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Mega Man Star Force (Ryusei no Rockman) is a spinoff of the Mega Man Battle Network series, itself a spinoff of the classic Mega Man franchise.

Taking place two hundred years after the events of Battle Network, it stars a young boy named Geo Stelar (Subaru Hoshikawa in the original Japanese), who lost his father after a journey to space. he teams up with a rogue alien, Omega-Xis (War-Rock in the original Japanese version). By performing a Fusion Dance (in this series called "EM Wave Change"), the two transform into Mega Man, and they use their power to fight various threats. Quite literally (for the first game at least) Battle Network...In SPACE!

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There are three installments in the franchisenote 

  • Mega Man Star Force 1: Dragon, Pegasus and Leo: At the beginning of the story, Geo is given a keepsake of his father's, a device called a Visualizer, which allows him to see electromagnetic waves. That night, he meets a blue alien named Omega-Xis, who is on the run from Planet FM, whose enforcers are hot on his tail. Omega convinces him to work together and are thrown into a battle against the other FM-ians for the fate of the galaxy.
  • Mega Man Star Force 2: Zerker X Saurian and Zerker X Ninja: Geo, Omega and their friends meet Lady Vega and her compatriots, who are obsessed with finding the lost continent of Mu. Vega and her assistant Solo are seeking the keys to Mu, the OOParts via the use of UMAs - Unidentified Mysterious Animals - wave-based lifeforms like FM-ians that take the shape of cryptozoological creatures.
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  • Mega Man Star Force 3: Black Ace and Red Joker: Geo and Omega must stop Meteor G, an EM meteor, from destroying the Earth, while contending with the spread of Noise caused by it. Meanwhile, Dealer, led by the public philanthropist Mr. King, seeks to use the asteroid for their own nefarious ends (basically the final premise of Battle Network 4, but without all the tournaments...and better use of the asteroid in question).
  • Mega Man Battle Network 1: Operate Shooting Star: an Updated Re-release of the first Battle Network game with one new scenario added as a crossover between the two series.

An anime adaptation of the series also aired but ended with an abrupt finale of the second season, Ryusei no Rockman Tribe, based on the second game. The English dub first premiered on Cartoon Network's Toonami block before moving online to Toonami Jetstream. Only half of the first season was released. No DVDs ever circulated in the United States or Japan, though the dub got a UK DVD release thanks to Manga UK. There was a manga serialized in Corocoro that loosely adapted the first and second games, and Ryo Takamisaki (of MegaMan NT Warrior fame) produced a promotional manga for Star Force 3. Neither of these were translated into English.


Tropes used in Mega Man Star Force:

    open/close all folders 

    # - C 
  • Academy of Adventure: Echo Ridge Elementary, which has had up to a total of eleven EM Humans walking around its halls at some point or another, including six students (plus Sonia and Solo), a pair of teachers, and the gardener.
  • Ace Custom: With few exceptions, every Wizard on the planet is man-made, but Acid was designed for use by Ace and is the only one that can engage in Wave Change.
  • Achilles in His Tent: Geo starts the series as a Hikikomori following the loss of his father and relapses in the first two games following drama. Inverted in the third game where he fights to keep his friends from getting demoralized themselves.
  • Actionized Sequel: When compared to the Battle Network games. Movement is restricted to sidestepping and blocking and you can lock on and Flash Step towards the enemies.
  • Adaptation Deviation: The anime is Lighter and Softer than the main games, featuring plot events that happen on a different schedule (e.g. Geo starts going to school in the first few episodes), many characters who are quirkier and more energetic, and the second half of the first season transitions entirely into episodic Filler to give Character Focus to the FM-ians.
  • Adaptation Expansion: The anime spent some time elaborating on side characters and especially the FM-ian invaders. In the Tribe anime, Hyde and Gori became Ascended Extra.
  • Adults Are Useless: Zigzagged.
    • Geo is the best Wave Changer in the world, despite being only twelve. This is somewhat more palatable than in the Battle Network series, as Mega Man is one of only a couple dozen EM Humans, and one of the longest-running and most frequently active. In Battle Network, there were armies of both private citizens and public servants making a living fighting viruses about as long as the main character had been alive.
    • Outside of Wave Changing itself, Mega Man gets a lot of support from institutions like AMAKEN and NAXA and the grownups who run them.
  • After the End: The Apollo Flame "second quest" in Star Force 2 is a Bonus Dungeon featuring an alternate Earth that became a Bad Future very quickly.
  • Aliens Speaking English: FM-ians are totally foreign to Earth but can communicate with humans perfectly.
  • Alternate Continuity: Like with Battle Network, the manga and anime adaptations deviate from the original games in very notable ways, though both adaptations feature expanded roles for the FM-ians.
  • Alternate Universe: Star Force 2 has the Trans Dimension, which is a horrifying picture of what would happen if you couldn't defeat the final boss.
  • Always Check Behind the Chair: As in Battle Network, it behooves the player to check everything he can get his hands on. Hidden items and activation points for computers abound.
  • All There in the Manual: Loads of backstory is stuffed into the Japanese-only Universe Compendium collection, including tidbits such as Dread Joker originally being designated Transcode-000.
  • Always in Class One: Geo, Luna, Bud and Zack are in Class 5-A. In the first game, Pat's also there, but in the anime, he's in a different class.
  • Animal-Themed Superbeing: Many bosses, being based on western constellations or cryptids, take the form of animals real or mythical. A minotaur, a swan, a crab, a snake, a werewolf, a Pegasus, a lion, a dragon, a yeti, a plesiosaur, a condor, a goat, and a crow.
  • Animation Bump: Whenever Shingo Adachi was in charge of the art direction for an anime episode, you could expect the animation to be top-notch, which especially helped during several fight scenes, like the Crown Thunder's debut and the second Wolf Woods arc.
  • Anime of the Game: Was adapted into an anime that may or may not follow the canon of MegaMan NT Warrior. Notable for giving unique personalities to the FM-ians. And Hyde.
  • Another Dimension:
    • According to the original Japanese version of Ryuusei no Rockman 1, Geo's world is still connected to the world of Lunar Knights...enough to have a crossover bonus (not in the west, though).
    • In the second game, the entire Bonus Dungeon is a Bad Future Alternate Universe. Due to a bad translation, though, it's very hard to figure out how the gap between the two was bridged.
    • Also in the second game, special event data from Real Life download stations (now unavailable) allowed Geo to obtain a Brotherband with the original Mega Man, suggesting at least a small bridge between their worlds was possiblenote .
  • Anti-Hero: Solo/Rogue in the third game, who is hunting Dealer for stealing and manipulating Mu technology. His first appearance in the game involves him throwing the Laplace Blade at Jack Corvus' exposed back, and we don't think he would have minded if Jack hadn't dodged.
  • Applied Phlebotinum
    • Z-Waves ("Zet Waves" in Japan), mentioned only in the first game, though technically present through the whole series; natural EM Beings are technically made of these. Extensive exposure to Z-Waves, however, presents a risk of turning matter into more Zet Waves, and living creatures are turned into EM Beings. Daigo uses this to his crews' advantage by having War Rock soak them in Zet Waves, which saves them from bodily death in space. In the anime, the ability to transform matter into Zet Waves is the hallmark of the AM-ian race, which is why War Rock is not the FM-ian he first thought he was.
      • Large concentrations of Zet waves (especially Murian ones) also work slightly in reverse — EM Beings may spontaneously become visible. A small story arc in the beginning of Star Force 2 is based around this.
    • Noise, which appears in 3. Originally thought to be a kind of corrupted electromagnetism, interfering with Earth tech and driving mass-produced Wizards violently crazy, comments from Spade Magnes R about the ability to use the Noise Wave suggest that it rather simply overwhelms the Wizards in question.
  • Arc Symbol
    • For the series itself, Geo's Shooting Star pendant. In the first two games, as you unlock achievements (beating the game, collecting all the Battle Cards, etc.), various marks will appear on the title screen. When you get all six, the marks connect and produce a silhouette of the shooting star. In Star Force 2, the same six-point pattern is the basis of a very useful Wave Command Code. The series' logo also uses a shooting star, but not quite the same design as Geo's pendant.
    • The chief symbol of Mu (which has no established meaningnote  but might as well be its trademark). Solo's clothes, Rogue's outfit, the Badge of Loneliness, Whazzap Lines, The Indie Proof, you name it. Shows up much less, but noticeably, in 3.
  • Arm Cannon:
    • As is traditional for the franchise, Mega Man has a Mega Buster. Untraditionally, this version of the Mega Buster is a whole face—Mega Man's left forearm consists of Omega-Xis' head, which shoots blasts of energy. This design was later replaced with a sleeker barrel in the third game as part of a revamp.
    • Many battle cards replace the Mega Buster with the weaponry depicted by the card, including a variety of ballistic weapons.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: Sword, Breaking, and Wind attributes all return to void Shadow, Shielding, and Barrier/Aura defenses. The Scope attribute (which voids Invisible) is present but much reduced in significance (the Gorgon Eye Giga Card has it and maybe a few others).
  • Artifact Title: The Japanese series title is "Shooting Star Rockman" (a deliberately English translation of Ryuusei no Rockman), despite the series as a whole losing the Cosmic Motifs after the first game and only getting a few tangential connections to space in the third. The Western title of "Star Force" likewise ceases to be accurate after Mega Man loses the power of the Satellite Admins.
  • Art Shift: Downplayed. While the series maintained the same artists across the series (Battle Network had a large shift after the third game), the aesthetic of the series changed dramatically between installments, with The Aesthetics of Technology from Star Force 3 (for example) being a far cry from the second game's.
  • Artifact of Doom:
    • The OOPArts of the second gamenote  are the last remaining artifacts of three tribes of Precursors that disappeared without a trace; each is made of an exotic material, leak massive surges of Zet-Waves, and are coveted by the villains for power and profit. Each of them is infested with the souls of its tribe, which threaten to overpower anybody who tries to use them, but mastering any of them allows Mega Man to wield it as an Amulet of Concentrated Awesome and Transformation Trinket.
    • The Indie Proof is the Evil Counterpart of the OOPArts, an ancient artifact that is designed to completely isolate its holder from the world around him.
  • Asteroids Monster: The head of Star Force 3's Final Boss blocks its core, but when you destroy it, it splits into two other heads.
  • Astral Finale: In the first and third games.
  • Atlantis: The second game and Tribe anime use the lost Floating Continent of Mu as a core plot element and setting.
  • Ax-Crazy: Gemini Spark Black, Wolf Woods when under a full moon, and Jack Corvus are all manic destroyers. Acid Ace B. is one, too.
  • Back for the Finale: The final episode of the Tribe anime had nearly the whole supporting cast of the first season cameo during Misora's concert at the end, including the FM-ians, who had all been Killed Off for Real.
  • Background Music Override: In 3, when an Omega Boss appears in the area the regular background music is replaced with an extremely ominous tune. This persists even through battles until either you encounter the boss or leave the area. Also, the Satella Police theme plays nonstop throughout the attack on WAZA HQ. Finally, for a less extreme example, the Dealer Base's theme carries over to the Wave World.
  • Badass Boast: Geo gets a few epic ones in 3 that seem a bit out of place for a guy like him.
    Mega Man (to Jack Corvus): "Your wish will remain only a pathetic pipe dream!!"
  • Bad Future: The Bonus Dungeon in the second game is Another Dimension . One of the inhabitants implies that it's Geo's fault.
  • Bad Mood Retreat:
    • Geo stargazes at Vista Point when he's feeling down (especially when angsting over his absent father).
    • Pat goes to an abandoned amusement park called Dream Park when he's unhappy.
  • Bag of Spilling:
    • Geo's Battle Cards do not carry over between installments, though Star Force 2 and Star Force 3 allow you to "unofficially" obtain cards from Star Force 1.
    • Geo gets a new type of handheld in each game, which disperses his Brother Bands and makes it necessary to recreate them. In Star Force 2, they're only reforged following major events in the story, but Star Force 3 quickly gets it out of the way, since Luna and company aren't tardy to re-friending each other.
    • Mega Man's entire power-up system is subject to Discard and Draw between installments. He loses the Star Force after the first game and the Tribe forms after the second.
  • Barrier-Busting Blow: In Star Force 3, Geo, Sonia, Zack, and Solo are all trapped in Class 5-A during a Dealer agent's attack. While Geo and Sonia puzzle over how to get out, Solo summons the Laplace Blade and smashes a massive hole in the floor, which leads to the Teacher's Lounge, and then a second one in the wall to get out to the hallway.
  • Battle of the Still Frames: Plenty in the anime. Taurus Fire's Breath Weapon was often subject to shots that panned across the full stream of flame.
  • Betty and Veronica: Zigzagged with Luna and Sonia. At first glance, Sonia—a lonely orphan in casual wear who is Birds of a Feather with Geo—is the Betty and Luna—the fancy Uptown Girl and Class Representative trying to get Geo out in the world—is the Veronica; on the other hand, Sonia is a world-famous Idol Singer who travels the globe while Luna lives down the street from Geo and both are in the same posse of classmates.
  • Big Bad:
  • Big Eater:
    • Bud Bison, and, given his family crest is a crossed knife and fork, the whole Bison family, apparently.
    • Depending on the direction you take the Dating Sim minigame in 3, Luna or Sonia or both will be seen scarfing tons of food. On her own, Sonia claims to be able to eat as much as she wants without gaining any weight.
  • BFS:
  • Bilingual Dialogue: Laplace can communicate only through a type of buzzing noise, but Solo can apparently understand him just fine, and even tells him to shut up at one point.
  • Blood Knight: Almost every optional boss in the first two games enjoys battle.
    • Claude, the rude and friendless eight-year-old Delinquent that hangs out at Big Wave.
    • Damian, a silent and antisocial gardener whose natural inclinations to violence are only aggravated by his alien partner.
    • Jean, a five centuries old ghost who comes from a long line of bellicose warriors. Naturally, he's quite traditional.
    • Kidd, a young martial artist who actually does so for reasons of sport and challenge.
    • Pat is the exception here. He mostly takes to sparring so he can exercise his ability to control Rey.
  • Bond Creatures: EM beings, with the exception of most Wizards, who can also work on their own.
  • Bonus Boss: There are a few optional bosses in each game that aren't involved with the story and just fight you for the heck of it. Then there are the Bonus Dungeons, which in the latter two games are home to powered-up versions of every boss, and in all three lead to an especially powerful foe (the Satellite Admin in 1, Apollo Flame in 2, and Sirius in 3).
    • Certain Wave Command Codes in 2 replace a specific boss's SP version with a special DX form, which gets a shiny golden color scheme and truly absurd stats, but always drops its SP-level Battle Card.
    • If you're wandering the Wave Roads and suddenly find the usual music replaced with this track, that means an Omega Boss can be encountered. Which boss you're up against is randomly determined, but the one certain thing is that they're incredibly strong — on par with a postgame boss.
  • Bonus Dungeon: Deep Space in 1, the Alternate Future in 2, and the Black Hole Server in 3.
  • Bookends: The series ends just like how it officially began: Geo staring off into space until Omega crashes right on top of him. The second time, however, Omega has brought someone else with him: Kelvin Stelar.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Zack's Link Power sidequest in the second game involves battling a wave of ten difficult virus battles that can give even players who have bested Le Mu a run for their money.
  • Boss Rush: At the end of every game.
    Mega Man: *Sigh* Not again...
  • Boss Warning Siren: In the third game, an alert displayed on the bottom screen indicates an incoming battle with a giant virus. However, if the current BGM is the persistent and ominous Omega Boss theme, then the alert means an Omega boss is approaching fast.
  • Break His Heart to Save Him: When Geo discovers Sonia has undergone a sudden Face–Heel Turn late in the second game, he's understandably stunned and heartbroken. Upon learning this, Luna insists that Sonia did so in order to keep him from hurting himself and gets so upset at Geo that she nearly starts crying. The game kind of glosses over the fact that Sonia's decision would only make sense if she suddenly lost faith in Geo; which got swept under the rug so that Geo can be wholly blamed instead. This, of course, backfires on Sonia.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: "Touch the screen...er, train!"
  • Bros Before Hoes: In the third game, Geo can choose to seize Bud's clothing when it's falling rather than Luna's handkerchief or Sonia's bag; Bud appreciates the show of solidarity and uses the moment to reveal he can Wave-Change to the audience.
  • Bullfight Boss: Taurus Fire and Queen Ophiuca have attacks where they charge you. They are, however, mostly out of your range, unless you have a Card that attacks your sides.
  • Butt-Monkey: Jammers in the first game. Several chips depict them being maimed, electrocuted, or otherwise harmed severely, and each of their appearances almost always ends with them running away in panic, if they survive.
  • Cain and Abel: Acid and Joker. Notably for being a rare example of non-human brothers.
  • Came Back Wrong: In Star Force 3, Strong, Luna, and Ace all get destroyed in the same fashion. Guess which one is revived as an Empty Shel of their former self.
  • Captain Ersatz: Virgo and Corvus are two criminals from Planet FM. The way it is set up (particularly with Omega's origins) brings to mind the villains of Superman II. They match up even better to the DCAU counterparts of said villains.
  • Card-Carrying Villain: Omega-Xis laughingly calls Dr. Vega a comic-book villain after she announces her plot to Take Over the World. In the anime, she goes so far as to self-identify as a villain.
    Well, maybe you shouldn't trust bad adults!
  • Casting a Shadow: Downplayed with the Grabity virus family, which is immune to all damage except swords, a style of defense that was previously used by various Eldritch Abomination Living Shadow viruses from Battle Network. Grabities even have a single Cyclopean eyeball like the Nightmare viruses before them.
  • Character Development: In a refreshing change from Mega Man Battle Network, whose characters remained largely static throughout the series, Geo goes from being mopey and introverted in the first game to having a chipper and outgoing personality (bar a slight setback) in the second one due to his experiences. In the third game, he has matured to the point where he functions as the team's pillar of strength during Luna's absence.
    • In the first game, Geo acted like asking someone to be his Brother was like proposing to someone, since he was timid back then. His first person that he asked to be Brothers with was Sonia. The first boy, incidentally, Pat. But in the third game, he went around getting Brothers everywhere. (Then again, the third game seems to forget that becoming Brothers involves sharing your secret with them...)
  • Character Level: In the first game, Mega Man has an established level tied into how many power-ups he's collected (as was the case in the early Battle Network games).
    • Not just the main character! Your in-game brothers also level up, depending on your progress in the story, maxing out at 60 in the first game. Their level dictates both the amount of HP bonus they give to Mega Man and their Favorite Cards, which Mega Man can use through the Brother Force. (e.g. At level 60, Sonia, Luna, and Bud can each respectively provide a copy of Pegasus Magic SP, Dragon Sky SP, or Leo Kingdom SP).
  • Cheat Code: Cipher Mail, the Star Force replacement for the Number Trader. By sending messages to very specific recipients, Mega Man can receive powerups and battle cards.
  • Chest Insignia:
    • Geo's Shooting Star pendant is embedded in the center of Mega Man's chest, rather than an artistic design. The official website notes that it symbolizes Geo's bond with his father, as well as showing that Geo is still in control of himself in his Finalized Noise Form.
    • Both the Black Ace and Red Joker forms each have Geo sport two symbols: the symbol of the person he's copying (upside down A, triangular J, respectively) and his traditional star pendant on his chest, to symbolize he's still in control.
    • Most (if not all) Wave Change forms have one of the artistic design category, though none are necessarily located on the chest.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: A lot of the characters do this, most notably Copper and Pat, who have major roles in the first game, minor ones in the second, and only get a partial appearance and a mention in the third game (respectively).
  • Clark Kenting: Thanks to sharing the same style of Anime Hair, Mega Man is a Paper-Thin Disguise for Geo even at the best of times.
    • To the game's credit, the one person really looking for Mega Man's identity, Copper, is actually suspicious of Geo (and even plants a tracking device on him at one point in the second game), but that's because he keeps encountering Geo in suspicious circumstances.
    • The game toys with this by having Luna force Geo into her really bad imitation Mega Man costume and still fail to connect the dots.
    • A few Mr. Hertzes at Geo's home and school hang a lampshade on their resemblance, but nothing comes of it.
  • Class Representative: Luna Platz is Echo Ridge's fifth grade president, and is constantly trying to get Geo to go to school.
  • Cloning Blues: In the second game, Hollow is well aware that he is a Replacement Goldfish, and regrets that he cannot recall any of Altair's memories in order to make Vega happy.
  • Les Collaborateurs: When the Big Bad of the second game pulls a Do Not Adjust Your Set and announces how her new society of Mu will be reserved only for the elite of society, nearly everyone on the planet starts backstabbing each other and breaking Brother Bands in the attempt to save their own skin.
  • Color-Coded Elements: Red Fire, Blue Aqua (Ice, for Yeti Blizzard), Yellow Elec(tricity), Green Wood, same as the prequel series. Star Force 2 also introduces a darkness-themed Purple coloring for attacks from Rogue or Mega Man Rogue, but these have no elemental affiliation.
    • It seems to be a Void-style attack; when dealing with Murian soldiers, Geo will address them according to their element - the dark purple variants he addresses as "Ye born of Nothing."
  • Combat Clairvoyance: According to the Official Website, Rogue's visor can apparently trace the movement of EM energy in his opponents. No one's entirely sure how that works out, or whether it amounts to much besides, as most of his attacks are designed to keep you from moving, anyway.
  • Combining Mecha: Mega Man Geo-Omega has the unique ability to combine his various Super Modes when in battle. In Star Force 2, he makes his living out of this, essentially, combining three different base forms in different ways to achieve the Tribe King. In Star Force 3, he can combine two Noises to stack their abilities.
  • Combos: Battle Cards that inflict status effects or field effects frequently set up other cards as well.
    • Chain Bubble traps foes in a bubble, which prevents enemies from doing anything and sets up double-damage for electric cards, like Stun Knuckle. (Both Chain Bubble 1 and Stun Knuckle are available before the Lyra scenario begins).
    • Grass Stage sets up every Fire-element card for a damage multiplier; one notable combo is to initiate Break Time Bomb, and then to hit the target with a Freeze Knuckle, which will earn the bomb (which has the breaking attribute) a damage boost both from shattering the ice trapping the target and, if grass stage is set, from burning the grass.
  • Compressed Adaptation:
    • For the sake of the Lighter and Softer Adaptation Deviation, many of the Dark and Troubled Pasts attributed to each character are simplified or removed, and the FM-ians (usually) are not preying on the insecurities of their chosen humans so much as simply helping themselves to the nearest useful human body.
    • The abrupt Gainax Ending of the Tribe anime was not able to explore the characters of the Big Bad and The Dragon, but was clearly conscious of them—the former gets a brief but intense Freak Out when the latter loses in battle.
  • The Computer Is a Lying Bastard: During the Junkyard level's Metal Detector Puzzle in the first game, Mega Man has to use an onscreen sensor to find the Hertzes needed to open the way forward. When cyber-tractors start plowing across the field, it seems you lose the signal for the Hertz and have to start pinpointing another area. The problem? If you instead look up a guide, you'll learn that the Hertzes' locations are actually fixed. The sensor losing its signal actually meant nothing.
  • Console Cameo: Geo has a Nintendo Wii in his room. The Transer model terminal in the first game's another good example — everyone in town's effectively walking around with a Nintendo DS strapped to their forearm.
  • Contest Winner Cameo: Goat Kung-Fu and Moon Disaster were designed by fans.
  • Continuity Nod: Both to earlier games in the series, and in some cases to Battle Network and NT Warrior.
    • The first Star Force game is saturated with NetNavi NPCs and the Dream Island junkyard has an area with large piles of PETs.
    • The quiz-giving NPCs also returned in force, complete with introductory catchphrase: "Hey, hey! Ho, ho!"
    • The mini-game from Harp Note's chapter in Star Force 1 has Mega Man trying to fend off Shock Note attacks from all sides, remarkably similarly to how Lan had to fend off Edo Castle's dummy soldiers in Battle Network 5.
    • Geo makes the same "Item Found" fist-pump as Lan and Mega.
    • The first game of the series kept the tradition of Crossovers with Boktai inherited from the latter half of the Battle Network series and included content from Boktai DS; this was not kept in the Western release of the game, possibly in keeping with the attempted rebrand of Boktai DS as Lunar Knights.
    • Bob Copper's least favorite thing in the second game? Baseballs. In the first game, Geo beaned him with one to keep himself from being found out.
    • Blair Loude is a lounge singer in the second game, which naturally implies he was fired as the Echo Ridge Elementary principal after the first game.
    • In the second game, Luna is both Brothers with her mother Veil, following up on the Platz family drama in the first game. Further, Luna's favorite food is Veil's home cooking; in the first game, Veil's quest is to collect a recipe so she can cook something for her family.
    • The third game in particular draws heavily from the Regal saga in Battle Network. The bad guy is named King, his plan involves an Impending Meteor and The Corruption, the heroes form a team to take him down, and the Noise Change system heavily mimics Soul Unisons.
    • The 3rd game has a scene at the beach discussing the art of "boxers-off" from the beach scene in the Mega Man Battle Network 5: Team Colonel and Team ProtoMan that has been passed down though the ages.
    • In some classroom scenes of the anime, there's a kid running around in Lan's clothes.
    • Another Lan reference in the anime — some kid with his outfit is in the giant crowd trying to get into Sonia's concert during her debut episode. He even has a bandana this time.
    • In the anime, Mega Man is afraid of ghosts (like MegaMan in MegaMan NT Warrior).
    • When Akane tags along for Hyde's art class in the Tribe anime, she's carrying a bag with the Hikari Insignia on it.
    • In the Tribe anime, Subaru and Gori have a meeting in a restaurant that has been around since at least RockMan.EXE Stream.
    • In the anime, a TV has the brand name IPC, short for Ijuin PET Company or Blaze Quest Games in the Western release of Mega Man Battle Network.
    • The Star Force 3's website character profile for Rogue indicated he used technology called the Darklight Harvester to power several of his attacks; one of its functions was to keep the "dark power" he used from running wild and causing harm to Rogue himself.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Rich Dotcom, alias Yeti Blizzard, in the second game. We never see him engaged in his actual company, but we do meet him in the middle of a hostile takeover.
  • Creepy Twins: Gemini Spark, the series' iconic Dual Boss.
  • Crossover:
    • Following the Battle Network tradition of crossovers with Konami's Boktai franchise, the first Shooting Star Rock Man game exchanged some crossover content with Boktai DS, including a sidequest for each game, Battle Cards for Rock Man, and War-Rock acting as a terrenial for Django and Sabata. This content was Dummied Out of the localized versions for both games for reasons unknown, but possibly related to the attempt to rebrand Boktai DS as Lunar Knights.
    • The premise of Battle Network: Operate Shooting Star is a Video Game Remake of the first Battle Network game with the Star Force cast visiting from the future. Mega Man and Harp Note both appear during the game, the former as a playable character. Luna, Bud, Zack, and Dr. Yoily cameo in the credits, and Burai appears in Star Force battle chips and a program advance.
  • Cursed With Awesome: Echoing Battle Network 6, late in the second game, Geo and Mega lose the OOPArt but (conveniently) retain the ability to Tribe-On. Geo suggests that the power of the OOPArt is more of a curse than a blessing. Omega-Xis, well...
    Omega-Xis: Well, if it makes me strong, it's my kind of curse!
    Geo: Um...OK...
    Omega-Xis: Why are you so scared? It's my curse and I'm cool with it!
  • Cutscene Power to the Max:
    • In the first game, Mega Man does some roof-hopping during a Big Damn Heroes moment, which is impossible in normal gameplay. Heck, Mega Man can't exist except on the Wave Road. In the third game, he even jumps off of a high platform to transform, which is also literally impossible in gameplay.
    • Rogue. This dies down the more he appears, but in his first appearance in Star Force 2, it's ridiculous how much the cutscene boasts of his power, despite only having 800 HP and none of his special abilities yet.
    • Jack Corvus too. He's probably one of the easiest bosses in the game (well, pretty much everything is easy in Star Force 3 if you know what you're doing, but still) but in your first boss fight the battle immediately ends before you can finish him off, cutting to a scene where Jack Corvus is at full strength and Mega Man is panting.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: In the second game, it seems like Geo can't do anything without the power of the OOPART. But the most ridiculous example ties in with Rogue's Cutscene Power to the Max, where Geo is helpless to stop his friends from being sucked into a black hole, despite being right next to the source of the black hole, which Geo was quite capable of OHKOing in the previous three cutscenes.

    D - O 
  • Damsel in Distress: Happens a lot with Luna. This comes to a head in the third game where her Damsel in Distress tendencies get her killed. Until the scientists find a way to put her back together.
  • Darker and Edgier: The main characters, especially Geo, are often inflicted with Conflict Balls and issues noticeably less cartoony than those of Battle Network, especially in the first and third games. In fact, a major part of the advertising for the third game was that it had a more serious story than the others.
  • Dark Magical Girl: Solo from Star Force 2 is a Dark Magical Boy. While Geo draws upon The Power of Friendship for his strength, Solo (check the Meaningful Name) uses his loneliness as his strength. He insists on making a mountain out of this difference between them, and you may find it hilarious that Geo largely ignores him about it.
  • Demoted to Extra: Despite being a core mechanic in the game, both story-wise and gameplay purposes, Brother Band is absent entirely in the anime and was only mention in the last few episodes of the first season. In fact, the gang never even heard of it, meaning Brother Band in the anime is only a space communication tool instead of a future version of FaceBook.
  • Dinosaurs Are Dragons: The Fire Dinosaur Tribe-On gives Mega the ability to, well, spit fire. Plesio Surf can also spit lightning.
  • Disc-One Final Dungeon: In the third game, Dealer's Base probably counts, the later orbital base also seemed like the end as well.
  • Disappeared Dad: Geo's father, Kelvin Stelar, vanished while on a First Contact mission to Planet FM. This not only kicks off the events of the first game and anime, it even has repercussions in the third.
  • Discard and Draw: Each installment of the series has a different, more developed power-up system.
    • In the first game, Mega Man can draw upon the power of the AM Sages.
    • In the second game, they've left, but Mega Man can take advantage of the powers of ancient OOPART superweapons...and their mixes.
    • In the third game, Mega Man can, through either the Ace or Joker program, tap into the power of Noise, which, short term, gives him the power of the FM aliens who invaded in the first game, and at its higher levels, can tap him into the power of the Meteor currently on a collision course with the planet.
    • Notably, the Big Bangs of the various powers tend to mimic each other. The Wood and Heat Big Bangs are always a tornado and a single massive blast, for example (even if he can wave the Extinction Blazer around a little bit) - and the Noise Force Big Bang for the Elec element deliberately reproduces Thunder Zerker's Thunderbolt Blade. On the other hand, the Aqua NFBB produces three large waves of water, in equally deliberate contrast to the Star Force Big Bang Magician's Freeze.
  • Disney Death:
    • Luna in the third game. Sort of. See the character sheet for more details.
    • Also in the third game, Ace sacrifices himself to stop Joker from blowing everyone up. Every character present, and some that weren't, act like and state until he's shown bandaged up in the hospital during the credits with no apparent explanation other than it makes for a happier resolution.
    • Presumably, he was brought back the same way Luna was.
  • Distant Sequel: Star Force take place two hundred years after Mega Man Battle Network.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: Late in the second game, Lady Vega pulls the old Do Not Adjust Your Set routine to spread her demands for world domination. One NPC in Wilshire Hills has no idea what she actually said, because all his attention was dedicated to how hot she looked.
  • Do Not Adjust Your Set: Lady Vega and Mr. King both make pronouncements this way. King doesn't settle for TV, though — he also broadcasts directly to everyone's Hunter-VG.
  • Downloadable Content: Each game allowed you to download a Secret Battle Card or two and possibly even extra BrotherBand Data...back when the Download Station still hosted them. If you have access to a hacking device like Action Replay, you can simulate the transmission and get them, anyway.
    • The first game offered you the Andromeda Giga Card and Legendary Master Shin's Brother Data (which earned you a Giga +1 Bonus).
    • The second game offered the King Grandeur and Le Mu Cards, plus BrotherBand data for both L.M. Shin and the original Mega Man himself.
    • The third game had the Acid Arrest and Crimson Meteor cards, but no BrotherBand Data.
  • The Dragon:
    • Hollow to Vega, and he's notable as such since the Bermuda Maze chapter is essentially his fault, down to convincing Harp Note to work for the Neo Mu Empire. He has a famous I Lied moment, but he does keep himself from "permanently" damaging Mega Man.
    • Gemini and Heartless both count as both The Starscream, and Heartless may arguably be a case of Enigmatic Minion.
  • Dub-Induced Plot Hole: In Black Ace/Red Joker, when Jack is introduced to Geo's class, everyone comments that his name indicates that he isn't from around there. One problem for the English versions: they change any Japanese name to more English-sounding ones, meaning Jack's unchanged name shouldn't sound odd to them.
  • Dub Name Change: In the first game at least, a number of the name changes actually make more sense than the original names. With the aliens in the first game being named after constellations, Taurus and Lyra made for better names than the original Ox and Harp. However, the localization team apparently forgot to carry Lyra's Dub Name Change over to Harp Note.
  • Dude, Where's My Respect?:
    • Unlike its predecessor, where this trope is played annoyingly straight, it's averted here. In the second game onwards Mega Man essentially becomes world famous. This is especially noticable with the EM Bodies, who treat him like a superstar.
    • Played for drama later on when Sonia explained (Luna's interpretation, but still) that the reason for her Face–Heel Turn is that she did not think Mega Man could stop the villains she was forced to associate with, despite his world-saving reputation in the first game and she actually acknowledged him as a hero in one of their dates.
    • In the third game most of WAZA refuses to take Mega Man seriously. On the other hand, he's amazingly popular around the globe and his star power eclipses that of an aspiring idol like Belle.
  • Dummied Out:
  • Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors: The same basic cycle of elements is inherited from Battle Network: Fire beats Wood beats Elec beats Aqua beats Fire.
  • Empty Shell: Hollow (of Vega's lover, Altair) and Strong, after being revived. Strong recovers though..
  • Energy Beings: If a character isn't human, it's this. Even the artificial ones.
  • Establishing Series Moment: Rather than have Powers in the First Episode like the games or the anime, the Ryuusei manga introduces itself with a bank robbery. The robber's Hostage Situation peters out when he notices that both the police and the hostage are more interested in a shooting star than him; he dismisses it only to have an Oh, Crap! moment when the meteor turns around in mid-air, crashes through nearby skyscrapers, and lands right in front of him. In the rubble is Ryuusei no Rockman. While the robber is terrified at first, he's rather put-out when he realizes Subaru and War-Rock are more concerned with arguing with each other rather than taking him seriously, but his decision to threaten them with a meat cleaver fails when War-Rock snaps the blade off of the handle with his teeth and eats it. The robber quickly turns himself in, and Rockman turns at the sound of the crowd crying his name, only to find a mob facing him down for the massive damage he did to the skyscrapers. He collects himself, makes a deep bow of apology, and then leaves...snapping several more skyscrapers in half as he flies away.
  • Expy: Zigzagged. Many characters are very clearly juggling around the same characterization and design tropes as the characters of Mega Man Battle Network, but in new combinations.
    • Inverted with Geo, who is a brown-eyed brunette, just like Lan was, but as a Contrasting Sequel Main Character he's also an introvert and a Hikikomori at the beginning of the franchise.
    • Omega-Xis is likewise an inversion, replacing the calmer, responsible, humanoid MegaMan.EXE with his own monstrous appearance and brash violence.
    • Luna and Sonia mix-and-match traits from several characters. Luna, as the haughty blonde ojou, resembles Yai, but also suffers from parental issues like Mayl had, though Mayl's went unexplored. Sonia as the Rose-Haired Sweetie better resembles Mayl (and the blonde in pink Harp Note is clearly imitating Roll.EXE), but as Mega Man's combat companion, she's reminiscent of ProtoMan.
    • Bud fits quite nicely into Dex's old position, but with an emphasized penchant for eating - his family crest is a crossed knife and fork. (Most aspects of Dex's character regarding food were only in the Anime)
    • Zack has a collared shirt, tie, glasses, fluffy brown hair, and intellect like Higsby, but he's also a midget Non-Action Guy like Yai; he also closely resembles Aster from Battle Network 6, who was likewise a midget Higsby clone.
    • As a Pretty Boy with Dissonant Serenity who gets close to the main character while in league with aliens, Pat is the Kaworu to Geo's Shinji.
    • Taurus Fire, the first boss of Star Force, as Dumb Muscle who likes punching things on the one hand and a Hot-Blooded Blood Knight who likes Playing with Fire on the other, is a mix of the earliest Battle Network bosses GutsMan.EXE and FireMan.EXE.
    • Gemini Spark's humanoid appearance, inhuman skin color, metallic arms, and electric element are very reminiscent of ElecMan.EXE.
    • Cancer Bubble, as a crab that likes Making a Splash, imitates Bubble Crab, and being a Pintsized Powerhouse who attacks with flooding torrents of water reminds of AquaMan.EXE.
    • Hyde/Dark Phantom from the second game takes an occult motif, fancy dress, Smug Snake, and girl-abducting traits from ShadeMan.EXE.
    • Solo is a mix of ProtoMan.EXE's and Bass.EXE's traits, being The Rival with a penchant for swords on the one hand and a darkly-colored Barrier Warrior on the other. As a Proud Warrior Race Guy and the Last of His Kind with upward-flying Anime Hair, he's also an Expy of Vegeta; official art of Rogue in battle with Tribe King Mega Man (who also has upward-flying Anime Hair, like a Super Saiyan) evokes Vegeta's rivalry with Goku.
    • Ace, as the leader of Star Force 3's anti-villain response team, serves as an heir to the team leaders of Battle Network 5, Chaud and Baryl. Like Chaud, he fights crime as a prodigy member of the police, and like Baryl he has a history with a villainous organization.
    • Dealer, the villainous organization of Star Force 3, spreads The Corruption and works to seize control of an impending meteor, making it a dead-ringer for Battle Network's Nebula. Concept art indicates that Big Bad Mr. King's original design was based on Dr. Wily before the creators settled on a design closer to Dr. Regal.
    • Jack and Queen Tia imitate Prometheus and Pandora: a Hot-Blooded Blood Knight brother who attacks with ghostly fire and scythe-like wings, and his quiet, emotionless sister who peppers her sentences with lots of ellipses and attacks by manipulating the elementsnote  with her staff.
  • Everything Is Online: Including sunken galleons, lost medieval treasure, rocks and rotisserie chicken, and that's just in 2.
  • Evil Duo: Queen Tia and her younger brother Jack in the third game. Their FM-ian partners, Virgo and Corvus, were an Evil Duo themselves back on the FM planet.
  • Fanservice:
    • Sonia, in her transformation sequence, gets a blatant ass shot.
    • The third game puts Sonia in a Sailor Fuku. Bud, Zack, and Geo appropriately go wild over it.
  • Fanservice Pack: The transfer from video game to anime created some rather, uh, noticeable changes to Vega's design.
  • Fantasy-Forbidding Father: Luna's in the first game, who apparently are against any kid having any sort of behaviour outside what they consider acceptable. Trying to get Luna to transfer to another school because they feel Luna's being dragged down by her friends and Echo Elementary, there's also this line they say to Geo and Sonia when they see them together:
    Mr. Platz: Elementary school students on a date? I can't say that I approve of such behaviour. Children have no business acting like adults, and going on "dates". If you have time to play pretend, you should spend it studying to get better grades.
  • Fight Like a Card Player: Wave Battle is basically a card game version of Net Battling, and Mega Man and company use Battle Cards.
  • Filler:
    • After hitting a mid-season climax by summoning Andromeda and having Rock Man gain the Star Force, the second half of the first anime season transitioned to a holding pattern of giving Character Focus to the supporting cast while the FM-ians got up to various hijinks trying to get Andromeda back up and running.
    • As one Let's Play puts it, if the theme of the second game is that "losing friendship sucks" (Cf. the precursor to ruin), almost half of the game fails to touch on that at all. You could remove a good 2.5 scenarios from the game.
  • Flanderization: Many supporting cast members have their Hidden Depths and Dark and Troubled Pasts glossed over, simplified, or ignored in both the anime and the second game, with their surface personalities taking up more narrative space. Luna is extra-pushy, Bud is extra-hungry, and Zack is extra-nerdy.
  • Flunky Boss:
    • Queen Ophiuca, Wolf Woods, and Cygnus Wing summon Attack Animals to rush at Mega Man in battle. Cygnus Wing also has a special variant of his flunkies, the Quacky Lackies (who insist that they are not ducks, but nascent swans), to guard him and harass intruders in his dungeon. The mini-game of the area is to shoot each and every one of them with a rocket.
    • Hollow and Le Mu are both Enemy Summoners; the former will call viruses to attack you, while the latter exclusively summons Murian soldiers.
  • Food End: In the credits of Star Force 3.
  • For the Evulz: Virgo and Corvus are sadistic FM-ians who take pleasure in making people miserable and cause devastation wherever they go. The moment Jack and Tia have second thoughts about their plan, Virgo and Corvus turn on them until the heroes intervene.
  • Foregone Victory: In the second battle against Crimson Dragon, you are invincible. Really. No matter what he shoots at you or how many HP you have left, you won't die. The whole point of this "battle" is to get to show off in Finalized form; in fact, the only way to beat him is to use the Noise Force Big Bang attack, which is suddenly strong enough to kill him off instantly.
  • Forgotten Phlebotinum: Despite all the amazing future-tech the kids have access to, they almost never think to use it. Star Force 2 is especially notable considering that Geo collects a Hover Board that works at up to thousands of feet in the air and Zack owns a personal sports car that neither of them sees fit to use more than once each.
  • From the Ashes: With some mild notation about how it being 200 years in the future (and none of the original cast are left), Star Force was a rather transparent attempt to keep up the flagging Battle Network series.
  • Fusion Dance: EM Wave Change, and it's not just Geo who gets it.
  • Gainax Ending: In the Tribe anime. The last episode was rushed with the sudden end of the anime and so made some fairly radical decisions to compress, ignore, or change important parts of the original finale.
    • Burai's backstory was completely altered to re-cast him as a protector of the Murian civilization, which robbed him of his original game motivation but provided no actual explanation of his previous actions in the anime.
    • The backstories of the Big Bad and The Dragon weren't explained, though the anime compensated with a two-second Freak Out and Skyward Scream by the former when the latter died.
    • The fate of Mu and the OOPArts also weren't elaborated on, and the final boss was ultimately defeated in one attack before it got to do anything.
  • Gambit Pileup: In Star Force 3, each villain and one or two major supporting characters has his own agenda. King wants to Take Over the World with Meteor G, Heartless is the Reverse Mole working to undermine him and contact Kelvin, Joker Turned Against Their Creators and joined Dealer because I Just Want to Be Free; Queen Tia and Jack want to use Meteor G to destroy Earth's EM technology, Corvus and Virgo are ready to kill them if needed to take over Earth, and Ace betrayed them all to join WAZA. Solo has a vendetta against Dealer for stealing Mu tech; Geo's just about the only one without some sort of ulterior motive.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: During the Messie Village scenario, Zack and Luna's relationship takes a turn for the worse. His Link Power practically flatlines to a measly 10 (which implies he's not that great with Bud, either).
  • Genocide Survivor: Omega-Xis/Mega and the Satellite Admins are the only survivors of Planet AM.
  • Get A Hold Of Yourself Man: Geo seems to need at least two of these per game whenever he slips back into angst mode. Ironically he's doing these for everyone else in 3. Go go Character Development!
  • Geo Effects: Burning, Freezing, Paralysis, Gravity, Attack Boost, Assist Drone, and Broken are all panel effects - and let's not even get started on when War-Rock starts taking swipes at the territory.
  • Geometric Magic: The second Star Force game seems to have been shooting for this, complete with Function and (small, almost inncouous) Ritual - an attempt that might've worked if Solo wasn't the only one using it on-screen. Mega Man can do it, too, but it's a lot harder to connect the dots when all you're looking at is a Wave Command Card.
    • The next time you try inputting the Tribe King Wave Command, take a look at the dots - it's an outline of Mega Man's Shooting Star symbol.
    • Star Force 3 carries this on with the Noise Kaizou ("Modification") Gear and its relatives.
    • In the anime, Burai's transformation does this with Instant Runes, instead.
  • Global Currency Exception: Two instances in Ace and Joker: As they travel the Wave Road, Geo and Omega-Xis will be granted the opportunity to rescue a number of Hertz from battle and to collect Noise Frags, the latter-day equivalent of Battle Network Bug Frags. King Root in Hertz Square will accord them a point for every Hertz they save, and will exchange those points for various programs. Later in the game, Geo and Omega find a Noism who will do the same in exchange for the Noise Frags. Neither will accept Zennys.
  • A God Am I: Played on a smaller scale with Bud in the second game. At the encouragement of the Shaman, the villagers of Whazzap revered Bud — or rather, "Budicus" — as an emissary of Mu. Bud, who was then suffering from amnesia, went along with it primarily to enjoy the great food. Played fully straight when the Shaman becomes Terra Condor. In the anime, the shaman is roughly possessed by Condor, who believes this about himself — and starts gunning for Luna.
  • Good Morning, Crono: At the beginning of the anime, Hope Stelar wakes Geo up in the hopes that her son will be able to fix the family's EM food creator.
  • Goggles Do Something Unusual: The Visualizer given to Geo by Aaron Boreal (that belonged to Geo's dad) allow him to see EM waves.
  • Grand Finale: The third game is marketed as "the ultimate climax" of the series. And it very much does, as Geo finally finds his missing dad and gets to bring him home.
  • Guide Dang It!: Visualizer
    • Just try and use the third game's Secret Satellite Server without a guide.
    • In general, nowhere near as bad as its predecessor, but still irksome. Case in point, just try and use the third game's anything without a guide. Or a hack device.
    • The game's various code-inputting options all serve as this. Wave Command Cards are an example in Star Force 2.
  • Hard Light: Matter Waves and the successor Real Waves and Wizards. Hollow is a person made out of Matter Waves, or, well, almost.
  • Hartman Hips: Heartless. If you squint hard enough, you can seen it in the sprites. Definitely so with the artwork .
  • Hates My Secret Identity: Luna the Class Representative treats Geo like dirt, while admiring his alter ego Mega Man, especially after he saves her from an enemy attack.
  • Heart Container: Like with Battle Network, you can collect HP Memory to increase Mega's maximum HP. This time, it comes in two variants which raise max HP by 10 or 20. There's still enough to reach the 1000 cap.
  • Hello, [Insert Name Here]: The third game explicitly says not to make your nickname naughty — A notice which may actually be warranted, as the profanity filters the second game had, which changed anything indecent into a series of asterisks, are no longer in place.
  • Henshin Hero: Most characters receive superpowers and secret identities by doing a Fusion Dance with Energy Beings, exactly like Cross Fusion.
  • Here There Were Dragons: The anime and second game reveal that the Wave Road (and a number of viruses) existed in the far, far past, during the age of Mu, so modern technology successfully made The Magic Comes Back. Whether Murian and Modern capabilities to interact with the internet count as Magic from Technology or Magitek is still up for debate.
  • Heroic BSoD:
    • Zack and Bud have one in the third game when Luna dies...but not really.
    • Thanks to Character Development, Geo steps up and takes charge of the situation while Bud and Zack Freak Out over Luna dying.
    • Geo's had them in other games. In the second game, he has one over his failure to pull Zack, Bud, and Sonia out of the Un-Dimension...which just ends up depositing them in other places of the world, and then another one where Sonia betrays him for Lady Vega.
    • Something exclusive in the anime, he gets a particularly spectacular one when he and Cygnus Wing Battle in the Rain. Cygnus Wing gives him a Breaking Speech and reveals that Omega-Xis, that very same alien he is currently fused with, is responsible for his father going missing. He gets the Dull Eyes of Unhappiness and de-merges with Omega-Xis, while standing on a wave road. And there is a river below. You know what happens next.
  • Heroic Resolve: The entire ending of 3, as well as how Kelvin was holding off Meteor G in the first place.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Acid Ace pulls a pretty heart-wrenching one after Geo's fight with Joker.
  • High School A.U.: The third attempt by the franchise at setting Mega Man in elementary school.
  • Homage: One anime arc ends up being one to Old Yeller, of all things. In the anime, Wolf takes off from the FM Cluster and spends the next two episodes as the Denpa-Pet of Mayu, who is ecstatic to have a D-Pet of her own (and she ends up names him Ricky). They become close, and things go relatively well until Wolf catches sight of the full moon, which forces him into his wild, uncontrollable Super Mode. Mega Man shows up and they fight, despite Mayu's pleas for him to return to normal; she even gives him a Cooldown Hug. Sadly, while crazy Wolf Forest doesn't want to hurt her, he has no such compunction against Mega Man, though is thwarted in his attempt by ending up on the receiving end of an Atomic Blazer, which leaves Mayu with the impression that he's just died. He's not, but he refuses to return to Mayu, because, ultimately, he's an FM-ian. In his place he leaves a small D-Pet that looks like a cub version of him, which she takes in as Ricky's child.
  • Hopeless Boss Fight: At least one per game. The first JammerG from 1 is inexplicably immune to damage until the plot gives you the Star Force; he doesn't even have a token defensive maneuver like Bass' aura. The following plot segment features the AM-ians giving Geo and Omega guff for losing.
  • Hostage for MacGuffin:
    • In the anime, Cygnus pins Geo down and threatens to kill him unless Omega hands over the Andromeda Key. Omega acquiesces, only for Geo to be saved by a Deus ex Machina moments later anyways.
    • In the Tribe anime, Hyde is teaching an art class when Subaru's mom - Akane - shows up, interested in taking part. After he learns who she is, Hyde immediately hijacks control of every viewscreen in town, showing that he's taken her hostage (really, she's just sitting for a portrait he asked to paint of her - and, no, nobody learns who Rockman is by association). When Rockman shows up unexpectedly (he got sidetracked by the portrait), Hyde wave changes to Phantom Black and kidnaps Akane, who is given one of the LEAST subtle ass-shots ever in all of shonen.
  • Idol Singer: Sonia Strumm, who has to work with a corrupt manager who exploits her songs to get himself out of debt. She quits at the end of her chapter in the first game, but gets back into the business with a vengeance before the second starts.
  • "I Know You're in There Somewhere" Fight:
    • Subverted. Any time Geo has to fight his friends (such as the first boss battle with Bud/Taurus Fire), he worries that defeating the FM-ian possessing him/her will kill the host body. Omega-Xis, the alien who gave Geo his powers, assures him otherwise.
    • This is played straight in 3, when Joker makes Acid destroy. Extra points for the fact that he would've killed Ace from inside-out if he wasn't stopped.
  • Inconsistent Dub: That particular issue is fixed in the anime, although Lyra Note's human name also becomes Sonia Sky (perhaps because Sonia Strumm was too much of a Punny Name for the localization's tastes). Other attempts to deal with the conventions of the translation include restoring Ophiuchus Queen's original name (in the game, she refers to herself as "Queen Ophiuca"), and changing Mr. Shepar's name to "Shepard". One episode, however, contains an outright mistake - it's not the "Rock Buster", it's the "Mega Buster".
  • Invocation: Star Force tried to keep Battle Network's energy going with similar catchphrases. When Geo transformed in the first two games: "EM Wave Change! Geo Stelar, on (the) air!" In Japanese: "Denpa Henkan! [Wave Change!] Hoshikawa Subaru, on air!" To announce a boss battle (in both versions): "Wave Battle! Ride on!"
  • I Was Just Passing Through: The end of Star Force 2. "Your body was in my way", indeed. Horrifically subverted in the 100% ending, as Rogue collects Geo's body to have one final showdown with him.
  • Infodump: The first game goes through a lot of text during the opening sequence trying to lay out basic worldbuilding and mechanical explanation
  • Interface Spoiler: If The Law of Conservation of Detail didn't give it away already...
    • In the first game, Mega Man can hack into literally anyone's Transer and examine their personal information, including their favorite battle cards. Characters who become EM Humans will have their Henshin Hero forms listed among their favorites, blatantly giving away future plot developments to anyone who makes the mistake of exploring too much too early.
    • In the third game, Geo can read a little snippet of information on or from the Wizard whenever he meets anyone who has one. There are a handful of characters who have their Wizard's information locked, which at least in one case gives away a character's upcoming significance.
  • Invisible to Normals:
    • The Wave World and the EM Beings which inhabit it are usually invisible except in special circumstances. Visualizer technology was specifically designed to see it, but it's rare; Geo has it, Legendary Master Shin has it, and the Satellite Police have it, but no one else. Occasionally, Muggles can see it or at least sense that they're Being Watched.
    • Aaron Boreal has a picture in his lab of something he saw after going three straight days and nights without sleep (a Mr. Hertz).
    • Joe Hawnt, a recurring minor NPC, can apparently see them regularly, but thinks he's dealing with matters of the occult.
    • The fortune teller Madame Hills can see Mega Man plain as the nose on her face (and you have to be Mega Man to find her corner of the world, anyway).
    • For some reason this gets invertrd in the third game: all nornal humans become invisible once Mega Man transforms (leaving only a shadow where they're standing).
  • Jekyll & Hyde: Played straight with Pat and his other personality, Rey.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Omega-Xis, later in the series. At the start he's just a plain old jerk.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Jerk: Mr. King in Star Force 3.
  • Joke Item: Equipping certain upgrades on Omega-Xis is Star Force 3 can change the Mega Buster's sound effects, as well as changing the L buttons help/talk messages to more humorous dialogue.
  • Justified Tutorial:
    • Luna teaches Geo all about setting up a Player Page in the beginning of the first game, because Geo really doesn't know how to do it.
    • In the second game, Geo's first scene involves setting up and getting used to new hardware.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • Blair Loude, Echo Ridge Elementary's principal, has a point when he argues with Mr. Shepar over how the latter fails to meet the curriculum and that his goal as principal is to improve the school. However, once he makes his point, he immediately starts talking about how improving the school would improve enrollment and allow them to raise tuition. Loude also forces Shepar to use the ambiguously tested "study wave" to download information directly into the children's brains by threatening to fire him.
    • The Dragon of Star Force 3 vaporizing characters outright serves no real narrative function except to generate antipathy. Especially blowing up Luna.
  • Kleptomaniac Hero Found Underwear: In the first game, examining Luna's dresser will cause Geo to acknowledge her frog stuffie, but he will abstain from rummaging through it. In the second game, Omega will force him to rummage through it to look for something interesting, which reveals a secret ES. In the third game, Geo happens upon..."a little girl's secret". He immediately panics, but he can't seem to stop staring.note 
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia: Most of the humans possessed in the first game/anime series suffer from this after being released. Omega-Xis has it too in the anime, with no memory of his past as an AMian.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: In an attempt to break Geo's spirit, Solo sends Bud, Zack, and Sonia into the Un-Dimension, and then sends them to Whazzup Village, Loch Mess, and the Bermuda Maze, respectively. Later on, the local shaman falsely makes Bud (now Budicus due to a bout of amnesia from falling on his head from the Un-Dimension portal) an emissary of the Mu civilization, prompting a deeply enraged Solo (an actual member of the Mu civilization) to attempt to beat Bud to death for befouling his ancestors through his actions. In other words, Solo kinda brought it upon himself for doing that earlier action.
  • Last Disc Magic: You will receive your first Giga Card as you begin the final chapter of the game. They are really powerful individual cards — strong enough to clear out most virus battles in a single use.
  • Latex Space Suit: These are worn by the crew of the space station Peace in the anime prologue.
  • Living Weapon: Wizards/FM and AMians can be considered this. As well as the weapons that Omega-xis consumes to obtain the powers of Zerker/Saurian/Ninja.
  • Lizard Folk: The original name for the fire tribe in Star Force 2 is "Dinosaur", and their section of the museum features models of animals; and yet they have a Murian weapon and are treated as sentient.
  • The Load: Zack. In the first game he informs Chrys Golds that he thinks he saw Sonia got on the bus to AMAKEN, which inadvertently caused the Harp Note Scenario, and in the second, he puts off calling his friends for help in order to help spread the word about Messie. (That last might be because he's absolutely desperate to acomplish something on his own).
    • He also spies on Geo in the first game, which is how Luna knows to head down to AMAKEN to keep tabs on Geo.
  • Loners Are Freaks: And easy targets for the military FM-ians who try to exploit their jealousy/shame/fears.
  • Lost in Translation: Shows up every now and again.
    • In Star Force 2, Geo, Luna, and Zack find Bud in an area called Whazzap. This is technically an accurate translation of the original Japanese "nanska" (a corruption of "Nan desu ka?"), but it loses the correlation to the Real World phenomenon the location references - the Nazca lines.
    • In the third game, Geo has a poster of the Pleiades star cluster on his wall. This makes more sense if you know Subaru is the Japanese name for that constellation.
  • Love Hurts: In the second game, the death of Vega's lover first inspired her to create Matter Waves and then (after she found Mu relics) decide to rule the world.
  • Loves My Alter Ego: To the point that even when Luna discovers Geo is Mega Man, she insists that her attraction is solely to Mega Man and not Geo, refusing to consider them one and the same.
  • Magical Database: Meteor G is part of the Black Hole Server, which holds massive amounts of data (including Battle Cards). Geo accesses Meteor G's power for Noise Changes and Finalize, but the Black Hole Server is only utilized by SF 3's postgame boss Sirius. Despite having a massive advantage, the guy's going up against Mega Man.
  • Magical Girl: According to The Other Wiki, the anime qualifies as Magical Boy. It's...not as inaccurate a descriptor as we would perhaps prefer.M
  • The Man in Front of the Man: The ending of the first game reveals Dragon-in-Chief Gemini had been manipulating the FM King into destroying planets with Andromeda.
  • Marked Change: Inverted with Solo, who loses his Facial Markings when he transforms.
  • Mascot Mook: The series have its own variant of the franchise's mascot Mettool, the Mettenna (they are, in fact, Metts with individual antennae). They're more or less identical in combat to their EXE originals, but their Shockwave Battle Cards have the improved ability to turn once after being launched.
  • Masquerade: Geo and Sonia do their best to hide Omega and Lyra from the public eye. This is made somewhat difficult by the aliens, who don't seem to care about exposing themselves to the world. By the third game this has become far easier, as instead of hiding them away entirely they can get away with simply passing them off as normal Wizards.
  • Meaningful Name: Many of which double as Punny Names.
    • At first, Joker only has that name to fit with Dealer's Theme Naming, but after he reveals his true form as the strongest Battle Wizard ever created, and his Villainous Breakdown, in which he turns into a crackling mess, it becomes meaningful.
    • Geo had some fun with this, calling Luna "Satellite Girl" early in the first game because the moon is the Earth's satellite, and Luna's always around him, nagging him to go to school. Interestingly enough, judging by dialogue in the second game, Sonia's name is apparently pronouced as "Sunya" (Geo stammers "S-Son-" and a nearby person states "Sun?")note . And I'm sure we all know the relationship between the sun and the earth.
    • Also, just about everybody else who has a sidequest of some sort. There's gotta be at least 30 people from the first and second games whose names drop hints at your quest for them. Many of them are also Recurring Characters, so you'll see them in each game.
    • While most people call him "War-Rock", everyone's favorite alien carries an obvious play in his name on "warlock", which is not just the male equivalent of "witch" (in that he gives Subaru his powers), but also literally means oath-breaker or traitor.
      • Further exemplified in the third game as the Star Force equivalent of Navis come into fruition: Wizards, meaning War-Rock, or Warlock, is now considered a Wizard as well.
  • Merchandise-Driven: As with the latter half of Battle Network, the games came with hidden built-in Purposefully Overpowered upgrades that you can obtain by purchasing Real Life merch and peripherals. While these upgrades in the first and third games are largely unusable for western games outside of hacking, the second game's "Wave Command" menu is accessible, allowing anyone who knows the Wave Command Codes to input them for immense profit.
  • Mercy Invincibility: As per usual, many attacks can cause this for both player and enemy alike, and certain attacks can pierce this state. Then there's the Noise meter mechanics in the third game — Getting over 100% Noise disables mercy invincibility on both sides, increasing danger but letting you go loose on boss enemies.
  • Me's a Crowd: Le Mu can only summon about five different models of EM Being (Phantom, Yeti, Plesio, Condor, and the Warriors). It will summon thousands of them during the final chapter.
  • Missing Trailer Scene: The Tribe anime's penultimate episode's On the Next sequence has a dramatic shot of Rockman as Thunder Berserk swinging his sword and lunging at the camera. Never shows up...because it's actually from the Brachio Wave arc.
  • Mission-Pack Sequel: While each game in the series operates via the same core mechanics, the sequels each introduce different mechanics to diversify themselves. The second game, however, gets the fullest brunt of this trope as it doesn't differ too greatly from the first.
  • Mole in Charge: Possibly. Somebody with access to WAXA's main lab sealed one of its computers with the Dealer Key. In turn, and quite bizarrely, at least one Dealer computer is sealed with the WAXA key.
  • Mood Whiplash: Rarely, but when it occurs, it can be startling.
    • When Condor Geoglyph kidnaps Luna and co. and threatens to sacrifice their laughter to the land of Mu. Which he will get by tickling them. For reference purposes: the misguided, manipulative leader of the village of Whazzap, who has transformed into a living, avian-themed jet fighter, is now busying himself by tickling his hostages.
    • Joker's first field appearance. In which he violates Luna's Plot Armor so hard that Geo struggles to reassure the others that she isn't dead. Note: this happened right after the Dating Sim Beach Episode.
  • Mooks:
  • Morph Weapon: Mega Man's Mega Buster transforms into the battle card weapons that he attacks with. In the third game, this takes another level with the Mega Arm, which in itself transforms into the Mega Buster,
  • Mundane Utility: Geo has on occasion used his EM Wave Change technique to accomplish relatively menial tasks, usually during sidequests. For example:
    • When he uses his powers to get to the upper section of Zack's room, despite the fact that there's a supposedly functioning elevator-step in plain sight.
    • After accidentally breaking the express mail's packaging system in the anime, Geo decides to use his incredible wave form powers...to deliver mail.
  • Mysterious Protector: Geo swears to keep Luna safe in the first game. Luna, only half-conscious, manages to hear the specific line and has it added to the School Play.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • The Global Currency here is still Zenny, as it was in Mega Man Battle Network and Mega Man Legends.
    • While Cygnus Wing's minions are called the Cygnets in English, they were originally called "Shitappā" in Japanese, which is also the original Japanese name for the Birdbots of Mega Man Legends.
  • Never Trust a Title: Zigzagged; despite the Stellar Name series title, the second game made a radical departure from the Cosmic Motifs of the first game but the third game brought them back.
    • The "Star Force" in the title refers specifically to the power Mega Man receives in the first game and further evokes the cosmic motifs of the cast and setting, as does the original Japanese title Shooting Star Rockman.
    • The second game keeps both titles while having nothing whatsoever to do with space and only having a one or two fringe references to the original motif.
    • The third game takes a step back in the direction of the original by bringing back a handful of the first game's characters, featuring an incoming meteor as a looming doomsday event, and setting the Bonus Dungeon entirely in space.
  • The Nicknamer: Dr. Goodall of WAZA, who calls Omega-Xis "Meggers", and Acid "Acidina".
    • Surprisingly, she refers to Ace by his given name of "Arthur".
  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Robot: In the second game, if you have at least one brother from the another version, you can mix tribes to create some awesome results. Ninja Dinosaurs anyone?
    • Not only that, but if you have another brother from the last version, you can fuse all three tribes into Tribe King and become a Ninja Dinosaur Swordsman.
    • It was planned for the game to have a water elemental Pirate tribe to complete the 4 elements (Zerker = Elec, Saurian = Fire, Ninja = Wood), as well as an elementless Angel tribe.
  • One Game for the Price of Two: While the first Star Force is one-game-for-the-price-of-three(Pegasus, Leo, and Dragon), Star Force 2 is, oddly, three games for the price of two (Zerker x Ninja and Zerker x Saurian). The third game reverts to the two-versions shtick (Black Ace and Red Joker), but there's no reason to buy both as none of the version-exclusive content can be transferred.
  • One-Winged Angel: Played straight in the first two games, where both of the final bosses pull off one of these when their health gets low. However, in the third game this trope is actually inverted when Mega Man enters his Finalized form in a second round with the Final Boss, who hasn't changed.
  • Our Ghosts Are Different: Several varieties of Virus are particularly ghostly. One variety specializes in disrupting their targets with Standard Status Effects; another are more interested in disorienting you with their own off-kilter motion and vulnerability patterns.
    • A couple of characters actually deal in this, too. The "boss" of the second group of Ghost viruses is Phantom Black, an Intangible Man in operatic dress with some ghostly wind powers.
    • Another technical "ghost" is Crown Thunder, a Bonus Boss from the first postgame; his attacks are based in either striking you with lightning or delegating to his trio of Tactical Rock–Paper–Scissors minions. His ghostlyness is largely backstory; apparently the alien Crown was already a ghost when he first Wave Changed with the human Jean. Jean, naturally, was busy dying from arrow wounds when this first happened.
      • The anime circumvents this small plot implosion by having Crown fuse with the dead remains of the human, which unfortunately binds him to the land the man died on. Luckily for Crown, Jean died on a ship, which agitates Mega Man and Harp Note to no end.
  • Our Werewolves Are Different: These ones become Wave Road entities when they transform!

    P - Z 
  • Paper-Thin Disguise: Some humanoid FM-ians like Cygnus Wing and Gemini Spark join the Amazing Technicolor Population, while Harp Note's hairdo gets a distinctive blonde dye-job. Mega Man's merely sports a slightly darkened version of Geo's unique Anime Hair, and not one person makes the obvious connection.
  • Parrot Exposition:
    • Lots of it in the second game. The final chapter has Geo and Zack repeating Vega's backstory once or twice and then a few cutscenes later Aaron e-mails Geo and reveals he's all caught up on his current events trivia by going over it all again.
    • From the third game: "Accumulate? You mean it builds up inside them?"
    • The first game has several examples when Geo first meets with the Satellite Admins: "We have words that must be conveyed." "You mean you have things to tell me?"
  • Party Scattering: Early in Star Force 2, Solo tosses Luna, Zack, Bud, and Sonia into the Un-Dimension. Geo successfully retrieves Luna, but is unable to stop the last three from being sucked in, though we later find they've been cast around the world.
  • The Power of Friendship: Exaggerated. Like in Battle Network, making friends gives you superpowers.
    • In the first game, collecting Brothers produced the Brother Force, a unique bond between Mega Man and one of his friends that would provide him with an HP Boost, access to his friends' Favorite Cards, and an ability (e.g. Sonia's provided First Barrier and Undershirt, while Bud's gives Super Armor).
    • In the second and third, Brother Bands create the more generic Link Force instead, which allows Mega Man to equip abilities he's collected elsewhere, so long as he has sufficient space for it. The second game really tries to sell it — people with high Link Power get all sorts of freebies, such as discount bus tickets or even free hotel suites.
    • In all three games this gets used as a Socialization Bonus — forming BrotherBands with other players will give you extra perks or Link Power that you will have difficulty accessing while playing alone. The second and third games also offer the ability to reject this power to access Rogue's power of loneliness.
  • The Power of Rock: Harp Note uses a guitar and its music as an offensive weapon.
  • Powers as Programs: As with Battle Network, this is once again taken in a very literal sense.
    • Battle Cards are the people's way of combating viruses and are often self-contained instances of enemy attacks; some EM Humans like Mega Man and Acid Ace are capable of using them as weapons.
    • Mega Man can likewise duplicate specific powers or abilities of other characters through his myriad Super Modes.
  • Power Floats: The Energy Beings in their natural state, and some EM Humans, too.
    • You can't really see it in battle (or realize it due to the camera), but when Le Mu Turns Red, it actually rips itself free of its stone mountain casing and ends up floating hundreds of feet in the air.
  • Power-Up Letdown: The Rogue Tribe of Star Force 2 is meant to be the Evil Counterpart to the Tribe and Brother Band systems; it avoids Elemental Rock–Paper–Scissors by being Non-Elemental and favoring the sword attribute, and it gives you the regenerating Mu Barrier and resistance to lock-on. However, it dives so far into the anti-friendship motif that it actually cripples most mechanics; clogging your Brother Band with the Indie Fragments prevents you from boosting your Link Power and limits your abilities, you can't use Mega Cards (which include some of the better cards in the game), your Big Bang attack can only be triggered in a multiplayer match, and the sword cards aren't that good anyway.
  • Principles Zealot: Rogue goes from being standoffish and rude to being more than a little eager to validate his ideals of solitude and self-reliance. From his very first appearance he assumes Mega Man is his ideological enemy.
  • Punch-Clock Villain: The FM-ians in the anime are portrayed like this, and actually spend more time screwing around, doing things like playing in game shows and shopping that they practically replace the real main characters as they go through their comedic antics. Which arguably makes it that much worse when Gemini murders each and every last one of them in cold blood as they spend their last day on Earth just having a good time.
  • Punny Name:
    • Almost every NPC not important to the plot has one(usually related to their sidequest).
    • Viruses, too, Mettennas are Metts with antennae, and Grabities are small black holes with arms.
    • Late in the original anime, a giant EM Meteor named "Rajione VI"note  passes by the Earth and inflicts either new powers or a new personality on each of the FM-ians. However, since the Japanese pronounce the English word "radio" as "rajio", it seems that the intended name of the meteor was Radion, not "Rajione".
  • Random Drops:
    • Downplayed with the basic Card Force. Since the Star Force series did away with chip codes for the Battle Card system, the only real randomization you have to worry about is if you're fighting a set of different viruses, since you'll only get one of their cards from defeating them.
    • Illegal Data cards (Deliberately Overpowered "unofficial" versions of Standard and Mega cards) in the third game, which are sometimes obtained when you defeat viruses with over 100% Noise. Wouldn't be nearly as annoying if you could still trade cards over Wi-Fi as in the first two games.
  • Random Encounters: Yet another mechanic retained from Battle Network. The instant Mega Man steps foot on the Wave Road, he is set to be besieged by EM viruses.
    • One specifically overdramatic example of this is the Omega Boss system from Star Force 3. From the very first moment of the game, Mega Man has a chance of encountering the strongest possible form of almost any of the bosses, regardless of whether or not you've encountered him in the plot yet, with thousands of hit points, attacks capable of dealing several times Mega's max HP in damage, and once the Hunter-VG flashes "WARNING" at you, it's impossible to escape.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Early on in the Libra scenario in the first game, Geo finally tells Luna just how much she's living up to her name by following him all the time.
  • Recap Episode: The English dub of the anime only covers the first half of season 1; to compensate for this, the dub ends with Geo recapping that part of the story along with footage from earlier episodes.
  • Recycled INSPACE: Mega Man Battle Network...IN SPACE!!.
  • Red Eyes, Take Warning:
    • Mega, one of the main heroes, has red eyes, and Geo's eye color changes to red when he transforms into Mega Mannote 
    • The Black Ace and Red Joker forms do have Red Eyes, however, mixed with Glowing Eyes of Doom (which are very evocative of F-Beast and G-Beast MegaMan from Battle Network 6). These are both a mix of Rule of Cool and a subtle nod to Bad Powers, Good People and Dark Is Not Evil (with a futuristic Sci-fi aesthetic), but not after you realize what's making his eyes red. Visor, why?
    • Played straight with Solo.
  • Red Oni, Blue Oni:
    • Geo and Omega. Despite Omega being blue, he proves to be the hothead to Geo's calmer, slower pace.
    • Mega Man and Harp Note. Geo tends to be the more serious of the pair, whereas Sonia's far more outgoing and perky.
    • Omega-Xis can also play blue oni when he wants to; in the anime during an early face-off with Taurus, Mega calmly analyzes Taurus' fighting "strategy" and explaining how he was bound to lose (Taurus' brute emphasis on power put him at a disadvantage against Mega's speed).
  • Relationship Values: The Brother Band system, on the surface, simply networks various individuals through their terminals. Not so with Mega Man, who derives some of his powers from his Bandmates. Geo's own Brother Band grows beefier across the storyline; most players prefer to eschew the in-game Brothers for one another.
    • In the second and third games, the in-game Brothers get their own section, so the Brother Band template from Star Force 1 is reserved for what are called "Real Brothers" (other players or downloaded Bands). Rather than granting Mega Man abilities directly, here, Brother Bands generate something called "Link Power", a numeric value that belies the maximum cap of Ability Program data Mega Man can use. Each Band has a numeric value based on the, er, intensity (for lack of a better word) of the relationship, and generally caps at one hundred for each of Geo's friends in the second game, although certain moments betray a different kind of intensity.
      • In the second game specifically, some people or institutions will give out rather particularly generous freebies to people for having high amounts of Link Power. Shopping Malls give out expensive gifts and at least one hotel may allot you a room based on your Link Power; this may possibly imply that Link Power has become something of a general power source. Basically put, your friendship may be radioactive.
    • In the third game, each character is given a static amount of Link Power, which appears to be explained more by their role in the story than anything else. Of course, Geo makes up for this by easily befriending a good dozen or so extra NPCs.
    • Averted in the Anime. The Brother Band is introduced in the last story arc when Mamoru discovers that it's still operating; a surprising development, considering how the space station it was in is otherwise destroyed. Here, the Brother Band engine was designed basically as a Good Feelings Cannon, designed to foster and reinforce the idea that the humans were indeed coming in peace. Of course, the space station was destroyed, as King Cepheus was under the impression that the Brother Band was heralding an invasion. It takes what may be several months of continued exposure for Cepheus to bring an end to this policy.
  • Remember the New Guy?:Averted
    • Averted—Laplace is present in the third game with no explanation, and no one comments on it. His name is only ever even mentioned twice in the game itself, neither of which occurs during the main plot.
    • Played straight with Virgo and Corvus, rogue FM-ians that Omega has history with.
  • Replacement Goldfish: Hollow was originally created by Vega in an attempt to bring her lover back to life. It didn't quite work, hence the Meaningful Name.
  • Resigned to the Call: Geo's not much for heroism in the first game, but goes along anyway due to feeling With Great Power instinctively. He later accepts his role more wholeheartedly.
  • The Reveal: In the first game, Omega-Xis is actually a survivor of the destroyed Planet AM. In the anime, the Sages have to reveal this to him.
  • Riddle for the Ages: Who made the Ice Sculpture in the Grizzly Peak Resort, and why?
    Omega-Xis: I feel sad waves coming from it.
  • Rivals Team Up: The basis of a four-stage minigame in Star Force 3, in which Geo and Solo attempt to take down a series of massive monsters of Noise that may remind you of the Dark Soul Monsters from Battle Network 5 and the Anime.
  • Running Gag: In Star Force 2, at least three different peoplenote  share the same disbelieving reaction.
    I SEE.
  • Sanity Slippage: In the anime, emotional humans who spend time under the influence of FM-ians may suffer from blending personalities with their FM-ian. Shinsuke and Tsukasa, in particular.
  • Scary Black Man: Joker certainly fits the bill. It doesn't hurt that he blows Luna up. Temporarily.
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Money!: Rich Dotcom's Modus Operandi, especially in the anime, where he even tries to bribe Geo, who immediately inverts this.
  • School Play: Luna first successfully got Geo onto the school's very grounds by telling him he was the only one who could fulfill a very important, nigh essential, part for the play Class 5-A was putting on. As it turns out...
    • Playing a Tree: Geo's important part is largely to model a pair of tree branches, which he wasn't aware of until it was too late.
    • Notably, the play is about the Taurus Fire scenario from earlier - complete with homemade Mega Man and Taurus Fire costumes. Unfortunately, Luna happens to be a Dreadful Musician when it comes to the Creative Arts in general, so even when Pat can't make it and Geo ends up wearing the Hero's costume, Luna still fails to recognize him. (She also fails to draw the connection from having Bud wear the fearsome "Cow Man" costume — but, then again, she spent that particular fight more or less passed out).
    • And when he appears on stage, we're treated to a brief chunk of the Moving Scene score (normally reserved for moments of heroism), with Mega Man appearing in his full and proper costume...until Zack accidentally knocks out the lights. When he gets them back on, Geo's back in the miserable costume — both Luna and the audience are left unsure whether he was actually in the costume or whether Luna was imagining things.
  • Railroading: The games have a very strict sequence of event flags that you must pass, and sometimes this means coming up with excuses to prevent Geo from exploring areas that are ostensibly open to you; at least once the player can't make Geo turn into Mega Man because Omega-Xis thinks Geo has other things to do.
  • Scunthorpe Problem: In the first game, the e-mail system contains a filter to prevent swear words from being sent. This filter renders a certain Cipher Mail unusable in the US version because it fires mistakenly on the word "Glasses".
  • Secret Identity: Geo and Omega have to bust their balls trying to keep it that way, though Omega is considerably less concerned with taking care of stuff like that.
  • Sequential Boss:
    • Dread Joker R and Acid Ace R. In that order. Also Those Two Bosses because you have to fight them in a row!
    • Subverted in Star Force 2. Rogue shows up after the battle with Hollow, but Harp Note blasts Mega Man away so the player can save and heal.
  • Shmuck Bait: In the second game, Hyde kidnaps Luna (round two) and then demands Geo make an appearance at the theater to star in his new production.
  • Shout-Out: Several.
    • When Goodall asks Mega Man to investigate the areas where Wizards went out of control, Mega gets into a detective frenzy, and Geo remembers of a program he liked: WRI. On said mission, one of the Noise Hertz sings a part of "Somebody's watching me". Geo also has an earthworm for a school project; its name is James.
    • As for Capcom itself, at one point Geo's teacher mentions he drinks coffee blend #107.
      • Another one occurs with an NPC's name: Sho Ryuken.
    • Alex Trebek. One sidequest even has Mega suggesting the guy "might be in Jeopardy!" when they hear the name.
    • Not to mention the fact that in the third game there is a generic satella male police officer named after Those Two Guys from Mighty Morphin' Power Rangers.
    • The Satellite Admins Pegasus Leo Dragon might bring a certain Sentai series to mind, the only difference is that the latter two switched colors with each other.
    • The Ghost Crisis movie's (Star Force 2) hero is the Ghost Duster. Pulls double-duty as a Shout Out to Luigi's Mansion, given that he's carting a vacuum cleaner around.
    • Also in Star Force 2, the Floating Continent of Mu can be used as a Kill Sat, like Laputa itself in Castle in the Sky.
      • At least one of the rooms has inert Murian soldiers held in tubes, much like the robots from the movie.
    • King bears some resemblance to Daniel J. D'Arby from JoJo's Bizarre Adventure, from their facial markings to their gambler motifs.
    • The Final Boss of Star Force 2 is continuously spawning energy and forming it with its will into even solid objects. Like drills.
    • The K. Knuckle weapon. Kaiser Knuckle was the name of a Taito fighting game produced in 1994. You might know it as Global Champion.
    • In the anime, the scene where Taurus is carrying Luna up the tower is very familiar to anyone who has seen King Kong.
  • Smug Snake: Dark Phantom is just not as good as getting people to match his "script" as he wants to be. Also, King.
  • Socialization Bonus: To have The Power of Friendship extend beyond the game's universe, the player can also form BrotherBands with up to 6 other human players for additional perks that the in-game Brothers don't offer.
  • The Something Force: "Star Force" in 3.
  • Spell My Name with an "S": In the second game, Plesio Surf (AKA Gerry Romero) calls himself Plesio Wave, possibly because his Japanese name is Brachio Wave.
  • Spin-Offspring:
    • Averted for the first three games. No one has any established relationship with the Hikari family or any other major characters of Mega Man Battle Network.
    • The concept for the unfinished Star Force 4 featured Kazuma, a descendant of the Hikaris who would ally with Geo.
  • Spotlight-Stealing Squad: Ace in the third game. Geo and Mega are ostensibly the main characters, but the third game is really about Ace's history, with Ace's team fighting Ace's enemies.
  • Stay Frosty: Practically becomes Omega's Catchphrase in the third game.
    • Or, his second favorite. "Buck wild" shows up more noticeably.
  • The Starscream:
    • Dark Phantom is implied to be this by Solo before he and Dark Phantom fight each other.
    • Gemini has nothing but contempt for the cowardly King Cepheus in the anime. In the games, he's just bad at keeping his cool.
    • In the third game, Dealer is a Dysfunction Junction where literally everyone has their own agenda, which results in a Gambit Pileup by multiple disloyal factions.
  • Star-Crossed Lovers:
  • Stellar Name: Not just a play on the main character's name, but every FM-ian is named after a constellation (Taurus, Cygnus, Gemini, Lyra, etc.).
  • Stylistic Suck: The translation of Star Force 2 more or less deliberately plays up the offbeat source material. Among the Saurian Tribe, we have the Chompsrealhardasaur vs. the Neckistoolongadon, and then there's the town of Whazzap.
  • Super Mode: Geo gets a new one each game.
  • Super Registration Act: In ''Star Force 3', the use of Wave Change with the Hunter-VG automatically registers the EM Human in question with a designation called a Trans-Code (Mega Man is Number 003), which must be deliberately accessed (which nicely justifies the until now Invocation).
  • Surplus Damage Bonus: In 3, overkilling an enemy with a card attack will fill up the Noise gauge. When the gauge reaches a certain point, you can access a powerful mode.
  • Sweet Tooth: Ace binges on candy bars constantly.
  • The Team: Star Force 3 refined the concept by introducing teams, groups of people working together towards a defined purpose, as a plot point and gameplay mechanic. In-story, Geo would pass from team to team as various struggles came up beyond the scope of his own abilities (not a few of whom were adults, nicely averting Adults Are Useless), collecting allies throughout the story. As a gameplay mechanic, teams worked hand in hand with part of the Noise Modification Gear called Rezon Cardsnote . By equipping a Rezon Card, Mega Man implicitly became part of the team of EM Humans shown on the card, and he would receive benefits in Finalized form (such as a First Aura or an extra level-up when finalizing), which could then be shared to every single one of your brothers. This could lead to potentially absurd situations such as having six extra turns in Finalized form.
  • Team Dad: Geo, after being adopted into Luna's gang. Especially notable when Luna drops out of the picture in game 3.
  • Team Mom: Luna, after Geo gets adopted into her gang. Especially notable at the beginning of the second game, following the tutorial, when she starts fussing over whether the boys are wearing warm enough clothes.
  • Terrible Trio: They aren't villains, but Luna, Bud, and Zack have this dynamic. This changes into Five-Man Band when Geo and Sonia join up.
  • Title Drop: In the original Japanese version at least. References to shooting stars abound, especially in 3; and some of the Murian Hertzes at the end of the 2nd game address Geo as the Warrior of the Fallen Star. Also, there was a Mythology Gag in which Geo and Omega exclaim "Let's Rock!" (And later "Let's Blues!"), which you might've missed if you weren't aware of one of the most basic translation issues effecting the original Mega Man (Classic) games.
  • Theme Music Power-Up: Moving Scene/Rise as a Hero plays whenever Geo and friends are being heroic. The third game also has Go, Satella Police! when the namesake policemen are involved.
  • Theme Naming: All the Energy Beings have themed names; the majority of them are Stellar Names. In the third game, even the humans get in on the theming.
    • Constellations: Taurus, Cygnus, Cancer, Lyra, Libra, Ophiuchus, Wolf, Gemini, Cepheus, Andromeda, Pegasus, Leo, Dragon, Goat, Auriga, Corvus, and Virgo. (Apollon Flame, Moon Destroyer, and Sirius also have Stellar Names but they're not constellation specific).
    • Legendary Creatures: Phantom, Yeti, Brachio, and Condor (for the Nazca lines).
    • Playing Card Motifs: Spade Magnes, Diamond Ice, Club Strong, Heartless, Jack, Queen Tia, Mr. King, Ace, and Joker.
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: The third game rewards overkill by having Mega Man's Noise levels increase by the difference between the attack power of a battle card and the remaining HP of the virus killed by that card. In Boss Battles, Noise levels are raised by half the attack power of Non-Elemental cards used on bosses, which still behooves the player to use powerful cards to make the Noise jump up faster.
  • Those Two Guys: Zack Temple and Bud Bison, Luna's closest friends/fanboys. Until the third game where Bud's compatible alien (Taurus) returns.
  • Title Drop:
    • By the third game, Subaru signs into the EM network as "Shooting Star Rockman".
    • Also in-game three the name of the final storyline team, dedicated to stopping Meteor G, is called "Star Force".
  • Too Dumb to Live: In Star Force 2, Geo's friends all decide that it's totally safe to approach while Rogue is still riding high on his introductory Cutscene Power to the Max. Rogue promptly dumps them in the Un-Dimension.
  • Took a Level in Badass:
    • Many bosses get substantially quicker and develop new attacks during re-matches.
    • Bud Bison and Tom Dubius, victims of Demonic Possession at the hands of the FM-ians in the first game, become willing partners of their respective FM-ian in order to become willing EM Humans in the third.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: The third game features the Crimson Dragon in promotional art and teasers; in the actual game, however, the dragon is a Giant Space Flea from Nowhere, so little of significance was exposed.
  • Transformation Is a Free Action:
    • While most of the EM Wave Changes are fairly fast, usually just involving a dramatic pose and shout, Solo's special EM Wave Change is an elaborate process that goes on much longer than the normal versions, and yet nobody ever tries to stop him.
    • Accessing Mega Man's Super Modes in Star Force 1 and Star Force 2 are big mid-battle showstopping affairs, as are the Finalization sequences in Star Force 3. Averted when Mega Man gains new Noise Changes, however, which happen after battle.
  • Transformation Sequence: Many Wave Changes have one, as do the various Super Modes.
  • Transformation Trinket:
    • The OOPARTs in 2, but not as apparent, since Omega-Xis SWALLOWS them.
    • The Ace and Joker programs as well - they allow for Noise Change.
  • Triang Relations: A fairly complex example.
  • Unexplained Recovery: During the credits of the third game, a character who'd undergone an ostensibly fatal Heroic Sacrifice inexplicably appears during the credits recovering in the hospital. The artist commentary in the Complete Art Works book muddies the waters by indicating that the scene was actually meant to depict someone's "heartfelt wish".
  • Universe Compendium: The various official strategy guides, plus things like databooks on Wave Command Cards, the Secret Satellite Server, and the Battle Black Box. These are all in Japan, though you can buy them either on Amazon (the Official Complete Works for Star Force and Battle Network were translated into English not too long ago by UDON, but there should still be Japanese editions listed) or from E-Capcom, the company's all-Japanese shop site. Good luck.
  • Unrealistic Black Hole:
    • The Grabity family of viruses ("Hell Black" in Japan) are spiraling vortexes with a single eyeball and four limbs emerging from their depths. They launch small projectiles at you and siphon your health, and their cards will instadelete anything with less than a certain amount of HP. Like the Shadow and Nightmare viruses before them, they can only be hurt by swords.
    • AMAKEN's Science Museum contains a machine that actually generates a small black hole. At one point, Mega Man needs to repair it so he can draw together the fragments of the Wave Road and proceed.
    • The Limit Break of the Black Ace form in Star Force 3, Black End Galaxy, features Mega Man sealing every enemy on the field in a black hole and then subjecting that black hole to a single stroke of his sword, which makes it explode.
    • In the post-game of Star Force 3, Planet FM is under attack from the "Black Hole Server", a giant Noise Cluster-like zone piloted by Sirius, who uses it to collect planets. Messrs. Hertz that are trapped inside are drawn inexorably towards the center, but Mega Man is free to walk around as he pleases.
  • Unwinnable by Mistake: Depending on the cards you have available, if you let any battle with a Magera or one of its relatives in the first game go on too long, you may wind up in a position where you can't overcome its combination of Aura and Holy Panel defenses. Zack's post-game virus gauntlet sidequest from the first game has one such bout, which you cannot run away from.
  • Victor Gains Loser's Powers:
    • As with Battle Network's battle chips, beating enemies nets you cards that replicate their attacks.
    • In the first game, the Satellite Admins would grant Mega Man a Super Mode with their powers if he defeats them.
    • Averted with the Noise forms in the third game, which give Mega Man Super Modes based on other EM Beings but are randomly obtained.
  • Villain-Possessed Bystander:
    • The vast majority of villains in the first game are locals subject to More Than Mind Control by Energy Beings trying to root out and destroy Mega Man.
    • Averted in the second game where Hyde parcels out Murians to likely candidates, but played straight in the Tribe anime where a couple of those Murians are acting independently and seize control of local humans for their own purposes.
  • Villainous Breakdown:
    • Hyde snaps in the third game when his plan to beat Geo fails.
    • Joker also starts to laugh hysterically upon defeat, which creates dissonance with his strictly solemn mugshot.
  • Virtual Sidekick: Zigzagged.
    • NetNavis appear in the first game but have been generalized to run in the background of society rather than be personally associated with human operators; they can be summoned by individuals through the use of their designated cards.
    • Navis did not appear in the second game but were replaced in the third game by Wizards, artificial Energy Beings who serve much the same purpose but can also manifest themselves and act in the real world. Several Energy Beings from the first two games are converted into Wizards in the third including Omega himself.
  • The Virus:
    • Bob Copper warns that extended exposure to the alien life form Z-Waves will turn human beings into more Z-Waves.
    • The shapeshifting "EM Human" monsters created by the Jammer that stalks the school in the first game, who claims that anyone exposed to them for too long will also turn into monsters.
  • Wake Up, Go to School, Save the World: Eventually played straight, once Geo finally starts going to school.
  • Walking Armory: Interestingly, only a few characters in the series make use of Battle Cards; for the first two games, only Mega Man has access to them, though Harp Note and Burai both use them in the anime. Acid Ace and Dread Joker can use them in the third game.
  • Walking Spoiler: At least one character from each game has a major chunk of spoilers under their belt.
  • Wealth's in a Name: The Shirogane family appears to be wealthy industrialists. "Shirogane" is the Japanese word for platinum. In the localization, they're called the Platz family.
  • Well-Intentioned Extremist:
    • The Shaman of Whazzup Village in the second game legitimately wanted his country to prosper, but to do this, he conspired to manipulate his people through a false prophet and later fell in league with Hyde to gain access to the powers of the Murian Condor. On defeat he admits his fears that none of the advanced civilizations would help a backwater like Whazzap; he reforms afterwards and Whazzap finds a niche as a tourist trap.
    • The Big Bad of the second game grew up in the kingdom of Tanabata, which suffered from terrible and stupid leadershipnote , which eventually caused her lover to die during its wars. She was convinced that the Lost Technology of Mu could bring her lover back to life and she could use it to establish a Neo Mu Empire, comprised entirely of the qualified, in order to rid the world of the fools she suffered under.
  • We Want Our Jerk Back: The "EM meteor" Radion VI in the anime imposes profound changes on the local Energy Beings, in particular turning War-Rock into a limp-wristed milquetoast who lavishes compliments on everyone around him, abhors violence, and even when he can be convinced to fight won't use battle cards because it would be rude to eat while standing. Not only does this drive Geo insane, when he's finally free of the effect, War Rock goes on a rant about how awful the experience was.
  • Wham Episode: Each game has a demoralizing catastrophe in it.
    • 1: Patrick betrays Geo.
    • 2: Harp Note joins Vega's cause.
    • 3: Joker obliterates Luna.
  • What Song Was This Again?: The finale of Sonia's concert at the end of her scenario in Black Ace/Red Joker comes complete with the series theme, notably given lyrics. However, the song's subject is the eponymous "Shooting Star", Geo. To Japanese audiences, this would double as a Title Drop, but the reference is generally lost to the western audience.
  • White Hair, Black Heart: Solo, complete with red eyes, tan skin, and Facial Markings.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds:
    • Jack and Queen Tia's life have been pretty much crap since their childhood, and they wanted to bring The End of the World as We Know It because of it.
    • Solo got the short end of the stick himself. Remember why he hates everyone?
  • The Worf Effect: In the anime, Hollow transitions from being a Non-Action Guy to The Dragon by subjecting Yeti Blizzard and Phantom Black to a Curb-Stomp Battle each in sequence.
  • Would Hit a Girl:
    • Mega Man fights Harp Note, Queen Ophiuca, and Queen Virgo with little trouble.
    • In the anime when Burai, Rockman, and Harp Note fight, Burai makes a point of not just taking out Harp Note, but taking her out early so she can't distract him.
  • You Can't Go Home Again: Geo's dad is safe in space, but has no way of navigating home, and Omega-Xis is a fugitive from his own planet. Geo's two forays into space at the end of the first and third games also leave him stranded, forcing his Brothers and the people he's helped to band together to help guide him home.
  • You Gotta Have Blue Hair: As far as actual blue hair, Ace and Queen have matching shades of blue hair. Sonia's hair is purple, Pat's is green, and Heartless's is pink.
    • For the Wave Changes, Mega Man has slightly purple hair and Gemini has orange hair. Rogue and Solo both have white hair.
  • Yin-Yang Bomb: Mega Man can potentially become this. In the third game, there's a special Noise Form called Rogue Noise, but to have any chance of gaining it you need to have no real world Brotherbands at all, fitting Rogue's loneliness motif. While you're using this Noise Form, it becomes impossible to gain any Real World brothers (the slots are replaced by Rogue/Mu's symbol), but it's worth it, since it doesn't actually have any weaknesses, powers up sword-type attacks (which mesh well with the sword-combo Battle Cards), gives you a regenerating barrier, and two other abilities. However, you still get the Link Power you gained from in-game NP Cs. Using both of them makes Mega Man a very powerful example of this trope.

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