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Star Wars Battlefront Elite Squadron is a handheld spinoff of the Star Wars: Battlefront series, released on PSP and Ninendo DS in 2009. However, it was originally intended to be the official third entry in the series. In 2008, the development of Star Wars Battlefront 3 was cancelled, and the assets were reworked into a handheld game. The result was a follow-up to 2007's Star Wars Battlefront Renegade Squadron, albeit unintentionally.

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Like Renegade Squadron, Elite Squadron features character customization but is limited by the hardware of the DS and PSP. That said, it is the first (and so far only) entry in the Star Wars Battlefront franchise to feature simultaneous ground and space battles (which are the game's core feature). However, even these are subject to obvious limitations: the transition between ground and space requires a short cutscene.

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Elite Squadron features the following tropes:

  • Artificial Brilliance: Concentrate your fire on the AI and they'll resort to combat rolls, breaking your lock. Sadly this only applies to ground troops; they don't seem too concerned about this being a problem in space battles.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Jedi and Sith are still this trope, the same as they were in Renegade Squadron.
    • A bit more so is the ability to pilot a starfighter as a hero. Sure, they have a much better rate of fire than the standard starfighter, and their missiles cause more damage. But the guns overheat far too quickly, and take too long to cool off afterward.
  • Boarding Party: Like Battlefront II and Renegade Squadron, you can land your spacecraft inside the hangar of an enemy capital ship. However, there are some major differences this time around. First, before you can land in an enemy hangar, you have to destroy their shields. Second, once inside, you don't sabotage the internal systems, but rather have the opportunity to completely destroy the ship — you must make your way through the ships corridors until you come to the main reactor. You know what to do.
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  • Boring, but Practical: Destroying enemy starfighters. Sure, it's not as glamorous as capturing command posts or destroying the enemy capital ship. But it's easy to do, the enemy rarely focuses their fire on you, and it nets you a lot of pointsnote . Oh, and they'll continue to spawn even after the capital ship is destroyed.
  • Cain and Abel: X1 and X2 respectively. Both are clones of a Jedi, but go on vastly different paths, with X1 falling to the Dark Side, and X2 being trained by Luke post-Endor. This all culminates in a final battle on Mustafar.
  • Clones Are People, Too: Subverted. The main character of the story campaign, X2, is a clone of a Jedi. However, the game fails to give him any real characterization. Leaked footage reveals that he would have gotten quite a bit more, had the game been officially realized as Battlefront 3.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: The game features the same red-and-blue setup as previous games, so you can tell the difference between allies and enemies (and who holds the command posts). X1 and X2 are colored this way as well.
  • Evil Twin: X1 to X2.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: Implied. X2 partakes in the order to kill Master Ferrada after the battle on Cato Neimoidia. However, after he does so, he turns his back on the Empire and joins the Rebellion.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni: A literal example, with X1's armor having red coloring and X2's having blue.
  • Later Installment Weirdness: Unlike the previous Battlefront games, the campaign does not have a system that allows you to respawn after your character dies as long as your squad hasn't died too many times. Instead, death is a mission failure and you have start from that last checkpoint.

Alternative Title(s): Battlefront Elite Squadron

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