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Video Game / Defenders of Dynatron City

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Defenders of Dynatron City started out as a 1992 video game for the NES developed by Lucasfilm Games. It also got a six issue comic and an animated pilot to help with promotion... And then people actually played the game. To cut a long story short, it put a damper on whatever future the property might've had.

The setting is Dynatron City, the futuristic home of Proto-Cola, a drink that causes mutation, much to the delight of the consumer. Unfortunately, that's not what the Mad Scientist that created it was intending, so he falls back on the old standard of building a robot army to scare away city residents.

Some stuff happens and suddenly there is a team of super powered construction workers there to fight the bad guy. Including Jet Headstrong, Buzzsaw Girl, Toolbox, Ms. Megawatt, Monkey Kid, and Radium Dog.

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Fun fact: The above image, as well as some of the comic series, were done by Steve Purcell early in his career with LucasArts.


Tropes appearing in Defenders Of Dynatron City include:

  • Animesque: The animatied pilot.
  • Badass in Distress: If one of the heroes is defeated, they're captured and held hostage, requiring you to rescue them before you can use them again.
  • Conspicuous CG: The cityscape art in the animated special full of little helicopters are done with some very primitive CGI rendering that looks nothing like the traditional animation making up the bulk of the show.
  • Hitbox Dissonance: One of the most infamous examples of its console generation. The player can almost never score a hit on the enemies, who can almost always score a hit on the player. You might almost think it was The Computer Is a Cheating Bastard instead.
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  • Losing Your Head: Jet Headstrong.
  • May Contain Evil: Proto-Cola and its mutating side-effects. Subverted as pretty much every single mutation is beneficial.
  • Nintendo Hard: Besides rather unforgiving mission design, the game is somewhat notorious for how hard it is to gauge whether the player's attacks will hit enemies.
  • One-Wheeled Wonder: Buzzsaw Girl, a mutant heroine whose lower body was a buzzsaw that functioned as a wheel.
  • Timed Mission: All of the levels have a time limit. Usually one that leaves very little room for error, especially in later stages.
  • Use Your Head: Jet Headstrong and Toolbox. For the former it's a missile, for the latter it's a giant hammer.

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