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Legends tell of an impregnable fortress.
And in its depths lies a weapon of immeasurable power;
A GUN... THAT CAN KILL THE PAST!

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/header_5.jpg
Clockwise, from top: The Marine, The Convict, The Pilot and The Hunter. Not shown are The Cultist, The Robot, or The Bullet.

Enter the Gungeon is a Bullet Hell Shoot 'em Up Roguelike developed by Dodge Roll Games and published by Devolver Digital. It's sort of like a cross between Smash TV, Nuclear Throne and The Binding of Isaac, where you must make it through a series of increasingly difficult levels filled with absurd guns and populated by anthropomorphic bullets that want to kill you, in search of the ultimate prize; A Gun That Can Kill The Past.

Each room in the Gungeon has a set of enemies with varying in strength and attacks. The player may dodge attacks by performing a dodge roll, or flip tables and use them as temporary cover, since they are destroyed after a few hits. The player also has a limited number of "blanks" for each floor that can be used to clear projectiles on-screen and push away enemies. At the end of each floor, a boss awaits the player; beating them grants the player various items and pickups, as well as currency to spend at shops and unlocks the next floor.

As the player progresses through multiple playthroughs, they may encounter non-player characters that can be rescued from the Gungeon. Once rescued, these characters take residence at the Breach, a safe level above the Gungeon where you can spend a specific type of currency earned from boss fights to permanently unlock special items that can appear throughout the Gungeon for all subsequent playthroughs.

The game received a free content update by the name of Supply Drop in the early weeks of 2017, which re-added content cut from the game before release due to time constraints. The update includes new rooms, guns, bosses, and much more, along with killable pasts for The Robot and The Bullet. Another free update named Advanced Gungeons & Dragons launched on July 19th 2018, bringing with it new guns and items, new rooms, hundreds of new item synergies, and a new secret area that features the Resourceful Rat as its boss.

The game was originally launched on Steam and the Playstation 4 on April 5th, 2016, before receiving releases on the Xbox One exactly one year after it's original release on April 5th, 2017, and on the Nintendo Switch on December 14th, 2017.

This Game Provides Examples Of:

  • 1-Up: The Pig item is one proper, as it will revive you upon death on the spot. But the Clone item works a bit differently, reviving you but putting you back at the beginning of the first floor. However, you keep all items collected in the run so far, making it more of a New Game+ for the same run.
  • Abnormal Ammo: Pretty much the entire premise of the game. Some examples include: A T-shirt cannon that fires poisonous shirts, a bullet that shoots pistols, a shotgun shell that shoots shotguns, a wooden gun that shoots explosive wooden grenades, the letter r that shoots the word "bullet", a banana that explodes into more bananas on contact, an oxygen tank that shoots sharks, a pillow that shoots zippers, and a dinosaur skull that shoots oil (and breathes fire on reloading).
  • Action Bomb: There are grenade enemies that run towards you and explode.
  • Adorable Evil Minions: The Bullet-kin are still pretty cute even though they're all trying to kill you. All but one, that is.
  • Advancing Boss of Doom: The Wallmonger, who is also an Advancing Wall of Doom. It will One-Hit KO the player if it reaches the opposite wall before getting killed.
  • A.K.A.-47: Played with. Some real-world guns are present, including the AK-47, the Winchester Rifle and the Colt 1851, while others are similar-looking guns renamed to avoid trademark disputes. This even extends to one of the Joke Weapons; the Mega Douser appears to be molded after the original 1990 "Power Drencher", better known as the precursor to the Super Soaker.
  • Animate Inanimate Object: One of the vendors, Flynt, is a sentient lock. There's also Gunther, a living, talking gun. And of course, there are the numerous gun- and ammunition-themed enemies you'll be facing during your runs.
  • Annoying Arrows: Averted, surprisingly enough for a game that's all about guns. The Hunter's crossbow is very powerful, able to one-shot lesser bullet kin in the early levels (when it usually takes three or more hits from any of the pistols you start with). There are other crossbows and a few bows, which are nothing to sneeze at, either. The one drawback they have is that most of them have, logically, only one shot per load (except for the Shotbow, which also launches arrow scattershots), making them slow to shoot, but that's pretty much it. The one weapon that comes close to playing this trope straight is the Charmed Bow, which is indeed weaker than the other bows, but the trade-off is that it charms enemies into fighting for you, making it very useful anyway.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Most quests, including the main Fetch Quest, will have their progress saved in-between runs. Because of this, you don't have to start a quest all over again if you die.
      • Adding to this, you can pay the cost for the Gnawed Key that's required to get to the Resourceful Rat's Nest in installments that curry over though runs till you pay 1000. Afterwards it simply costs 115 in future runs.
    • You start with a weapon that has infinite ammo and can't be sold or dropped, so you always have a fighting chance even if you've emptied out all of your other weapons.
    • Each floor has fast travel points in certain rooms (particularly the entrance of the boss room and the shop) that are unlocked upon clearing the enemies to prevent backtracking being a total chore.
      • Probably the biggest expression of this is the existence of a fast travel point in the lair of a boss that fights in a particularly large boss room. You can't fast travel during combat so the teleport point is purely there for if the battle took you far away from the exit door and you don't feel like walking all the way back after you win.
    • Flipped tables will destroy bullets just in front of it when they get destroyed so that you're not caught out by bullets that come in a heavy stream or forced to count how many hits said table has left. That said, the range on it is extremely minuscule, so you still need to be on your toes and ready to dodge.
    • Upon clearing a room, all currency dropped by enemies immediately gravitate towards you, ensuring that you won't miss a single cartridge and saving you the trouble of doing a lap around every room to pick up every coin that drops.
    • Edge Gravity kicks in during the tumble after hitting the floor from a dodge roll, so that you don't end up rolling off into pits. Very helpful when jumping towards small or narrow platforms.
    • The game really doesn't want you to miss out on Hegemony Credits. Should they fall into a pit, they'll respawn near you. And if you decide to leave towards the exit without collecting them, they'll instantly warp into your inventory.
    • If you dodge roll into an explosive barrel, it'll break harmlessly instead of exploding in your face.
    • The shop is guaranteed to stock at least one key if you enter it before picking up a key on that floor, nearly guaranteeing a chance at opening the chamber's chests or locked doors. Although that still won't help you when the shop gets generated behind a locked door...
      • Advanced Gungeons and Draguns changed this, by guaranteeing the first two chambers' shops will always stock one Key regardless of any keys you may have picked up already, and Shops will no longer be behind locked doors.
    • Along the same lines, the game takes care to ensure that you are supplied with a new gun by the end of each chamber. If you haven't picked up a gun by the time you defeat the boss, the boss drop is guaranteed to be a new weapon.
    • As of the Supply Drop update, you can now save and quit the game at the end of a floor. Prior to this update the absence of this feature was often maligned by people who had to abort runs when real life came a'calling.
    • You can open the Ammonomicon at any point and read up on the various items and what they do, as well as flavor text. If you do so during an active game, it will offer pages on all items you currently own, removing any (or some depending on the item) of the guesswork on what an item will do.
    • While the Resourceful Rat will steal most items if you leave the room without picking them up, he won't take keys, health pickups, blanks, or Hegemony Credits.
    • Failing far too many times at Challenge Mode will result in the price for playing it going down from 6 Hegemony Credits to only a single Credit, as well as unlocking the Chaos Bullets for future runs.
    • Table Tech Money grants you some money whenever you flip a table. To save players some tedium, this also goes ahead and flips every other table in the room.
    • After you enter The Oubliette for the first time, the game will provide some assistance on further runs to help you reach it again, by adding a movable water barrel to the fireplace room.
    • Right as the Dodge Roll logo appears during the startup sequence, you can press Q (or Y on controllers) to skip the startup and immediately start a run with your most recently played character.
    • Given that the final phase of the Resourceful Rat's boss fight is such a radical shift in gameplay, failing it won't end your run, and you'll still be awarded with all the items you managed to get from it before being knocked out.
    • The Tailor's sidequest to open up shortcuts is surprisingly flexible. While you have to give him all the materials for a given request at once, he'll actually accept materials for future requests if you happen to have them handy and know what he'll want in advance. The only exceptions are the Hegemony Credits, since they're the only material that can be accumulated over multiple runs.
  • Anti Poop-Socking: A Downplayed example. Once a character runs out of health, you are shown the time of day, and it reminds you of how long you just played by rewinding to the time at the start of your run, before the character gets shot and dies.
  • Ascended Extras: The tie-in comic that comes with the Collector's Edition stars Frifle and Grey Mauser, the two NPCs that just give you hunting quests in the actual game.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: After it Turns Red, the High Dragun's heart is the only area you can shoot at to further damage the boss. Of course, the heart only appears after the boss uses its last attack.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: Some of the A- and S-ranked guns can fall into this territory. These are easily some of the most powerful firearms you can find in the game, but often have low ammo counts (or high ammo consumption) that limit how helpful they can be during your Gungeon travels. As ammo drops aren't a guarantee, they're typically saved for the boss fights.
    • The S-ranked Super Hot Watch drastically slows time to nearly a standstill when you aren't moving, which gives you as much time as you could desire to avoid bullets. Unfortunately, this also applies to shooting your guns. You need to either be moving or continuously swapping guns in order to effectively unload a clip into an enemy, not ideal when you've gotten into a good position or are otherwise surrounded by bullets.
    • The Gun Soul is an A-ranked passive item that provides an extra heart container and grants you the ability to revive after death multiple times. The only catch? You respawn at the entrance with only a single heart container, and all cleared rooms are reset. You can retrieve your (empty!) heart containers if you can reach the point where you originally died. Good luck navigating the chamber that killed you with a single heart, low ammo stocks, and no refunded blanks.
  • Backwards-Firing Gun: The Gun That Can Kill the Past. It's a pistol with the barrel bent back towards the shooter.
  • Batter Up!: A weapon you can come across is Casey, a baseball bat which can reflect bullets and send enemies out of the park.
  • Bee Bee Gun: Bees are present in many weapons and items. When released, they will seek out the nearest enemy and deal damage until it drops dead:
    • The Beehive is a gun that will continuously release bees as you hold the trigger.
    • You can throw a Jar of Bees.
    • The Honeycomb is a passive item that releases bees to defend you (and the hive you're carrying) when you take damage.
    • The Stinger, a rocket launcher inspired by its real-life equivalent — except for the part where its rockets release bees on impact.
  • BFG: Quite a few, including an Expy of the Trope Namer itself.
  • Blessed with Suck: You will never have to use a key again if you wear the Mimic Tooth Necklace, because the chests are replaced with mimics.
  • Big Fancy Castle: The very first floor, Keep of the Lead Lord. It consists of libraries, courtyards, and even a room with a fancy fireplace which houses a secret switch to access The Oubliette. The corridors and the rooms are decked out with paintings, shields, suits of armor, and what look like gun-swords mounted on the walls. One of the bosses also fits the theme, the gun-throne riding Bullet King.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: The AU Gun, as it name implies, is a gun made of solid gold.
  • Blob Monster: Blobulons and all their variations.
  • Body Horror: The Mutation weapon, which turns one of your arms into a pulsating mass of flesh that spews a powerful blood beam. Its Ammonomicon entry states that it is a consequence of radiation exposure.
    • The VertebraK-47 is a dead adventurer's spine strapped to a gun frame. It shoots vengeful ghosts. Even the game calls this thing an abomination.
  • Bonus Boss: Quite a few of them, such as Blobulord and Old King.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • The Marine isn't as fancy as the other characters, but he starts off with an accurate sidearm, has armor that lets him take a hit, and his military training means he reloads faster and is more accurate.
    • Many of the guns. A good old revolver might not be as wacky as a gun that shoots homing skulls, but it'll get the job done just as well if not better.
    • The character's starting weapons. They don't have any special abilities, but they have infinite ammo and can whittle down already weak enemies.
  • Boss-Only Level:
    • Almost all of the character pasts consist of nothing more than a short story-related sequence, followed by a boss fight. The exceptions to this are Convict's and Bullet's pasts, as they each have a small group of enemies to deal with before facing the boss.
    • Opening a glitch chest will result in you being instantly sent to the next floor, except it only contains one room with two Beholsters.
  • Boss Rush: This game features one as an unlockable game mode, where you face every normal boss in the game up to the High Dragun. The Past bosses, Bonus Bosses, and the True Final Boss are all excluded from this mode. It's free to play on your first try, but every time after will cost you 3 Hegemony Credits.
  • Boss Subtitles: Each boss has one, e.g. Gatling Gull is a "rapid fire raptor", and the Bullet King sits "in the lead throne".
  • Breakout Mook Character: The Bullet, an unlockable Gungeoneer that is the same as the Bullet Kin that you'll be gunning down by the hundreds on every run, only he can dodge roll and use more than one gun by virtue of being playable.
  • Brutal Bonus Level: Bullet Hell.
    • For that matter, the two secret levels The Oubliette and the Abbey of the True Gun, feature some enemies you'll only otherwise see in the Forge and Bullet Hell. Except they occur very close to the start of the game when you have very little equipment. You're likely to have only one random gun plus your starting loadout when you enter the first of the two.
  • Bullet Hell: Follows a lot of the genre conventions, with enemies using intricate yet slow-moving bullet patterns. Bosses especially tend to have danmaku bullet patterns. It's also the name of the final secret level.
    • The description for the Gunjurer is said to be capable of "producing bullets from beyond the Curtain." This is a reference to the Japanese term for the Bullet Hell genre: Danmaku (a compound word meaning "barrage" and made up of the words "Bullet" and "Curtain").
  • But Thou Must!: Averted for when every character confronts their pasts, as you have the option to repeat the very action that ruined their lives in the first place instead of doing the right thing. That is, except for The Convict, for which this trope is played straight. When the bad guys come, your options are as follows:
    Teach them a lesson. <Flip desk>
    • Also played straight for The Robot's past in the Supply Drop update. Choosing to refuse the protocol of taking on the Last Human results in "command not found".
  • Canine Companion: The Hunter has a dog known as "Junior II" that can occasionally dig up items and will warn you if a chest is a Mimic. You can unlock the first Junior by killing the Hunter's past, and he'll seek out and attack enemies instead of digging up consumables.
  • Cast from Money: The Microtransaction Gun uses your money as ammo.
  • Charged Attack: Many weapons in the game need to charge before firing.
  • Chekhov's Skill: Three of the four player characters use a skill they learned in the Gungeon to defeat their past. The Hunter uses a Blank to destroy the trap her nemesis trapped her with, the Convict uses Table Flip to surprise the soldiers, and the flavour text for the HS Absolution states that the Pilot used the Dodge Roll to take it down.
  • The Chessmaster: It's implied that The Lich orchestrated the events within the Gungeon to facilitate his escape from Bullet Hell.
  • Chest Monster: Mimics show up in this game disguised as — surprise, surprise — chests. You can tell one apart from regular chests if you wait around a bit until it opens its mouth, or if your familiar starts barking if you have the Dog item. Or you can just shoot it once, which will cause it to respond aggressively if it is a Mimic. As of Advanced Gungeons and Draguns, they can also appear as walls.
  • Combat Tentacles: The Abyssal Tentacle lets you attack with these.
  • The Computer Shall Taunt You: Getting killed by something after a room is cleared has the game say you have been killed by "Your own slow reflexes"
  • Inverted when you beat the final boss, the game says you were killed by "Nobody! You did great!"
    • In the AGnD update, dying during the Resourceful Rat fight nets you various insults on the death screen, ranging from "Hubris" to "Your sad lack of skill".
  • Cool Guns: Pretty much the point, but of note are the real-world weapons that make guest appearances, like the AK-47 and M1 Garand. Such weapons tend to be Simple, yet Awesome, lacking gimmicks but being generally powerful.
  • Crate Expectations: They don't contain anything, but they can take a single hit from a bullet, making them decent short-term cover.
  • Creepy Circus Music: Winchester's shooting gallery minigame plays music that wouldn't be out of place at a carnival, but the light distortion and off-putting key makes it sound slightly deranged. Not helping is the fact that the room plays a drone when the game isn't being played.
  • Deal with the Devil: Sometimes, you can come across a shrine dedicated to "a prideful Bullet angel, now fallen". You can offer the shrine a heart container in exchange for a permanent damage increase.
  • Desperation Attack: Invoked by the Gilded Hydra, a very powerful shotgun-type weapon whose magazine size increases by 1 everytime its wielder takes damage.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: The Bullet. Not only is he immune to contact damage and his dodge roll deals more damage when he rolls into an enemy, his sword is the highest-damage starting weapon in the game, able to one or two-shot most enemies well into the late game and destroy projectiles. The draw is that, normally, the sword shoots powerful sword beams that can deal great damage, but only do so at full health. Getting hit at all means resorting to melee to deal damage, and in a game where only a select few enemies don't shoot bullets (and lots of them), it's very risky.
    • There's also the Alien Engine. It dishes out some of the highest DPS in the game and sets targets on fire, but it chews through ammo in the blink of an eye, has a very limited hit range, and has such massive recoil that it will blast you far away from your target the second you start firing it. Unless you come across the Heavy Boots, which eliminate the recoil, making it less Awesome, but Impractical, although you still have to stay close to enemies to damage them.
    • Another is the rad gun, a gun with a baseball cap and a skateboard. It starts out very weak, but enables active reloads (each reload can be made faster with a quick time event) and each successful active reload increases the damage of the weapon. After four successful reloads, your bullets will have sunglasses and be absolutely deadly, able to one- or two-shot many enemies, even late game. The catch? Each time you do a successful active reload, the reload time gets faster, making it harder to pull off an active reload. If you mess up, the counter resets and the gun goes back to weak bullets and a really slow reload.
    • Yet another example is Casey, which is basically just a baseball bat. As such, it doesn't actually fire any bullets of its own, and can only be used to hit things at a close range. However, it deals ridiculous damage, able to one-shot virtually any enemy, including heavily armored ones such as gun nuts. Plus, it can reflect bullets right back at whoever shot them, at high speed. If you can catch a bunch of bullets in one swing, it can prove extremely deadly. Smacking the bullet king at the same moment he fires off a ring of bullets will take out nearly half his health.
  • Disk One Final Boss: The High Dragun will end your run prematurely if you haven't completed the Bullet Fetch Quest.
  • Double Unlock: Unlocking an item or a gun doesn't give access to it right away. You'll have to find it in the game to see what it does!
  • Developers' Foresight:
    • During a co-op run, if you shoot the Cultist with the Gun that Can Kill the Past, you can get a special ending where you fight over who becomes the main character.
    • The iBomb Companion App detonates all explosives in the room. This includes not only enemies who explode on death, but also certain projectiles fired from guns such as the Grenade Launcher.
    • If you try to cheese the fights against the High Dragun or the Lich's second phase by flying behind them, the game will spawn an unavoidable wave of bullets in order to force you onto the main arena.
    • In the tutorial level, Ser Manuel is surprisingly interactive:
      • When Manuel instructs you to kick some tables around, he will react if you instead break the other props scattered throughout the room. He will also comment if you dodge roll, since he's supposed to teach you that later.
      • Once you get a weapon, trying to shoot Manuel will elicit many responses from him depending on the situation. For example, shooting him right before his boss battle will cause him to say stuff such as "not yet" or "I wasn't ready."
    • The Resourceful Rat, who usually steals almost anything you leave behind, won't bother taking the Super Hot Watch. This may seem like a bug at first, but it's actually deliberate, as the item's Ammonomicon entry states that it's "extremely hot to the touch."
  • Dual Boss: The Trigger Twins, a pair of giant bullets with contrasting dispositions. The Kill Pillars up the ante by being a Quadruple Boss.
  • Dungeon Bypass: If you complete the Tailor's sidequests, you'll be able to start the game from the second chamber or further down, depending on how many elevators you've helped to fix.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Everyone, if you kill their pasts. The Pilot saves his partner and best friend from the Hegemony battleship, The Marine saves his squad from an Eldritch Abomination and is hailed as a hero, The Convict escapes to a life of paradise with a fortune of her bribe money, The Hunter defeats her nemesis and escapes from being cryogenically frozen, The Robot prevents humanity from overthrowing an army of robots, and The Bullet saves the Gungeon from being ruled by an even more evil force.
    • Averted with the Cultist: He kills player 1, attempting to take their place, then realizes that doing so makes him the villain.
  • Easy Levels, Hard Bosses: A good gun will be enough to down most enemies, but the bosses' health-scaling mechanic will force you to focus less on your damage and more on their Bullet Hell patterns. It doesn't help that Master Rounds, which are rather beneficial HP-increasing items, can only be obtained by not getting hit during boss fights.
  • Eldritch Abomination: The Marine's past boss is this. It summons demonic minions and warps reality around it, making portions of the floor poisonous.
  • Eldritch Location: The Gungeon is implied to be one; twisting local wildlife into gun-wielding mutants, raising the dead, and transforming anything even remotely gun-shaped or related to guns into deadly weapons (not to mention continually resurrecting those who explore it and trapping them inside until they manage to kill their pasts).
  • Emergency Weapon: Every character's starting weapon has infinite ammo, so you'll always have something to fall back on should you run dry all your other weapons.
  • The Empire: The Imperial Hegemony of Man, which is mentioned in the descriptions of several items.
  • Epic Fail: one of the Bullet's relatives tried to "aim and fire" their ancestral weapon, a sword... and ended up stabbing himself in the head. How exactly that happened is a good question. And how did he even try to "aim and fire" a sword, anyway?
  • Encyclopedia Exposita: The Ammonomicon provides a description of every item, weapon, enemy, and boss you've discovered throughout the game.
  • Evolving Weapon: The Polaris is a gun which starts out fairly weak, but starts dealing more damage as it is used to kill enemies. Taking damage sets its power back a level; this is a reference to Cave Story and its weapon system, as the Polaris is based off the game's default weapon.
    • Gunther is the S-rank version of this. It just deals modest damage when first acquired, but as the player clears rooms, its bullets gain power and additional properties (ricochets, then homing). Unlike the Polaris, these changes do not ever get reverted.
  • Exact Words: The Mimic Tooth Necklace item's description states that it "unlocks all chests". To its credit, it does. What it doesn't tell you is that it does so by turning them into Mimics. Thankfully, Mimics in this game drop items upon their deaths, so it's not that bad.
  • Eyepatch of Power: Literally. The Eyepatch item increases your damage, at the cost of your accuracy.
  • Fantasy Gun Control: Inverted. While there are plenty of fantasy-themed monsters, all of them are packing heat.
  • Fetch Quest: This is a part of the story, as the Gun That Can Kill The Past won't work if you don't collect four specific items and bring them to an NPC in the fifth chamber. Fortunately, once you bring an item to that NPC, she will keep it for the rest of the game.
  • Feathered Fiend: The Gatling Gull, a giant bird carrying a minigun.
  • Feather Fingers: The photo that appears in the Ammonomicon when The Pilot kills his past is one of him clinking glasses with a feather-fingered avian person, presumably Z from his past cutscene.
  • Flintstone Theming: Oh yes. The game throws in nearly every possible gun-related joke there is. Gun themed names, creatures, furniture, puns, everything. One item description theorizes that the Gungeon itself being so obsessed with guns warps reality and is the reason anything slightly gun-shaped becomes a real weapon (in that specific case, a mailbox).
  • Flipping the Table: You can flip tables or coffins and use them as temporary cover. Some items even grant bonuses whenever either is flipped.
  • Foreshadowing: When your character dies, cross-hairs depicting a rewinding clock rewind to your console's system clock at the moment you started the Gungeon and fires. It's actually the Gun That Can Kill The Past.
    • The silhouette at the starting screen turns out to be Lich, lord of the Gundead and the games True Final Boss.
    • Each of the four main gungeoneers' starting guns have a bit in the description that alludes to their past. The Hunter's gun is shiny and new despite being so old, just like her. The Marine's sidearm is "prone to failing when it's needed most" despite looking solid, and the large Marine was certainly needed when he took the escape pod. The Convict's gun is "cheaply made and prone to jams", just like her relationship with Black Stache, and the Pilot's Rogue Special "often gets itself into more trouble than it can handle", not to mention it was given to him by his partner and "has never let him down". Unlike how he left his partner alone with the Hegemony Battlecruiser.
  • Frickin' Laser Beams: Most beam type weapons are these. Some enemies, such as the Beholster, also attack with these.
  • Gatling Good: The Gatling Gull, again. The players can benefit from this trope if they find a Vulcan Cannon.
  • Gainax Ending: After you beat the True Final Boss, it's not really clear what's going on. you shoot him with the Gun That Can Kill The Past. What this accomplishes and why it sends your character where it does are unknown.
  • Gender-Equal Ensemble: The starting playable cast has two male cast (the Marine and Pilot) and two female (the Huntress and Convict). The Cultist is sometimes referred to as a "he", but just as often as a "they".The unlockable characters, the Bullet and the Robot, are of genderless races.
  • Gorgeous Gorgon: The Gorgun is your typical green medusa look-alike, except dual-wielding a pair of uzis.
  • Greater-Scope Villain: Several Ammonomicon entries state that a few enemies (such as the Ashen Bullet/Shotgun Kin and the Kill Pillars) are controlled by some dark force, and the Drunkard reveals this dark force to be that of Kaliber, the seven-armed goddess of bullets. Though the entries may also be referencing The Lich, as his own Ammonomicon entry states the Gundead revere him as the immortal master of the Gungeon.
    • Upon accruing maximum curse points the player is relentlessly stalked by the Lord of the Jammed, who is responsible for the jammed Elite Mooks the player faces throughout the game and possibly for Lich's imprisonment in Bullet Hell.
  • Guide Dang It!: There's some secret levels in the game. Good luck finding them without a guide of some sort.
    • To get into The Oubliette, you need to find the fireplace that spawns in the Keep of the Lead Lord, extinguish the fire with a water weapon that may or may not spawn in one of the chests, enter the fireplace and flip a switch that opens up a secret room in the level and finally use two keys to open the gate down. There is absolutely no indication that you can do this, the means to enter the level depend heavily on RNG, and you'll likely end up going in with hardly any weapons while facing enemies about as powerful as those in the third chamber, as well as a special boss.
      • Reaching The Abbey of the True Gun is even worse, since it's dependent on getting into the Oubliette. Inside the Oubliette, there's a special armor item, the Old Crest (which may or may not spawn behind a locked door that you may or may not have a key for), which appears to act like a normal armor pickup. However, if you can get through the rest of the Oubliette AND the Gungeon Proper following it without taking ANY damage and place the crest on the shrine in the Gungeon Proper, you can finally open up the Abbey. The level has you facing enemies from the fourth chamber (two up from the Gungeon Proper where you entered from) and since you likely spent most of your keys on entering The Oubliette, you'll be lucky to have one or two decent weapons to fight with.
      • Advanced Gungeons and Draguns adds The Resourceful Rat's Nest, and it makes the last two look easy as it has two layers of frustration. To even get to it you must first pay 1000 shells for the Gnawed Key, which thankfully can be payed in installments in each run till it's paid for, then it's just 115 afterwards. Then you also need 2-3 Blanks and a normal key, find a room in the Black Powder Mine with rats running about and find a hidden trap door, go down it and ride a minecart. At the end of the ride, you must blank to reveal another secret chamber....and then use another blank to reveal a hidden chamber in the hidden chamber and use the Gnawed Key on the hatch in that room and you'll enter the Resourceful Rat's Nest. Think your done? That was the easy part. The level itself is The Maze and a Timed Mission that if you fail to get to the boss room in time will boot you right into The Hollow. The only way to know how to get to the boss room in time is to find six Infuriating Notes in chests, each of which contains a step of which way to go. The directions are randomized for each player.
      • Making the Advanced Dragun appear is also frustrating. You need to beat the Resourceful Rat, meaning you must do all the above and find a secret room in the boss room and unlock two doors with two keys you get from the rat. Behind the door is a Serpent which must be fed three non-junk items or guns to awaken it. The serpant must be taken to the High Dragun boss and beat his normal two phases, after which the serpant fuses with the High Dragun to become the Advanced Dragun. Thankfully after beating the Resourceful Rat once unlocks the Weird Egg, which when placed in fire hatches the Serpent.
    • The way to unlock Table Tech Rocket is bizarrely obtuse if you've not looked at the achievements. Flip a table and push it into a pit.
    • There's a LOT of secret interactions between items, mostly of the form "X is more effective if Y is in your inventory". These include logical interactions (ie Junk boosting the Trash Cannon), references based off the source material (items from the same game or famously used by the same character), and some that appear arbitrary (silver bullets are more effective in a few specific guns). As of the AG&D update, these interactions are denoted by a sound cue and a blue arrow when an item/gun is picked up that interacts with another, and selecting an item in the Ammonomicon will highlight whatever other items/guns that it is interacting with, if any.
  • Guns Akimbo: The Hunter and Convict are portrayed with these in the Versus Character Splash, with the former wielding two revolvers and the latter using a pistol and the sawed off shotgun they start with. Note that you cannot, in fact, wield guns that way in the game proper.
    • Some bosses do, however, dual wield guns, such as the Beholster, the Gorgun, or the High Dragun.
    • As of the AG&D update, certain synergies allow dual-wielding, such as the Bullet Twins' revolvers and the shotguns of Love and Hate.
  • Hand Cannon: There's a few of them, but the biggest (no pun intended) example is the Frost Giant, a pistol that is almost twice as big as the player character.
  • Hearts Are Health: Technically, your health is represented by bullets, but red and crossed two at a time in such a way as to form hearts.
  • Heart Container: Various heart-shaped items increase your health by one heart.
    • If you defeat the floor boss without getting hit, you will get an HP up as well.
  • Hellis That Noise: The strange, squelching sound that indicates that there's a Confirmed in the room.
  • The Heretic: One of the secret unlockable characters; a sword-wielding Bullet Kin.
    • The Fightsaber, being originally a sword (and still usable as such, though only in the silliest way possible), is considered highly heretical and merely picking it up gets you cursed.
  • Heroes Prefer Swords: Averted. There are only a few melee weapons in the game, and it's actually stated that the Cult of the Gundead consider non-gun weapons heretical. The only melee-oriented hero is a secret character, an exiled Bullet Kin wielding a sword.
  • Hitscan: Most of the guns use slower-than-sound ammunition, but notable exceptions include sniper rifles and the Heck Blaster (basically Earthworm Jim's old laser submachine gun).
  • Infinity -1 Sword: The Fightsabre, an assault rifle made from a sword that will send most incoming projectiles flying right back to sender without lessening the damage they do as long as you keep reloading it. Not only does this feature make it a real lifesaver against most bosses (up to and including the High Dragun), the Fightsabre itself also deals decent amounts of damage, has a good rate of fire, and can fire 500 shots before its ammo supply needs to be replenished. As French Let's Player Bob Lennon demonstrated in the third part of his playthrough, this weapon can turn most of the game into a pure cakewalk as long as you get your timing right. On the downside, it is also considered a cursed item, which means you'll occasionally encounter stronger 'Jammed' enemies after you pick it up, but it is definitely worth it.
  • Instrument of Murder: The Facemelter (a weaponized electric guitar) and the Gunzheng (a weaponized guzheng, a Chinese string instrument).
  • Invincible Minor Minion: The Gunreaper, a creature who appears in the later levels and has more than a passing resemblance to The Grim Reaper, cannot be killed by normal means. Instead, it will vanish once the rest of the enemies in the room have been dispatched.
    • The previously mentioned Lord of the Jammed, a Head Swapped Gunreaper that shows up once your curse reaches 10, is also this. Except it'll pursue you for the entire run until you drop your curse below 10.
  • Invulnerable Civilians: All NPCs are protected by a force field that diverts bullets if you try to shoot them. Their reactions can range from appalled to mocking.
  • Joke Weapon: The Microtransaction Gun. The gag on this one is a giant Take That! at Microtransactions and publisher companies forcing developers to include DLC (well, despite the fact that the gun itself is also DLC). The gun is classified as an A-tier weapon, so it diminishes your chances at finding actually good guns, costs 100 credits to unlock, costs money to shoot, and it is rather weak for a weapon of its rank. The only upside it has is that its shots can randomly unlock chests, but it would probably be better to buy a key with the money you would have spent shooting (and potentially breaking) the chest.
    • Even worse in this regard is the Klobbe, a reference to the infamous Klobb from GoldenEye, sharing the same horrible inaccuracy and pitiful damage. Even its Ammonomicon entry implies it's the worst weapon in the Gungeon!
  • Killer Rabbit: Those cute, smiling Blobulons? They're part of a galaxy-spanning empire that's conquered countless planets and is obsessed with battle and war.
  • Kill Sat: The Mourning Star lets you take control of one.
  • King Mook:
    • The Bullet King is obviously this to the Bullet Kin.
    • Inverted with the Beholster, as it spawns Mini Mooks known as Beadies.
    • The boss of the first secret level, Blobulord, is this to Blobulons.
    • The Lich, particularly his third phase, is this to the Revolvenants. The latter's Ammonomicon entry foreshadows this by mentioning how they're on their way to "Lichdom". Granted, he is their leader.
  • Lead the Target: For the most part, enemies will shoot at where you're currently standing, but a few enemies will aim where they believe you'll strafe to. On their own, this makes them only moderately more dangerous, but especially on later levels where you'll have a lot of bullets coming at once, it might make using a blank the only way to avoid damage.
  • Lethal Joke Weapon:
    • The soaker gun can seem useless at first, as it doesn't deal direct damage to enemies, only pushing them back. However, this can be considerably more efficient in environments rich in traps and pits, being able to keep space between you and your enemies can be tremendously helpful, and it does deal direct damage to bosses, all without needing to reload since it doesn't use a clip. Furthermore, if you're playing as the Robot, you can fill the whole room with water, which combined with his starting passive means you'll be able to fry every non-flying enemy in the room at the same time without ever having to expose yourself to danger.
    • The Barrel is a gun that shoots live fish. Seems silly until you realize the fish actually do decent damage for its fire rate, plus has a chance to stun enemies, allowing you to deal more damage with impunity. Also, the fish leave puddles of water where they hit, so if you also happen to have an electrical weapon or are playing as The Robot...
    • The Camera is just that — a big ol' journalist's camera with a massive flash bulb on top. It doesn't shoot actual bullets, has a tiny "magazine" of four flashes, and has to charge up before each shot... but it hits every enemy in the entire room simultaneously and is almost unparalleled in how quickly it can clear a massive room filled with weak enemies.
    • The Klobbe, an SMG made for reference to Golden Eye 1997. Like the game it hails from, it has a mediocre fire rate and a pitiful spread and damage per bullet. It also has "synergy" with the AU Gun — having an AU Gun and a Klobbe at the same time increases the spread of the Klobbe. Pairing the Klobbe with the Cog of Battle, however, multiplies its damage by 10 and removes any spread, making it a powerful weapon, even if it's difficult to find both in one run.
    • Ser Junkan has a chance to spawn instead of junk from destroying chests; at his starting level, he can't even hurt enemies and just weakly pushes them around. Collect MORE junk, however, and he'll eventually become a Hyper-Competent Sidekick.
  • Literal Metaphor: The Barrel is a barrel-shaped gun that shoots fish, in reference to the old saying "as easy as shooting fish in a barrel". According to the description, a gun-related phrase repeated enough can have strange effects coupled with the fact that "words are the Gungeon's second language".
    • The first gun you receive in the tutorial is the Peashooter, a gun that shoots literal peas.
  • Luck-Based Mission: A NPC you'll rescue in the Gungeon, the Sorceress, will provide a "blessing" for the price of 6 Hegemony credits. This "blessing" means that a) your gun will randomly change into any other unlocked gun during the next run and b) you won't be able to pick up any guns. Which means you can get either totally overpowered weapons at any given time, or you can be stuck in a difficult room or boss fight with only a Joke Weapon. Completing a "blessed" run will unlock Gunther, one of the best weapons in the game.
  • Luck Stat: Coolness will increase the chance of finding rewards after clearing a room and decrease the chance of finding a chest with a fuse. You aren't told how much coolness you have at any given point, but items that increase coolness will generally use the word "cool" in their Ammonomicon description.
    • Curse works in the opposite way — increasing the chance of finding Mimic chests and decreasing the chance of finding rewards after clearing a room. It's not entirely a downgrade, though; enemies drop more money, and your chances of finding ammo after clearing rooms increase.
  • Macrogame:
    • Defeating bosses earns you Hegemony Credits which you can use to unlock new weapons and items to find within the Gungeon.
    • Rescuing people locked in the Gungeon saves them forever and lets them show up in the hub or during runs to provide their services. There is also a secret playable character that can be unlocked by "making friends" You have to Sheathe Your Sword on the one enemy in the game that does not attack at all with a specific enemy five times.
    • Contributing to the repair of elevators is a quest that can be accomplished over several, even unsuccessful, playthroughs. There is also a secret playable character that you can heal from their coma if you work on the elevators.
  • Magikarp Power: Ser Junkan, hands down. First, you have to be lucky enough to get him (which is REALLY hard after you find him the first time, the spawn rate drops to 5%) instead of a regular piece of junk from a broken chest. Then, you have to destroy further chests to get even more junk to increase his level, which means that all your usual drops from treasure chests are replaced with otherwise useless junk, or a random supply like health bullets, or even an exploded chest containing nothing. You can get free junk from the Ser Junkan shrine if you have him, but good luck finding it. You need 6 pieces of junk to unlock Ser Junkan's archangel form, which makes him extremely powerful AND will sacrifice his life to fully heal you if you die, and if you get one more piece of junk he loses his healing ability but it becomes quite clear who the real star of the playthrough is.
  • Metal Slime: The Supply Drop update introduced Keybullet Kin, which taunt the player and run to the other side of the screen to teleport. Chasing them down is dangerous in a bullet-filled environment, but they have low HP and always drop a key on death. Advanced Gungeons and Draguns introduced their cousins, the Chance Kin, which drop random pickups instead.
  • Mix-and-Match Weapon:
    • Despite their name, the "Gun Nut" enemies wield these.
    • The Huntsman, a shotgun/axe combo that is reloaded by swinging it, which can deflect bullets if timed well.
    • Excaliber, a burst-firing sword that also can deflect bullets.
    • The Staff of Firepower, which is a revolver taped together with a magic wand.
    • The Duct Tape active item allows you to create your own Mix-and-Match Weapon out of any two weapons you may have in your inventory.
  • Motifs: Guns and ammo, naturally. Nearly everything is related to them or is named after them in some manner.
  • More Dakka: Too many weapons to list here. And this being the kind of game it is, you can expect this to be the standard MO for pretty much all bosses.
  • My Greatest Failure: All of the main characters had these for entering the Gungeon.
    • The Marine: Having abandoned his unit to Eldritch Abomination after an experiment gone wrong. The Gungeon allows him to go back there to aid his squad.
    • The Convict: Getting sold out by Blackstache. The Gungeon gives her the chance to kill him when he storms her nightclub.
    • The Pilot: Having to accept his colleague's Heroic Sacrifice to allow him to escape from Hegemony starship. The Gungeon will give him means to defeat the Hegemony starship.
    • The Hunter: Having surrendered to her nemesis rather than fighting back. The Gungeon will allow her to defeat him through Blanks that would dissipate the force field he trapped her in.
    • The Cultist: Being considered a mere sidekick to their partner, thus receiving an All of the Other Reindeer treatment from the NPCs. The Gungeon will let them kill their own partner in a Mirror Match.
    • The Robot: Having somehow failed to kill Sarcon, which put EMP-R0R's army at a major disadvantage against the humans. The Gungeon will allow it to achieve its protocol by beating Sarcon in a fight to the death.
    • The Bullet: Having been defeated by Cannon and/or Agunim. The Gungeon will provide him the strength to kill both his enemies, and save his master from being overthrown by them.
  • Nail 'Em: One of the weapons you may find in the Gungeon is a good ol' nailgun. It has a big ammo capacity, doesn't need to reload and can be fired almost as fast as you press the button. Unfortunately, its damage is pitiful, so it's more a Joke Weapon than something useful.
  • Nerf Arm: The game is practically built on this. While there are plenty of normal, real-life guns, there are even more silly weapons that are just as if not more effective. Highlights include:
    • The Silencer, a pillow that shoots zippers and can be used to smack enemies. This one's Ammonomicon entry reveals that one of the Gungeon's previous residents was a mad wizard that kept enchanting random stuff into makeshift guns, which explains a lot of later entries.
    • The Origuni, a gun made of paper which fires remote-controlled paper airplanes.
    • The Crown of Guns, a crown with a bunch of guns strapped to it that wildly sprays bullets in all directions.
    • The Balloon Gun, which fires miniature tornadoes and allows you to hover.
    • The Starpew, a watering can that fires surprisingly lethal drops of water.
    • The Anvillain, a crate that fires anvils.
    • The Super Meat Gun, a slab of meat that fires bouncing saw blades.
    • The Fossilized Gun, a dinosaur skull that sprays oil and breathes fire.
    • The Light Gun, an NES zapper that fires lasers and a homing duck.
    • The Shock Rifle, a giant AA battery that fires bolts of electricity.
    • The Gunzheng, a Chinese string instrument that fire arrows with machine gun-like speed.
    • The Face Melter, an electric guitar that comes with weaponized amplifiers and shoots deadly musical notes.
  • Never Bring a Knife to a Gun Fight: The Gungeon and Cult of the Gundead call this heresy, to a point that using bladed weapons increases your curse. The Bullet's starting sword is even called Blasphemy, in case the point wasn't obvious enough.
  • Nintendo Hard: Aside from your first weapon, all weapons have limited ammo, enemies become both tankier and more accurate the further you go, and new enemies start showing up with patterns that can reasonably called Bullet Hell. The later bosses in particular can have screen-filling attacks that you need to look for pixels to dodge accurately. And this isn't counting each character's unique final boss, and the True Final Boss. Good luck.
  • Not Completely Useless:
    • The Junk you get from breaking chests is completely useless... Unless you have the Trashcannon, for which each held Junk boosts the gun's damage, or you encounter the Sell Creep who'll gladly buy it. It also becomes vital if you have picked up Ser Junken as an ally, as each Junk collected powers him up. Also, if you find a Ser Junken shrine, you can offer it Junk in exchange for Armor.
    • The Busted Television's only real use is for you to take it to the Blacksmith which unlocks The Robot, as it's otherwise a huge liability as you can only throw it, after which it just sits on the floor and doesn't affect anything, and it drops on the floor when you dodge roll so you must toss it across pits first. However, after you throw it, the game considers the item active for a couple seconds. Now, there's another item that shoots a ring of bullets whenever you use an active item...
  • Oculothorax: The Beholster boss is a shout-out to the Beholder of Dungeons & Dragons fame. In addition to the traditional eye-beams, each of its tentacles carries a gun.
  • One-Hit Kill: Some of the magic-themed weapons (e.g. Bundle of Wands, Hexagun, Witch Pistol) come with a chance to transmogrify enemies into harmless chickens. This won't work on bosses, of course, but is quite effective at quickly dispatching dangerous Demonic Spiders and Giant Mooks.
  • Only Known by Their Nickname: The player character are all known simply by their titles. The Convict was once known as "Laser Lily" back when she was a crime boss.
  • Our Liches Are Different: They're The Gunslinger for one, and practice Ammomancy. They can become giant, and form limbs out of bullets.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: The Spent are zombie bullets. It Makes Sense in Context.
  • Power at a Price: Cursed items. They tend to be better than most other items of their kind, but having cursed items will give you bad luck — it decreases the chance of finding items after clearing rooms, increases the chance of finding mimics, and causes enemies to spawn as their Jammed variants occasionally.
  • The Power of Hate: Invoked with the Shotgun Full Of Hate, which has a counterpart...
  • The Power of Love: ...Appropiately named Shotgun Full Of Love.
  • The Power of Rock: The Face Melter is an electric guitar that fires musical notes in a cross pattern. Reloading it summons an amplifier for double the firepower!
  • Player Tic: One player hobby will be to run into the clutter in the dungeon, even after the room is clear. Things like books and clay pots won't actually do anything, they block one bullet during combat but they're often positioned on the walls so they won't even be good cover, but players may feel the need to walk over or shoot them anyway just to watch them break. Or flip a table that has items on it just to watch them fly off.
    • On occasion, there is a very, very small chance that one of the random breakable containers will contain a single coin, but it happens so rarely that there really is no point in actively breaking all the knick-knacks in the room aside from Catharsis Factor.
    • There's also a small chance pots will contain a fairy.. that will agressively attack the player.
    • This is actually invoked at one point. push a table down a pit. You get a table flip tech that can spawn in the Gungeon for it. And the Steam achievement for doing that is titled "I knew someone would do that".
  • Purposely Overpowered: The Makeshift Cannon, a weapon powerful enough to kill bosses in one shot. The catch? Its maximum ammo count is just one single shell, so you might want to save it for a particularly powerful boss.
  • Really 700 Years Old: The Hunter, due to being cryogenically frozen. Her past boss fight takes place 1000 and some odd years ago.
  • Reference Overdosed: Almost every weapon or item is or contains a reference to something. Just take a look at this game's Shout-Out page.
  • Retirony: One item is a Badge belonging to "someone near retirement", who spawns a buddy cop that helps you take out enemies and can be interacted with. He can take damage and may die, asking you to take care of his daughter and all.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: Most of the pistols you can find in-game seem to be revolvers.
  • Rewatch Bonus: After seeing the True Final Boss, one might notice how the gunslinger in the title screen looks identical to him, and might even be him.
  • Robot Buddy: An unlockable player character.
  • Russian Reversal: The Bullet and the Shell are both oversized ammo that shoot weapons. That then fire themselves on impact.
  • Set A Mook To Kill A Moo K: If you have any weapons or items able to charm enemies (such as the Charmed Bow or the Charm Horn), you can temporarily make enemies fight among themselves.
  • Set Right What Once Went Wrong: The basic plot of the game is this. All characters have something in their past they want to defeat, so they seek the weapon which is capable of doing just that.
  • Shaped Like Itself: One of the guns is a lowercase "r" that acts as an SMG that shoots out BULLETs. As in, literally the word bullet as a six-round burst, while saying "BULLET" in a disinterested tone. It also produces written sound effects as it hits surfaces or enemies.
    • In addition, if the player holds certain bullet modifiers, the "r" may change the words it fires (i.e. ghost bullets will make the "r" fire "boo", "spooky", or "ghost".)
  • Shoot Out the Lock: Players can opt to shoot a chest instead of using a key to open it. This reduces the quality of the potential loot. You'll be lucky to get some health or a key for it; for low-quality chests, the result is generally junk. A nearly useless passive effect reminding you to "use a key next time".note 
    • The AKEY-47 gun takes the trope a step further: Shooting locks with it will actually unlock them instead of breaking them, saving you on keys.
  • Shoplift and Die: The shopkeeper does not tolerate guns being shot in the shop. The first time, you get a warning. The second time, he'll take out his shotgun and double the prices. Shoot again, and he'll start drowning the store in bullets and close the store in other floors.
  • Shout-Out: Has its own page.
  • Simple, yet Awesome: Many guns are simply just... guns which fire bullets. Some of the higher-tier guns are just guns which fire bullets that do a lot of damage, fire rapidly, and are quite accurate. They lack gimmicks, sure, but they're very potent. Hell, even the Old Goldie gun invokes this trope with its description mentioning that "The right answer isn't always a gun that shoots bees, a water gun, or a flaming hand. Sometimes, all you need is a simple concept executed immaculately."
  • Smart Bomb: Blanks clear all bullets on the screen, giving you a brief respite from the chaos.
  • Smoking Is Cool: Literally — using the "Cigarettes" as an active item will permanently increase your coolness by one, although it damages the player for half a heart (or one armor) when used.
  • Spread Shot: Several weapons fire these out. As for the enemies, it's easier to list those who don't fire some form of this.
    • The Scattershot passive item makes every weapon do this, with every individual projectile dealing a little less damage.
  • Stable Time Loop: The Gungeon became the firearm-themed labyrinth it is today after a mysterious force from on high plowed into it in the form of a giant bullet. A bullet you fired.
  • Stationary Boss: The Wallmonger, The High Dragun, HS Absolution and The Lich's second phase do not move around like the other bosses do, but they make up for this by using more complex Bullet Hell patterns and limiting the amount of room the player has to dodge. (Well, technically, the Wallmonger does move...)
  • Suffer the Slings: Yep, you can also get a Sling. Despite being considered a low quality weapon, its 250% bonus damage agsinst bosses makes it a surprisingly efficient boss killer.
  • Swiss Army Weapon: A few guns alternate between two modes with each reload, allowing for a more dynamic experience and, in some cases, some sweet combos. Examples include the Trick Gun, a revolver that turns into a shotgun and back again, and the Gungeon Ant, a literal giant ant that alternates between shooting oil (that creates puddles in the battlefield) and fireballs (to light said puddle with).
  • Take That!:
    Everyone involved in the production of this gun thought it was a bad idea, but the higher-ups made them build it anyway.
    Later, management shut down that gun factory for making a gun no one liked.
  • Taking the Bullet: How the Pig familiar translates into a 1-Up. The Ammonomicon will even update itself once you're revived by it by hailing the Pig as a hero.
  • Title Drop: By one of the guards in front of the Keep's main door.
  • True Final Boss: The Lich, a boss who appears in the sixth chamber. You can only unlock his floor by beating each of the characters' Final Bosses, which in turn requires you to complete the Bullet Fetch Quest and kill the High Dragun.
  • Trick Shot Puzzle: Winchester's minigames, which feature a room full of colored blocks suspended over a pit and allows the player to use only the trick gun. They can be cheesed by players with the jetpack or wings who can just fly over the gap and shoot the targets at point blank.
  • Unnecessary Combat Roll: Actually, it's very necessary to a point some bullet patterns are unavoidable without it. It's a key game mechanic; the player is invincible for the first half of their dodge roll, and can even use it to jump across gaps.
  • Unexpected Gameplay Change: The third phase of the Resourceful Rat boss fight (introduced in Advanced Gungeons and Draguns) is a round of Punch-Out!! of all things.
  • Unexpected Shmup Level: The Pilot's Past Boss turns the game into a classic Shoot 'em Up where he must go against a battlecruiser with his ship.
  • Unique Enemy: The Arrowkin, a primitive form of the Bullet Kin who only appear by shooting said Bullet Kin with the Devolver gun.
  • Variable Mix: The music becomes more idle when you haven't encountered any enemies in a while.
  • Versus Character Splash: One is shown each time you're about to fight a boss, with your character on one side and the boss on the other.
  • Vestigial Empire: The Blobulons were once part of an empire that spanned a thousand worlds, until an unfortunate winter campaign.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: This actually must be invoked for the Ledge Goblin's sidequest, where you have to keep pushing her helmet into the depths of the Gungeon for her to retrieve over multiple runs. A rare case of negative Character Development as she is grateful to you at the first rescue but antagonistic to you by the fourth rescue, but if you want that Blast Helmet, you'll have to be a jackass to her.
    • You also have a couple opportunities to invoke this after certain boss fights. Killing the Bullet King/Old King's chancellor while he's sobbing over the loss of his liege (and/or destroying the throne made of guns), murdering the orphaned spawns of the Beholster, destroying the Gorgun's petrified corpse, and finishing off Blobulord when he's shrunken down to the size of a loaf of bread are noteworthy examples, although players might do some of these for the potential coin bonuses.
  • Weapon of Choice: Oh so many types of guns.
  • Weaponized Offspring: The gimmick of the Scrambler, a gun that shoots "bullet eggs" that hatch into swarms of homing bullets. Probably one of the best low rank guns, thanks to disproportionately high damage and excellent tracking effectively meaning you don't even need to aim ever again.
  • Whale Egg: The Scrambler fires unhatched bullet eggs. The bird-like Gigi enemy can spit them up as well.
  • Wham Shot: Once you reach the True Final Boss, the first thing you'll immediately notice is how the boss is wearing both a hat and a cloak, revealing the significance of the silhouette in the title screen.
  • Weird Currency: Empty bullet cartridges are used as currency to buy things in the in-game shop.
  • Words Can Break My Bones: One of the silliest weapons, the Lowercase r. It doesn't fire bullets, instead it speaks the word BULLET in bursts of letter-shaped projectiles.
  • World of Pun: As if the game title wasn't enough, nearly every boss, enemy, level, and item in the game is a firearm-related pun of some sort. For instance, the Gungeon itself is an ammunition-themed place where those haunted by their past go to toil and suffer for eternity.
    • After the AG&D update, the loading screens say "Reloading" instead of "Generating"
  • Ye Olde Butcherede Englishe: One of the NPC's you'll end up rescuing, the Gunsling King, speaks in this way.

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