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Just another day living ten coins at a time.

"Smash Bros. is how you build friendships. Mario Party is how you destroy them. Ironic, isn't it?"
Random commenter on an unrelated page, whose comparison sums up the series.
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Mario Party is Nintendo's long-running series of multiplayer games for the Nintendo 64, GameCube, Game Boy Advance, Wii, DS, 3DS, Wii U, and Switch. It started off developed by Hudson Soft, though Hudson's acquisition by Konami led to 9 and later games being developed by Nd Cubenote , developers of Wii Party. The series also created arcade adaptations, which are developed by Capcom.

The series combines a board-game motif with various competitive mini-games. Besides Mario, Luigi and their friends, some of the enemies from Super Mario Bros. are playable characters in the Mario Party series. About a dozen Mario Party games have been released so far: eleven on home consoles, one on the Game Boy Advance, one for the e-Reader (actually a non-collectible card game with included minigames), one on the Nintendo DS, two in arcades, and three on the Nintendo 3DS. The basic format of the game has mostly remained the same: Four players (computers filling in if there aren't enough human players) take turns rolling dice to move across one of several themed boards, with the ultimate goal of obtaining Stars, which are classically obtained by a player who reaches a Star Space and buys a star for 20 Coins, after which the Star Space is moved to a random location on the board.

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After all players have had their turn, a mini-game begins. The players are placed on Blue or Red teams based on what spaces they had landed on (Green players are randomly marked Blue or Red) and a roulette begins to pick a game. The winner(s) of these games are typically awarded with 10 coins (in the first Mario Party the loser(s) may lose coins), although there are special games where the goal is to collect coins, in which case everyone gets to take however many coins they collected in the game with them.

Mario Party 9 changed the board game concept to have one vehicle that all the players take turns captaining. Mini-games only start when a mini-game space is landed on (and sometimes at random on blue spaces). Coins are gone, and stars are replaced with mini-stars, which are collected several at a time both on the board and in mini-games.

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Mario Party 10 retains 9's changes but its star is Bowser, who is playable for the first time (not counting a bonus game in 4 and Super Duel Mode from 5). Whoever plays as him can ruin the other players' days. The game is confirmed to have amiibo functionality: The game is compatible with Super Smash Bros. figures, but there is also a new set of figures dedicated to Mario Party 10. This set includes Mario, Luigi, Peach, Yoshi, Bowser, and Toad. Mario Party 10 is compatible with 9 figures in total: The first six, plus Rosalina, Donkey Kong, and Wario.

The games are infamous for their high propensity for screwing your opponents over — random chance and luck are large components in these games, and it's not uncommon to see people lose their shot at winning and sink to the bottom of the leaderboard, and for those who have had terrible luck all game suddenly be in the lead. Despite this, skill in the mini-games and careful planning are also equally rewarding and useful, and a smart player can easily maneuver themselves into a good spot. It's also known for its AI controlled opponents, which can be equal parts ludicrously stupid and deviously intelligent, capable of feats of incredible planning and execution followed by stupidity in the minigames after their turn.

Most of the games (with the exception of 1, 2, 6, 10, and Star Rush) include some form of Single-Player campaign, which typically involves playing against computers on the game boards, but the mechanics may be slightly different.

    Games in this series 
Each entry typically has a unifying theme that dictates the aesthetics and occasionally gameplay, along with a character or group of characters serving as the host.

  • Mario Party (Nintendo 64, 1999): This is the first game in the series, and as such doesn't really have a theme. Toad serves as the host.
  • Mario Party 2 (Nintendo 64, 2000; Wii Virtual Console, 2010): The theme is "costumes", as every level sees you dress up in a new outfit and take part in a sort of play. Toad once again serves as the host.
  • Mario Party 3 (Nintendo 64, 2001): This game's theme is "storybooks", and the game has a kind of pop-up book aesthetic to it. Hosting duties are shared between two Original Generation characters: The Millennium Star, a star that only shines once a millennium, and Tumble, a magical die that was brought to life by the Millennium Star.
  • Mario Party 4 (GameCube, 2002): This game's theme is "parties and celebrations", and has unique "hosts" for each board, like a Toad or a Goomba. It also introduces the option to play party boards in a 2vs2 fashion.
  • Mario Party 5 (GameCube, 2003): The theme this time is "dreams", and each level takes place in a themed dream, like a pirate cove or a toy-themed area. The game is hosted by the Star Spirits from Paper Mario, marking one of the few times a character from that series has appeared in a non-Paper Mario game.
    • "Super Mario Rolling Mystery Party" (Arcade, 2004, Japan Only)
  • Mario Party 6 (GameCube, 2004): This game's theme is "day and night" and features boards that alternate between day and night, dynamically changing the way you move about them. The game is hosted by Brighton and Twila, the embodiment of the sun and moon, respectively.
    • "Super Mario Rolling Mystery Party 2" (Arcade, 2005, Japan Only)
  • Mario Party Advance (Game Boy Advance, 2005): This game focuses more on single-player, though there are multiplayer modes as well. Its story mode features one big main board that the player can explore to complete quests. The game also features small interactive toys called "Gaddgets", similar to the souvenirs from the WarioWare series. Tumble returns as the host for this game.
  • Mario Party 7 (GameCube, 2005): This game has an "around-the-world" theme, and the boards are based on slightly stereotyped versions of real countries like USA, Egypt, and China. Toadsworth serves as the host. This game is also exclusively compatible with 8 players, both in Party mode and Minigame mode.
  • Mario Party 8 (Wii, 2007): This game has a "carnival" theme, and is the first to incorporate motion controls into its gameplay. The game is hosted by MC Ballyhoo, a big-mouthed circus ringleader with a talking hat.
    • "Mario Party: Spinning Carnival" (Arcade, 2009, Japan Only)
    • "Mario Party Mysterious Rolling Catcher" (Arcade, 2009, Japan Only)
  • Mario Party DS (Nintendo DS, 2007): This game focuses around "shrinking" as a theme, and incorporates boards and minigames being made out of normal objects. Like Mario Party 4, each board has its own host.
  • Mario Party 9 (Wii, 2012): This game introduces the "car" mechanic, having all players move together on the board rather than separately. The game is hosted by a Blue Toad and a Yellow Toad.
    • "Mario Party Mysterious Challenge World" (Arcade, 2016, Japan Only)
  • Mario Party: Island Tour (Nintendo 3DS, 2013): Exactly What It Says on the Tin, this game takes place on the floating islands known as the Party Islands, with various play modes. Blue Toad and Yellow Toad once again host.
  • Mario Party 10 (Wii U, 2015): The first game with Bowser as a playable character in his own mode, and the second to have more than 4 players playing at once. Once again, various Toads serve as the hosts (except for Bowser Party, where they share the role of host with Bowser Jr.)
  • Mario Party: Star Rush (Nintendo 3DS, 2016): Places the spotlight on the Toads, with each player moving simultaneously and less emphasis on minigames and the other characters. Yet again, the hosts are Toads.
  • Mario Party: The Top 100 (Nintendo 3DS, 2017): A collection of the 100 best minigames from the 10 home console Mario Party games. Toad and Toadette host, but non-Toad hosts from the previous console games make cameos.
  • Super Mario Party (Nintendo Switch, 2018): A complete reboot of the series. Returns to the board game mechanic prior to Mario Party 9 mixing with a few elements from later games (such as the "ally" recruiting mechanic from Mario Party: Star Rush). It also features a mode which takes emphasis on "dual screen" gameplay across two Nintendo Switch systems. Toad and Toadette return as hosts, while Kamek also serves as a host when characters land on a bad luck space.


This series provides examples of:

  • Abandon Ship: In 2, this is played straight in a mini-game of the same name.
  • Ac CENT Upon The Wrong Syl LA Ble: New Re-CORD!
    • GOT It-EM!
  • Adapted Out: The Koopa Kids were present in Mario Party 4's "The Final Battle", but when the minigame was remastered for The Top 100, they're nowhere to be found, with Bowser Jr. taking their place.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: Bowser in Mario Party 10.
  • A Lizard Named "Liz": Shroomlock the Toad detective from Advance.
  • The All-Seeing A.I.:
    • Torpedo Targets in 2 has you looking for targets and shooting them. The computer always knows where they are, even though there is no map or radar.
    • For Ground Pound in 1, the AI always gets one wrong for every one that it gets right (but usually still wins anyway). However, at the beginning of the game, you can see and memorize which posts are right and wrong before the butterflies land on them.
  • Always Night: Boo's Haunted Bash from 4, King Boo's Haunted Hideaway from 8, Boo's Horror Castle from 9, Kamek's Carpet Ride from Island Tour, and Haunted Trail from 10. Subverted in Horror Land from 2 and all of the boards from 6, where it's night only half of the time.
  • Always Over the Shoulder: The tank games.
  • Amusement Park: Bowser Land in 2, Toad's Midway Madness in 4, Bowser's Enchanted Inferno in 7, and the entirety of 8.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Generally speaking, if the players are on the final turn of a game board, item shops and set pieces that need coin investments will be automatically skipped, because there would be no advantage in buying an item or plunking down coins for something that a player couldn't use.
    • Starting with 2, players could practice any mini-game, which allowed them to play it with nothing at risk before playing it for real. It was a very useful way to get a sense for how a mini-game worked.
    • If a player has to keep retrying a mini-game in The Top 100's Minigame Island, the game will reduce the difficulty of the CPU opponents. It's very useful if you can't mash or rotate hard enough in certain minigames the first time around.
    • In Super Mario Party, where a player lands after their dice roll, what a space does, and how far they are from the star are immediately apparent at all times. Additionally, players can practice minigames on the minigame screen without having to go to a separate screen, and the minigame won't start until all players are ready.
    • Failing a minigame enough times in Super Mario Party's Minigame Island will result in a Toady giving you the option to skip it and move on to the next.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: From the first installment:
    Koopa: This Star was broken up by Bowser, and he even wrote graffiti all over it! This cannot be permitted!
  • Art Evolution: The first three games had simple, flat boards with simple 3D-ish models. The fourth game had a 3D background, but all the paths took place on the same four-direction metal walkway. Starting with the fifth game, the paths are incorporated into the boards themselves. 4 was also the first game in the franchise to show Peach and Daisy with their current designs.
  • Artificial Brilliance: Contrary to the trope below, there are times where the AI can actually show brilliance in Mario Party.
    • In 2 and 3, if the star is behind a locked gate, the AI knows to buy a skeleton key from a shop and use it on the gate to get to the star. Also, if a star can be reached by going backwards through a fork in the path, especially if this allows you to avoid otherwise using a skeleton key, the AI may even buy a reverse mushroom (exclusive to 3) and use it to actually go backwards after they pass the fork if they're close enough.
    • The AI will buy Mushrooms/Golden Mushrooms or Magic Lamps in 2 and 3 (or Double/Triple Dice sets and Star Pipes in DS) if they can afford them, to help them get around and to instantly warp to the star next turn respectively. They may also buy Plunder Chests (or Snatch Bags in DS) to steal items from other players, and in 2 you can even use the snatched items on the same turn, which they do.
    • Bowser encounters can go from penalties to Comeback Mechanic if you encounter them while you're in last place. The AI understands this, even going so far as Bowser Phones from 3 or even the coveted Slow Dice Block from 9 to make it happen for themselves.
    • Generally in Mario Party, the AI will take the correct way to get to the star, and they are quite good at most of the mini-games, even the puzzle-based ones, at least on harder settings (other than the ones that just involve button mashing, which they are always notoriously good at).
    • Super Mario Party's River Survival mode is a four-player co-op game - a timed trip down a river, with minigame scores adding to your time. Although the AI's skill at maneuvering is questionablenote , they will always perform the cooperative minigames with perfect synergy, allowing the time bonus to be made or broken by the player's own skill and not a faulty AI.
  • Artificial Stupidity: On Easy mode, the game practically wins itself.
    • Demonstrating this are a series of YouTube videos where, in their words, Luigi wins by doing absolutely nothing. It even crossed over with Super Smash Bros. and later on with Mario Kart 8 Deluxe as well. Although to be fair, many of those mini-games usually require several tries to win by doing nothing, and it won't work for most other minigames.
    • In the minigame "Ground Pound" in the first game, the computer always ground pounds an incorrect pole after each one they get correct, no matter what difficulty they are set on. To make matters worse, they will rarely fail this minigame, meaning the entire point of them always hitting an incorrect pole is to waste more of your time watching them than you need to.
    • In 3, computers will always use a Wacky Watch on the last turn if they have one (which always changes the turns remaining to 5 turns left), even if they are winning. It's as if they're purposely giving you another chance.
    • In DS:
      • On the Bowser's Pinball Machine board, there is a Star Zone that you occasionally end up in (rather than the Bowser Zone) where you hit a block and end up getting 1-3 more stars. However, if the AI has a Star Pipe and they get lucky enough to get sent to the Star Zone before using it, they may still use their Star Pipe to get to the regular star on the map, even though they could have just waited another turn and gotten 1-3 more stars by simply staying there.
      • Hexes in that game are traps that can be set on spaces that activate when someone lands on them (like Orbs in 6). These are given out for free for passing a Hex Space. The AI will never turn down a Hex, even if they have to drop an item they paid for to do so. And Hexes are apparently much higher on the AI's priority for item stealing than even items like Triple Dice and Star Pipes.
    • In later games that let you buy multiple items at once, it's perfectly common for the AI to buy more items than it has turns left to use them in.
    • The story mode versions of Pagoda Peak in 7 and Goomba's Booty Boardwalk in 8 require you to get to the end of the board first with a certain number of coins. The AI tends to ignore that second part and waste coins buying items that let them reach the end first.
    • Mario Party's AI has even evolved into an online spectator sport known as "Mario Retardy", where viewers watch a match between 4 bottom-level AIs as they hopelessly stumble around in minigames, unintentionally screw themselves out of stars, and suddenly propel themselves into 1st place against all odds during Chance Time.
    • Even high-level AIs can do this on a few occasions, such as in Mario Party 3, using a Lucky Lamp to move the star space elsewhere when they're right in front of it.
  • Art Shift: The 3rd game uses more flat, 2D imagery, since it takes place inside a toy box. The 4th switches entirely to 3D.
  • Ascended Extra:
    • Over the course of the games, Koopa Troopa, Boo, Toad, Dry Bones, Shy Guy, and Magikoopa (Kamek in Japan) have all gone from helpers or obstacles to hosting the game to being playable characters.
    • Bowser himself was also briefly playable in 4, but only for the volleyball mini-game, as well as 5's Super Duel Mode; now he's the main star of 10, with his own mode. He then joins the playable Mario Party cast in Super.
    • Also applies to Spike, going from being a boss in 9 to being a playable character in 10.
    • Diddy Kong was one of the board hosts in DS, then a "mid-boss" in 9, and now a playable character in Star Rush and Super.
    • After 20 years of being an extra in minigames, Goomba finally became playable in Super.
  • Ash Face: In Mario Party 4, whenever the loser of a Bowser minigame is decided, they get a roasting from Bowser, which chars their entire body except for their eyes black. The unfortunate victim then turns toward the camera and blinks.
  • Aside Glance:
    • In the original Mario Party, when getting a completely pointless Ztar that costs 40 coins from Bowser in Mario's Rainbow Castle, getting a free coin from Bowser's machine in Luigi's Engine Room (at the cost of 20 coins, equaling a net loss of 19 coins), having a Goomba plant a Piranha Plant trap for you on Peach's Birthday Cake, or getting some free coins from Bowser if you run into him without any coins or stars, the character turns around and, despite the graphics in those days, you can clearly see his/her expression of What.
    • Also happens in 3's Story Mode, if you're not playing as Luigi. After each Battle Royale board, the Millennium Star is about to give you a Star Stamp when a character will interrupt and say they deserve the stamp more than you because they suit that stamp's quality better (for example, Mario wants the Courage stamp). If you're playing as that character, Luigi will appear instead, claiming he deserves the stamp. Then your character turns and gives the camera a look.
    • In 4, the loser of a Bowser minigame faces the camera and blinks after being roasted by Bowser's flames.
  • Asymmetric Multiplayer:
    • Some mini-games pit one player versus the other three. The lone player is often given some advantage to compensate for their lack of teammates.
    • "Bowser Party" mode in Mario Party 10 is a 1 vs. 4 mode where one player controls Bowser as he chases down the other 4. Bowser gets to role 3-5 dice each turn and forces the normal players into a potentially lethal mini-game whenever he catches up.
  • The Bad Guy Wins:
    • In Mario Party: Island Tour, when the character reaches the top of Bowser's Tower, Bowser will reveal that the destroyed Bowser was a decoy and then proceed to knock the character off the tower, saying that they can come back any time.
    • Played with if Bowser Jr. reaches the top. Bowser will say that he was taking it easy to let Jr. get the chance to be a hero for once. Then, he knocks Jr. off the tower anyway, saying that he can come back any time.
    • This is the GamePad player's goal in 10's Bowser Party mode.
  • Band Land: Toadette's Music Room in DS.
  • Bat Family Crossover: Donkey Kong's board in 9 is clearly supposed to be based upon Donkey Kong Country Returns.
  • Batman Gambit: The player. To get anywhere, you'll have to plan ahead. Not accounting for the Random Number God can be a massive Spanner in the Works. Sometimes throwing a mini-game later on can be the best course of action to stop whoever's in first place from getting another star or what have you.
  • Beauty Is Never Tarnished: In 2, the most you can do to Peach's portrait in the Face Lift game is... style her hair.
  • Belligerent Sexual Tension: Brighton and Twila from Mario Party 6 seem to have a G-rated relationship.
  • Betting Mini-Game:
    • The Battle mini-games. All the players are forced to bet a set number of coins (if they have less, they lose it all) and have to play a minigame. The first place winner gets 70% of the jackpot, the second place gets 30%, and a random player gets any coins that were lost in rounding.
    • Duels have the players betting coins, a star, or a large number of coins for an opponent's star, on a Duel mini-game. Winner takes the pot.
    • Mario Party 3 featured Game Guy minigames, where you are forced to wager every last coin you have in a game of blind chance; you either win a multiple of what you wagered or lose it all.
    • In Mario Party 7, the Mic Minigame space. When landing on it, Toadsworth will ask you how many coins you want to wager on a minigame you'll play shortly after. Win the minigame, and your bet is doubled. Lose, and the money you bet is lost.
  • Big Boo's Haunt:
    • Horror Land from 2.
    • Boo's Haunted Bash from 4.
    • King Boo's Haunted Hideaway from 8.
    • Boo's Horror Castle from 9.
    • Kamek's Carpet Ride from Island Tour.
    • Haunted Trail from 10.
  • Big "OMG!": Luigi and Wario in the first game say "Oh my God!" when something really bad happens to them in the Japanese version. This was Bowdlerised to Luigi sobbing, while Wario says in German "So ein Mist!" (literally "Oh crap!") in the English version.
  • Bladder of Steel: 6's Endurance Alley. You have to beat all 100 minigames in one go to clear it.
  • "Blind Idiot" Translation: Not as bad as most cases, but the phrase 'Got Item!' in the earlier games does read somewhat strangely.
  • A Bloody Mess: Horror Land from 2. The natural path of the map has a car accident/sentient car monster on the far-left side. Traveling up the path reveals a red smear traveling up through the graveyard, with wolves licking at it at night. At the end of the path, just in time for you to veer away from it, you can see it was just a giant crumpled ketchup bottle.
  • Bonus Space: Some of the Happening Spaces might be this, but the Donkey Kong spaces are more likely to have a nice payoff. Then there's the Lucky Spaces in 8 and 9, with the former being more eventful and earning you a free Star.
  • Boss Arena Idiocy: Naturally appears in boss mini-games with Bowser where he is commonly defeated by something left in the arena that the player uses against him.
  • Boss Battle: Aside from 1, 2, 6, Advance, and Super, there is at least one boss in each game, usually as the final minigame of the game:
    • 3: "Stardust Battle".
    • 4: "The Final Battle!"
    • 5: "Frightmare".
    • 7: "Bowser's Lovely Lift!"
    • 8: "Superstar Showdown".
    • DS: "Feed and Seed", "Hammer Chime", "Hexoskeleton", "Book Bash", and "Bowser's Block Party".
    • 9: "Sock It To Lakitu", "Wiggler Bounce", "Whomp Stomp", "Bombard Big Bob-omb", "Deck Dry Bones", "King Boo's Puzzle Attack", "Cheep Cheep Shot", "Blooper Barrage", "Spike Strike", "Chain Chomp Romp", "Bowser Jr. Beatdown", "Bowser's Block Battle", "Diddy's Banana Blast", and "DK's Banana Bonus".
    • Island Tour: "Goomba Tower Takedown", "Chain Chomp's Lava Lunge", "Mr. Blizzard's Snow Slalom", "King Bob-omb's Court of Chaos", "Dry Bowser's Brain Bonk", and "Bowser's Sky Scuffle".
    • 10: "Mega Goomba's Ladder Leap", "Petey's Bomb Battle", "Mega Sledge Bro's Card Chaos", "King Boo's Tricky Tiles", "Mega Cheep Chomp's Shell Shock", "Mega Blooper's Bubble battle", "Mega Monty Mole's Maze Mischief", "Kamek's Rocket Rampage", "Mega Mechakoopa's Swing & Stomp", and "Bowser's Tank Terror".
    • Star Rush: "Mega Goomba's Bad Dream", "King Boo's Light Smite", "Mega Monty Mole's in the Hole", "King Bob-omb's Boom D'état", "Petey Piranha's Shell Smackdown", "Mega Blooper's Bayside Bop", "Mega Dry Bones's Femur Fever", "Kamek's Card Tricks", "Bowser Jr.'s Pound for Pound", "Bowser's Space Race", "Bowser's Shocking Slipup", and "Bowser's Hit-or-Missile Mania".
  • Bowdlerize:
    • In the first game, Luigi and Wario originally broke the third commandment when something bad happened to them.
    • The realistic guns used at the end of the second game's Western Land were changed to toy cork guns, inadvertently making the scene funnier due to Bowser having a Minor Injury Overreaction as a result. Professor Fungi's pipe was also removed.
  • Bragging Rights Reward: In-universe, this is the plot of the first game, with all the characters competing to simply prove who is the best among them.
  • Bubbly Clouds:
    • Mario's Rainbow Castle from the original.
    • Rules Land in 2.
    • Rainbow Dream from 5.
    • The entirety of Island Tour.
    • Airship Central in 10.
  • Brought Down to Badass: Rosalina is as capable as the rest of the cast, but her deity-like abilities don't come into play. Because of this, she is just as vunerable as everyone else to Amusing Injuries like getting her butt burned or other types of punishments such as being comically chased off by a horde of Broozers.
  • Bullying a Dragon: An AI-controlled Donkey Kong in 2 will repeatedly go for the Bowser Bomb in item games, because he apparently believes he can take on Bowser himself. But unless he has the most stars at the end of the game, he cannot. Expect him to lose coins as a result (Bowser takes his own turn on the board at the end of the turn in which the Bowser Bomb is won, with a triple dice block; he bankrupts any player he runs into on his turn).
  • Butt-Dialing Mordor: In 3, you can get a Bowser Phone that instantly calls him to deliver misery. When you dial him, he asks who is calling. You can lie and say whoever you want. You can also be honest, which can actually be really helpful if you have no coins when you call him. The final option is "Who do you think?", which yields a random result. Woe unto you if you choose the last option and Bowser guesses correctly.
  • Butt-Monkey: Wario receives the brunt of the abuse on Mario Party 1's title screens. Donkey Kong's has him falling off of the vines everyone is swinging on, Luigi's has him getting hooked by his overalls, Mario's has him being dragged along on Mario's flight by his feet, Peach's has him apparently drowning in cake frosting, and even Wario's own title screen has him not seeming too enthusiastic about the two armies of Bob-ombs surrounding him and the gang. The other two simply depict him posing with everyone else (on the default screen) and pulling down a volleyball net for Donkey Kong to lay down a mean spike (on Yoshi's screen).
    • Less pronounced then usual, but Luigi also ends up as this on occasion. Most notably in 6's Miracle Book, in which almost every page he's on has something bad happen to him.
    • The playable cast in general, when considering the amount of abuse they can (and will) endure every game. Bowser's Peculiar Peak in Island Tour and Bowser Party in 10 are the greatest examples of this, since both are pretty much themed around Bowser putting Mario and company through the wringer.
  • Button Mashing: Many mini-games require pressing a button as much as possible. Some other games in the original Mario Party required spinning the control stick.
  • By Wall That Is Holey: A minigame in Mario Party 4 requires you to do this with a giant book by running to the holes in the pages when they turn.
  • Call-Back:
    • amiibo Party in 10 operates in the same fashion as the earlier Mario Parties, with Coins and Stars rather than Mini-Stars.
    • At the end of the first game's Mini-Game Island, Toad would come and challenge the player to a race on Slot Car Derby, acting as the Final Boss of the mode. In The Top 100's Mini-Game Island, Toad returns to challenge you to a race on Slot Car Derby once again, though he's only the boss of World 3 this time around.
  • The Cameo: Plenty of other Mario characters make cameo appearances here and there.
    • MIPS the Rabbit makes an appearance in 3's Woody Woods, among other rabbits.
    • The infamous Mad Piano makes an appearance in 2's Horror Land during the night, playing in a band with other haunted instruments.
    • Dorrie makes so many appearances in the series, he's almost a Running Gag. 4's "Right Oar Left" has boats (called "Dorrie Boats") modeled after him, 5's pool toys in "Tug-O-Dorrie" are likewise modeled after him, and he can sometimes be seen in the background of 3's Creepy Cavern. He does make a full appearance in 3's "Dorrie Dip" and is one of the characters you earn a gadget from in Mario Party Advance. That said, he started to make less and less appearances once ND Cube took over.
    • Snowflake Lake from 6 has Whackas and Snow Bunnies making appearances.
    • Rosalina combines this with Ascended Extra, making an appearance in Island Tour's Rocket Road along with a few Lumas, before ultimately becoming playable in 10 onwards.
  • Camera Abuse: The Top 100's version of "At the Chomp Wash" has the Chain Chomp splatter the camera with paint before the minigame begins. The original version in 8 does not do this.
    • Additionally, "Head Waiter" in 5 ends with the loser getting smashed against the screen before falling down.
  • Camera Screw: 9's Perspective Mode deliberately invokes it for added difficulty.
  • Casino Park:
    • 7's Neon Heights board is a combination of this and Broadway.
    • There's also Goomba's Greedy Gala from 4.
    • Bowser's Pinball Machine in DS. Also doubles as Pinball Zone, obviously.
    • Shy Guy's Shuffle City in Island Tour.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Koopa Kid stopped making appearances in the series after Mario Party 7, being replaced by Bowser Jr. Likewise, Toadette didn't make an appearance in Mario Party 9, but returned for 10.
  • Climax Boss: Daisy, Waluigi, and the (fake) Millennium Star in the Story Mode of Mario Party 3.
  • Color-Coded Characters: In the Hudson Soft-produced installments:
    • Mario: Red
    • Luigi: Blue
    • Peach: Pink/Light Pink
    • Yoshi: Green
    • Wario: Purple
    • DK: Brown
    • Daisy: Yellow/Orange
    • Waluigi: Black
    • Toad: Light Red
    • Boo: Light Blue
    • Koopa Kid: Orange/Dark Green
    • Toadette: Pink
    • Birdo: Magenta
    • Dry Bones: Grey
    • Blooper: White
    • Hammer Brother: Yellow/Orange
  • Combat Pragmatist: Or Mini Game Pragmatist. It’s highly advised to play dirty if you intend to win.
  • Comeback Mechanic:
    • Bowser will normally take Coins or Stars from players. If a player reaches Bowser with no Coins or Stars, however, Bowser will give the player 40 Coins.
    • In the ninth game, when a player in last place lands on a Bowser Space and gets "Lose half your mini-stars!" on the roulette, he'll double your mini-stars (yes, DOUBLE the mini-stars) because he feels bad that you are in last.
      • When a player not in last place lands on a Bowser Space, they may have to give their own mini-stars to last place.
      • There are many events that benefits the person in last in the ninth and tenth games, as well as Island Tour. Beginning with Star Rush's release, this trope was severely cut down for the series.
    • Most Mario Party titles also present an event when there are 5 turns remaining where the player in last is invited to spin a roulette wheel (actually a spinning item box), of which most of the results are in that player's favor.
  • Commuting on a Bus: Donkey Kong, who was a fully playable character in the first four games, although he returns as playable in 10. Koopa Kid hasn't fared much better as a playable character himself, having only been playable in 5 and 6 before falling on the wayside.
  • Composite Character: In The Top 100, since Koopa Kid has been gone from the series for years, Bowser Jr. takes on his role as an NPC in certain minigames.
  • The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard: It depends. In certain minigames, they have extreme skill that no human could possibly surpass. A good example is in Mario's Puzzle Party in the third game. Despite popular belief, though, they do not cheat in luck-based areas.
    • In the earlier games, whether or not you'll win a race to the finish such as Skateboard Scamper or Abandon Ship depends entirely on whether the computer wants you to. It always comes down to the very last button press, and 9 times out of 10, the computer player will dance in victory and you'll be screaming that you had it. Thankfully, in later installments, tie victories are possible and you'll get the money as long as you survive at all.
    • While the AI is usually incompetent for the overarching game, in a game with multiple AI opponents, they suddenly seem to actively team up against the human players, up to and including throwing mini-games to let another AI win and get ahead. This could also be considered Artificial Brilliance.
    • High-level computer AIs are capable of input speeds that are beyond what is possible for a human player, even with a TURBO CONTROLLER. An example of this is in Mario Party 2 when a Hard-level AI has to fight off a coin-stealing Boo.
    • On some versions of the game (DS is a particularly notable offender), as the difficulty setting rises, it becomes increasingly apparent that the AI knows what number the dice will land on before it rolls and will make strategic decisions accordingly.
    • In Mario Party 4, and presumably the other games in the franchise, playing against computer players set to Expert difficulty will allow them to be able to mash buttons on games such as Domination faster than the game controller can register. Unless you're using a Turbo controller, in which case you are a cheating bastard as well, they may be damn near impossible to defeat.
    • The CPU always seems to know when to hit the spinning blocks in Chance Time. For us, the last block will spin too fast.
  • Computers Are Fast: Despite problems they may have with some of the more complex games where other players affect them, the high-level AI players always do well on the "rapidly press A", "Press the button that appears", and, most infamously, "spin the stick in a circle" games.
  • Conjoined Eyes: Due to graphical limitations on the N64, Yoshi doesn't actually use his eyelids in the first 3 games. Instead, Yoshi squishes his irises to create the illusion of "blinking" and "winking". Koopa Troopa also has this problem as well.
  • Conservation of Ninjutsu: If there's only one computer player, even on Easy, it will suddenly become much more competent at mini-games.
  • Continuity Nod:
    • The start screen featuring Mario's Rainbow Castle in the first game (the screen will change to match the player and the board named after them depending on who wins — beat any board with Mario in this case) features Mario in the forefront wearing his wing cap, flying himself and the others over the rainbow and the castle. Seem familiar? (Note that both games were released on the same system.)
    • The hosts of 5 are the Star Spirits from Paper Mario.
  • Cool and Unusual Punishment: For the last-place finisher in the first installment, and the loser of many minigames in every installment.
  • Corridor Cubbyhole Run: Banzai Bill's Mad Mountain in Island Tour.
  • Cut-and-Paste Translation: Every single minigame board is renamed for international releases, generally for the better.
  • Cutting Off the Branches: Zig-Zagged. In the intro to 2, Wario claims the theme park should be named after him because he was the Superstar in the last game, but the argument over the superstar continues, making it ambiguous whether he was telling the truth or was being a Sore Loser revisionist.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: Any mini-game in The Top 100 that has changed controls and/or objectives:
    • "Face Lift" uses the touch screen.
    • "Shy Guy Says" uses L and R instead of A and B.
    • In "Cake Factory", you have to press A twice to both grab and place your ingredient.
    • "Dizzy Dancing", "Hexagon Heat" and "Tidal Toss" are affected by the overall change of ground-pounding controls from A>Z to A>Anote 
    • "Kareening Koopas" and "Crate and Peril" have you tilt the screen.
    • The controls for "Mario Speedwagons" are reversed - that is, A to accelerate and R to shift gears.
    • In "Three Throw", you press A twice instead of B to throw. This makes it impossible to throw from the ground.
    • "Cage-in Cookin'" and "Dizzy Rotisserie" are affected by the overall change in ranks in mini-games.
    • "Balloon Busters" and "Dart Attack" do away with speech-based commands in favour of blowing into the microphone (or pressing L). Additionally, in the former, one player is eliminated at a time.
    • The change in camera angle in "Track and Yield".
  • A Day in the Limelight:
    • 10's star is Bowser, who is playable for the first time (not counting a bonus game in 4). Whoever plays as him can ruin the other players' days.
    • While he's never been out of focus in this subseries, the Super Mario Party rhythm minigame "Time To Shine" invokes this with its title regarding Waluigi: the game involves mimicking another character's poses in time with the music, and Waluigi will always be chosen as the "teacher" if nobody is playing as him.
  • Demoted to Extra:
    • Starting in 5, Donkey Kong went from being a playable character to a cameo that appears if you land on his space. He then got his own board in 9. He is playable again in 10, Star Rush and Super.
    • Koopa Kid went from being playable in the fifth and sixth games to being an extra in the seventh, and then disappearing entirely.
    • Dry Bones dropped off the playable roster after 8, but appeared in DS and 9 as a miniboss. Dry Bones became playable again in Super.
    • Blooper was a Unexpected Character in 8, but then only got a mention in DS before eventually, like Dry Bones, being a boss in 9 and 10.
    • Hammer Bro became playable in 8, but then became the Battle Game referee in 9 and 10. Hammer Bro returns as playable in Super.
    • Boo got it worst of all. After becoming an Ascended Extra to playable character, he was knocked down to Board Hazard in 9, not even getting to be a boss or host. King Boo got to be a boss, though. Boo was also a playable character in Mario Party: Island Tour, Star Rush's Mario Shuffle mode, and Super.
    • Toadette became playable in 6, but she was then relegated to be the host of one of the boards in DS. In Mario Party 9, she didn't appear at all. Toadette once again became playable in 10 and Star Rush. Then Toadette was demoted again in Super, but this time as a host.
    • Spike went from being playable in 10 to a minigame extra in later games.
    • Birdo also suffered this fate after 9, appearing as a background character in Island Tour and being completely absent from 10 and Star Rush. She makes a non-playable cameo in Super.
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • The Mario Party 8 Challenge minigame "Fruit Picker" requires the player to memorize five fruit symbols on a wheel, which then turns, and pick the out one to three of the symbols. If the player pauses or presses the Wii's Home Menu button, the symbols disappear until they unpause to prevent players from cheating by writing the symbols down.
    • Almost every NPC in Super has unique dialogue when approached by Bowser or Bowser Jr. Among other things, path-blocking characters are polite and apologetic, "minion" characters in the plaza shower them with compliments instead of trash-talking them, and Kamek will be visibly quaking with fear if either of them land on a Bad Luck Space.
    • If you somehow have the max amount of stars (which can basically only be achieved by hacking), the NPCs doling them out will tell you that you can't carry anymore.
    • In the first game's Eternal Star, the Baby Bowsers are programmed to not get the number you've rolled to prevent a tie from happening.
  • Did Not Do the Bloody Research:
    • In the intro for Grand Canal in 7, Toadsworth will say "The Star will move to another location when someone gets one. What a crafty bugger!"
    • 8 had to be recalled in the UK early in its release after outrage over the use of the word "spastic" — a highly offensive term for someone with mental disabilities.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Each character in Super Mario Party has their own dice block. Boo's die is a Risk and Reward sort of thing. On one hand, you have a 2/3 chance of getting an extremely high roll. On the other hand, you have a 1/3 chance of not only moving nowhere, but losing two coins. Do you feel lucky, punk?
  • Disney Villain Death: This is the fate of the player character in the Thirsty Gulch single-player board in 6 if one manages to roll enough to walk past the Goal/Rare Mini-Game space that is the last space on the board. They'll step onto a rock platform that crumbles under their feet and drops them into a canyon river; the camera cuts off here.
  • Divergent Character Evolution: Even in the early days, Luigi is shown to be a more complex character than the others. In 3, each character has their own Star Stamp: Wit, Kindness, Strength, Love, Courage, Beauty or Mischief. Mario, Peach, Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Wario, Daisy and Waluigi can only get one stamp apiece but, apart from Beauty and Mischief, Luigi can get all the rest. Though which one he gets depends on who you play as.
  • Does This Remind You of Anything?:
    • A mini-game in Mario Party 8 has you shake the Wii remote up and down to build up pressure in a soda can to make a geyser taller than everyone else's. Anyone who played this mini-game for the first time probably made the obvious dirty jokes after seeing how the game was played.
    • In Mario Party 3, if you land on a Bowser Space, the screen will cut to Bowser doing his trademark merry dance. Most of the time. Some other times, you'll catch him lying on his side, his head on one hand, his other hand on his hip, with one leg stretched and the other raised. Think about that. It's a familiar position, and it's somehow both extremely uncomfortable and hilarious beyond description. Especially if you're playing as Peach or Daisy.
    • Grab Bag and Bumper Balloon Cars from the first 2 games are this, as both games have players aiming for things on each others' backs. And then gyrating somewhat.
    • During Mario Party 2, the gimmick is that they all wear costumes on whatever "land" they're on (barring Bowser Land). In the first world (Pirate Land), Toad's costume happens to be a little dinghy from the "waist" down. Now pay attention to where the bowsprit is located, the angle and size of said bowsprit, and what he does when he's announcing the location of Baby Bowser.
  • Doomy Dooms of Doom: Bowser's minigames in Mario Party 4 are called Darts of Doom [[note]]Exactly What It Says on the Tin; players throw darts at a spinning dartboard and the player with the lowest score after everybody throws their darts gets torched by Bowser; however, there is also a Bowser bullseye in the middle, and if a player throws the darts and one of them lands in that bullseye, they lose immediately, meaning a few other players may not need to take a turn at all, Fruits of Doom note , and Balloon of Doom note . There's also Panels of Doom (a special minigame available on Bowser's Gnarly Party) and Doors of Doom (a single-player game note ).
  • Dream Land: The Dream Depot, the main setting of Mario Party 5. All the boards are formed from peoples' dreams.
  • Early Installment Weirdness:
    • The 'Rotate-the-control-stick' minigames from the first game, which were entirely eliminated after due to complaints that people hurt themselves, plus all the broken analog sticks
    • The first game was also the only one where you could lose coins in the end-of-turn minigames, although your coin total could never go below 0.
    • The first game likewise didn't have an in-party item shop. You had to buy items from a shop in town while you weren't in a board game, using the coins you accumulated in your Shroom Bank from completing parties. These items could then be switched on or off when you visit the bank (where they get stored). For any items that are switched on, a player may get one by chance instead of a regular dice block when their turn comes (such as a blue block that will give you coins equal to the number you roll or a yellow block limiting your die to the numbers 1-3). Other types of items had some pretty neat effects that never returned.
    • The second game was the only one where you could only hold one item at a time until you use it. Starting from the third game, you could hold more than one item.
    • The first game had mushroom and single-player mini-game spaces. These concepts, while not removed entirely in the second game, were changed drastically to having mushroom items, and single-player minigames went from being played for coins to being played for an item.
    • The first game doesn't have any battle or duel mini-games. Some 4-player games were even cooperative, where everyone was supposed to work together to accomplish the goal, although there are several reasons why a player might want to throw or sabotage the game (such as to prevent helping the first-place player), and even the computer players don't try as hard on harder difficulties for these games. The Co-op games didn't return until Super Mario Party.
    • 1 vs. 3 minigames in the first game had a small but significant variety of coin outcomes, unlike in any game afterwards where they always gave 10 coins to each person on the winning team.
      • Some of those minigamesnamely  involved the team of three stealing a fixed amount of coins from the solo player if the team wins and dividing it equally among the three players. Conversely, if the solo player wins, a fixed amount of coins is stolen from each member of the team of three, and triple that fixed amount would be given to the solo player.
      • Crane Game lets the solo player steal a third of another player's coins if they manage to drop them into a pipe. However, the captured player can attempt to wiggle free, and if they manage to escape, the solo player loses immediately but the team of three gets nothing either. Alternatively, the solo player could ignore the players and pick up solid cash instead.
      • Bowl Over had the solo player steal five coins each from any players they knock over.
      • Bash n' Cash had three solo players trying to steal as many of a fourth player's coins (the latter of which is dressed in a Bowser suit) as they can by hammering the Bowser-suited player.
    • Ztars did not cause the player receiving them to lose stars in the first two games. In the first game, getting a Ztar would only cause the unlucky player to lose 40 coins, and in the second game they do nothing at all.
    • Hidden Blocks in the first game could summon Koopa Troopa, Boo, or even Bowser, a capability never seen again afterwards.
    • The first game also had Mushroom Spaces that could either let you move a second time that turn or cause you to lose a turn.
    • In addition to Bowser Spaces in the first game, Bowser himself also appeared somewhere on each board, and any player who passed him would surely end up losing coins or sometimes stars if they had any. What's worse is that sometimes you had to pass (or risk passing) him in order to get to the star, or just might not even have a choice in the matter. In Mario Party 2, Baby Bowser replaces him, who may even give out coins if you're lucky (and then throws a tantrum over his Epic Fail), but if a player obtains a Bowser Bomb item or lands on a Bowser Space and gets Bowser's Appearing Act, then at the end of the turn, it causes Baby Bowser to turn into Bowser, who then moves around the board and takes every coin from any player he encounters, before turning back into Baby Bowser. In Mario Party 3, neither Bowser nor Baby Bowser appeared on any boards to take coins or stars, but the Bowser Spaces have remained for all the future installments.
    • In the first 3 games, landing on a Bowser Space wasn't necessarily a bad thing for that player, especially in the first game. Sometimes, all the players would play a Bowser-themed 1 vs 3 minigame (where the player who landed on the Bowser Space is the lone player), and only the losing team would lose coins. You might even play Bowser's Chance Time in the first two games, where the player gets an attempt to choose who will give coins to Bowser. There's also Bowser Revolution, where he makes everyone's amount of coins the same, which would help the player who landed on his space if they had less coins than the other players. In Mario Party 2 and 3, you may even win a free Bowser Phone or Bowser Suit item from him.
    • The first two games didn't have dedicated story modes; instead, each board had its own story, with an ending cutscene showing the winner of the board saving the day in some way. Their single-player focused modes instead consisted of mini-game gauntlets that you had to clear, and most progress towards unlockables was achieved just by playing the party boards. In the first game, you had to collect 100 stars just to get near the end of its "story", whereas in the second game, each board only had to be played once to unlock the final board, which also only had to be played once, so each star the human players had got converted to 50 more coins. The lack of a story mode was recycled in Mario Party 6 and its own final board had to be unlocked the same way that Mario Party 1's final board was unlocked.
    • Mario Party DS is the first Mario Party game to have boss battles. Unlike the future games in the series (with the exception of Island Tour), however, the bosses have a certain amount of hit points instead of a health gauge and don't turn red when their health drops to half or below, instead becoming harder with every hit. The boss minigames are also single-player games instead of four-player games.
    • Mario Party 4 is the only GameCube Mario Party to not use the Orb system.
    • Additionally, the Orb system in 5 is less refined than in the other games. Orbs were called capsules and were given at random by a machine with no way to buy them (said machine also had a small chance of giving the player a Bowser capsule, which added no capsules to their inventory, but did turn one red space into an additional Bowser Space). All capsules could be used on yourself or thrown, and using them on yourself required a cost. Finally, all capsule spaces could affect anyone who landed or passed them, including the person who put them there.
    • Luigi, Peach, Wario, and Toad in the first two games used their voice actors from the Japanese version of Mario Kart 64 in all versions, which explains why Luigi suddenly had a weird high-pitched voice and Wario sounding extremely gruff when compared to their voices from the English voice actors in Mario Kart 64. The characters would eventually revert to their English voice actors by the third game (with the exception of Toad, whose voice would remain the same until the fourth Mario Party).
      • Wario's N64 voice is an example of this trope for another reason as well: Thomas Spindler, Wario's voice actor in the first two Mario Party games, stated that the reason why Wario's international losing quote ("so ein mist!") was in Gratuitous German was because voice director Takashi Tezuka intended for Wario himself to be German. The character's nationality would quietly be retconned to Italian (through the use of a conspicuously Italian accent) once Charles Martinet permanently took over the role.
    • In the first installment, you would earn 10 coins for looping around the board and returning to the start point. This concept was dropped by the next game. Likewise, all the boards in the N64 era were sprite backgrounds and only the characters themselves were 3D. The GameCube era would have all the boards in full 3D. On the subject of 3D, character models on the board in the first game would shrink and become low polygon if it wasn't their turn.
  • Easter Egg: Super Mario Party has a minigame called Rhythm and Bruise, where the players bop plastic Monty Moles in time to the rhythm. If you play as Monty Mole in Rhythm and Bruise, Monty Mole will spend the entire minigame with a panicked expression and look away when he hits the plastic moles.
  • Easy-Mode Mockery: Playing Mario Party 2's Mini-Game Coaster on Easy or Normal results in the player only being able to progress up to a certain point: World 3 on Easy, and World 6 on Normal. In order to face the Baby Bowsers at the end of World 8, you have to play on Hard.
  • Egopolis: In 2, the Mario characters create a new world that is initially named Mario Land, but each one wants to name the world after themselves, so they have a contest to determine who gets to name it.
  • End Game Results Screen: Some games give a line graph at the end detailing everyone's progress over the course of the game, or a table with assorted stats such as how many of each space players landed on.
  • Enemy Mine: The 1v3 and 2v2 games (and 4-player cooperative games in the first installment), in which you team up with other players and everyone on the winning team gets coins. There are rare situations late in the game where throwing such a minigame is the best option.
  • Eternal Engine:
    • Luigi's Engine Room from 1. Lampshaded, as the announcer says "This is the Engine Room, but what kind of Engine Room is it? I have absolutely no idea!"
    • E. Gadd's Garage from 6.
    • Bob-omb Factory from 9.
  • Even Evil Has Standards:
    • Bowser will (usually) take mercy on you and give you some coins if you happen to land on his space without a single coin or star. However, he implies he only does this with the motive of taking them away later.
    • In Bowser's Tower in Island Tour (3DS), Bowser will occasionally give out random "punishments" through a roulette wheel once you reach certain floors. One of these punishments is to send you back down to the first floor, which, if chosen, Bowser will outright say "That's just cruel, even by my standards!" and won't follow through with it. He also won't take any of your Mario Party Points if "Lose all your Mario Party Points" is chosen.
    • In Mario Party 7, Bowser hosts the "Final 5 Turns" event, stating that the player in last is so lame, he's giving them a second chance by letting them spin a roulette with (mostly) beneficial effects.
  • Evil Counterpart:
    • Toad and Bowser in the first game. Mario's and Yoshi's stages revolve around making sure you hit the right one (Bowser starts this board on the island where the starting line is and Toad is on the other island, but landing on a ? Space will switch their positions, and accidentally running into Bowser will either take 30 coins from you or all your coins if you don't have that many).
    • Starting in Mario Party 5, Donkey Kong became the Good Counterpart to Bowser. This is especially evident in 6, where DK's out at day and Bowser's out at night (literally in the case of the final board), and 8, where the two alternate spaces depending on which one everyone most recently met.
    • Shy Guy and Kamek are a "board piece" example of this in Mario Party 9's Story Mode. They serve as the 3rd or 4th or both CPUs, and if they win the board, you lose.
    • In Island Tour, Bowser makes evil dream clones of the playable characters to fight you.
  • Evil Tower of Ominousness: Mario Party 7 has Bowser's tower from "Bowser's Lovely Lift!"
  • Evolving Title Screen: In the first game, the title screen changes its background depending on which character wins the board.
  • Excuse Plot: In all of the games, the "plot" will always be "We have a problem in X place with Y thing, help us collect stars to solve it!" The plot is hardly developed, but then again, no one plays these games for the plot.
  • Failure Gambit: Sometimes, you will want to lose a minigame on purpose. This may seem counter-intuitive... but if you're teamed up with a player who's in the lead in stars and is just short of coins to buy the next one after the minigame, you might want to make them lose by letting yourself be beaten as well. This way, your teammate won't get too far ahead in the lead, which is a pretty neat outcome in exchange for refusing 10 coins.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: If Bowser sets up a minigame in the original game, then somebody is going to lose coins. The games end in a tie? He just steals coins from everyone. He puts the player in Bash and Cash, a 1 vs 3 minigame where the other players' goal is to hit them and take their money, and they don't lose any coins? He'll just take their coins anyways.
  • Feelies: Rather than having a board game played in the game itself, Advance includes a physical board and pieces that you cut out and play a board game with, using the GBA only to play minigames, find Stars, and serve as a die.
  • Feud Episode: The entire storyline of 6 involves Brighton and Twila arguing over who is better, which Mario and friends must resolve by collecting Stars.
  • Floating Limbs: Tumble from 3 appears to have these.
  • Foregone Victory: In 1, 2, 9, 10, and Star Rush, even though there is a definite chance of your character not being the Superstar, there is no chance of Bowser ultimately succeeding. You cannot even lose to the bosses.
  • Forgot I Could Fly: Some characters, such as Paratroopa, Boo, and Blooper, are continually hounded by platforming sections and conveyor belts despite being able to leave the ground at will, and some of them don't normally touch the ground at all, although this may just be to keep them in balance with the other characters.
  • Gambit Roulette: More often than not, your plan will rely heavily on chance (e.g., the die roll) to be successful. Literally true in Goomba's Greedy Gala in 4, where you will take the path to the star or not depending on what the roulette says note . In general, a very lucky roll for you might win you the game after struggling so many turns for your plan to work, and a very unlucky one will screw you over for the rest of the game.
  • Gangplank Galleon:
    • Pirate Land from 2.
    • Pirate Dream from 5.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar:
    • Mario Party 3 will sometimes show Bowser in a suggestive pose in his Bowser Space encounters.
    • Mario Party 4 has a swimming minigame where you're able to see the petticoats under Peach and Daisy's royal dresses.
    • Mario Party 9 to some extent shows you there is no fluff in Peach and Daisy's gowns.
    • Wario's memetic "D'oh I missed" line from Mario Party one is quite literally this as he's actually saying "So Ein Mist!", the German equivalent to "Oh, Crap!".
    • When you pair Birdo and Dry Bones together in "Mario Party 8", their team is called the "Bone Chokers".
  • Ghost Leg Lottery: One of the 1v3 minigames in the first game, by the name of Pipe Maze, is essentially a Ghost Leg lottery. Here, the screen quickly scrolls up from the player characters at the bottom, briefly showing the turns in the pipes until the treasure chest is revealed at the top. The 1 player of the 1v3 must quickly determine which path leads to them, and select the pipe that would ultimately drop the treasure chest and its coin bounty to them. Make a wrong choice and the coins go to whoever the chest lands with.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: Super Mario Party features a 1v3 minigame in which the three-player team must crush the remaining lone player with a hammer-wielding crab mech.
  • Go-Karting with Bowser:
    • Wario is playable in nearly every game in the series; Bowser himself usually shows up only as a board effect to mess with the players.
    • Also, other enemy characters that have been playable include Waluigi, Koopa Kid, Boo, Dry Bones, Hammer Bro, Blooper, Koopa, Shy Guy, Kamek, Bowser Jr., Spike, and Pom Pom.
    • Mario Party 9 adds Shy Guy and Kamek/Magikoopa, causing trouble for you in 9's Story Mode.
    • Mario Party: Island Tour lets you unlock and play as Bowser Jr.
    • Bowser was playable in Mario Party 4's Beach Volley Folly mode. He becomes a fully playable character in Super Mario Party. Unlike his previous appearances, where he mostly antagonized the playable cast, Bowser is surprisingly amicable in Super Mario Party and gets Kamek to help set up the whole event. Additionally, Pom Pom makes her playable debut in the series here as well.
    • The boards usually contain enemies that Mario kills on a regular basis living relatively normal lives (in 7, Koopas and Goombas populate a peaceful town, Shy Guys run a train, etc.)
  • Golden Snitch:
    • Although the first game's Mini-Game Star was probably going to go to someone already in the lead, the randomization of the types of Bonus Stars in the later games makes it more likely that the person in last could win all three of them and take the lead. Especially in Mario Party 7 and 8, if the person had been falling behind because they were spending all their coins on Golden Mushrooms or Thrice Candy (Roll 3 Dice). Three of the possible Bonus Stars that can be awarded in both games are for spending the most on orbs/candy (and Golden Mushrooms and Thrice Candies are pretty expensive), using the most orbs/candies, and moving the most spaces...
    • Chance Time can change the fate of the game in a hurry. Try switching stars with the player in first place if you're behind.
    • The Wacky Watch in 3 can shorten the game drastically, forcing players to start actively hunting and/or chasing down the Stars.
    • The final minigame in 9 functions as this despite posing as a Comeback Mechanic. Unless you're really ahead in mini-stars, whoever wins this game is likely to have the most mini-stars.
  • Gratuitous German: Wario's "so ein mist!" (literally "oh crap!") in the N64 installments, commonly misheard as "d'oh I missed!"
  • Green Hill Zone:
    • Towering Treetop from 6.
    • Windmillville from 7.
    • Wiggler's Garden from DS.
    • Toad Road in 9.
  • Grenade Hot Potato: Available as a battle mini-game in several versions, using a Bob-omb instead of a grenade; true to the trope, you can elect to hold onto the Bob-omb instead of throwing it right away.
  • Guide Dang It!: How to obtain some of the Solo Mode bonuses in Mario Party 6, since you never receive any hints on how to obtain them. There's also one specific bonus no one has been able to get, and a music track in the Solo Mode section of the Sound Test is named "Special Gift", implying that you will receive something upon obtaining every bonus in Solo Mode.
  • Hailfire Peaks:
  • Handcar Pursuit: 1, 2, and The Top 100 have a team mini-game that is a race between two handcars, where you have to coordinate with your partner to speed up, slow down, and bank around sharp corners (1 also made it possible to bank too far and fall off the track completely, meaning a draw would occur if neither team reached the finish line; 2 and The Top 100 did not, and there will always be one winning team and one losing team here). 8 also has a two-player mini-game in this vein.
  • Happy Dance: Bowser of all people has one in the N64 games, but whenever he's dancing, he's probably the only one happy about it.
  • Harder Than Hard: Very Hard, Super Hard, Brutal, Expert, Intense, Harder, or Master, depending on the game, which usually needs to be unlocked. The AI is clearly better at some minigames than others. 9 was the first installment to include two difficulty levels above Hard.
  • Head Desk: In Mario Party 3, one animation Mario might perform upon losing a Mini-Game is to slam his head into the ground, only to immediately recoil from it in pain.
  • Historical In-Joke: The Bowser Revolution, which evens out everyone's coins (ie money), parallel to many Communist (etc) revolutions. Of course, which players are happy about it depends solely on how many coins they have relative to the others. Some people like to call it "BOWSER COMMUNISM!!!" or just refer to it as Communism. Even stronger in Mario Party 9, where it evens out everything.
  • Honest John's Dealership:
    • Bowser has actual appearances on the board in the first game — anyone who passes by him automatically has to buy one of his cheap-as-free and totally-not-bogus items, which inevitably blows up in the character's face the moment they 'accept' it. After wasting your time, he then takes most of your coins as payment and then does a merry dance to mock your pain. On top of that, if you don't have the money required to pay for his item, he takes everything you have. Jerk. This is not the case on the last two boards, where he is a pure Whammy that will steal coins or Stars from you if you pass in front of him; the last board also changes its teleporters if you bump into Bowser.
    • One of the Bowser events in 7 involves him opening a shop again as a possible Bowser Time event; pass by this shop, and Koopa Kid and Bowser force you to either buy a useless Bowser Statue (which is taken from you right away) or a Koopa Kid Orb, which is already given out as a random orb on certain spaces and adds another Koopa Kid space to the board while giving you nothing. Bowser closes shop afterwards and the store he replaced returns. Other Bowser times, he just shows up and charges around ten to twenty coins for photos that you don't get. note 
    • An obstacle on Kamek's Tantalizing Tower in Super is a shop run by a Toady that will not allow a player to pass it without buying an item. All items cost six coins, but the shop doesn't restock until all three items (a Dash Mushroom, Poison Mushroom, and Choice Dice Block) have been purchased.
  • Hostile Show Takeover: Waluigi's Island from 3 is implied to have belonged to Luigi, indeed, that Waluigi is in the midst of taking it over. The board is even similar in layout to Luigi's Engine Room from the original.
  • Hypocritical Humor: Boo Spaces in early games let you pay coins to take other people's coins or Stars. In the Goomba's Greedy Gala board in 4, after a successful attack Goomba says "See you later! And remember, kids, stealing is wrong!"
  • Inconsistent Dub:
    • Prior to Mario Party 4, Koopa Kid went by the name of Baby Bowser. In addition, he's called Mini Bowser in PAL territories and Mini Koopa in Japan.
    • Ztars retained their Japanese name in the English versions of every game they appear in except in Mario Party 6 and Mario Party 7, where they are named "Shadow Stars" and "Dark Stars" respectively.
  • Incredible Shrinking Man: The plot of Mario Party DS, where Bowser has made all the cast tiny. Minigames and boards play on this theme, with one board being set inside a (normal-sized) pinball machine.
  • Instant Home Delivery: In 3, there's an item called the Cellular Shopper, which calls a store and lets you buy one item. There's no wait, as you get it immediately.
  • Invisible Anatomy: Zigzagged with Goomba in Super Mario Party. Sometimes it hold objects on its head, other times it grabs them using its mouth, but there are times when it can "hold" items as normal as if its has invisible hands.
  • In-Universe Game Clock:
    • In Mario Party 6, it will change between day and night every three turns. When the time of day changes, prices at stores will change, routes will change, some board events will be different, and certain minigames will play differently.
    • Horror Land from 2 also changed the time of day once every two turns.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Snifit in the duel maps from Mario Party 3 has 2 in Attack and Defense.
    • Super Mario Party had character dices which made some of them become this
      • Mario and Moley Mole's dices are fall into this. Their dices only got minor changes, however it's recommended to use when aim for non 1, 2 or 4.
  • Jerkass: Bowser is basically there to ruin your good time by stealing your coins and/or stars.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: Bowser does show a softer side in Mario Party 4 and Mario Party DS.
  • Jungle Japes:
    • All of the DK boards use this theme.
    • Shy Guy's Jungle Jam from 4.
  • Land of Tulips and Windmills: Windmillville from 7. You have the flowers, the cheery bucolic atmosphere, the windmills, and even the Koopa shepherdess is wearing traditional Dutch clothing.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: The decision to allude to the smaller game system in Mario Party DS by shrinking the characters.
  • Lethal Lava Land:
    • Appears in most games, where it is usually a Bowser-themed board, which means it's also likely to be a harder board than the others in some way.
    • The only game where the lava board is not a Bowser board is Magma Mine from 9.
    • The Solo board Infernal Tower from 6.
    • One of the Bowser multiplayer mini-games from 7 is set in this kind of location, requiring the character to hop across a long stretch of platforms that sink into lava.
  • Level Ate:
    • Peach's Birthday Cake from the original game.
    • Sweet Dream from 5.
    • Megafruit Paradise from Super Mario Party has islands shaped like a pineapple and a watermelon.
  • Loads and Loads of Characters: As the series went on, it started with just six major Mario characters (Mario, Luigi, Peach, Yoshi, Wario, and DK), to having 14 in 8, including a few various recurring enemies as characters.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading: DS and Island Tour's Multiplayer modes are full of this, since they only use Download Play to allow 4 players to play with one copy of the game. The host player's game has to send board and minigame data to every client player every time it's called for.
  • Locomotive Level: Shy Guy's Perplex Express from 8.
  • Long Song, Short Scene:
    • The track "Not Gonna Lose" in Mario Party 2 was only used in the 2 vs 2 mini-game "Balloon Burst", the battle mini-game "Bumper Balloon Cars", and the bonus one-player mini-game "Driver's Ed". The problem with the former two was that those mini-games were almost always over in less than 15 seconds, while the problem with the latter is that not many people know that the mini-game even exists.note  Therefore, the latter half of the song was never heard by many players.
    • "Gaming with Bowser", the music played during Bowser minigames in Mario Party 6, plays for 53 seconds before looping, but none of Bowser's minigames in 6 last more than 30. The music player in Options Mode is the only way to hear it in its entirety.
  • Lost in Translation: Woody the friendly tree is known as Kinokio in Japan, a three-way Punny Name on Pinocchio, the Japanese word for tree ("ki"), and Toad's Japanese name, Kinopio. On its own, the translation in Mario Party 2 simply simplified the pun, but when Mario Party 3 introduced his Evil Counterpart, it kept his name as Warukio, which is Kinokio filtered through the same naming convention that gave us Wario and Waluigi, which was naturally lost on those who didn't know Woody's original name.
  • Luck-Based Mission:
    • The entire games to much of an extent, but Game Guy's mini-games in Mario Party 3, various "Russian Roulette" style mini-games in every single entry in the series, and a good deal of the board events certainly fall under this.
    • Some 2-on-2 mini-games are won or lost instantly depending on if an AI opponent has a particular position or not. For example, Torpedo Targets in 2 has two two-man submarines, one player steers and the other fires torpedoes at targets. The AI always knows where the targets are even though they can't be seen due to the narrow view screen, so if an AI is piloting your sub, you've already won.
    • Some of the Duel Minigames in "6" are this.
    • Goomba's Greedy Gala board form 4 has a roulette in the centre that determines which quadrant of the board you go to (although the scales can be tipped), and to progress around each quadrant, you have to win a dice-rolling game against Goomba or be sent back to Start.
  • MacGuffin: The Stars, which are the main point in the series (9 and 10 use the Mini-Stars and bananas instead).
  • Macro Zone: The entirety of DS, since everyone is Fun Size.
  • Make My Monster Grow: 5's final boss has Bowser drink a potion to make himself giant.
  • Mean Character, Nice Actor: In-Universe in Super Mario Party. Kamek takes on the role usually fulfilled by Bowser, who is now playable, and causes bad things on the board. However, according to Toadette, he's actually a really nice host and the two develop an Odd Friendship.
  • Megamix Game: The Top 100, as its name implies, features one hundred minigames taken from the ten numbered installments of the series, with redone graphics and sometimes different controls.
  • Million-to-One Chance
    • Winning Game Guy's Sweet Surprise with at least 32 Coins on a x32 Multiplier, or 16 Coins on a x64 Multiplier, will set you for the entire game with 999 Coins. The chances of this happening are very low (losing in the regular board will bankrupt you).
    • Mario Party 5 introduces the Miracle Capsule, which gives all the Stars of the player in first place to the player in last place. However, the huge catch is that this action (which is the the most powerful single action in the series' history) requires one player to have THREE Miracle Capsules in their inventory to activate and the odds of getting even just one Miracle Capsule are very low. To give you an idea of how bad the odds are, most 50-Turn games will only see two Miracle Capsules appear at most.
  • Minigame Game: The very point of the series, and the Trope Codifier.
  • Mighty Glacier: With introduction of Character Dice in Super, some of the dices can go really far but come with a high chance of the player not moving or losing coins. To wit:
    • Bowser's dice has a high number side, however the side effect is that the dice comes with sides of -2 coins and 1.
    • Donkey Kong's dice also falls under this. The dice comes with two sides of 10 which is helpful for those trying to collect sides, but three other sides are 0 and the final side is +5 coins, giving you a 50% chance of earning any sort of coins.
    • Downplayed with Diddy Kong's dice. His dice comes with only three sides of 7, but only 2 sides are 0 and 1 sides for +2 coins.
  • Mission-Pack Sequel: With the exception of Advance, all games in the series prior to 9 fall under this trope. 10 is arguably this to 9.
  • Monument of Humiliation and Defeat: In Island Tour, Bowser builds a huge tower as a monument to his awesome power and locks all the fun of the other Party Islands away.
  • Musical Nod:
    • The title screen theme of the first game contains part of the original Super Mario Bros. overworld theme at the end of its loop.
    • The music for Peach's Birthday Cake also contains part of the original Super Mario Bros. theme.
    • The staff roll music from the first game also references the Super Mario Bros. theme.
    • "The Room Underground" from the first game is a remix of the underground theme from Super Mario Bros., as is the Option House's theme.
    • "Dodging Danger", also from the first game, is a remix of World 8 from Super Mario Bros. 3.
    • The first notes of "The Blue Skies Yonder" from 2 are very similar to the beginning of the song that plays in the Princess' Secret Slide in Super Mario 64.
    • Creepy Cavern from 3 contains part of the Super Mario Bros. underground theme.
    • The main menu music from 7 is a remix of Castaway Bay from 6.
    • The BG music to the minigames "Ghost Guess" and "Pedal Power" from the first game is very similar to the map screen music from Super Mario Bros. 3's World 6.
    • The results screen music for Shroom City in Advance as well as 9 and Island Tour is a remix of the main theme from Super Mario World.
    • "In Calm Water", which plays in 5's "Submarathon", is a remix of the Super Mario Bros. underwater theme.
    • There are three remixes of the Starman theme throughout the series: when a player is under the effect of a Mushroom in "Toadstool Titan" (3), when the player is under the effect of a Metal Mushroom in Star Sprint mode (6), and when under the effect of a Star in "Cheep Cheep Leap" (10).
    • In "Bowser's Peculiar Peak," the first verses after the intro are "Koopa Road" from Super Mario 64.
  • Mythology Gag:
    • In 2, Bowser runs around causing trouble under various alter egos like Cap'n Bowser or the Bowser Sphinx, just like in The Super Mario Bros. Super Show.
    • 7 has a DK minigame called "Jump, Man". Jumpman was Mario's first name in the original Donkey Kong, which this minigame plays similarly to (Toadsworth lampshades this in the minigame's description).
  • Night and Day Duo: 6's hosts Brighton and Twila have a clear sun and moon motif, respectively. Brighton has a sun head and Twila a moon head, and they turn the board to either day or night, respectively, after three turns each time. They also get into an argument over which of them is more brilliant.
  • Nintendo Hard: In 2, Minigame Coaster on Hard. It forces you to perform and win every minigame in a predetermined order on Hard mode. You have a very limited amount of lives, much like the earlier platformer games, lose one every time you failed a minigame, and you only earn 1UPs from invoking Law of 100 with the coins you win from cleared minigames. If you lose all your lives in any world, you must start all over from your last savepoint (which is at the start of each world), and the last couple of worlds both have 6 stages in them. The final few stages have mostly button-mashing minigames, and the computer is usually very good at these types of games. The absolute final stage only has one repeat of a Mini-game played higher up in the coaster, but the "Toad" in front of it asks you a trick question about whether or not you want to start the entire coaster over. The actual minigame is a second round of "Shell-Shocked", but it counts as a one-vs-three match because you're up against three Koopa Kid tanks who will try to gang up on you.
  • No Ontological Inertia: DK destroying the Minimizer in DS by accidentally stepping on it reverts the playable characters back to normal size.
  • Non-Standard Game Over: Losing a board in 9's Solo Mode normally doesn't matter, as you'll go on to the next board regardless. However, if Shy Guy or Kamek win the board, they'll steal all the mini-stars to give to Bowser before vanishing, forcing the player to redo the board.
  • Obstacle Ski Course: Several mini-games take place on these (including one where you have to try to outrun an avalanche).
  • Obvious Rule Patch:
    • For a while, the bonus star awards were given to people who A) collected the most coins in mini-games played, B) most coins held at any point in the game, and C) landed on the most ? spaces. A skilled player could always get the bonus star mentioned in example A, which would usually lead to them getting a star from example B. Additional bonus categories were added, such as "most spaces traveled" or "spent the most coins on items", in addition to "most coins held at any point in the game" being removed. This was made so that there would be more diversity in playing styles and give other people a chance in winning bonus stars.
    • Chance Time was also removed from 7 onwards so that players would have a more fair chance of winning or catching up instead of just winning at the very last possible moment because of a luck-based event.
    • The Reverse Mushroom was introduced in 3... and promptly ditched in 4. It was supposed to hinder the target by forcing that player to go backwards on their next turn. However, going backwards could actually be very handy, allowing the player to go back to the Star they might have just missed, visit Boo more than once without having to go around the rest of the board, and even allowing them to get into areas which are supposed to be inaccessible without a Skeleton Key.
      • What the Reverse Mushroom did was to force you to go backwards, initially. Once you reached an intersection, you could choose to move in any direction but the one you came from.
    • Similarly, 3 featured locked doors on one-way paths. The player could "bounce" off the door, going backwards from it back to the main path, in order to land on a different space there. This was also reverted back to locked doors only being at the start of a path.
    • The Sluggish 'Shroom Orb in 6 and the Slow 'Shroom Orb in 7 slowed the dice block down and made it count up by one as opposed to being random. Unfortunately, it turned out to be all too powerful, as it was very commonly used to get an easy 10 instead of landing on a precise space. 8 nerfed it so it could only go up to 5, although that also made it easy to get a lucky space.
    • Similar to Chance Time, the removal of Hidden Blocks was likely to prevent one person getting a lead based on a luck-based event with no way to predict. It was brought back in Super Mario Party and H Idden Blocks can also be obtained as items. Unlike the previous versions, the coin awards are slightly randomized in value and a spinner was added to show you whether you would get a star or coins.
    • It was standard to have players that lost a mini-game not earning anything. In Super Mario Party, you can still earn a few coins if you lost. The only time you don't get any coins is if you come dead last in a mini-game that ranks players from 1st to 4th. This rule also somewhat neuters the problem of one skilled player winning most of the mini-games and winning all the coins from it while the losing players get nothing. Coin based mini-games are exempt from this rule since, like in the previous titles, your winnings depend on how much you collected.
  • One-Winged Angel: Instead of turning red like the rest of the game's bosses, the boss battle against Bowser in 10 (not to be confused with the playable version of him in "Bowser Party") has him turn into his "Dry Bowser" form when his health reaches half. Not only that, but his attack patterns change from him riding a tank to him trying to blast you with his blue fireblasts while standing in lava.
  • Out-of-Genre Experience: Mario Party-e was a tabletop card game rather than a video board game like the rest of the series — however, the e-Reader could be used to play minigames like those in other Mario Party games.
  • Outside-the-Box Tactic: Normally, one doesn't try to lose games on purpose, but throwing a mini-game if it's 2 vs 2 can be a valid strategy so that the partner you're with doesn't get ahead in coins/stars. How your "partner" reacts to it is a different story altogether unless they're an AI character.
  • Palmtree Panic:
    • Yoshi's Tropical Island from 1.
    • Pirate Land from 2.
    • Koopa's Seaside Soiree from 4.
    • Castaway Bay from 6.
    • Goomba's Booty Boardwalk from 8.
    • Blooper Beach from 9.
    • Megafruit Paradise from Super Mario Party.
  • Pet the Dog: Under various circumstances, if you end up losing coins to Bowser but have no coins at all to give him, he feels sorry for you and gives you a few coins out of pity.
  • Pinball Zone: Bowser's Pinball Machine from DS.
  • Portable Hole: Losing the dice-rolling minigame against Goomba in the Goomba's Greedy Gala board in 4 causes a hole to appear out of nowhere below your character and spit you back to the Start.
  • Precision F-Strike: Whenever something bad happens to Wario in 1 and 2, he will say "SO EIN MIST!", which roughly translates to "Holy crap!". It also counts as a Foreign Cuss Word.
  • Production Foreshadowing: Mario Party 10 launched alongside the Super Mario line of amiibo, which included Mario, Luigi, Peach, Yoshi, Bowser, and Toad. In-game, the first five characters always use these specific designs regardless of whether their Super Smash Bros. figures are used. Oddly, this also applied to Wario, Donkey Kong, and Rosalina, despite only having figures for the Super Smash Bros. line at the time. The following year, Star Rush was announced, as well as a second wave of Super Mario amiibo that includes the Wario, Donkey Kong, and Rosalina figures from Mario Party 10.
  • Promoted to Playable:
    • Bowser gets this in three different ways:
      • The Beach Volley Folley minigame from 4 features him as a playable character (the version featured in 5 and Top 100 do not, however), as does Super Duel Mode from 5.
      • "Bowser Party" in Mario Party 10 is a special game mode in which the player controlling the Wii U GamePad plays as Bowser against four other players.
      • After years of being a non-playable Big Bad or restricted to certain minigames, Super Mario Party promotes Bowser to a standard playable character who can play the same modes as everyone else.
    • Donkey Kong, after being Demoted to Extra in Mario Party 5, is playable once again in Mario Party 10.
    • Spike and Rosalina, who were a miniboss in 9 and a cameo in Island Tour respectively, are also playable in 10, with Rosalina being playable in all games afterwards.
    • Diddy Kong is playable in Star Rush and Super after being a board host in DS and a "miniboss" in 9.
  • Pun-Based Title: The names of most minigames are heavily pun-based, especially in the international versions.
  • Puzzle Boss: Many bosses in Mario Party DS.
    • Also some of the bosses from 9, with King Boo being the most obvious example.
  • Quip to Black: "Seer Terror", an unlockable Mario Party 6 minigame, consists almost entirely of Bowser making bad things happen to you and making witty remarks in the guise of fortunes. "You'll feel crushed by stress!" he'll say after you're crushed by a Thwomp.
  • Random Number God:
    • Chance Time is the moment where luck decides who gets ahead and who gets screwed over, either slightly (Coins) or royally (Stars).
    • Players are guaranteed to hold Game Guy's name in great fear and contempt, as his Mini-games tend to cheat and rob them of their hard-earned coins more often than not.
  • Reality Warper:
    • Bowser becomes this in Island Tour as he harnesses the magic bubbles.
    • Kamek in DS is the one who teleports everyone away to Wiggler's Garden at the beginning, and he also seems to have some Domain Holder-style control over the aptly named Kamek's Library (particularly in his boss battle).
  • Real Men Wear Pink: Bowser Pad in Advance. Hoo boy. It's decorated in pink and purple, and Bowser asks you to get him a ring, a necklace, or a bracelet.
  • Replay Mode: Each and every game has a Free Play mode to get into the unlocked minigames without having to play Story Mode, Party Mode, or any of the other special minigame modes. Later games added boss minigames into the mix.
  • Riddling Sphinx: In the Mystery Land board of Mario Party 2, Bowser is cast as the Bowser Sphinx (though he merely wears an Egyptian headdress and isn't winged or lionlike at all) who challenges all comers to identify a silhouette. The Superstar of the board identifies it easily. It's the Sphinx himself. Bowser also appears as the Sphinx when a Bowser Bomb or Bowser's Appearing Act is forced on the board and will ask a riddle to any player he meets (you're not going to get it right; he'll automatically strip you of all your coins if you're in his way).
  • Rule of Fun: The minigames don't give much explanation to their existence other than to let you have fun.
  • Rump Roast: Very frequently, both in minigames and in board events.
    • Mario Party 5's Lava Bubble capsule has the characters intentionally inflict this on themselves to advance 10 spaces.
    • Happens to Mario, at the hands of a fire breathing statue, in the Miracle Book page of the minigame Dizzy Rotisserie. Amusingly subverted with Peach, who doesn't get her butt burned, because the statue behind her turns out to be Bowser in disguise, which shocks her.
    • Happens every turn in Island Tour's Bowser's Peculiar Peak. It's the only reason the characters even move towards the goal, where Bowser is waiting for them.
  • Sad Battle Music: The first half of the final battle in 9 features this.
  • Scolded for Not Buying: In the fourth game, some of the item shopkeepers will lambaste you for passing by the item shop without buying anything. Boo, for instance, will say, "What!? Why did you even come in if you're not going to buy anything!? What a waste of time!" Bah shut up! You just didn't have any good items that I wanted.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here!: In the event that the Bowser Roulette actually stops on a good thing (such as 10,000 Coin Present) in the second and third games, Bowser will stand there for a second... and then run away.
  • Sequel Difficulty Drop: Played With in the case of Mario Party 4's "The Final Battle". Upon being transferred to The Top 100, several changes were made: the platforming sections no longer have a time limit, falling into the lava only costs one heart rather than killing the player instantly, and the camera actually follows the player during the final battle against Bowser and is no longer subject to Camera Screw. However, the player now starts off with seven hearts as opposed to the original's ten.
  • Sequel Difficulty Spike: The Minigame Coaster in 2 is much more difficult than its predecessor, Minigame Island in 1. Firstly, you no longer win extra lives by simply winning a minigame; instead, the amount of coins you earn is multiplied by your consecutive wins. You can't go backwards or replay beaten minigames anymore, meaning you can no longer grind up coins from a game you're good at, or even save your progress until you get to the next save space. There are also no branching paths, meaning you have to win every minigame in order whether you want to or not. Also, if you want to get the rewards from it, you have to beat it on Normal first (which stops after the sixth world) and then beat it on Hard. Also, the final minigame is brutal compared to the first game — in the original, you raced Toad in Slot Car Derby, who was simply a really good NPC. On Minigame Coaster, you have to face three Koopa Kids on Shell Shocked (normally a free-for-all) where they actively team up against you. Considering the second game axed control stick spinning, it's pretty telling that Minigame Island hardly compares.
  • Sequential Boss: The battle with Bowser at the end of Story mode often is this. Also, the fake Millennium Star in 3.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story:
    • With decent players, an average game of "The Beat Goes On" from 3 consists of over three minutes of pressing the same buttons as the previous players and no one receiving anything for it.
    • In Mario Party: Island Tour, when the character reaches the top of Bowser's Tower, Bowser will reveal that the destroyed Bowser was a decoy and then proceed to knock the character off the tower, saying that they can come back any time. Yes, this even includes Bowser Jr..
  • Shout-Out:
  • Signature Move: In early games, each member of the main cast favored a specific item, which served as both mild characterization and an influence on the AI's gameplay-style.
    • For Mario, it's the Mushroom, allowing him to double his full range of possible moves in any given turn.
    • For Luigi, it's the Skeleton Key, which allowed access to certain alternate paths with shortcuts or special events.
    • For Peach, it's the Plunder Chest, which allowed her to help herself to the items held by other players.
    • For Yoshi, it's the Warp Pipe, which swapped his location with another player's, chosen at random.
    • For Wario, it's the Dueling Glove, which allows the user to wager both his and an opponent's coins on a mini-game.
    • For DK, it's the Bowser Bomb, apparently because he figured he could take him in a fight.
  • Skeleton Key: An item of this name found in 2 and 3, and allows one to access certain paths that often have shortcuts or unique events.
  • Slapstick Knows No Gender: This is possibly the most slapstick heavy Mario spinoff series, and the playable females aren't spared from any of it. Not even Rosalina gets off the hook when it comes to suffering huge amounts of abuse here.
  • Slippy-Slidey Ice World:any of it.
    • Chilly Waters from 3.
    • Snowflake Lake from 6.
  • The Smurfette Principle: In 1 and 2, Peach is the only female playable character. Averted with the rest of the series when they added Daisy as a playable character in 3 onwards.
  • Snowy Sleigh Bells: The theme that plays on the Chilly Waters board in 3 has sleigh bells ringing throughout the entire song.
  • Sore Loser: The characters are always completely devastated whenever they lose a minigame, lose three measly coins to a red space while they still have tons, miss their chance at getting a star (and when they get downgraded from one of their rankings as a result), and so on. Characters like Wario and Waluigi doing this makes sense due them being bad sports to begin with and are fed up of being bested by the heroic characters, but seeing characters like Yoshi or Peach throwing a tantrum over losing a minigame can seem extremely Out of Character and rather childish.
  • Space Zone:
    • Eternal Star in 1.
    • Space Land in 2.
    • Future Dream in 5.
    • The Solo board Astro Avenue in 6.
    • Bowser's Warped Orbit in 8.
    • Bowser Station in 9.
    • Rocket Road in Island Tour.
  • Sphere Factor: The Trope Namer comes from 7, where teams of two push a giant ball to a finish line. Better examples would be Bumper Balls from 1 and 2, and Flatiator from 5, where players actually travel atop the balls to attack other players.
  • Spiritual Successor:
    • Wii Party.
    • It should also be noted that this series itself is somewhat of a Spiritual Successor to the little-known Japanese game Getter Love!!. Both are board games in video game format, have mini-games, have items with which you can get ahead or slow down your opponents, and were developed by Hudson Soft (though Nintendo still publishes Mario Party).
  • Square-Cube Law: One 1-vs-3 minigame is surprisingly built around this. The 1 player is a tiny, quick cube and the 3 players are large, slow cubes that are trying to crush the tiny cube.
  • Static Role, Exchangeable Character: In Mario Party 3, each character has a predetermined stamp aligned with them, except for Luigi, who will fill in the hole in the cast if you choose one of the other characters. Mario's proper stamp is Courage, of course, but if you're playing as Mario, Luigi fills in his spot in the lineup instead. If you'd like, you can interpret this as Luigi qualifying for each stamp (Wit, Strength, Courage, Kindness, and Love) while the rest of the cast only qualifies for one each.
  • The Starscream: Pulled off by Waluigi towards Bowser in Mario Party 3's Story Mode. You were about to battle Bowser for the Mischief Star when Waluigi shows up having the star in his possession. He even beats up Bowser to prove a point. Bowser then demands that you avenge him and defeat Waluigi. Strangely enough, even though Bowser wants you to defeat Waluigi, he still messes with you if you land on a Bowser Space.
  • Stone Wall: Whomp from the Mario Party 3 duel maps. He has the highest amount of health but cannot attack.
    • Koopa and Mr. Blizzard also count as this to a lesser extent.
  • Super Title 64 Advance: Mario Party Advance and Mario Party DS.
  • Sweat Drop: Done in Mario Party 7 in the duel mini-game "Apes of Wrath", when the two players realize they've stolen some apples from some pissed-off Ukikis.
  • Tactical Suicide Boss:
    • Piranha Plant in DS, where you catch the projectiles he spits at you and throw them back at him. Why is this tactical suicide? On the board itself, he simply breathes fire at you, which cannot be turned against him.
    • Bowser in his giant form in 5. He can breath fire out, and throw orbs that release shockwaves, yet keeps using orbs that leave behind rocks that can be thrown back at him after he uses his fire breath.
  • Token Evil Teammate:
  • Toy Time:
    • Toy Dream from 5.
    • 3 takes place within a magical toy box, and the scenery looks like what you might find in a pop-up book.
  • Trailers Always Lie: The promotional items for Mario Party 5 made it seem that the game's plot involved Mario and Bowser running for Mushroom President. The game is actually about Bowser invading the Dream Depot.
  • Turns Red:
    • Every single boss in Mario Party 9 gets angrier and harder to beat when they reach half health. Additionally, Wiggler literally turns red.
    • Bowser gets redder twice in 8, adding new weapons to the Koopa Clown Car each time. In 7, at the 50th floor, Koopa Kid will join the fight.
  • Underground Level: Creepy Cavern from 3.
  • Under the Sea:
    • Deep Bloober Sea from 3.
    • Undersea Dream from 5.
    • Whimsical Waters from 10.
  • Unexplained Recovery: Whenever someone is defeated in a minigame by something lethal (heck, one minigame in 6 has the loser sucked into a black hole), they emerge completely unharmed on the beginning of the next turn (although their finances and self-esteem suffer).
  • Unrealistic Black Hole: Before Super Mario Galaxy existed, a black hole appeared in the Mario Party 6 minigame Black Hole Boogie. The objective of said minigame is to mash A in order to swim away from a black hole. The loser gets sucked in, but then the black hole disappears, and they can be seen floating across the screen in the background after the minigame has ended.
  • Useless Useful Spell: The miracle capsules in 5. If the requirements are fulfilled, it takes away all of the stars of whoever's in first place and gives them to whoever's in last place. Unfortunately, meeting these requirements are almost impossible. The miracle capsule itself is a very rare capsule to get, and to activate its effect, a player will need three of them, taking up their entire capsule space, so odds are, the game will be done before you collect enough of them. To make matters worse, since it gives the stars to the last place player regardless of who collects the capsules, there's no guarantee that collecting them will help you. More often than not, it's just wasting space.
  • Variable Player Goals: 1 vs. 3 minigames would always end in a massacre against the solo player if most of them didn't require a different objective between the 1 and the 3.
  • Versus Character Splash: One appears before the boss battles in 9, Island Tour, and 10.
  • Videogame Cruelty Potential:
    • Some of the minigames are incredibly cruel and violent to the losers, who will end up electrocuted, spirited away, chased and then trampled over by a stampede of Thwomps, frozen, mauled, burnt, drowned, trapped inside a computer, taken away by Ukikis, and even swallowed by a black hole. Likewise, the fourth-place player that doesn't get enough stars or coins in the first game also meets a similar fate.
    • In 10, playing as Bowser in Bowser Party is all about bullying Team Mario and clobbering them in all sorts of ways.
  • Violation of Common Sense: Invoked in Mario Party 9 during the "Reverse Mini-Game" in a Bowser Event. You play a standard mini-game, but the objective is to lose as quickly as possible instead of trying to play the normal way. The first person to lose the game will win. Don't let this hurt your head too much.
  • Walk Into Camera Obstruction: The Pirate Land stage ending movie in 2 does this with Bowser and the winning character.
  • Whammy:
    • The Bowser Spaces typically play this role by penalizing coins or stars (or both) from your total and anyone else's or adding hazards to the board.
    • Mario Party 5, 6, and 7 also add the Ztar/Shadow/Dark Star to the roster. This is a black false star that will subtract a star from your total. 5's Card Party mode has a Ztar Star card that can be hidden under a real star card, and in this mode, it's possible to have a negative star total (plus it is possible to get a Double Ztar Star card and have a real Star turn into a Ztar on you; these very rarely happen, however). If there are any Ztars on the board in Card Party, they must be revealed and "awarded" to player(s) to finish the game (Card Party plays until all Star Cards on the board have been revealed). Bowser will otherwise be the one handing out the black Stars.
  • Who Wants to Be "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?": Mini-Game Attack in Mario Party Advance. 15 mini-games in order to win coins, 3 special items (Switch, Replay, and Practice). If the player wins five games, he can win 1,000 coins, ten games results in 10,000 coins, and 100,000 coins for all fifteen games. The player can stop and quit at any time, because if he fails, he loses everything.
  • Wild Card: The Happening Star is widely considered as this. The Coin and Mini Game stars are widely determined on skill, so it's easier to calculate who's going to get those stars. The Happening Star, on the other hand, is largely based on luck.
  • Wild Teen Party: The commercial for the first game has some cops arriving regarding a wild party. They eventually end up arresting Mario for disruptive behavior.
    "But it's-a me, Mario!" "Yeah, yeah... Tell it to the judge."
  • Windmill Scenery: Windmillville from 7 revolves around windmills. Buying them to get stars is the main goal of the board.
  • Wins by Doing Absolutely Nothing: The Trope Namer is a series of YouTube videos where Luigi stands around and does nothing, and the computer opponents, all set to the easiest difficulty, defeat themselves. It later expanded to include the Super Smash Bros. seriesnote  and Mario Kart 8 Deluxenote .
  • Wutai: Pagoda Peak from 7.
  • Xanatos Gambit: If you're a good enough player, you can set up a situation in a board where all possible outcomes in the late game benefit you in one way or another. You'll have to account for the luck factor for this to work, though, and you will need full knowledge about the board and the AI's behavior (or that of the people who play with you).
  • Xanatos Speed Chess: Because of chance and the AI sometimes making more stupid or smarter moves than you predicted, your plan may be foiled several times through the game. You'll have to rectify and change your plans as you go along.
  • Your Princess Is in Another Castle!: In Island Tour, when the character reaches the top of Bowser's Tower, Bowser will reveal that the destroyed Bowser was a decoy and then proceed to knock the character off the tower, saying that they can come back any time.

Alternative Title(s): Mario Party 9, Mario Party 2, Mario Party 4, Mario Party 10, Mario Party Star Rush, Mario Party Island Tour, Mario Party 3, Mario Party 5, Mario Party 6, Mario Party Advance, Mario Party 7, Mario Party 8, Mario Party DS, Super Mario Party

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