like a child if it wasn't for the fact that he's a Minotaur with a deep voice at the age of 21. This is because he had a sheltered life, having neglectful parents, and a hostile environment in which no one approached him friendly. This is the reason why P is so hesitant on starting a relationship with him even though he's attracted to him, because he sees it as an Unequal Pairing.
  • Mirror Character: Storm has several similarities with Asterion beyond both being minotaurs. Both are physically in their 20s, both have tragic pasts, both have been discriminated for their non-human looks, both have extremely limited knowledge of the outside world, both are stranded alone when they meet someone that will help them out, and both can potentially fall in love with that same someone who helped them out because of their kindness.
  • Mr. Fanservice: Once he's fully healed, Asterion is a big muscular bull-man that you can see naked whenever you're deciding his clothes, and although he cannot wander the hotel naked, he's willing (or not) to wear some more fanservice-y outfits later on in the game. Luke and Storm are also no slouches in that department.
  • Multinational Team: The various guests that you will meet and may be able to recruit come from different countries and their respective country's myth. For example, Luke is of mixed heritage but was born and raised in the United States, Kota is from Japan, and Asterion himself is from Crete.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Invoked with the protagonist on the main route. He and Asterion get to a point where the protagonist is the "master" but functions more like a simple manager, while Asterion is a "servant" but he's on an equal level with the protagonist in terms of decision making and management.
  • Nothing Personal: Asterion's punishment isn't for anything he has done. The gods who voted against him either did it out of self-preservation or as Revenge by Proxy against each other.
  • One-Steve Limit: Averted with the delivery man, whose name is Jean-Marie, the same name as the master of the hotel that preceded Clement, which raises suspicion towards the man.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: As you can imagine, P wasn't named "P" at birth. Apparently, this was a family tradition, with his grandfather also being known as "P". His real name is Pedro. "Storm" is also a nickname, with his real name being "Oscar". After the two reveal their real names to each other, the game changes their in-game name to their real names, though they're still known by their nicknames towards everyone else.
  • Our Gods Are Different: Conversations with Kota and Robert dwelve a bit into the different natures of the gods of the various pantheons, with the Shinto gods for example being "lesser" in comparison to the Olympians. The created god in the ruthless route is a borderline animalistic Eldritch Abomination.
  • Perception Filter:
    • Mythicals have charms that make them appear human towards other humans. Even if a human were to touch a mythical's non-human part, such as their tail, they would still perceive them as human as they wouldn't even notice that they're touching a tail. That said, most charms aren't perfect, and other mythical are occasionally able to see defects in other mythicals' charms, though most humans aren't able to notice.
    • The hotel automatically translates everyone's words into languages other people can understand. For example, a person who only understands English will be able to understand someone speaking Japanese while their words will sound Japanese to that other person. This extends to books and documents, but not towards modern inventions such as electronic tablets.
    • The hotel also makes it so that any guests won't immediately freak out upon seeing a tall minotaur, or a large demon.
  • Perspective Flip: The whole premise of the Visual Novel, centering around the Minotaur from ancient myth and his side of the story.
  • Prolonged Prologue: The part where you are able to decide what you can do with your time and where most of the story branching happens? That won't come until after Chapter 13. Until then, your time is spent deciding on how you'll treat Asterion (which will decide what route you'll be locked into), understanding the mechanics of the game, and getting the hotel back to action. It avoids the trapping of this trope, however, by making the first 13 chapters entertaining with how it sets up the story.
  • The Promise: P promises to Storm that once Storm figures himself out and learns to be independent, he will reconsider starting a relationship with him. Storm accepts his promise and tells him he'll be sure to become independent.
  • Purple Prose: The narration tends to run into this from time to time, though never overstaying its welcome in the process.
  • Recursive Canon: The Adaptational Nice Guy minotaur gets depressed, but not surprised, when he reads the Athenian slander that is the known legend about himself on the internet.
  • The Runaway: Storm runs away from home due to how abusive his mom is and how basically no one ever treated him kindly. He can barely survive on his own, relying on stealing food and using caves for places to rest.
  • Sadly Mythtaken: Minor, but the Minotaur in myth was said to be human in all but his head (though some ancient pottery depicted him with a tail). Asterion in this game has hooves for feet and his body is covered in fur. Justified considering the art was made by a furry artist, so some Artistic License was to be expected.
    • On the other hand, unlike the cannibalistic beast Athenian slander made him up to be, he is a sweet, cultured, mentally human. The Monstrous Cannibalism he was accused of was actually being tricked into eating beef.
  • Shipper on Deck: Luke is pretty set on you and Asterion being a thing, even going so far as calling you "top" and him "bottom". You're not amused, while Asterion is just confused about his comments.
  • Sinister Southwest: The Hinterlands, situated in the northeastern part of Brazil, is a cursed, salt-covered half-desert, isolated from the outside world, in deep poverty, with a violent history and rich folklore.
    • The hotel is also in the middle of a desert devoid of any kind of life.
  • Shown Their Work: The developers made sure that everything in the game was as accurate to their respective mythologies as they could be. The game toys with some of the more obscure parts of ancient mythology in order to tell its story.
  • Smug Snake: Argos is a literal example, being an actual serpent and smug as all hell.
  • Stop Being Stereotypical: At one point, Ismael asks you what your favorite anime is. If you pick the option declaring that you love Anime so much that you can't pick a favorite, he tells you that his favorite anime is some Moe anime. This prompts you to internal monologue about how it's possible for someone to watch so much anime and still have shit taste. Author Tract or Hypocritical Humor? You decide.
  • Story Branching: Aside from the main three routes, there are various choices you can make that will affect the path of the story, with one of the earlier ones being whether you picked Kota or Luke as the manager for the hotel's restaurant. These choices decide which routes you can go through, and how certain interactions play out.
  • Supreme Chef: Khenbish makes amazing food for anyone who has the pleasure of having a taste in his food, and if he's the hotel cook, his food can even give buffs to various guests should you decide to help him cook for the day.
  • Sympathetic Murder Backstory: Asterion was convinced to Mercy Kill Tithonus when he was young.
  • Sympathetic Slave Owner: While Asterion is officially a "servant", he's basically a slave in all but name. That being said, he's had a least a few masters that were mostly benevolent, even if was for reasons that had nothing to do with Asterion himself.
    • Joseph the Merciful refused to torture Asterion, though mostly out of his religious beliefs telling him so. Asterion looked back on him fondly.
    • Jean-Marie was not above punishing Asterion, yet he only did so if he truly believed Asterion deserved it. Otherwise, he was a splendid master, doing everything he could to fulfill the hotel's mission, and make it the best it could have been.
    • And of course you yourself in the Main route (and to a lesser extent the Lukewarm route). In the Main Route, Asterion even declares you to be the best master the hotel has seen due to you going out of your way to not hurt Asterion while still fulfilling the hotel's mission. At that point though, you don't even see Asterion as a servant, so it's essentially just a technicality.
  • Sympathy for the Devil: Even though he tried to trick you into getting Asterion into the valley, ultimately you just can't hate him for the fact that any wrongings he could have done pale in comparison to Clement and the other masters that abused Asterion. You're given the option to hug him when he tears up.
  • Take That!: Asterion asks, shocked, if you are British, if you choose a Frenchman over a demon to be suspicious of.
  • Take That, Audience!: When Storm and P get a little tipsy, Storm starts to ask P a bunch of questions. Eventually, he asks P his top three things about him. Since P is a little weirded out on the idea of starting a romantic relationship with Storm, he answers sarcastically that his three favorite things about him are: his mouth that won't stop asking questions, his horns that scratch the ceiling of his car, and his stench that stinks up the place. Storm laughs at his response and then decides to run a lap so he can get sweaty and even smellier. P is not impressed. Considering this game is targeted towards a gay furry demographic, and several works that are targeted towards that same audience tend to play up the smelliness of some of their characters, this scene can be seen as a cheeky nod towards their audience's... interests.
  • Title Drop: Happens twice. Once when you need to name the wi-fi network something, so you name it "Minotaur Hotel", and another when it's been pointed out that the hotel doesn't have a name, so you just decide to name it "Minotaur Hotel" as well.
  • Twice-Told Tale: Although the game does its best to explain the necessary mythology to make sense of the story, the game is best told with some prior knowledge of various mythologies, as it's that knowledge of the various myths that give the extra context to the story.
  • Video Game Caring Potential:
    • The player has the option to make P do nice things towards Storm during the Hinterlands segment, such as giving him new clothes or console Storm after an uncomfortable visit to his old home.
    • Soon after you first meet Asterion, you're immediately given choices to help him do various tasks. As the game goes on, you can treat him with even more kindness, which in turn, will cause him to trust you and eventually care for you a lot as a person...
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: ... or you can be an absolute dick and perform several Kick the Dog moments towards him, which will cause him to eventually realize how doomed his situation is.
  • Video Game Perversity Potential: You can dress up Asterion in just a loincloth or other sexy outfits. At first, this decreases Asterion's trust towards you, but later on, you can dress him up in almost however you like so long as long as you treat him right first.
  • Video Game Perversity Prevention: Despite the above, during certain parts of the game, you can't have him be naked, or have his penis showing, outside of the customization menu. The reasoning behind this is that the previous masters thought it was disgraceful for Asterion to have him serve the guests without any clothing.
  • What Is This Thing You Call "Love"?: As Asterion continues to work with you, he starts to grow feelings for you in the main route. At first, he's really confused by these feelings you bring to him, and even the narrator can't describe these sensations brought to him.
  • Xenofiction: If you are looking for security, you can see the hotel from an actual wolf's point of view.
  • Yamato Nadeshiko: Kota is a male example, being prim, proper, and polite at almost all times.

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