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Super Mario 64: Last Impact is a Game Mod of Super Mario 64 designed by Kaze Emanuar released on September 30, 2016. Quite simply, this game is to Super Mario 64 what Mario Adventure was to Super Mario Bros. 3: a completely new game based on the same engine with 15 new full-sized levels, several new smaller-sized levels, 12 all new power-ups, and 130 stars to collect. This is in addition to a Banjo-Kazooie style overworld hub. After its release, the game has been noted for being the most extensive ROM hack of Super Mario 64 to date, even moreso than Super Mario Star Road.
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During a relaxing afternoon, Mario and Peach are suddenly attacked by monsters. After defeating them, Mario and Peach soon discover that the moon is coming closer to the Mushroom Kingdom by the minute, and Mario sets off on an adventure to gather the Power Stars in order to prevent the moon from destroying the world.


This game provides examples of:

  • Absurdly Spacious Sewer: The sewers underneath the Gamble Games Gallery, and they have quite a problem with mice.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: Right at the start of the haunted Gloomy Ambiance.
  • Amazing Technicolor Battlefield: The Livid Surreal Dream and Rainbow Road.
  • Amusement Park: Luna Park, one of the last special stages of the game.
  • Ascended Glitch: If the player does a Backwards Long Jump in a certain area of the first Over The Cloud stage, they wind up on a distant floating island with a castle that has an image of Weegee on the side.
    • Doing this in a specific part of Dusky Doomed Dale will place Mario in a cage with a Monty Mole who compliments you on pulling off the Backwards Long Jump.
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  • Attack of the 50-Foot Whatever: Kurma Koopa attacks the Sky-High Islands. Subverted — the islands are his, and he's very protective of his territory.
  • Big Bad: Rashay the Moon Spirit is the one trying to crash the moon into the Mushroom Kingdom for his own entertainment.
  • Big Boo's Haunt:
    • Dusky Doomed Dale is the typical "haunted" level. It is actually a haunted town and the reason it's haunted is because Kamek the witch has laid a curse on the town.
    • The second Gloomy Ambiance is a more typical haunted stage.
  • Build Like an Egyptian: The pyramid in the Drybone Desert, though not as big as the one in the original game.
  • Bubbly Clouds: The "Over The Clouds" stages, all of which feature the Cloud Mario power-up from Super Mario Galaxy 2.
  • Camera Screw: The less positive aspect of the game is how the camera misbehaves or gets stuck when it's forced into small corridors. Even with the ability to raise and lower it as well as spin it toward Mario's back, the camera can still be a little screwy at times.
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  • Casino Park: Gamble Game Gallery is a giant casino.
  • Cave Mouth: The entrance of the Great Beast's Belly. After all, the mouth is the way to the stomach.
  • Character Customization: By talking to a Toad in the Minigame Hut, the player can pick which color Yoshi is. There is also a toad on the Roof of Gamble Games Gallery that can give Mario cat ears.
  • Clipped-Wing Angel: Downplayed with the Final Boss. While he's still very tough in his second form, it doesn't change the fact that he's invincible in his first form.
  • Colony Drop:
    • The Sky High Islands are in danger of dropping because of energy-sapping vines someone has put on the outside.
    • For that matter, the moon is in danger of dropping on the Mushroom Kingdom because of Rashay.
  • Console Cameo: In the room leading to the first Gloomy Ambiance, there is a Nintendo Entertainment System along with a Robotic Operating Buddy, even though the game on the screen is Super Mario Bros.. The shelf on the opposite end of the room has an original Game Boy in front of it and a Nintendo Gamecube on it.
  • Control Room Puzzle:
    • The underground ice palace in Melty Molten Mountains has a series of switches that are respectively activated by the fire and ice powers. The player first has to set a series of switches to gain access to the lowest room, followed by setting switches to make giant snowballs roll into four corners of the lowest room.
    • The mission "Find the Passphrase" in Sky-High Islands requires that the player uses switches to spell the name of the land's ruler, Kurma.
    • The Snake's Belly in Stonesnake Shatters is also a switch puzzle.
  • Curse: The residents of Dusky Doomed Dale are putting up with a curse that has made the monkeys in town act extra ferocious and throw large stones at guests as well as infesting the town church and village square with Boos.
  • Cyberspace: The Colossal Circuits takes place inside a giant computer system.
  • Darker and Edgier: To go with the more apocalyptic premise, the hack's general atmosphere is more subdued. If a stage has a storyline, chances are it'll be somewhat dark — for example, during Dusky Doomed Dale, Mario has to stop a witch burning.
  • Difficulty Spike: The game is already hard enough as it is, but after Bowser's stage, it becomes even harder, and only goes up from there.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Bowser, interestingly enough, isn't the main threat this time around, being defeated in the first major boss stage and then vanishing from the plot. The real villain this time around is the original character Rashay, who is the main force behind the moon falling into the Mushroom Kingdom and even kidnaps Peach midway through the game.
  • Dual Boss:
    • Triple-enemies variant with the Goomba Bros, also a Recurring Boss.
    • In the Colossal Circuits, the final star requires to you to fight the Viruses, which are a triple-boss variant.
  • Dual-World Gameplay: The castle in the Livid Surreal Dream. It appears that the castle is set between the past and the present. In the past, the castle seems smaller, with plenty of easy room to make jumps, but it has been overtaken by vines in the present.
  • Dummied Out: There is a secret level that can be accessed from the third overworld by locating a hidden (invisible) warp pipe behind Gamble Game Gallery. The level actually is complete and has one star, but collecting it will not add to the player's total.
  • Easter Egg:
    • There is a giant calculator on the first Gloomy Ambiance level (which is made up of a giant desk) that is functional.
    • A few different characters will appear on the File Select the more times each file gets a Game Over.
    • By entering the button combination ALBZBALZ in front of the green gate in the Abandoned Outpost, the player finds Gobi hiding from Banjo and his friend.
    • An old diary is found on the roof of one of the buildings in Sky High Islands, belonging to somebody appearing to be writing from captivity, being stuck on Microsoft and their systems, and wanting to go back to Nintendo.
    • For that matter, the same certain character is buried within the haunted Gloomy Ambiance.
    • The slot machines in Gamble Game Gallery actually work. Want an easy yet lengthy way to get the 100 coins star for the course?...
    • A Toad on the rear side of the entrance of the Gamble Game Gallery can give Mario cat ears if he is spoken to.
    • The giant tree in Wildlife Valley has a love message with Dimentio & Mimi's names on it.
    • Wario's signature is located on the side of the Giant Desk on an area that can only be seen if Mario is launched off the right side.
  • Eternal Engine:
    • The Shadow Factory is not just a factory, but a very dark factory where the key is held not by Bowser, but by Dark Mario.
    • There is also the Candy Factory inside Super Sweet Sugarland. Both use a remix of the factory level music from Kirby 64.
  • Evil Twin: The boss of the Shadow Factory is none other than Dark Mario.
  • Eyes Always Shut: The mermaids in the Crystal Caves course.
  • Fire/Water Juxtaposition: The hot, fiery volcanic area of Melty Molten Mountains is contrasted by its surprisingly cold, snowy icy side.
  • Floating Continent: Sky-High Islands is actually a group of continents floating in the sky.
  • Foreshadowing: In the Dusky Doomed Dale, Kamek appears as the witch cursing the town, but takes one of two stars in her possession, saying she'll be back. Sure enough, for the last mission...
  • Gender Flip: In canon, Kamek is consistently male.
  • Great Escape: "The Prison Escape" in Dusky Doomed Dale is a prison break mission.
  • Green Hill Zone: Wildlife Valley, which is the typical first world/grass land for a Mario game.
  • Gusty Glade: The very first mission in the game "Touch Fuzzy, Get Dizzy", involves walking along thin and high platforms among strong winds and the presence of monsters which create an Interface Screw to retrieve the star.
  • Hailfire Peaks:
    • Melty Molten Mountains is a mountain range with a fiery side and an icy side and even features the return of the Ice Flower.
    • The Crystal Caves are a less straight example, being broken up into the dry Brown Caves and the Blue Caves which have a watering hole.
  • Halloweentown: The Dusky Doomed Dales is a village that has been inflicted with a curse.
  • Heroic Second Wind: The Goomba Bros.' Star Power is what allows Mario to fight and defeat Rashay for real after being beaten up before.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: You can't really hurt Rashay in his first form, and after he drains Mario's health to 1, he'll grab him and then throw him into the same cage where the Goomba Bros. were being held hostage. After you get powered by the Bros., Rashay transforms, awesome rock music starts playing, and the final fight begins for real.
  • Hornet Hole: Harried Honey Hive is a reference to the Honeyhive Galaxy from Super Mario Galaxy.
  • Ice Person: The Ice Flower power-up is present, which allows Mario to freeze enemies solid.
  • Idle Animation: Not of a character in particular, but waiting long enough on the Mission Select screen will cause a message to appear that forces you to choose.
  • Interface Screw: Touching a fuzzy, much like the game they were introduced in. The move to 3D since then has made the effect even worse, with Mario spinning in place and making 3D objects distort while everything is covered in rainbows.
  • Lava is Boiling Kool-Aid: The lava in the Underground Depths. One of its two stars requires that Mario jump across a series of boxes floating through the lava or just use fire power from a distance to light two torches that make a bridge appear.
  • Lethal Lava Land: The hot side of Melty Molten Mountains as well as Bowser's Fiery Castle and the inside of the Pipe Line in Colossal Circuits.
  • Level Ate: Super Sweet Sugarland is a stage set in a sky of sweet things, including donuts and ice cream.
  • Levels Take Flight:
    • The "Float Through the Sky" mission in Wildlife Valley requires the player to take flight with an extra-large dandelion seed.
    • In Sunset Islets, the mission "The Blimp & the Lighthouse" requires the player to inflate a large blimp and then float up to the star.
    • "Stop Kurma Koopa" takes place on Kurma Koopa's back.
    • The second "Above the Clouds" stage located within Drybone Desert has a flying ship.
  • Macro Zone: The first Gloomy Ambiance is set on a giant desktop.
  • The Maze: The Bottomless Pit in the Livid Surreal Dream repeats until you hit all four of the switches.
  • Minecart Madness: No actual minecart ride, but there is Whomp's Roller Coaster in Super Sweet Sugarland, the Fiery River in Bowser's Fiery Castle, and the rainbow go-kart in Rainbow Road.
  • Minigame Zone: The Minigame House, which has a total of five mini games, two unlocked from the start, and three unlocked later. All of them offer stars as rewards if the high score is matched or beaten.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • One of the items on the shelf in the room with the first Gloomy Ambiance is a boxed copy of Super Mario 64.
    • One of the game room posters is for the "Ultra 64", the code name of the Nintendo 64 during development.
    • In the game room leading to the first Gloomy Ambiance, there is a POW Block from Super Mario Bros. 2, a giant Paper Mario sticker on the wall, and the Poltergust 3000 from Luigi's Mansion. The shelf on the opposite end of the game room has a ? block from Super Mario Bros., a kart and first place trophy from Mario Kart, a set of Hanafuda cards (which was Nintendo's main product before they started making video games), and a boxed copy of Super Mario 64. It even has both a regular and gold cartridge of Nintendo World Championships 1990.
    • The very first mission in the game is Touch Fuzzy, Get Dizzy.
    • One of the recurring bosses is the Goomba Bros, a nod to the Koopa Bros from Paper Mario 64.
    • The Floating Blocks mission in Abandoned Outpost is similar to the mission of the same style in Super Mario Galaxy.
    • The Mermaid Race in Crystal Caves is similar to the penguin race in Super Mario Galaxy.
    • The whole Rainbow Road stage takes place in space and everything is made out of rainbows. Kind of like the recurring area in a certain spin-off series.
  • Nintendo Hard: After a while, things start to get very difficult. And if the game itself doesn't count, then getting 100% Completion definitely is.
  • Nostalgia Level: Rainbow Road is full of pixelated sprites of all the characters, including Mario, Princess Peach, and Bowser.
  • Palmtree Panic: The Sunset Islets, which is an archipelago with many sandy beaches that takes place at sunset.
  • Paper People: Mario after he gets the Flat Mushroom power-up.
  • Pinball Zone: The Pinball Machine game in the Gamble Games Gallery with Mario as the ball, but not for the first time.
  • Playable Menu: Unlike in the original, the File Select screen is set in the center room of Princess Peach's Castle. This time, every visible door leads to a different playable file.
  • Prison Episode: The mission "The Prison Escape" in Dusky Doomed Dale. Mario's actions in past missions, including freeing Kamek and collecting gold items to craft a power star (since the items were intended as sacrifices to the gods), results in his arrest. The resulting mission is a jailbreak.
  • Recurring Riff: The main melody of the Melty Molten Mountains is an overarching theme for the game, and makes various appearances in other levels.
  • Recycled Soundtrack: Much of the music is heavily remixed from other games. A full list of which songs are remixed from other games can be found in the OST playlist.
    • The boss music for the Stone Snake (Stonesnake Shatters) and Giant Fish (Crystal Caves) is the boss theme from The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask.
    • The music for the Brown Side of Crystal Caves is the cave level theme from Yoshi's Island, while the music for the Blue Side is Zora's Domain from The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time.
    • The music for Abandoned Outpost is Meteor Herd from Sonic Adventure 2.
    • The music for Bowser's Fiery Castle is a remix of Koopa's Road from the original Super Mario 64, while the music for the Bowser battle is a remix of the music for the first phase of the final battle in Paper Mario 64.
    • The music for Super Sweet Sugarland is the Neo Star cave/volcano theme from Kirby 64: The Crystal Shards, while the theme for the factory sub-level (and the Shadow Factory) is the Factory Infiltration theme from the same game. Meanwhile, the theme for the rollercoaster ride is Candy Constellation from Kirby & the Amazing Mirror.
    • The boss theme for the invisible Boo gang in Dusky Doomed Dale is Megalovania from Undertale. note 
    • The music for Melty Molten Mountains (and also the Underground Corridor and the Dummied Out rising-magma secret level) begins as Ridley's theme before segueing into its own melody.
    • Dark Mario's theme is the Shadow Queen's battle theme from Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door.
    • The music for Big Beast's Belly is the theme of Fawfulized Peach's Castle from Mario & Luigi: Bowser's Inside Story.
    • The music for Gamble Game Gallery is the theme of World Bowser from Super Mario 3D World.
    • The music for Rainbow Road is the music for the Mario Kart 64 incarnation of the Rainbow Road track.
    • The music for Rashay's Moon Cellar is the theme of Lost World from Sonic Adventure.
  • Remilitarized Zone: The second area of the Hub World is a battlefield.
  • Rise to the Challenge: The Dummied Out level has Mario working his way upward through the interior of a volcano as lava rises from below.
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike: The game doesn't seem like it's much harder like the original, until you notice that its courses are much more challenging, with hard-to-reach Power Stars, more dangerous hazards, and complex boss fights. Furthermore, Mario has six units of health compared to the original's eight, and the air meter is now separate from the health meter, meaning that Mario can no longer refill it by grabbing coins underwater, nor can he re-fill his health meter by jumping in the water.
  • Sequential Boss: The Final Boss, Rashay, with two different boss themes to boot.
  • Shifting Sand Land: Drybone Desert, but it is not the second regular area in the game; it is a smaller stage appearing about midway through the main game.
  • Shout-Out:
    • The front of the game shelf has the Triforce.
    • Unreleased games on the game room shelf include Banjo Threeie, Dinosaur Planet (which evolved into Star Fox Adventures), and the N64 port of Final Fantasy VII.
    • One game that was released and is found on the shelf in the game room is Super Smash Bros Melee.
    • A bonus area within the Crystal Caves is the Water Temple.
    • The Big Beast's Belly as a whole is a reference to Clanker's Cavern from Banjo-Kazooie.
    • For that matter, Mario appears to find Banjo's journal in the Abandoned Outpost, mentioning his captivity with Microsoft forcing him to be a builder of cars while he longs for the good old days.
    • Much of the game's soundtrack has remixes, mostly of Mario games, but also some from other series of games, like Kirby or Sonic the Hedgehog.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World: The icy side of Melty Molten Mountains.
  • Space Zone: The Abandoned Outpost is an old space station located on the Moon. The final area of the Hub World is set on the Moon. Even the very last level also takes place on the Moon.
  • Stealth-Based Mission: "Escape the Prison" from Dusky Doomed Dale, where you're arrested for stealing the gold and rescuing a witch. If a guard Bob-omb spots you, you lose.
  • Theme Music Power-Up: Happens during the Final Boss battle. While the first two phases have appropiately tense, orchestral-sounding, Super Mario Galaxy-like music, the final phase of the fight has a blood-pumping, fast-paced metal-like track that heavily contrasts with the first theme. This makes a lot of sense since it plays right after Mario gets empowered by the Goomba Bros.' Star Power, which enables him to defeat the moon's evil spirit.
  • Temple of Doom: Stonesnake Shatters, although it's not entirely set in a temple, it is a central feature of the stage.
  • Turns Red: Kurma Koopa with every hit.
  • Underground Level: The Crystal Caves. The division between the Brown Caves and Blue Caves also give it a Hailfire Peaks theme.
  • Under the Sea: The Secret Aquarium returns from the original game, and is the only undersea stage.
  • Variable Mix: Notable for a Mario 64 hack in that it uses this technique uniquely, like in the Crystal Caves and Melty Molten Mountains where the music changes seamlessly in certain places.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: Rashay's Moon Cellar.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: You can use a fire flower to defeat the large Koopa that is on vacation in Sunset Islets.
  • Visual Pun: In Colossal Ciruit:
    • What are the different-paletted Scuttlebugs in this level? Bugs.
    • The bus between the CPU and Main Memory has a tram that goes back and forth between the two platforms.
  • Wackyland: The Livid Surreal Dream is a world produced by somebody's dream.
  • Womb Level: The Big Beast's Belly takes place within the innards of a great monster.
  • World Tree: The giant tree in Wildlife Valley. Of course, scaling it from the inside is one of the missions.

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