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Released in Feburary 1, 2017 in Japan and January 30, 2018 worldwide, Dissidia Final Fantasy: Opera Omnia is another free-to-play Mobile Phone Game in the dimension-shatteringly popular Final Fantasy series. It is the franchise's 7th mobile game. It is developed by Team Ninja, who developed Dissidia Final Fantasy (2015), and is set within the same realm.

The game is set in a parallel world created by the Crystal to serve as resting ground for heroes and villains from various Final Fantasy games summoned by Materia and Spiritus to serve as their champions, now under threat from "Torsions", distortions in time and space which bring fearsome monsters. The champions are forced to fight anew, even set aside differences, to protect their secondary homeland.

Opera Omnia continues its evolution of the systems instituted in the original Dissidia Final Fantasy, which was an interesting hybrid of Fighting Game and RPG Elements. Team Ninja have made the decision to just split them in two: where NT focuses primarily on the fighting aspects, OO is a straight RPG featuring a single-player campaign, Turn-Based Combat, a three-character party, and the "Conditional Turn-Based" / "Command Time Battle" / "Count Time Battle" system from Final Fantasy X which utilizes a Combatant Cooldown System and Visual Initiative Queue.

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Battle, as always for Dissidia, revolves around "Bravery Points," AKA the Break Meter. Characters execute BRV Attacks to transfer BRV points from an enemy to themselves, and then use HP Attacks to deal Hit Point damage, which is equal to the amount of BRV they currently have and consumes all that BRV. Any character who is at BRV 0 and then has a BRV Attack applied to them is put in a "Break" state, which delays their next turn and delivers a BRV bonus to the entire opposing party; fortunately, all characters regenerate a small amount of BRV at the beginning of their turn. Characters can also equip a variety of unlockable magic and Signature Moves, though every character has a unique list. The resulting system is surprisingly deep; while Level Grinding will of course carry the day, players can also bait the opposition into throwing HP attacks early and leaving themselves vulnerable to BRV Break, all whilst negotiating the intricacies of their own characters and their varying Starting BRV / Max BRV / BRV gain rates.

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Out of battle, the game features a hexagon-based navigable map and allows players to recruit many characters, some through events and others via the single-player campaign. It is scaffolded by the traditional free-to-pay microtransactions functions, which allow players to get their hands on equipment for use and upgrading. Players may also unlock Summon Magic and bring one into battle for once-per-battle use. Finally, in addition to the famous music of Final Fantasy, there is also an (extremely) limited amount of voice acting.

    Playable Characters 
Note: Names in italic denote characters which are, as of June 2022, still Japan-exclusive.

  • I: Warrior of Light, Garland
  • II: Firion, Maria, Leon, the Emperor, Guy, Leila, Minwu
  • III: Onion Knight, Cloud of Darkness, Desch, Xande
  • IV: Cecil Harvey (Dark Knight), Yang Fang Leiden, Edward "Edge" Geraldine, Kain Highwind, Palom, Rydia, Cecil Harvey (Paladin), Rosa Joanna Farrell, Porom, Golbez, Edward Chris von Muir, Fusoya
  • V: Bartz Klauser, Galuf Halm Baldesion, Faris Schweriz, Krile Mayer Baldesion, Lenna Charlotte Tycoon, Gilgamesh, Exdeath, Dorgann Klauser
  • VI: Terra Branford, Shadow, Setzer Gabbiani, Sabin Rene Figaro, Cyan Garamonde, Edgar Roni Figaro, Celes Chere, Relm Arrowny, Locke Cole, Gau, Kefka Palazzo, Leo Cristophe, Strago Magus, Mog
  • VII: Cloud Strife, Yuffie Kisaragi, Tifa Lockhart, Vincent Valentine, Aerith Gainsborough, Cid Highwind, Cait Sith, Barret Wallace, Sephiroth, Reno, Rude, Jessie
  • VIII: Squall Leonhart, Laguna Loire, Zell Dincht, Irvine Kinneas, Quistis Trepe, Selphie Tilmitt, Rinoa Heartilly, Seifer Almasy, Raijin, Fujin, Ultimecia
  • IX: Zidane Tribal, Vivi Orniter, Adelbert T. Steiner, Eiko Carrol, Garnet Til Alexandros XVII, Kuja, Freya Crescent, Beatrixnote 
  • X: Yuna, Wakka, Tidus, Auron, Seymour Guado, Lulu, Kimahri Ronso, Jecht, Braska
  • XI: Shantotto, Prishe, Lion, Lilisette, Aphmau, Kam'lanaut, Arciela V Adoulin, Eald'narche, Iroha
  • XII: Vaan, Penelo, Balthier, Ashelia "Ashe" B'nargin Dalmasca, Fran, Basch fon Ronsenburg, Vayne Carudas Solidor, Gabranth
  • XIII: Hope Estheim, Sazh Katzroy, Oerba Dia Vanille, Lightning, Snow Villiers, Oerba Yun Fang, Cid Raines
    • XIII-2: Serah Farron, Noel Kreiss, Caius Ballad
  • XIV: Y'shtola Rhul, Yda Hext, Papalymo Totolymo, Thancred Waters, Alisaie Leveilleur, Alphinaud Leveilleur, Lyse Hext
  • XV: Noctis Lucis Caelum, Prompto Argentum, Ignis Scientia, Ardyn Izunia, Aranea Highwindnote , Gladiolus Amicitia, Cor Leonisnote , Lunafreya nox Fleuret
  • Type-0: Rem Tokimiya, King, Ace, Cater, Seven, Deuce, Cinque, Machina Kunagiri, Eight, Jack, Trey, Nine, Kurasame Susaya, Queen, Sice
  • Tactics: Ramza Beoulve, Agrias Oaks
  • Crystal Chronicles 1: Ciaran
  • Crystal Chronicles: The Crystal Bearers: Layle, Keiss, Amidatelion, Jegran
  • Crystal Chronicles: Ring of Fates: Yuri, Chelinka
  • Crystal Chronicles: Echoes of Time: Sherlotta
  • World of Final Fantasy: Lann and Reynn, Enna Kros
  • Stranger of Paradise: Final Fantasy Origin: Jack Garland

    Other Characters 

Opera Omnia can be found on the iOS Games and Android Games portal of your choice.

Opera Omnia provides examples of:

    open/close all folders 

    A - B 
  • Absurdly Low Level Cap: The level cap was initially 50, and has gradually been increased to 90. The recommended level of some optional quests can go up to 250.
  • Adaptational Heroism: Many of the villain characters have their vileness toned down from their original games, and a couple even perform a Heel–Face Turn. ​Justified by the circumstances in which they find themselves: the gods will not allow their summoned warriors to die, so it's not as though the heroes could permanently kill the villains even if they wanted to, and many of the villains are canonically dead in their home worlds, so they have nothing to live for or fight for except the world of the game and the war between the gods. That said, they are dependent on this world continuing to exist so they can continue to live (in a manner of speaking) in it, and some of them are willing to put aside old grudges and ambitions and work with the heroes to protect the world. Even so, many of them are still evil and open about it, and the heroes don't always welcome the idea of fighting alongside their enemies, but they can usually stand each other long enough to hold a civil conversation and exchange information, which is a lot more than could be expected of some of them in their original games.
  • The Adventure Continues: Act 1, Chapter 11 ends with the defeat of the Blackened Will, and Materia is about to send everyone home until Mog reveals that he could sense other dark powers while he was possessed. After some discussion, everyone agrees that it's worth putting off their return both to protect their worlds, and because they enjoy journeying together.
  • Amnesiac Hero: Unlike the other Dissidia entries this is generally averted, except in the case of Warrior of Light. Although he remembers his rivalry with the evil Garland, he doesn't actually remember very much more than that. Mog shrugs it off that the torsions have different effects on different people, for some they can cause memory loss, while for others they may lose access to their abilities. Kain hints that Materia erases certain parts of her summoned heroes' memories, while Spiritus summons his heroes with all their memories intact. This is discussed further in Chapter 10, when the group meets Ultimecia and Zell has no idea who she is. Squall, on the other hand, seems to remember the entirety of their journey, even defeating Ultimecia, averting this trope. Zell explicitly mentions that he only remembers up to the events of the end of Disc 1, with the attempted assassination of Edea. In the Interlude chapter, the player comes to learn that all of the playable cast have met before in the previous world meant for the endless cycles of battle, but upon coming to the world of respite they lost their memories when Garland attacked and struck down the Warrior of Light. The characters only know that there is more they have forgotten, not what it is or what the circumstances of it were (and even consider the possibility that they chose to forget.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • The Auto-Battle feature is pretty bad, but if you don't care about your final score it is fantastic for taking a lot of the annoyance out of grinding the extremely repetitive Daily Events and World of Illusion battles.
    • The game has gradually added the ability to streamline various level, crystal level, and weapon upgrades, compared to the early days when players could only raise one level or sell one weapon at a time.
  • Anti-Villain: Vivi and a few of the other characters repeatedly express doubts that Seifer, Raijin, and Fujin are all that bad.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit: You're allowed to take only three of your 120+ characters to battle. Looks like a strange inverted version of Mook Chivalry.
  • Arbitrary Skepticism:
    • Some characters appear rather shocked to encounter a talking Moogle. Subverted in the case of Ramza, who was only so surprised because in his world Moogles have gone extinct.
    • In Deuce's recruitment event, various people are incredulous that she uses a flute as an actual weapon, despite already having comrades who fight with a paintbrush, playing cards, rackets, or megaphones.
  • Arc Villain:
    • Each chapter has an antagonist from the series' cast of baddies (or not-quite-baddies), who may or may not be fought in boss battles.
    • Interestingly, each chapter more or less has someone acting as an Arc Hero as well, giving a character or group of characters a Day in the Limelight. For example, during Chapter 4 when Seymour is the Arc Villain, Yuna gets more prominence in cutscenes.
  • Artificial Stupidity: The default version of "Auto-Battle" is incredibly poor; the AI will never use abilities, targets enemies in an A-B-C pattern, will always focus on Breaking the enemy unless it can get a one-hit KO or is that near max BRV, and during Chase sequences will only ever use BRV attacks, even if their HP attacks could end the battle. However, the Auto-Battle feature is fantastic against endlessly grinding weaker battles, such as the Daily Events or the World of Illusion. The later addition of an Auto+ option improved this, which rotates through a pattern of Burst Finisher, EX ability, LD ability, and the 2 default abilities in that priority order depending on their availability.
  • Ascended Meme:
  • Assist Character:
    • In any fight that isn't Co-op, players can elect to have someone else's character be available to call into their party for three turns (replacing another unit), using the other person's stats, moves, and equipment. By Following other players, it makes their characters more likely to appear to be selected, and if they Follow you back, you can use their character for five turns a battle instead of the usual three.
    • With the level 80 cap, this is extended to your own characters as well: any crystal level 75 character or higher can respectively Call any other C-level 75 or higher character once per battle to use a predetermined ability without using up their turn that provides that ability's normal effects on the character, party or enemy, with it potentially also having greater effects than the ability normally would when used by that character. Later, the LD ability of a character, if they possess one, can also be used as a separate assist attack, with generally much greater effects. However, all of these are subject to the normal limitation of not being able to use more than a single copy of any character in the party per player, meaning that the 3 active party members and their assists need to be different characters.
  • As You Know: Setzer tells Celes that she's the brilliant Magitek Knight of the Gestahlian Empire with a host of military feats to her name, mainly to prove to her that he's the real Setzer and not another manikin.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Most of the summons start off as this initially, with passives that only trigger with awfully low HP thresholds (Ramuh, Leviathan, Alexander, Diabolos, Odin), and the benefits themselves being too low to be properly useful. Once they're fully upgraded to Level 30 however, they become fantastically powerful, with the passives needing a much more lenient HP threshold of 80%, as well as providing useful permanent benefits (Ramuh boosts Max BRV, Leviathan reduces enemies' Speed, Alexander boosts the party's Max HP, Diabolos boosts Initial BRV, and Odin reduces all enemies' Defense).
    • Dark Knight Cecil has two very powerful abilities, but both of them are Cast from Hit Points. While the hit points Cecil uses for his abilities don't actually count towards the final score, it does turn him into a Glass Cannon which makes him dangerous to use in fear of him being subject to a One-Hit Kill from an enemy. This can be averted if you pair him up with powerful tanks that can soak up damage like Basch, Nine, and the Warrior of Light.
  • Auto-Revive:
    • Late in the game, a majority of major bosses do this; a prime example also goes to Bahamut itself during its World of Illusions quest, where he'll spam Curaga twice to heal half of its total HP twice when you deal it a fatal blow the first time around.
    • The Blackened Will also does this for a total of 3 times in its final round, each time to unveil its arms. The raid boss version upon Act 2 Chapter 5 hitting does the same, only it does the animation for it each time its increased HP bar its a certain threshold instead of healing itself, thus subverting it.
  • Background Music Override:
    • After Celes sings for Garnet, Eiko, Zidane, and Setzer, the Background Music for her lost chapter map changes from "Terra's Theme" to "Maria and Draco," the opera music.
    • The map theme for Act 2, Chapter 3 becomes "Dark Messenger" after watching the Decisive Battle cutscene, and then switches back to the Iifa Tree theme. The music for the final battle in the chapter is also "You're Not Alone" rather than the usual boss battle theme.
    • Act 2, Chapter 7's usual Background Music is temporarily replaced by Zack's Theme (specifically, the melancholy Crisis Core version), after Zack regains all of his memories, including of his death.
    • Any character with a Burst mode gets this. When you use the Burst command, the game enters a Bullet Time mode where only the Bursting character can take actions, concluding with a Finishing Move that does a lot of damage. (If you are using an Assist Character, they only get the Finishing Move.) During this time, the BGM shifts to a battle theme associated with that character.
  • Badass Crew: The party becomes one as they recruit more and more warriors from different worlds, becoming close friends who rely on and support each other, bonding over their shared experiences and having fun on their journey together to seal the Torsions. They even sometimes refer to their party as a family.
  • Bag of Spilling: No matter when in their stories they enter the crystal's world, everyone starts as level 1 with access to one special ability. Mog says that this is an effect of passing through the Torsion.
  • Balance Buff:
    • Much like the game it is closely modeled after, reworks to characters' awakening passives (mainly their Extend ability passives) pop up from time to time which allow them to be viable in harder content in the future. These usually occur during certain special/character events or during Lost Chapters, as well as the respectively reworked character's EX weapon reprinting on the banner tied to it.
    • Realization of high-tier weapons (starting with EX and continuing in subsequent tiers) are another way characters are kept viable in new content tiers, both by cutting down the number of ability uses and turns needed to get the character's buffs online as well as providing them with powerful new buffs.
  • Battle Boomerang: All throwing weapons will bounce off the enemy and return to the user, whether they are boomerangs, shurikens, playing cards, paper cranes, or underwater soccer balls.
  • Bigger on the Inside: Implied for the party's airship. It can hold the entire party without feeling cramped no matter how many new people join them.
  • Birds of a Feather: Multiple characters get along and then start hanging out with each other frequently in cutscenes.
    • Yang and Sabin quickly hit it off. Terra and Penelo comment that martial artists are alike, but then realize that they seem more susceptible to brainwashing than the others... causing them to stare at Yda to see if she's next.
    • Shantotto and Papalymo quickly come to respect each other, being haughty geniuses of black magic.
    • Airship lovers Vaan, Sazh, Setzer, and Cid all get along.
    • As noted under Gun Nut, Irvine, Laguna, Vincent, and King also do.
    • Steiner also hangs around the Warrior of Light and Cecil often when not with the FFIX cast, and the three of them being knights is often commented on.
    • Y'shtola and Quistis quickly strike up a friendship upon realizing they're both very similar in personality and have an aptitude for reading others.
    • Rydia and Yuna also befriend each other quickly. However, Tidus notes that their personalities really aren't similar despite both being summoners.
    • Seymour attempts to invoke this on Rydia by bringing up the fact Cecil killed her mother, an obvious ploy to connect her to Seymour's own mommy issues. When Rydia claims she's already forgiven Cecil, Seymour abruptly calls her useless to him and leaves.
    • The child party members (Vivi, Eiko, Yuri, Chelinka, Palom, etc) all play and have fun frequently in cutscenes.
    • Rinoa finds common ground with Terra, Prishe, Layle, and Vanille over having powerful abilities that make them feared by others—and fearful themselves of losing control.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: The manikins, frequently. Depending on what character they're a copy of, they might just do standard attacks with a decent special ability, or they might buff their allies up to full BRV, shield them from all damage, and become undodgeable killing machines. Fear the Penelo Manikin: her very first action is to use her LD ability which nearly always results in a Total Party Kill without some sort of extensive damage mitigation.
  • Breaking Old Trends: At first, BT weapons were only exclusive to each games' main protagonists and antagonists, but this trend was later broken by Yuna, expanding the list of BT weapon candidates to "anyone who was playable in the Dissidia games" (such as Kain, Tifa, Rinoa, and Prishe). It was broken again later with Garnet, who was a secondary protagonist in her game but never playable in the previous Dissidias. The release of Minwu with a BT weapon pretty much threw any form of trend out the window and said "Anyone can get a BT now. ANYONE."
  • Breather Episode: One side event in Chapter 2 takes a break from the main story to feature Zidane trying to hit on Tifa, Rem, and Y'shtola. Tifa brushes him off by insisting that their quest is more important, Rem tells Zidane that she has someone she wants to protect, which causes him to back off, and he doesn't even try for Y'shtola, leaving her perplexed when he approaches and says nothing but "Nevermind."
  • Bribing Your Way to Victory:
    • While it is not required to spend real-life money to play, getting the best equipment in the game can take thousands upon thousands of in-game gems to unlock. While at first the game gives players gems hand over fist, that well dries up once content is complete, and new characters and golden weapons are released all the time. Players are forced to either save up gems and draw tickets for the characters they really want to max out, or relent and spend real-world money on gems... not to mention there are multiple weapon types to draw for, and it takes four weapons to max one out and allow its ability to be used without equipping it, or 4 Power Stones per missing copy of a weapon, which are gained by selling duplicates of other weapons. Again, none of this is needed to play the game, but some weapons and abilities are so powerful playing characters without them almost makes it not worth bothering with them.
    • With the above being said, there are some bonus missions, such as The Lost Chapters and the Heretic Quests, that are nigh impossible if you don't have the correct characters leveled and outfitted with their best Golden Weapons, sub-weapon abilities, and best armor. Again, to get any character fully decked out can take tens of thousands of gems and quite a bit of good luck.
    • Played straight with the Mog Pass. For a monthly fee, the rate at which Character Enhancement points, Summon Board points, and Illusion Board points are increased, and the cap on obtainable Character Enhancement points per event is doubled. It also guarantees that passives obtained from High Eidoja artifacts are red and of the highest value. It comes in both regular and premium versions, with the regular one granting all of the above benefits. The premium version, for a significantly higher cost, confers additional benefits, with more gems granted, 2 special Moogle Tokens that can be redeemed for Burst Tokens, 5 EX Tokens, granting additional Ultima Cores for clearing event missions, and tripling the cap on Character Enhancement points.
  • Bullet Time:
    • Summons do BRV damage, raise your BRV Cap, and add several extra turns to the front of the turn counter. It isn't explicitly described as slowing down time, but frankly it isn't explicitly described as anything, so this trope seems as likely as any.
    • Burst weapons do something similar. When used, the character gets five consecutive actions plus their burst finisher, and summons cannot be used mid-chain. Lastly, when the Burst ends, all the damage dealt during it is totaled, implying this trope.

    C - D 
  • Cap:
    • All characters have both a normal level cap and crystal level of 50, though updates to the game have allowed levels to be raised to 60, 70, 80, and 90.
    • Each character has a hard cap to their Bravery that limits how much damage that character can inflict with a single HP Attack. It can be raised permanently by level-grinding and raised temporarily by using a Summon. The Cap only lifts so long as the summon's extra turns are going, but any BRV gained during that time is not lost once the cap is lowered again, which can leave a character with more than 100% of their max BRV. Likewise, as of the awakening era, "Overflow" mitigates this issue where the BRV gained from specific attacks/skills/passives can exceed the maximum amount by a certain percentage (ranging from 120%, 150%, 180% or even 200% of the character's current Max BRV). This mitigates "BRV leakage", where a character gains more brave points than their maximum amount.
    • Burst effects and the new tier of armors available from tokens gained from perfecting Lufenia-difficulty fights can both raise the BRV hit and HP damage caps beyond their normal maximums of 9999 and 99999, respectively.
  • Character Select Forcing:
    • In the first two story acts, numerous gateways require having specific characters (usually related to the current plot) at a minimum level before they open, as well as loot drops that were reliant on a character's presence in battle. Limited-time events also have a short roster of Boosted characters who are more effective in battle, grant loot bonuses when used, and have double EXP for the event duration.
    • Enforced in the Abyss event missions. For the first round of events (to commemorate the release of the Final Fantasy VII Remake) anyone who is not from FFVII is forbidden to battle.
    • Dimension's End: Transcendence takes it even further than other DE dungeons: each new tier consists of 3 seperate fights, the first 2 fights require you to use different characters for both of them, they both require you to use a character belonging to a specific crystal color to Perfect them and the last fight only lets you pick your party members from the 6 characters you used to clear the first 2 fights.
  • The Chosen Many: Everyone recruitable character is a bearer of the Light, making (potentially) every character in every Final Fantasy a Warrior of Light. Mog has the ability to sense it, though sometimes he chooses not to recruit those who have it.
  • Chronically Crashed Car: Both Act 1 and 2 end with the Global Airship being destroyed.
  • Clothes Make the Superman: In addition to weapons, armor is just as important to building characters, providing more CP to equip more abilities, and later on, increasing their BRV and HP damage caps. High Armor in particular, has various keystones which provide additional effects that match the characters playstyle.
    • Attack: Increases the BRV and HP damage cap by 15%.
    • Encouragement: Increases BRV gains by 30%.
    • Support: Increases the party's Attack and HP damage cap by 5%.
    • Unity: Increases the party's BRV damage cap by 5%.
    • Tactics: Decreases all enemies ATK, iBRV, and mBRV by 10%, and DEF by 20%.
    • When realized, all High Armors further increase maximum BRV and HP damage cap values, although there are a number of different variants even within the same keystone type: Encouragement, Support and Unity can increase the party's caps anywhere from an additional 5% to 15% and Attack and Tactics can either increase both stats equally by a total of 35% or a higher value for one of them at the cost of the other, such as Garland gaining a 45% BRV damage cap increase by only a 25% HP damage cap increase or the exact opposite for Strago with 25% BRV damage cap increase and 45% HP damage cap increase.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience:
    • When your Bravery reaches its maximum possible value, the value and the BRV Attack button glow orange. When a character currently has enough Bravery to finish off the targeted enemy, their Bravery value will glow purple.
    • Enemies have the same display, with the added detail that their BRV glows purple if it's enough to kill the character they are presently targeting.
  • Combat Medic: Some characters, like Rude, have moves that both deal damage to the enemy and heal your party. In a turn-based game, this kind of efficiency can be very valuable.
  • Combination Attack: Force ("FR") abilities are available to every character, giving them each their own partner to combine their attacks with. Usually, the two characters involved have something in common with each other - for example, Rydia's FR partner is Terra, and the developers stated that it is because one is a human raised in the esper world and the other is a (half) esper raised in the human world. This always involves characters from different games partnered up, and also isn't mutual; Terra's FR partner is Kuja instead, due to their shared history in the rest of the Dissidia games and their common Trance ability.
  • Combos/Launcher Move: If you focus fire on a single target, there's a chance that your next attack will launch the target into the air. Your other party members can then chase the target (a la Dissidia Wall Rush) and perform additional BRV Attacks or HP Attacks (but no Skills) on the target without using up their turns. Attacks made during the combos deal 10% more damage. How it actually works is through decreasing a hidden value each enemy target has (known as "chase HP" as per the community), with some attacks providing a free launch and/or in Layle's case, decrease more of that hidden "chase HP" value to enforce earlier launches.
  • Commonality Connection: Setzer bonds with several other party members when he realizes they also have their own forms of gambling and entertainment in their respective worlds; such as the Final Fantasy VII crew having the Gold Saucer and the Final Fantasy IX party members having both a love of theater and of the Card Battle Game Tetra Master. He also connects with both Sazh and Vaan when he learns they are both airship enthusiasts like he is.
  • Complacent Gaming Syndrome: invoked Forcibly averted by the Abyss dungeon, where each encounter has different objectives based on forming a party with characters that meet certain requirements, like a party with two Black Crystal characters and one Sword character. This makes it impossible to master all the encounters and get all the rewards with the same party, you have to have a variety of characters. Dimensions' End also locks out any characters used in a Perfect battle clear, forcing players to either switch up their party or re-run that battle if they want to "free" those characters for use in a different tier.
  • Composite Character: Many of the FFV characters actually have features of multiple classes, representing how players could mix and match Mastered Abilities in that game:
    • Bartz has Doublehand which is a Knight skill, Missile which is a Blue Mage spell, and has the Ex Ability Iainuki, which is from the Samurai class. His LD ability, Finisher, is from the Gladiator class.
    • Faris has Waterwhirl, which is a water-based 4-hit attack, referencing both Spellblade which is a Mystic Knight skill, and Rapid Fire, a Ranger skill (both of which are very popular to use together in FFV), as well as Cannonfire, which a reference to the Open Fire ability of the Cannoneer class. Her LD ability, Spellblade Sword Dance, combines the aforementioned Spellblade with Sword Dance, a Dancer ability.
    • Galuf has Blade Block, which is similar to the Samurai's Shirahadori (or Blade Grasp/Sword Grab) in effect, and Cover, a Knight skill.
    • Krile uses the Thunder spell, an obvious reference to the Black Mage, and Ray of Light, which doesn't have a direct one-to-one equivalent but appears quite similar in name and nature to the Orcale's skill Predict (which includes predictions such as Blessing and Divine Judgement, which also grants party buffs). Her LD, Cleansing, makes it more explicit by inflicting the enemy with a debuff that triggers the aforementioned Judgment after the enemy's turn.
    • Lenna uses Rapid Fire, a Ranger skill, and Wind Drake's Arrow, which may be a reference to another Ranger ability Animal (also known as Critt) as she calls on the Wind Drake to ward herself and the party. Her EX Ability, Brave Phoenix, is a reference to the Summoner class, her animation even using elements from when a Summon spell is used in FFV. (It is also a reference to the fact that her personal dragon transforms into the Phoenix summon.)
    • Outside of FFV, Penelo of FFXII uses both White Magick (Regen Waltz, based on Regen), and Time Magick (Great Haste, based on Hastega). While in the original XII the License Board made learning these two abilities easy, in the subsequent The Zodiac Age release this could be seen as a nod to Penelo cross-classing as the White Mage and Time Battlemage, two very popular choices for her due to her natural affinity for magick.
    • Paine of FFX-2 shares abilities of several different Dresspheres (in reference how in that game players could change classes mid-battle). Break Attack is based on the various Break abilities of the Warrior Dressphere (Paine's default class), Black Sky comes from the Dark Knight Dressphere, and her EX Ability Sword Dance comes from Paine's Ultimate Dressphere Full Throttle.
  • Continuity Nod: In general, the characters frequently reference events from their past and homeworld when encountering warriors from other worlds and comparing themselves to each other. This can be attributed to the fact that unlike other Dissidia games, where the core cast had their memories taken from them, everyone in Opera Omnia retains all of their memories up to a certain point in their home game's story.
  • Crisis Crossover: Hardly the first for FF, but as noted just above, the game is a bit unique in that its narrative behaves more like a "classic" Crisis Crossover; while the fighter Dissidias, Final Fantasy Record Keeper and Final Fantasy Brave Exvius all avoid having the various casts interact, Opera Omnia pretty much relishes in allowing the cast to bounce off of one another.
  • Critical Hit: A feature brought back from the original PSP games that was removed in NT: whenever a BRV Attack is landed upon an already broken target, it'll become a critial hit that steals even more BRV than normal (indicated with yellow-colored damage numbers though enemy-based crits are colored orange-red instead).
  • Critical Hit Class: Likewise, a number of specific characters focus on this, such as through a Crit Rate Up increase or increasing the overall critical hit BRV damage they inflict.
  • Culture Clash:
    • Between different games' Central Themes. Hope and Rem seem inclined to sympathy towards Kuja since the latter seems to be trying to "defy his fate," but Vivi and Zidane repeatedly point out that doesn't excuse Kuja from causing pain and suffering in two different worlds.
    • Eiko is the last of the horned summoners left in the world of FFIX (asides from Garnet, but that's a bit complicated), so she is shocked to discover that the world of FFX has so many summoners like Yuna. If that wasn't enough, Yuffie from FFVII then informs that with the right Materia, anyone can be a summoner, really throwing Eiko for a loop!
    • The FFX and Type-0 casts get a major, dramatic version of this from each other in Act 2, Chapter 1. When confronted with the idea of removing the memories of their lost loved ones, Tidus makes an Innocently Insensitive comment saying that they'd be stupid to want that, which happens to everyone in the Type-0 world, and Yuna says that they need the memories of their lost loved ones to be able to move on. Ace and Rem struggle with the idea of what sort of memory they'd leave behind in the case of their own deaths. In both of their worlds, the "spiral of death" is a strong theme, but both games deal with it in different ways which the characters are forced to confront here.
  • Cut-and-Paste Environments: In-universe, this is used to explain why certain environments in the world look familiar to some of the characters despite not being perfectly identical. Most of the setpieces are sampled from their home worlds and then mashed together, creating a sense of familiarity while being unique. Later, in Act 2, some warriors of Spiritus figure out how to summon actual places from their homeworlds.
  • Cutscene Incompetence: In Act 3, Sepiroth compels Cloud to hand over the compass of light. This is done in full view of Aerith, Zack, and Tifa. None of them attempt to interfere when it becomes obvious that Cloud is struggling, even though they're all uninjured and brandishing their weapons while this is going on.
  • A Day in the Limelight: While main story chapters sometimes focus on certain characters, they also generally deal with a small selection of a cast from one or two games at a time in addition to whichever new character is summoned at that time. Lost chapters and character events focus on whichever character is newly recruited. However, this trope is the main purpose of Intersecting Wills chapters, which is short story content that focuses on a single character who may have otherwise been Out of Focus for a while.
  • Death of a Thousand Cuts: While some characters will have just one tremendous BRV attack (such as Vivi's Fire or Bartz's Doublehand), some characters will instead attack several times at once but with relatively weak attacks; such as Setzer's Red Card that hits 9 times, or Ash's Heaven's Wrath that hits 10 times. Sometimes however, certain characters can play this more straight if their BRV damage potencies in question happen to be low (damage ratio of their ability doesn't scale as high with their attack power), though there exist abilities and/or characters who can both hit hard with high base attack stat with destructively high base BRV damage potencies on their abilities to put this trope into a harder-hitting effect.
  • Defeat Means Friendship: Some of the playable characters are recruited this way. Averted with Vincent, however. The party fights him twice in Chapter 7 yet he still refuses to join until he nearly gets them killed by Kefka and Cloud of Darkness and joins out of penance.
  • Degraded Boss: Many bosses that are a serious threat in the earlier chapters, such as Iron Giants, Garudas, and Malboros, are fought later on in earlier waves when new bosses take their place as the immediate threats.
  • Demoted to Extra: Typically in Dissidia Squall and Tidus are primary characters as crucial to the plot as anyone else. Due to the fact both of them are earned through Player Events and not through the actual story, neither of them have any impact on the real plot whatsoever (this in spite of Squall's rival, Seifer, being an antagonist through a couple of the chapters). Squall finally becomes relevant to the plot in Chapter 8, and Tidus in Chapter 9, showing that any Event character who later gets a Lost Chapter will begin appearing in the main story.
  • Do Wrong, Right: Happens a lot on Spiritus' team. They might be the Big Bads of their respective games, but their goals clash a lot. The Emperor, for example, views the world of respite as an avenue to conquer all worlds the Torsions reach, and isn't keen to share. Kuja is disgusted with the inelegance displayed by his putative comrades. One constant is the universal loathing of Kefka. Every one of Spiritus' warriors, no matter how malicious, finds his desire for wanton destruction to be utterly pointless—even Seymour, an Omnicidal Maniac himself, has a purpose behind his murderous goals.
  • Dual Boss: These become common in Chapter 9 and latest events.
  • Dude, Not Funny!: After one conversation with the Emperor, a few characters say that it's almost refreshing to deal with someone who's such a Card-Carrying Villain. This gets a cold reception from Leon, Maria, and Firion, who point out that having no loftier philosophy than personal dominion makes him more dangerous since he will seek to ruthlessly destroy anyone and anything that appears to be an obstacle, and there is no avenue to reason with him.
  • Due to the Dead: The final cutscene of Lenna's event has her, Eiko, and Vivi dig a grave for the dragon they were forced to Mercy Kill, planting flower seeds on it for when they come back to visit.

    E - G 
  • Early-Bird Cameo:
    • In the fourth region, Onion Knight's Manikin is fought in the Void, several stages before he's recruitable.
    • In Layle's recruitment, he mentions Edgar and the Returners. Later in the month, it's revealed that Edgar will be recruitable in a later region.
    • In Krile's character event, a Manikin of her is fought in the first battle before the actual Krile even appears proper.
    • Weekly events have cutscenes to introduce them, and may feature characters you haven't recruited yet. (This is why entering events sometimes comes with a notice that you should complete a certain chapter first, which was eventually replaced with a blanket notice that some scenes may contain characters a player hasn't recruited yet if they aren't following up to date.)
  • Early Installment Weirdness: As the game is constantly being developed in real-time, efforts are always being made to rebalance characters, which results in some strange quirks looking back at attempts that only lasted a short time.
    • Some characters used to have Passive Abilities that gave them a boost agaisnt very specific enemy types, such as Zidane being better suited against Wolf enemies, or Tifa being strong against Skeletons. With the enemies in the game eventually becoming so varied and unique, these abilities became useless, with Edgar's boost against Machine-types being the last time any character was given such an ability.
    • In an effort to strengthen characters who were being left behind, the developers decided to attempt giving significantly stronger unique Passives, rolled at random. These passives range from extra ability uses or party-wide buffs, however because there was no way to influence passive rolls at the time, they were referred to by fans as the "Cursed Artifacts", as you could spend hours grinding for materials only to not get a single double Artifact. After the first six characters got these, they were quickly forgotten.
    • Early in the game's lifetime, another way to strengthen characters were to give them alternate C15 Gold Weapons. These weapons would not be linked to any ability, but instead usually grants a special effect or buff. While interesting in theory, they never really caught on, and the only one that is considered essential today is Cloud's passive that allows him to dispel a buff in response to a critical hit.
    • Whips in general being their own weapon type, at well over 150 characters in the game there are currently only three dedicated whip-users; Rydia, Quistis, and Seven (with possibly two more if Izayoi and Harley from The After Years also have whips). Had whips been introduced later, it is very likely they would have been Unique weapons instead, since there is so little cause for them to have their own entire weapon class all to themselves.
  • Easy Logistics: For much of the story, the question of how everyone's needs are accomodated is generally unaddressed except when the Big Eaters get together. Ignis finally raises the issue directly in Act 2 and is informed that the airship provides all the food they require and never seems to run out of space for everyone to stay. Another scene elaborates on this when Noel and Chelinka note that they have sometimes gone for long stretches without eating or sleeping, as though their bodies have been suspended in time—they eat out of habit and comfort.
  • Eldritch Abomination:
    • Blackened Will, the entity that has been influencing and controlling Mog and absorbing the powers of the heroes and villains, is a dungeon-sized mass of braided tendrils, grinning mouths that don't move against the writhing tentacles, and bloated, tumor-like pod with a single red eye.
    • The same entity returns in Act 2 as a smaller creature with almost a humanoid body that has tentacles emerging from multiple points on its torso.
  • Eldritch Location: The final floor of Chapter 11's dungeon is a castle-sized abomination of tentacles and mouths with no real start or end to its form. Edgar actually wants to figure out a way to tame the aberrant fortress so he can use it was a mode of transport, much like he did Castle Figaro in FFVI.
  • Elite Mook:
    • Kactaurs are rare and elite versions of normal Cactaurs; they have a BRV attack called 9999 Needles instead of the normal 1000/2000 Needles, and have such high SPD they are one of the few mooks who can naturally evade attacks, even from maxed out party members. On the plus side, they also provide a ludicrous amount of EXP upon defeat.
    • Green and gold manikins are stronger than the standard silver model.
  • Evolving Attack: A number of characters have abilities that change or get stronger in a variety of ways:
    • The most normal example is if you cast them enough times in one stage. Vaan, for instance, starts with Red Spiral and White Whorl, which become "White Out" and "Luminescence" on their third uses, while characters from Final Fantasy V like Bartz and Galuf 'Master' their abilities with repeated uses, giving them upgraded or added effects. Some of these characters also get unique framed buffs that tie to such, and in some cases, even normal BRV and/or HP Attacks become enhanced like so (normally dubbed as BRV/HP Attack+; extra + symbols may indicate further potency). The usual indication for this is when the button for the ability goes from a standard blue (green for any co-op units) to red (though the green/blue color on its own may indicate that no weapon passive is active).
    • As of the awakening era, Extend passives further enhance the base abilities via the indication of turning the ability text on the button from white to orange. Though for EX weapons, you need to enhance the EX weapon itself with into an EX+ in order to Extend its passive in line with all other Awakening-based abilities. Limit Breaking the EX+ weapon also usually further powers up the EX ability, usually by adding more BRV hits to it, letting the character start the battle with the buff gained from the EX ability already in effect and/or giving the EX another powerful effect on use, such as letting you start the battle with it already charged up, turning the EX into an Area of Effect attack or giving the character a Last Chance Hit Point.
    • Likewise on the note of enhanced BRV and HP attacks, many future reworks (seen in Balance Buff up above) make a majority of characters more up-to-date by making enhanced BRV/HP Attack+ moves a more common mechanic than before (as via Sazh's 35CP being early in GL and a few specific awakenings/35CP weapons in both GL and JP, it was still a rather niche mechanic).
  • Evolving Title Screen: After the player completes Act 1, Chapter 10, Mog vanishes from the main menu.
  • EX Special Attack: EX abilities are this, moreso than they were in the other Dissidia games. Overlaps with Limit Break.
  • Failed a Spot Check: Numerous characters are taken in by the obviously crystalline manikins, either trying to talk to them like the real deal or assuming that their actual friends are just more fakes. This is lampshaded in Celes' event when Bartz points out that the real Galuf isn't sparkly.
  • Family of Choice: Discussed in Maria's event when she and Firion talk to Wakka and Yuna about how Maria's parents adopted Firion as a child when his parents died, and how Wakka and Lulu made Yuna a little sister when they all met as orphans on Besaid.
  • Fighter, Mage, Thief: Your three starting characters fit this thematically: the Warrior of Light (FFI) can tank, Vivi (FF9) does potent magic damage, and Rem (Type-0) fights with dual daggers, though in a subversion she also has the Cure spell.
  • Forced Level-Grinding: This trope is the bread and butter of any Mobile Phone Game, but Opera Omnia turns it Up to Eleven. In addition to levels based on gaining Experience Points, every character has a "Crystal Strength Level" which unlocks new commands and upgrades to pre-existing ones; said crystals, naturally, must be farmed in specific levels. Every Summon Spell comes with a "Board," which each character has access to; characters can unlock nodes on each board if you consume points; points, naturally, require tons of farming by in specific levels. LD weapons added individual character training boards, whose points must be farmed on certain levels. Every character has a "Command Points" cap on how many passive and active skills they can equip, which are raised by strengthening their equipment, Crystal Strength Level or character boards. Characters can also equip "Spheres" to get various passive bonuses depending on the type of sphere they can equip.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • One of the first optional recruits is Squall, who is skeptical about joining up just based on Mog's exposition. In Chapter 4, Onion Knight finds Mog's answers a little rehearsed. And in Prishe's event, Mog is worried that she could know what he's thinking. Come chapters 6 and 7, it turns out they were right to question Mog's veracity.
    • When Rem and King join the party they express doubt that the rules of their own universe, in which when a person dies everyone immediately forgets about their existence, would apply here since this world is so far removed from their own. Sure enough, when Ace joins the party he attempts and fails to save a Chocobo who dies shortly thereafter, leaving Ace reeling with the emotions of mourning death for the first time.
    • At first, Tidus and Yuna's accounts of their home world (Yuna being ignorant of Seymour's true colors, Tidus being unaware of Seymour being a Maester) seem like Broad Strokes or a weird case of Timey-Wimey Ball, but in Chapter 8 Mog explains that another side effect of coming to this world could be memory loss. The Warrior of Light thought he was the only one affected, but taking into account Tidus and Yuna's behavior it's possible he isn't the only one... as shown in Aerith's event, where it is subtly implied that she was taken to this world after her death in her home world, and only Sephiroth, Vincent, and Aerith herself seem to remember it happening. Vincent and Sephiroth may only remember due to them working with Spiritus rather than Materia (originally, in Vincent's case), but Aerith herself questioned why she was brought to this world at all. After Aerith encounters Sephiroth, he lets her go unharmed so her presence could trigger Cloud's lost memories.
    • During Relm's character event, after seeing Galuf and Krile together she reminisces about her own grandfather, the famed Blue Mage Strago. Cecil also talks about Tellah, a wise old grand mage from his own world. It's heavily hinted that both Strago and Tellah will be making an appearance sooner or later in the world of Opera Omnia.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: A number of them:
    • There was Zack's EX Ability not working properly as there were times it did not refresh his BRV Barrier buff upon usage. This actually was less a bug, but more an oversight of the game working too well, due to a programming command that a weaker buff cannot dispel and replace a stronger buff (such as ATK UP Level 1 cannot replace ATK UP Level 3). When Zack's Int Brave is artificially boosted (like with his c65 Ability) it gives him a stronger version of his shield, so the next time his EX is cast without the boost it does not refresh the stronger shield since the new buff would be weaker. Thankfully, this was fixed in a later patch.
    • When Barret's event hit the GL version, his artifacts were severely bugged in that they gave nonsensical passive combinations (e.g. an Eidoga artifact having two different Attack + [insert number here] passives as opposed to two different ones as usual). These broken artifacts were eventually all fixed to have their slots allocate the passives properly.
    • For some time in GL there was a bug where if someone used a support ability in co-op that targeted a single party member, the turn order would become desynchronized and each player would see that it was someone else's turn, causing it to be no one's turn and thus the battle was unable to proceed.
    • Upon his release in JP, General Leo's loyalty apparently ran so strong that if there was a character in the party not owned by the player (either due to co-op or swapping in a friend unit), Leo could target and kill his own party members with his HP++ attack. This was patched a few days later.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • In the battles for Palom's event, the bombs still have their face scribbles on them.
    • Any recruited playable character in a cutscene will be holding whatever weapon they actually have equipped. This can get rather amusing depending on who the player has invested in; certain scenes may have the heroes dramatically confronting the villain with one-star equipment (and if the villain is already recruitable, having one-star equipment brandished right back).
    • The reason (other than the usual Power Creep and the requirement to design alternate character models for them) why none of the villains use their One-Winged Angel forms during battle or even any attacks that're directly associated with them, despite the fact that they could do so in previous Dissidia games? It turns out that they've been sealed away in the core crystal of darkness, Ardyn is actively working to unseal them as a plot point, and once he succeeds, said attacks become a part of their Burst skills, with him being the first villain who gains access to one.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation:
    • Kain, in one of his cutscenes, says that Mog drains every character's life force after every battle. However, no stats are ever decreased as the result of that supposed Life Drain.
    • More obviously, no matter which character rushes into battle in cutscenes, you always get to choose any three party members to actually fight in gameplay. Battle dialogue between characters happens no matter who is actually in the party, making it look like they're yelling from offscreen.
    • Initially, characters obtained from time-limited events would not appear in main story scenes (or other events) until the release of the Lost Chapter that makes them recruitable at the player's leisure. The roster eventually grew too large for this to remain practical, and new chapters would recommend that you go complete the content in which appearing characters were recruited from. Now they simply note that characters who the player hasn't recruited yet may appear regardless.
    • Act 3, Chapter 1: The group is separated and the story follows the Onion Knight and Desch having to leave the cavern they woke up in. You can still use any of the characters you got beforehand. Justified to an extent by Mog explaining the characters not with the party are just shadows that he summons, but that still doesn't explain why it happened before he catches up with the group.
  • Gameplay Grading: At the end of a Quest, you are scored based on the number of Turns taken, the amount of HP lost (minus any HP healed back), and any Bravery Breaks you may have taken. This is translated into a total score; if it is higher than the target score, you'll win a prize, such as Gil or Gems.
  • The Ghost: The Cloud of Darkness mentions resonating with Class Zero's "mother," Dr. Arecia, in order to manipulate Ace, but Dr. Arecia is never seen, and it's even mentioned that it's unlikely she could even be summoned to this world.
  • Going Through the Motions: All (humanoid) player characters have basically the same set of animations outside of battle—stepping back in surprise, thrusting an arm out when making an important statement, looking down when pensive, etcetera. Only a select few have additional, unique animations, such as Sephiroth covering his face to laugh.
  • Gotta Catch Them All: The light compasses in Act 3 are not just a method to lead the people holding them to the friends from their homeworld. When gathered together, they will open the path back to the Warrior of Light so that they can save him from his eternal battle with Garland. Once the group figures this out, they pick up their search for other groups with compasses.
  • Got Me Doing It: After Selphie joins the party, her "Booyaka!" Catchphrase catches on to the rest of the party, much to both Serah and Lightning's confusion. Serah however, starts to join in on the fun as well, making Lightning pull a comical Et Tu, Brute? in response.
  • Guide Dang It!: One of the most common complaints after three years in service is that the game doesn't really do much to assist new players on some of the basics (such as not selling c15/c35 gold weapons until you permanently unlock the passive). If not for the extensive and supportive fan base making guides and videos explaining these things, the wall to getting started to late in the game's lifetime would be even higher.

    H - L 
  • Halloween Episode: In Global. It doesn't seem like a coincidence that the darkest and most horror-filled story chapter yet (Act 2, Chapter 5) was released in October 2019.
  • Harder Than Hard: The game has progressively added more and more challenging challenge fights as Power Creep sets in. The first was EX (level 100), then COSMOS (150). The second anniversary for the JP release added CHAOS (180), noted for enemies with powerful attack and defense and extremely high HP. Lufenia and Lufenia+ added a countdown orb that triggers a Total Party Kill attack unless it's stalled by character mechanics specific to that fight. Shinryu replaces this with the Force Gague and Force Time.
  • Heel–Face Revolving Door: Villain characters, such as Seymour, Kuja, and Sephiroth, are able to be recruited into the party through Character Events, yet will remain major antagonists in the main story. This means you can use the same villainous recruit in the same story chapter they, themselves, are the main villain of, and can even be used in said fight with themselves.
  • Heel–Face Turn: Most of the antagonists who become playable do so out of Enemy Mine reasons or in an attempt at manipulation, but a few seem to genuinely turn to the party's side.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: The base version of most character abilities only hit one thing at a time. Characters with innate multi-target attacks are preferred as Assist Characters because they speed up Level Grinding. Passive abilities acquired through crystal levels often upgrade single-target attacks into this type.
  • Hypocritical Humor: Galuf asks all sorts of personal questions when the old men go off to chat amongst themselves, but as soon as someone turns the inquiry on him, he pretends to be struck by amnesia again.
  • I Choose to Stay: At the end of Act 2, basically everyone who died in their home games decides to continue living in the World of Respite, since the party goes to confront Shinryu with the intention of being able to go home afterward. Instead, this decision is rendered moot when the Warrior of Light sends everyone to a new world altogether.
  • I Never Told You My Name: When the party meets up with Kain Highwind, they are hesitant to let him join until he recognizes Edge and calls him by name. This doesn't happen until much later in FFIV, after Kain has rejoined Cecil's party—that and Kain's poorly-concealed distress over Cecil "still" being a Dark Knight prompts the party to realize that they may have lost some of their memories. (Something similar happens with Rydia later on, but that is both less fraught and also overshadowed by the fact that she is an adult.)
  • Improbable Weapon User: There are some weapons used by certain characters that are quite weird, such as Yuffie using a paper crane or Layle using a ball of psychic energy ... although these particular weapons are still classified as throwing weapons (and thus can be used by other throwing weapon users). There are rare characters, however, who use weapons so bizarre that they can't be classified as anything other than "Unique"; such as Kefka fighting with clown hats, Cait Sith using megaphones, or Relm entering the battle brandishing a paintbrush.
  • Infinity +1 Sword: Each new content era adds a new "best weapon" level. First were 35 CP weapons, which enabled use of a second ability. Then were the EX and EX+, adding a rechargeable Limit Break. Burst (BT) became the best weapons for certain characters only and were also upgraded into BT+ so that their finisher ability could be used without Bullet Time. Ultima Weapons are not locked to characters like most weapons and can be upgraded six levels, becoming the most powerful weapon type to date.
  • Infinity -1 Sword:
    • LD weapons. They boast a higher base CP than EX weapons, but less than EX+ weapons, and grant the character a powerful ability that always proves centric to their skillset. Fully leveling the LD weapon gives the character their LD skill for 0 CP, so it is always great to have.
    • Force (FR) weapons are not as powerful as the current Infinity Plus One Swords (BT an Ultima), but they are stronger than EX+ and confer a special Force Ability which can be used twice per battle when the Force Gauge is filled to 100%. This initiates Force Time, massively boosting the HP damage cap as long as the conditions to increase the bonus are fulfilled.
  • Innocuously Important Episode:
    • Aerith's recruitment event. Most character events are focused on that person with perhaps a dash of foreshadowing for the overall plot (such as Seymour sharing the group's doubts about Mog and the gods). Aerith's event reveals Kuja to be an Anti-Villain, that the Torsions can increase in power, and that some characters have lost significant chunks of memory as a result of entering the new world. Her event also has a different format from the others; rather than three cutscenes with optional, harder battles after the third, hers alternates cutscene-battle-cutscene all the way up through seven cutscenes.
    • Kain's recruitment event seems to be one as well. Despite following the usual formula "three cutscenes and five battles", it hints that Spiritus, unlike Materia, recruits his champions in person and with memories intact and alleges that Mog drains the life force of Materia's champions after every battle.
    • Most of the Intersecting Wills events are lighthearted side-stories, except for Snow's, which involves Eald'narche giving him an existential crisis over missing memories that ends with Snow leaving the party.
  • Irony: The dramatic sort. In Act 2, Chapter 1, a group of characters discuss the idea of dying and the effect it has on those they leave behind. One of the characters involved is Yuna, whose job it is to Send the dead to the Farplane. The others in the scene all die in their respective games: Serah, Papalymo, Galuf, and Aerith.
  • It Only Works Once: Burst abilities are extremely powerful attacks that confer great benefits to the whole party, but they can only be used once per battle, making it crucial to use them properly in difficult fights.
  • King Mook: The final boss for Aerith's Character Event is the aptly named King Behemoth. The royal title isn't just for show either, King Behemoth can hit the entire party like a freight train for both BRV and HP damage. There's a good reason he's the final boss coupled with the introduction of a character with a Revive ability.
  • La Résistance: The Returners, named after the same group as in Final Fantasy VI by Edgar. They aren't a traditional rebel group in that they don't actually fight the gods or anyone among Materia's warriors, and in fact offer aid and information on several occassions—they simply refuse to follow the gods' wishes and instead investigate and deal with threats on their own. Each Returner ends up joining the main party soon after meeting them. By the time Edgar arrives, the Returners have brought enough people around to their way of thinking that they no longer need to operate as a separate faction.
  • Let's You and Him Fight: Leon's recruitment event begins with the Emperor brainwashing him and then dumping him in front of Firion so that they'll fight.
  • Lampshade Hanging: Up until Act 1, Chapter 8, Squall is an optional character and doesn't appear in chapter cutscenes. He's basically Retconned in by chapter 8's inclusion of "flashback" scenes that show him interacting with events in previous chapters—and in one of them, Seifer gets mad that Squall didn't even bother to say hello back in chapter 3.
  • Laser-Guided Amnesia:
    • Turns out to be rampant and rather fitting to the trope title. Some characters don't remember anything beyond a certain point in their home game (such as Zell only knowing the events of Disc 1 while Squall remembers the whole thing). Others seem to know everything except certain, specific experiences (such as Yuna knowing Seymour as an Unsent but not a villain, or the FFV characters having no reaction to Galuf being alive and well). It turns out Materia extracted memories she thought painful enough to interfere with the goal of providing respite to her warriors.
    • The Type-0 cast specifically discusses fears over this, given what happens to memories of the deceased on their world. When they determine that the crystal's influence will likely not be able to reach a completely different world Rem shows some relief that if one of them were to die they won't be forgotten by their friends.
  • Law of Chromatic Superiority:
    • Weapons are ranked in power using metallic colors; Bronze Equipment is non-specific to anyone, have no abilities, and are the weakest. Silver Equipment is stronger than Bronze and offers a small character-specific boots to stats. Golden is even stronger than Silver, and when fully upgraded becomes a pale blue Crytal. EX+ level equipment is purple. Burst-level equipment has a black starfield that becomes green and sparkly when fully upgraded to BT+ (and the corresponding High Armor becomes deep blue).
    • Ultima Weapons have an unique color progression with each upgrade tier: their initial appearance makes them look like they're encased in crystal and have a pale teal palette, with each upgrade breaking away a part of the crystal and adding a steadily growing dark red area to the background while the teal shifts to a brighter blue hue. The third upgrade tier has the red and blue take equal amounts of space in the background, while the middle of the icon is now dark purple due to the colors mixing, the fourth upgrade turns the entire background dark purple, and the final upgrade turns it into a more dark teal color: this signifies the fact that the Ultima Weapons are made by Materia and upgraded by Spiritus and distributing both gods' power evenly results in the Ultima Weapon's final form.
    • Character backgrounds also change color based on how they are equipped; characters with no Golden Equipment whatsoever have a white background, characters with at least one Golden weapon but who do not have two pieces of character-specific Golden equipment have a purple background, and characters who have two pieces of their character-specific Golden or Crystal equipment have a golden background.
    • The color of the command buttons and their description text in battle also follows a specific color scheme: by default, all buttons are dark blue (or dark green for other players in multiplayer), but they turn red if the character has a passive ability that upgrades the ability, and the color of the text usually becomes the same shade of red if the command is being further enhanced. Level 90 passives make the Additional Ability and EX Ability text dark yellow when equiped alongside any changed BRV or HP commands if the level 85 passive affects them.
  • The Leader: While most characters get a Day in the Limelight and contribute to making decisions, the Warrior of Light is the one that everyone ultimately defers to for leadership, fitting his status as representative of the Dissidia franchise and the hero of the first Final Fantasy game. And once he vanishes, the other nameless hero - the Onion Knight - takes over the reins.
  • Light Is Not Good: As Shantotto divulges in Chapter 7, what Mog deeems the "light" allows characters to not simply close torsions but to punch open new ones as well. She clarifies that the threat from this power is one of intent, rather than making all of the warriors an inherent threat to the world, but it means that Kuja and Seymour are as blessed with the light as the protagonists.
  • Limited Wardrobe: This actually causes some issues in Chapter 4, when the lightly-dressed characters (such as Zidane and Yuna) wind up in the snowy mountains and complain about the cold. Similarly, Laguna gripes about the desert heat in Chapter 6 and wonders how the Warrior of Light can stand it wearing all that armor.
  • Loads and Loads of Loading: The game is three years old and has, as indicated above, a great deal of content. This can lead to long loading times even on today's cutting-edge or flagship devices. Even worse, it requires an always-on Internet connection that is immune to things like momentary lapses of service or, in a large building, hand-overs between routers that are maintaining the same Wi Fi network. If you attempt to connect to the DFFOO server during one of these very brief windows of missing coverage, the game will crash back to title screen... requiring you to navigate through another minute of menus and loading scenes in order to get back to where you were trying to go.

    M - O 
  • Ma'am Shock:
    • Vivi's polite mannerisms tend to get this response. At one point, he refers to Hope as mister. Hope, being fourteen, is taken aback. Squall reacts similarly to being called mister by the young mage.
    • Later on, Yda and Thancred calling Alisaie "Lady" clues her in that these aren't quite the friends she knows. Serah and Lilisette, being experienced time travelers, take on the role of explaining that she may be from their future.
  • Magic Knight: Many characters may qualify, but for example both Terra and Hope use melee weapons (swords and throwing weapons, respectively) but their attacks are considered magic when it comes to enemy resistances.
  • Magikarp Power: Many characters are mediocre or subpar up until you max out their Crystal levels. The "Extension" abilities at Level 55 and 60 augment their unique attacks, providing variable effects like increasing the number of uses, boosting its damage, granting the user stat buffs on use, making BRV attacks BRV-to-HP attacks, and more. While it varies depending on specifics, numerous characters have a lot of their power locked in their Crystal levels, and their viability skyrockets once you have them.
  • Massive Multiplayer Crossover: It wouldn't be Dissidia without it, and this time, there are even more new characters.
  • Meaningful Name:
    • "Opera Omnia" literally means "The complete works." The game features or is set to feature many different characters from almost every Final Fantasy game. Even surprising entries like Crystal Chronicles.
    • Doubles for the recent JP reveal of Noel Kreiss via Dec 25 2018, as "Noel" means Christmas in French.
  • Mercy Kill: The boss in Lenna's event is a dragon that was fatally poisoned while fighting with another monster. It's been rampaging across the landscape in its pain, forcing Lenna and the others to accept that the best thing they can do is to put the once-proud beast out of its misery.
  • Mistaken Identity: When Seven first meets the Warrior of Light, she asks if his name is Lightning because Caius told her to look for a knight named Lightning, who would be with her friends. Seven actually does meet Lightning later, and is confused because she isn't a knight, but says nothing because she isn't sure how much of her memories Lightning has.
  • Mythology Gag: It wouldn't be a Dissidia game without them.
    • All PS1- and PS2-era characters who had post-victory dances use the again here (i.e. Cloud windmilling his sword and then tucking it behind him).
    • Terra is recruitable in the fourth region, which is a snowy mountain range. Narshe, anyone?
    • The first thing Terra does when she sees Moogle? She hugs him, just like her special event for obtaining Moogle summon in the first Dissidia.
    • In Faris's event, Tifa asks Cloud to give the unconscious Faris a CPR. Later, she also mentions how Cloud once had to dress up as a woman, which makes Zidane uncomfortable in process.
    • Ace's event has Bartz comforting Ace about the stray Chocobo's death. This serves as references to both Bartz's close bond with his Chocobo Boko, and the deaths of Izana and his Chocobo.
    • Sabin's event takes place in a forest full of ghosts, and he thinks Manikins are ghosts and recruited some of them to assist him. This refers to the Phantom Train sequence. Appropriately, Shadow calls Sabin out of this.
    • When the party closes the Void in the first region, Hope asks Vivi to keep his eyes front while he watches their back.
    • Krile's offensive Brave skill is Thunder, referencing to how she attacked King Tycoon with a Thunder spell in her proper first appearance.
    • Yuna and Seymour's relationship in the fifth region is the same as their relationship prior to the reveal of his true goal in the original Final Fantasy X.
    • When Sephiroth is fought in the sixth region, the battle theme is J-E-N-O-V-A. Like its usage in Duodecim, this indicates that Sephiroth will be fought later. As a bonus, the fight happens in the northern part of the region.
    • Once Vincent shows himself in the seventh region, the Background Music for the world map changes to that of Nibelheim.
    • The party searches for Vincent in a huge mansion. Tifa finds a path to the basement and tells everyone that Vincent should be there, like how he was in his game.
    • Before fighting it, Ultima Weapon makes its Badass Boast from the original Final Fantasy VI.
    • Upon seeing Laguna for the first time, Zell asks himself whether it's just a dream or not. Later, Seifer also asks him the same.
    • Kuja still refers to Garnet as a "canary". He also did so towards Aerith in her event.
    • Likewise, when Garland talks to Kuja about his motives and vice versa, a third-person quote in part of Garland's speech has Kuja remark "just hearing your name alone makes my skin crawl" as back in his home game, there's a completely different person with the same name that has a hand in both of Zidane and Kuja's origins. It also functions as a callback to Dissidia 012, where this was his introduction quote against a player controlling Garland.
    • The ninth chapter has a section where the group has to walk after their airship crashed, and they have to locate another airship to go to the next region. All while Sunleth Waterscape's music is playing on the background, and it turns out the airship is located at Eden's replication.
    • Edgar is leading La Résistance called "Returners", which Layle is apparently a member of.
    • The Warrior asks what would happen if they were to "flood the world with light" after the Onion Knight explains what the Cloud of Darkness does. The "Flood of Light" was a disaster in the history of Final Fantasy III, and averting one is central to the plot of Final Fantasy XIV expansion Shadowbringers, in which one of the villains that attempt to bring about the flood takes on the form of The Warrior of Light.
    • Galuf gives Krile and Bartz an Always with You speech, in spite of the fact he isn't dying, foreshadowing that he is Doomed by Canon to die halfway through Final Fantasy V. Later, he declares that he will sacrifice all his energies to defeat Exdeath, which is how he dies.
    • Garnet is able to summon Leviathan's Tidal Wave and Ramuh's Judgement Bolt in battle; Leviathan and Ramuh are the first two eidolons Garnet is guaranteed to get through Final Fantasy IX.
    • Penelo's Regen and Hastega abilities may very well be a reference to her cross-classing the White Mage and the Time Battlemage from The Zodiac Age. If that is the case, both of Penelo's Golden-level daggers, the Orichalcum Dirk and Platinum Dagger, are also the only two daggers either class could ever learn to equip legitimately.
    • Faris' worry that they've been playing into Exdeath's hands are highly justified, given that it's basically the plot of Final Fantasy V.
    • Layle's EX Ability? Resembles something ripped straight out of an action done during the final boss battle of his home game.
    • Noel's EX ability has him assume a pose very reminiscent of how he engages Lightning in Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII. On top of that, his abilities especially when he's fully awakened allow him to deal more overall damage to already broken targets, referencing his initial Commando role that specializies in having enhanced offense vs. staggered enemies.
    • The World of Illusions is full of these in both the summons available and the progression through their trials.
      • The summons from Dissidia NT return, but they are also joined not only by recurring summons Mog, Chocobo and Sylph, but three Guardian Forces from Final Fantasy VIII; Pandemonium, Diabolos, and the Brothers.
      • In the Trials of Bahamut, the final enemy of the EX trial is Bahamut himself rather than the Dark Bahamuts from Final Fantasy IV that act as the bosses of each tier of the trial. In most games he appears in, starting with Final Fantasy II, he is known to test the player's worth personally to ensure they are worthy of his help.
      • In the Trials of Diabolos, you end up fighting The Brothers and Phoenix multiple times, each fellow Guardian Forces originating from VIII, and each bearing powers related to their primary ability when summoned.
      • In the Trials of Pandemonium, the primary boss is Archeoaevis, who maintains its gimmick of having four distinct phases with different resistances and weaknesses.
      • In the Trials of Alexander, you predominantly fight Lich as he appears in Final Fantasy IX, referencing Alexander's prominence in it. In addition, the original Marilith can be fought here as well as she's the fiend that succeeds Lich in boss order.
      • The Ultimate Trials each end in a fight with their respective summons. While all of them use a mix of the track "Explosion" from Dissidia NT, either used when fighting them in that game or otherwise Bootstrapped, Diabolos is given a cover of "God in Fire", as he and Chaos are both demons originating from the void.
  • Name's the Same: invoked Both Ramza and the Final Fantasy XII crew are from Ivalice, but not the same Ivalice. This gets revealed when Vaan hears Ramza is from Ivalice and asks him what country in Ivalice he's from, confusing Ramza since in his world, Ivalice is a kingdom, not a region/continent.
    • Likewise, Noctis's Warp Strike in Japanese is called "Shift Break", which is the same name as one of Zidane's abilities that he doesn't have in this game.
  • No Hugging, No Kissing: Though the Official Couples like Zidane and Garnet are still affectionate, interaction between casts is all platonic. The flirts still flirt with people, but they universally get turned down.
  • Non-Dubbed Grunts: There is voice acting in the game, but all of it is left in the original Japanese. This includes both grunts and short voice clips each character is accompanied with.
  • "Not So Different" Remark:
    • King snaps out of his brief existential crisis and agrees to join the party after Vivi points out the parallels between the both of them.
    • Vivi also compares himself and Gaia's Black Mages in general to the manikins, pondering the possibility of the later having souls.
    • Staunch knight Steiner is initially aghast to be working with the pirate captain Faris, until hearing about how Faris is concerned about her missing sea crew and relating her emotions to his own worries over how the Knights of Pluto are holding up without him.
    • Ramza gets a pep talk from Rem and Laguna, who both are no strangers to war, as well as Terra and Vivi, who both have personal experience being used as weapons of war but decided to pursue their own interests instead. All of this resonates strongly with Ramza, who always thought the unfair class systems and fruitless wars of his Ivalice were pointless and stupid.
    • The Warrior of Light fearfully realizes this about Light and Darkness after Onion Knight explains the premise of the Cloud of Darkness (a force of nature who appears to destroy the world when there is a severe imbalance towards either side) to him. He is visibly shocked when he realizes the light he carries is just as dangerous as the villains' darkness.
    • Squalls broods upon the fact that he and Seifer really aren't that different, Seifer just has the unfortunate situation of being alienated by Squall's group of allies.
    • Both Yuffie and Cater are aghast when the party suggests they are more similar than they think ... in that they are both annoying tomboys. Ironically, once the party walks away Yuffie and Cater take a moment to realize they really do share a number of similarities but put a positive spin on it.
  • Non-Indicative Name: Since all enemy types are classified as whatever the base type of that enemy that was first added to the game is called and said base enemy type name can be at times overly specific, this comes up often when trying to find a good location to kill a large number of said enemy type for the Chocobo Board missions: for example, instead of there being a general "golem" enemy type, said enemy type is called "plant golem" because that's what the base golem enemy is called and all other enemies of that type will be classified as belonging to the "plant golem" category as well, even if their actual name and appearance are the complete opposite of that base description, such as the enemy in question actually being a broken down robot upper torso.
  • Noob: While everyone learns how to play the game at their own pace, something of a Berserk Button for many players is seeing someone who does not change their Assist Character, and thus offers a Lv.1 Warrior of Light with Bronze Equipment for anyone bold enough to befriend them. Suffice it to say, there's many a player whose tagline on their own character reads "Update your assist!".
  • One-Hit Kill: Very possible if you have a character with an extremely high BRV cap via a variety of circumstances. By sheer coincidence, one of your starting characters, Vivi Orniter, is such a warrior. Of course, you need to build up his BRV while protecting his relatively low HP...likewise, the later you go into the game with more decked-out your overally party can become, the less likely it is to be able to one-shot bosses due to their high HP amount (even though the trope is still in effect for most superbosses themselves being able to reach One-Hit Kill threshold with their BRV amounts at times).
  • Overrated and Underleveled: All new characters join at Lv. 1. The Level Cap is Lv. 50 for all characters, with crystal boosts needed to raise to 60 and then 70. Until the addition of chocobo feathers, EXP dungeons were the only way to powerlevel.

    P - S 
  • Painting the Medium: Whenever a character uses a move, its name is displayed at the top of the screen in a little window. The font, font color and background color of this window corresponds to the (default) menu settings in the character's home game: white text on grey for FF8, a light-brown parchment background for FFT, etc.
  • Party Scattering: At the end of Act 2, the entire player party gets scattered by the brilliance of the dark crystal going out of control, with the Warrior of Light pulling a Heroic Sacrifice to send them to a new world separate from the World of Respite. Act 3 seems to involve Putting the Band Back Together.
  • Power Creep: The game's history is split into "eras" based on what the most powerful weapon and/or battle tier was at the time. It started with the 35-CP era, then there was the EX era, the COSMOS and CHAOS eras, Burst-Era, LD era, etcetera. The developers continually rework characters introduced in earlier content (or who were the pioneers for a new tier) to keep them usable in new content, but it's noticeable when going back to earlier acts, chapters, and resource node battles. The JP version eventually updated to start all characters from a base level of 70 rather than 1.
  • Power Floats: Characters that specialize in magic tend to do this. Terra rises from the ground when performing Meltdown and Meteor, Rydia lifts off and does a slow spin to fire off her HP attack, and Kuja is always airborne.
  • Reality Warper: Eventually the party comes to learn that anyone with a will strong enough can bend reality in this world, giving them the ability to recreate exact locales from their home worlds or, as Golbez demonstrates, the party's airship.
  • Recurring Boss: Iron Giants are fought at least once per region in Act 1. Seifer, Fujin, and Raijin are fought three times in the third region.
  • Recurring Element: Lampshaded. In the second chapter, everyone notes how familiar the ruins look and start wondering if there's a deeper meaning until Mog explains that Materia and Spiritus designed the world to look familiar to their warriors.
  • Redemption Demotion: If a playable character has to be fought to join the party they will always have their secondary abilities/attacks as well as be a higher level. When they join your team, they suddenly forget that attack and have to be retaught it via crystals, and their level resets to 1.
  • Rest-and-Resupply Stop: The world of Opera Omnina exists for this purpose. It was created as a haven for champions of Materia and Spiritus to rest from their previously ceaseless battles against one another. The appearance of the Torsions ruined this, however, as Warriors with the Light must fight and close them less the monsters spewing forth destroy this world and all others.
  • Retcon: The Lost Chapters feature characters from the chapters that were released after the original recruitment event took place, such as Edgar and Lightning in Prishe's chapter. Another explanation could be that the extra cutscenes occur later on, independent of when the character in question was first recruited.
  • Rhetorical Question Blunder: When Steiner tells Faris to get lost because she's a pirate, Vaan pipes up, asking if being a sky pirate means he should get lost too. Steiner's reply is basically that yes, he should.
  • Royals Who Actually Do Something: There are many members of royalty in the party, from Prince Edge of FFIV, King Edgar and Prince Sabin of FFVI, and Princess Garnet of FFIX, however this is actually brought up as a point when Princess Ashe from FFXII joins the team, many members act surprised but inspired by a princess so competent in taking up a sword herself in the name of protecting her kingdom.
  • Ruins for Ruins' Sake: A common feature of the landscape. Firion and Wakka complain about it at one point because it reminds them too much of the ruins of their homeworlds, which they saw become that way firsthand.
  • Running Gag: The various pilot characters (Setzer, Balthier, Sazh, Cid Highwind) jockeying and wagering over who gets to fly the airship... while universally agreeing that Vaan doesn't get the job.
  • Save the Villain:
    • Chapter 10's final cutscene has Squall and the others trying to get an unconscious Seifer to wake up, lest he be sucked into the rift overhead. (They restrict themselves to shouting, probably due to the limits of the character animations.) Seifer finally comes to and runs over to argue, which gets him clear.
    • Act 2, Chapter 3 is largely about trying to bring Kuja back down from another Suicidal Cosmic Temper Tantrum. Most of the IX characters acknowledge that they still can't forgive his atrocities, but they still want to save him rather than kill him.
  • Self-Deprecation: One cutscene has Rinoa and Tidus comisserating over basically being characters who are frequently found "annoying" before they underwent their Character Development in their home games.
  • Set Bonus: a way to encourage players to use the Item Gachapon. There's a large variety of equipment, but each character has at least two weapons and armors that, when equipped to them personally, adds significant stat bonuses.
  • Shipper on Deck: Krile, Bartz, Ace, and Penelo all get involved helping a chocobo make a Love Confession.
  • Shown Their Work: The dinosaur bosses in Gau's event sport colorful plumage, in line with the now well-known analysis of fossil evidence showing that dinosaurs did indeed have feathers.
  • Socialization Bonus: Players can assign a single character who can be "borrowed" for three turns during a battle, at which point they Tag Team out one of your (owned) three. You can Follow other players to make them appear more frequently on your list, making it easier to bring them along. If they Follow you back, you are allowed to use their Assist Character for five turns a battle, instead of three. Following players follows the same rules as Final Fantasy Record Keeper; you can freely Follow as many players as you can hold without them being mutually obligated to Follow you, and vice versa.
  • Status Buff:
    • Comes in very specific forms for both buffs AND debuffs that can be inflicted/gained from various sources, via the feature bring carried over from NT with some new additions. Buffs and debuffs last for a certain amount of turns and only six can be on a target at a time. Certain buffs/debuffs have a frame around the icon which means they can't be knocked off except by other framed effects of the same type (silver or gold), unless the character (inevitably, the enemy) has an ability that allows them to remove frames.
    • Crystal levels include invisible buffs (sometimes called auras) that add to the power of visible buffs and can affect the whole party, not just the character casting it.
    • Crystal level 65 is always a buff that has one or two uses in battle.
    • Limit breaking EX and higher-level weapons adds some kind of passive boost to the character, such as starting the battle with buffs or a full EX gauge.
  • Stealth Sequel: When the Warrior of Light gets his memories back of the previous cycles of battle, including those with Cosmos and Chaos, it confirms that this game takes place after all the other Dissidia games.
  • Summon Magic:
    • By Binding Summons through expending materials, you can bring Summons with you when you enter battle. In addition to providing a passive buff to the entire party, performing actions in combat fills the Summon Gauge; when it's full, you can Summon your Summoned Beast, which will perform a Summon-specific attack, then temporarily raise the maximum Bravery limit of all characters for a few turns.
    • A few party members can use summons outside of the above, including Rydia from FFIV who can summon Leviathan, and Garnet from FFIX who can also summon Leviathan, but also Ramuh as well. Relm from FFVI can sort of also do this, by way to using Sketch to copy the Summon the party has equipped, but she isn't actually calling the summon, just copying their attacks.
  • Super-Deformed: The game's art style, although to a lesser degree than games like World of Final Fantasy.
    • Shantotto is an interesting case: as she's already canonically short, her artwork is only slightly redrawn from her Dissidia art, and her in-game model is directly recycled from the PSP games.
    • The cast of IX also downplay this, as their models are fairly close to their original game's models. Likewise the same or not with the VII cast in regards to the overall size of their original overworld models compared to their Opera Omnia artwork/models.
  • Super Mode: When characters equip their Burst weapon and use their Burst ability, they enter Burst Mode, which allows them six free turns, a free ability use for all their equipped abilities (including a free EX charge) and a final Burst attack, all while their home game's battle theme plays. Once finished, they also have a powerful unique party buff active for a set number of turns. Only certain characters get Burst weapons and only one character can use their burst per battle; anyone else with a Burst weapon will have the ability locked (except for friend units).
  • Super Move Portrait Attack: Burst attacks call up the character's portraits and also involve BGM Override. Overlaps with Super Mode.
  • Swirly Energy Thingy: The Torsions appear as dark whirlpools hanging in the air.

    T -Z 
  • Team Dad: Older characters like Galuf, Sazh, and even Laguna often dispense fatherly wisdom and advice to the rest of the party. Interestingly, they all offer advice to Tidus regarding his relationship with his father Jecht.
  • Team Pet: The party gets one in the chocobo Chichiri, who Ace managed to summon to the World of Respite after drawing on the power of the crystal core of darkness. They keep her on the airship to the delight of the other chocobo lovers, to be taken care of by Ace and Machina together.
  • Terrible Interviewees Montage: Mog attempts to show what a good job he's doing with managing Spiritus' warriors by summoning several of them in quick succession. Without exception they dismiss him, insult his motives, and depart.
  • The Battle Didn't Count: No battle against real Final Fantasy characters even ends with them dying. They either join you afterwards or escape.
  • Timey-Wimey Ball: Initially, it's unclear whether characters are entering the gods' world at different points during the timeline of their homegame, or whether their own memories are patchy. The cast of IV seems to be legitimately timeshifted (with Cecil appearing as a Dark Knight, while Rydia arrives as an adult—after the point where he'd become a Paladin), while for others like Zell and Squall it could simply be a lack of memory. It turns out that it's both. Materia tampers with her warriors' memories, but during the Interlude it comes out that many characters forced themselves back in time somehow when they entered the world, and also forced themselves to forget doing so for as yet unknown reasons.
  • Training from Hell: Yang likes to put the party through this on occasion, to the delight of the other martial artists. Everyone else is always terrified of by the prospect.
  • Turn-Based Combat: Unlike the main Dissidia games, which are action games with RPG Elements, Opera Omnia shifts to pure turn-based, utilizing a system similar to Final Fantasy X's Command Time Battle system.
  • Unreliable Expositor: The party increasingly suspects Mog of being one. When Celes and Terra decide to ask him about the origin of the manikins, Shadow says that they're wasting their time.
  • Unsettling Gender Reveal: The party is shocked when they discover Faris is actually a woman (minus Bartz who already knew, and Zidane who figured it out on his own), given that she not only looked like but called herself a man. Once Faris explains it was just the way she grew up, they are quick to accept her into the group (although Sazh is still quite a bit unnerved, thanks to discovering Cloud also masqueraded as the opposite gender once).
  • Unusually Uninteresting Sight:
    • When Celes first joins the party she is understandably shaken at the prospect of being in a completely different world, but Layle just shrugs and says it doen't seem weird to him at all. Zell calls him out how most people would think their situation was quite bizarre and that he's being odd by thinking it is so normal.
    • So far, none of the XIV characters have discussed the fact that Galuf Halm Baldesion and Krile Mayer Baldesion share the same name and roughly the same relationship as two of their allies in Eorzea.
  • Vancian Magic: In a very similar fashion to Final Fantasy Record Keeper, every character has an explicit number of charges of each Ability in their loadout per battle, and may not recover Ability charges under most circumstances until they leave combat. As such, a key crux of strategy is deciding where and when to use specific Ability charges to maximize their effectiveness and hasten combat. (This has fluctuated from era to era due to reworks adding more ability uses or changing the strategic priority of the high-tier battles.)
  • Villain Teleportation: Several villains, such as Kefka, the Emperor, and Kuja, show the ability to teleport with and without the use of Torsions.
  • Violation of Common Sense: Unlike most RPGs or games in general, most endgame fights involve fighting 2 or 3 copies of the same boss at the same time: while this wouldn't normally be too out of the ordinary, OO really wants you to keep each boss at roughly the same amount of HP remaining instead of doing the more obvious thing and killing them off one by one to reduce the total number of targets. This is enforced both by the fact that both bosses gain higher stats and BRV damage reduction when you reduce their HP, making the remaining one(s) that much harder to kill off if you focus solely on a single boss and leaving you with less ability uses to do so with, as well as the fact that most characters have attacks that hit all targets for either split, full or splash HP damage, with more overall damage naturally being done overall with them than with pure single-target attacks if there's more than 1 target present.
  • Walking the Earth: Lion bonds over her love of this with Layle and Bartz.
  • War Is Hell: One of the themes of Act 2, Chapter 9. Class Zero struggles to imagine a world without war and some of the adults, like Sazh, are horrified about them being Child Soldiers and all the fighting they've been through. Basch and Penelo talk about their experiences of war themselves but even they admit they haven't always lived through war and know what peace is like, unlike Seven and King.
  • Weapon of X-Slaying: Funnily enough, instead of actual weapons of slaying a specific enemy type, there are instead Party Members of X-Slaying (who may not really fit into the Hunter of Monsters category on their own, since they are not solely dedicated to killing their types of enemies story-wise). Tifa is specialized against Skeleton-enemies, Zidane gets a bonus against Wolf-enemies, Steiner is strong versus Humanoid-enemies, Sabin is great when fighting Ghost-enemies, and Edgar is a savant when dealing with Machine-enemies. Barring this however are characters that inflict imperil damage on any debuffed enemies (regardless of which debuffs are inflicted).
  • We ARE Struggling Together: In chapter 10, Materia and Spiritus both appear to demand that their summoned warriors go into the Torsion and fix it, and immediately start bickering. They both wish to preserve their new world from being torn apart, but Materia wants to do it righteously while Spiritus insists that raw power is the only way to get things done, which is why they've been choosing the people they have. In the end, the warriors on both sides decide to ignore "their" gods and team up to fix the situation themselves (along with Materia starting to listen more to her own warriors' concerns later on as of Chapter 11).
  • Wham Episode:
    • Chapter 6, the Domina Wastelands. To start with, the opening cutscene is Mog paying a visit to Spiritus—the god of battle opposing Materia—and speaking to him as a subordinate. Then, Shantotto's investigations reveal that everyone in the world, regardless which side they're on, has the power to open and close Torsions at will. In fact, this ability is the very "light" that Mog refers to. From then on, the party's main priority becomes not just dealing with the Torsions but figuring out if the quest laid out by Mog is even the right path to follow.
    • After Chapter 6, Opera Omnia basically turns into Wham Episode: The Game.
    • The Interlude chapter ends with The Reveal that the Blackened Will was a corrupted larval form of a planesgorger straight from Dissidia Final Fantasy (2015). Furthermore, the characters might have intentionally chose to have their memories removed for some reason. And the crystal core of the world, the crystal of light, was shattered by the planesgorger which means the party will have to travel to the World of Darkness to save the crystal of darkness, which is currently the only pillar the world has left to stand on.
  • Wham Shot:
    • Chapter 8 ends with the party fleeing an aerial bombardment, revealed to be lead by none other than Golbez.
    • The final cutscene in Kain's recruitment event ends with a flashback of him speaking to the god who summoned him—Spiritus, not Materia.
  • What Measure Is a Mook?: Once the manikins appear, questions start to be asked about whether or not they're people and if anyone should feel guilty about fighting them. This becomes a central point in Act 2, Chapter 3, when Kuja replaces Vivi with an advanced manikin of him, which he persuaded with the offer of a heart. The manikin ultimately starts to care about the party and joins their side to help save the original Vivi. Vivi himself calls it a "little brother."
  • Wolverine Publicity: It is obvious the team knows how popular Final Fantasy VII is. Cloud and Tifa are both recruited in the first chapternote  and almost all of the "novice" missions are about using and buffing Cloud. The game logo has reflects this too—it started with the Warrior of Light, switched to Cloud, then Lightning (who is also subject to this), and seems to have settled back on Cloud again for some time.
  • Word Salad Title: Vast majority of the EX+ passive abilities have ridiculously long Engrishy names which, while they generally follow their own consistent internal terminology logic, look like someone had a stroke while typing them and picked the first autocorrect suggestion for each word. For one example, Onion Knight's EX+ weapon passive that grants him an unique buff, makes all enemies weak to ice damage and makes the magical version of the EX's HP attack deal full HP damage to all enemies is rendered as "Blade Torrent Buff Debuff Plus Force Meteorite HP Equal Attack".
  • Your Magic's No Good Here: Generally averted except when it comes to the Universal Rules of death for the Final Fantasy Type-0 party members. In their world their Crystal causes them to instantly forget anyone who dies so that they are not burdened to linger on the past, however their Crystal's effects cannot reach them in the Opera Omnia world. Ace actually feels this firsthand when shortly after arriving he attempts to save a Chocobo who dies on him thereafter, leaving him visibly shaken.

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