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Fights In Tight Spaces is a single-player, turn-based, deckbuilding roguelite based on the moment-to-moment decision making in Fight Scenes. You and your enemies are represented on a small square grid, and possible actions you can take are represented by a hand of cards. With those cards, you must outplay and outwit your opponents to be the last one standing.

In a world where espionage consists mainly of analysts poring over data packets, Section Eleven's role is to find more direct solutions, taking on criminal organizations that fall beyond electronic communication. You are one such agent, tasked with taking a hands-on approach to keeping the peace, via smashing your fist into people's faces and people's faces into other things.

The game was released on Steam in Early Access on February 24, 2021.

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Fights In Tight Spaces contains examples of:

  • A Rare Sentence: Even Agent 11's boss is surprised to have to tell you that Berlin has a ninja problem.
  • Adam Smith Hates Your Guts: The costs of medical and gym services rises sharply with each subsequent purchase you make in that location. Thankfully, this is only per location, so you'll always have an opportunity to purchase something each time you enter a new location.
  • All Bikers Are Hells Angels: The first organization you face is the Death's Head biker gang. Their boss is a bearded fellow wearing a vest.
  • All the Worlds Are a Stage: In the final mission, all the organizations you've defeated previously team up, so encounters can consist of any enemies previously encountered and at any location previously visited.
  • Arbitrary Mission Restriction: Each fight has several optional objectives to complete, e.g. finish in a certain number of turns or defeat enemies in a particular way. Completing them earns a variety of rewards like money or stat enhancements.
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  • Badass in a Nice Suit: Agent 11 - as you would expect from an obvious James Bond Expy.
  • Bar Brawl: One of the locations you fight in is a bar. The final battle of the Death's Head Bikers will usually be in one.
  • Bathroom Brawl: You'll often find yourself brawling in a bathroom.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: Agent 11 and his handler are black, the British Ambassador is yellow, Death's Head mooks are red, Insider mooks are orange, Jade Staff mooks are green, and I Completi mooks are purple.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Agent 11 never goes as far as to use guns, but he's willing to use other things like stun darts, flash powder, and the environment itself to gain a leg up on his opponents.
  • Continuing is Painful: You can choose to start on a later mission if you want, but the game warns you that without the upgrades from previous missions, things will be considerably more difficult.
  • Counter-Attack: Some cards let you hit your enemies back if they hit you. The Counter Striker deck is built around these types of cards. Some enemies also have counter-attacks, which can make them an absolute bastard to fight - although it also leads to hilarious displays if you can abuse movement and redirection so that they end up counter-attacking impacts from their own side.
  • Deadpan Snarker: Starting with the Insiders level, Agent 11 starts making witty comments about the next mission to his boss. It only comes up in the section openers, although the Taunt card does imply some use of it in combat too.
    Agent 11: (on being sent on an undercover mission into prison) I'm afraid orange isn't my colour.
  • Dressed to Kill: Agent 11 wears a sharp suit while taking on enemies.
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: You fist-fight enemies in claustrophobic spaces, as the title suggests.
  • Excuse Plot: There are criminal organizations up to no good and it's up to you to take them out.
  • Fight Like a Card Player: The various actions you can take are represented as cards.
  • Gathering Steam: The basis of the combo mechanic, which raises by one each time you land a blow and goes down when you move. Some cards are more effective at high combo levels, and some require a certain combo level to be useable at all.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: Section Eleven's philosophy. When all else fails, you have to get down and dirty. Notably, while certain enemies do bring guns to the fight, Agent 11 never uses them himself (though he's perfectly willing to dupe enemies into shooting their friends).
  • Gratuitous Ninja: The entire point of the Jade Staff section.
    Handler: I wasn't expecting to say this, but Berlin has a bit of a ninja problem.
    Agent 11: Don't we all.
  • Heavily Armored Mook: Certain Elite Mooks can simulate this trope by passively generating high amounts of block per turn to mitigate damage, and a couple will retain any block they've built up between turns. Often, the best way to eliminate them is by Ring Out.
  • Institutional Apparel: The Insiders are a prison gang, their mooks mainly wear jumpsuits, and appropriately their faction color is orange.
  • Jack-of-All-Stats: Your starting deck is a balanced one that mixes offense and defense together.
  • Kung Fu-Proof Mook: Minibosses are often immune to being Downed, and there's a Jade Staff miniboss who is also immune to friendly attacks, making redirection less useful against him.
  • Prison: The second mission has you infiltrating a correctional facility to dismantle a powerful prison gang.
  • Protection Mission: Sometimes, there is a friendly target that you have to protect, usually the British Ambassador. While it's not always required, accomplishing the task can get you an edge in the future.
  • Ring Out: If someone gets pushed out of the level, they're done. Makes sense when you're throwing them off prison walkways or onto subway tracks. Makes a bit less sense when you shove someone out of a public restroom and they pass out rather than just coming back in again.
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: Your enemies are capable of hurting each other with both regular attacks and counters. With clever planning, you can win a battle while throwing only a few of your own blows. Cards that reposition you and/or your enemies like Dodge, Redirect, Grapple, Push and Shove are particularly useful for it, especially when upgraded (since an upgraded Grapple or Redirect costs no momentum to use).
  • Situational Damage Attack: Certain moves can deal lots of damage, but require specific circumstances in order to use. For example, Head Smash requires your target to be next to a wall or an object, and Wall Jump Punch requires you to be between a wall and your target.
  • Spiritual Successor: The game is often described by players and audiences as "Metal Gear Ac!d without the guns".
  • The End... Or Is It?: The game ends with all of the organization leaders in jail... but the last line has one of them saying "(...and so it begins)".
  • Three-Strike Combo: One attack is three punches delivered in quick succession. Also, most versions start with three Momentum per turn, and pretty much all the attack cards in the Balanced starter use only one Momentum, so you can chain, say, Quick Strike, Quick Kick/Front Kick and Long Strike/Hammerfist into a three-hit sequence that also pushes the enemy away.
  • A Winner Is You: Complete the final mission, and you're treated to a scene where the leaders of the organizations you've felled are in prison, while the Section Eleven boss congratulates you on your work.

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