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Hoxxes IV. Located in the lawless Outer Rim, it is home to the richest motherlode of valuable minerals in the galaxy. The problem? It is a Death World par excellence. Many have tried to tame this world, greedily seeking her riches; all have failed - all but one. Deep Rock Galactic, one of the biggest and most stubborn space mining conglomerates in the galaxy, has set its sights upon Hoxxes IV.

Their goal is nothing less than - in their own words - the "complete subjugation" of the planet. This will be no easy feat; the natives of Hoxxes are endless and hungry, and they have the home field advantage. In the lightless depths, intruders must contend not only with the native Glyphids, but also the many geographic hazards Hoxxes has to offer; subterranean jungle, ice caverns, even the churning tectonics of the planet's very core. Who do you call on to undertake such an insanely dangerous excavation?

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Dwarves, of course!

Deep Rock Galactic is a cooperative First-Person Shooter and the debut game of Danish Studio Ghost Ship Games. It was released on Steam Early Access on February 28, 2018. On May 13th, 2020, it entered full release on Steam. It has also been released on Xbox One and the Windows 10 Store. In it, you play as a team of 1 to 4 heavily-armed Space Dwarves on a mission to the most dangerous (and most lucrative) planet in the galaxy. The game consists of randomly generated and fully destructible cave systems, containing a variety of environmental obstacles and swarming with hungry bug-aliens. Players are tasked with completing a variety of objectives, such as mining as much mineral wealth as possible, escorting a Drill Tank or pumping liquid minerals into an orbitally-inserted refinement facility. Ideally, this should be accomplished without dying to the locals.

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To combat the Glyphid hordes, Deep Rock Galactic fields four specialist dwarves, each with their own abilities and equipment:

  • The Scout specializes in mobility and exploration: he's equipped with a flare gun and a grappling hook that help him light and explore the caves, respectively, and his default weapons are an Assault Rifle and a Shotgun, both lacking long-range accuracy, encouraging him to get up close and personal with the local wildlife. His grenades focus on crowd-control; IFGs, which create a slowing field to trap encroaching hostiles, Cryo Grenades, which freeze bugs solid, and Pheromone Canisters, which attract enemies and make them attack whatever they hit. He can also unlock an M1-Garand Expy and Dual SMGs.

  • The Driller specializes in excavating, mining, and tunneling. Although all four Dwarves carry pickaxes, the Driller gets his name from a pair of massive power drills that destroy surfaces much faster. He's definitely not useless in a fight, though, since he also enters the mines with a pistol and a flamethrower. He is also the undisputed master of Stuff Blowing Up; his HE Grenades do Exactly What It Says on the Tin, his Throwing Axes have devastating damage but do nothing if they miss the target, and his Neurotoxin Canisters rapidly poison bugs - but not Dwarves. He is also the exclusive wielder of the feared Satchel Charge. He can unlock a Freeze Ray and chargeable Plasma Pistol.

  • The Engineer specializes in deployable sentry guns, crowd control, and platforms. If anything gets past his turret(s), he packs a pump-action shotgun; for heavier targets, he also wields a Grenade Launcher that blows holes in walls and aliens alike. His grenades further his crowd-control capabilities; the Plasma Burster erupts a detonation of deadly ionic flames, his Proximity Grenade lets him booby trap the caves to head off flankers, and his Decoy allows him to draw incoming hostiles around a giant dancing hologram. If his standard-issue guns aren't suiting his needs, he can also pack a modified SMG that shoots electrified ammunition, and a plasma 'wave' cannon that can obliterate entire swarms at once.

  • The Gunner specializes in, well — what else? He carries a massive minigun as well as a revolver. His team support abilities are his emergency dome shield generator, which recharges player shields and blocks both enemies and projectiles. His trusty zipline gun creates 2-way motorized ziplines that his entire team can use to cross pits or offer some vertical mobility. His selection of grenades is second to none for sheer destructive potential; Incendiary Grenades transform the cave into a raging firestorm, Cluster Grenades give the Satchel Charge a run for its' money in massive destructive power, and Sticky Grenades can attach to mobile bugs, only to detonate right as they're in the middle of a swarm. For more focused dakka-ing, he can unlock a heavy dual-barrel autocannon and a burst-fire pistol.

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Scanners detect examples of the following tropes:

  • Achievement Mockery: There are several hidden achievements awarded for doing particularly Dwarvish things.
    • "Without A Paddle," for being the last dwarf standing, with no ammo, while a Dreadnought is active.
    • "The A-Team," for stuffing a barrel into all four seats of the Drop Pod.
    • "Foreign Objects in the Launch Bay", for kicking every last barrel in the Space Rig into the launch bay forcefield. "You are why Mission Control drinks"
    • "Time Well Spent," for stuffing every barrel in the Space Rig into the drop pod. "Management weeps."
    • "Self Control," for taming your barrel-kicking urges for ten consecutive digs.
    • "Darwin Award," for jumping into the barrel hoop. While drunk.
    • "I Like It Down Here," for staying in one mission for over an hour.
  • Advanced Tech 2000: The M1000 Classic, somewhat paradoxically at first glance given the weapon is clearly an Expy of the World War II-era M1 Garand rifle. However, text from the modifications or overclocks indicate that the weapon is actually a railgun.
  • The Artifact: Some official artwork, as well as the statues that appear in the Memorial Hall, depict the Dwarves with their first-generation gun models, rather than the updated ones that are actually used in-game. This may be a deliberate Call-Back, as a form of recognition for the players who were playing way back then.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: Added in Update 25 is the Haunted Cave mission modifier, in which your dwarves must complete their mission while being chased relentlessly by a ghostly horror in the shape of a Bulk Detonator. It's completely invulnerable, and the only thing that can keep you safe is running away and completing your mission before it can catch up.
  • Alien Catnip: Inverted. This is the in-universe justification for why your dwarves are eating the health-restoring mineral known as red sugar.
  • Alien Invasion: An unusual example where the players are the alien invaders. Deep Rock Galactic is launching what amounts to a full-scale orbital invasion of Hoxxes IV; they openly state that their goal is "the complete subjugation" of the planet. All of the usual tropes are present—the Dwarves have an overwhelming technological superiority, they travel to and from the planet in indestructible ships, and they are exploiting the planet for resources and abducting some of the inhabitants by way of Egg Hunts. The catch is that the only inhabitants seen so far are (presumably) nonsentient, animalistic bugs.
  • Alien Kudzu: The woody chambers and passageways of the Hollow Bough are absolutely covered in overgrowths of an invasive red thorny vine. It appears to all be of the same species (Dwarves even comment that it "looks like one big thorny organism") but differentiates into three different forms. Creeper Vines are the most common, and spawl across rooms and tunnels, sprouting from holes in the wall, which they will slither back into if damaged. Short contact with creeper vines deals a bit of Scratch Damage. Bloated Vines are sessile, and much larger than the other forms. They act as part of the terrain, and can be mined, but beware of the large protruding thorns, which they will eject if damaged. Last and certainly not least are the Stabber Vines, which look similar to a cluster of three creeper vines, but with enormous sharp blades at the tips. These will target any dwarf that gets too close, lining up the blade before lunging forward to deal massive damage.
  • All-Natural Gem Polish: Averted for the most part. You can find huge gemstones lodged deep in the walls — either green Jadiz, blue Aquarq or the rare purple Bittergem — but they're giant lumpy blob shapes much like real-life natural gems. The only material you can pull out of the ground which plays this trope straight is the Enor Pearl, which is always perfectly spherical. As these "pearls" are found buried in the earth rather than inside a giant mollusk, it's anyone's guess as to how they're supposed to form, although the name is probably just a figure of speech.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • The game has been designed with multiplayer as the primary focus, but the AI assistant Bosco makes singleplayer missions more palatable:
      • Bosco can be assigned to do some of the more onerous tasks that would be annoying or even dangerous for a lone player to do. For example, he can be tasked to protect Doretta during Escort Duty missions so the player can run into a previous cavern to grab minerals or secondary objectives, and in On-Site Refining he can be assigned to finish constructing pipe segments, which would take a long time to complete for a single player.
      • In solo missions, Bosco's floating capabilities help to make up for movement options lost by not having allies to provide them for you; primarily the Engineer's platform gun, which Bosco doesn't need to mine objects on vertical walls. And he doesn't dig just veins; he can excavate to and reach buried chunks like Aquarq and Gold Nuggets by himself just fine if you point him at the proper patches of stone, so you can get the troublesome ones out of the ceiling and such.
      • Bosco can also carry heavy objects for you (such as Enor Pearls and Mini-M.U.L.E parts) to keep your hands free while you dig or to fetch them from a distance.
    • The M.U.L.E. has a manual call button, so depositing ore from a large vein won't eat up much time from going back and forth.
    • When the M.U.L.E. is recalled to the drop pod, it'll leave behind glowing markers that blink in a sequence leading to its direction, giving a lifeline to players who attempted to go ahead of it and got lost or players who have been left behind and don't know where the M.U.L.E. went. A later update added holographic arrows to the marker, meaning players don't have to waste precious seconds searching for the direction of the sequence.
    • If the M.U.L.E. has already been claimed by the drop pod but the player still has resources on them, their minerals will automatically be added to the totals after the drop pod launches. If they have more resources than they can carry at once, however, they can deposit resources on a chute on the side of the drop pod instead.
    • In the event that the M.U.L.E. is stuck or otherwise unable to find its way back to the drop pod (usually due to pathing errors or passage obstruction by platforms), it will directly teleport to the pod in the last 15 seconds. No matter what happens, so long as the team stays alive throughout the countdown the doors will ALWAYS open before time runs out.
    • Once the drop pod has landed, anyone standing inside of it is relatively safe from harm, as enemies cannot enter it. Very useful if your team has agreed on only getting through a Sole Survivor to succeed on the mission proper, or if rescuing the rest of the team would mean a Senseless Sacrifice.
    • Flares don't have an infinite battery, but won't disappear if they run out either. Burnt-out flares can be used as a navigational tool, indicating areas that have already been visited.
    • Heavy objects like Aquarqs and Glyphid eggs only prevent carriers from shooting their guns and throwing grenades. Hanging onto ziplines, throwing flares, and even climbing up ledges can be done like normal (that last one omits the animation, though).
    • Holding the laser pointer tool will show additional indicators on the screen that show the location of teammates, ammo resupplies, the M.U.L.E., etc.
    • On Egg, Elimination, and On-Site Refinery missions, opening up the terrain map will show glowing indicators of where you can find your mission objectives, which is helpful since unlike other mission types, the objectives are located at specific locations instead of being equally spaced out around the cave.
    • The Naedocyte Shockers spawned by the Breeder are purple, unlike naturally-occurring ones, which are blue. This helps players determine when they're just being brutalized by the AI director and when there's an active Breeder on the map. Likewise, Swarmers spawned by brood nexuses are green instead of purple, so you know when one is nearby spawning them.
    • Leaf Lover's Special is by far the cheapest brew at 25 credits and no beer materials, an amount that no matter how much you dump on upgrades you'll have unless you've cut it extremely close. This lets you get rid of any Interface Screw from more intoxicating brews in case you don't want to go in smashed or said interface screw is too nauseating to play with.
    • Additionally, none of the buff-granting beers will induce any intoxication if only one is drank and no other beers have been consumed.
    • If something dangerous is directly behind you and about to attack, the game volume will mute itself pretty much entirely, this can serve as a forewarning for an exploder that you didn't see, or a praetorian about to start breathing on you.
    • Temperature Shock happens when a frozen enemy is suddenly hit with a fire damage, or when a burning enemy gets frozen, causing a sudden influx of instant damage to trade off for cancelling out the element's effect. This way it doesn't become harmful to your team's overall efficiency if different dwarves are running Molotovs/Flamethrower or Freeze Grenade/Cryo Cannon at the same time (It can also be a strategy for a cryo cannon using Driller to trip it on purpose with the Experimental Plasma Charger perk that does burning on a full charge).
    • There is no cost in terms of any resources required to construct pipe segments during On-Site Refinery missions. This helps keep the gameplay of the mission streamlined, there is no need to scour the caves for material to slowly build up your pipelines one segment at a time, and prevents any scenarios where you may not have enough resources to complete the pipe from the refinery to the well. The only limits to pipe building are segment length, angle, and terrain.
    • Speaking of which, the pipe nodes are fairly lenient on being placed with regards to terrain blocking the pipe itself, and can only get blocked if there's a significant amount of terrain touching the pipe itself. In fact, successfully placing down nodes clears out the surrounding area, so dwarves will always be able to successfully grind on top of the pipes, given that it's not built underneath a structure such as the resupply pod or another pipe segment.
    • The Magma Core biome has frequent earthquakes, which can potentially open up scorching cracks in the ground that players can fall into. They can easily be fatal, but all of these cracks will generate safe platforms inside them, so quick players can save themselves from getting cooked and escape without having to dig their way out. The Glacial Strata has a similar obstacle (crevasses that open up when stepped on) that function in the same way.
  • Ambiguously Human: Deep Rock Galactic itself. According to the website, they have "long relied on" Dwarves when it comes to dangerous excavations. This implies that the company itself is actually run by humans or at least non-Dwarves. Mission Control is never revealed to be a human or a dwarf as well.
    • When Update 18 added the bar, it also added "Leaf Lover's Special", a sobriety-inducing anti-beer maligned by the workers because it's implied to be brewed by Elves. The description also says it was only shipped in to "please Management". This might imply that there's Elven management at DRG.
  • And This Is for...: "For Karl!" is a common rallying cry by the dwarves. While it's one of several slogans they can shout when you hit the "salute" button, they can also snarl "That one's for Karl!" when mowing down Glyphids. Who Karl is, however, remains one of the game's biggest mysteries.
  • Apologetic Attacker: Dwarves remark that Loot Bugs are adorable and it makes them feel bad to kill them... but also, if the Loot Bugs didn't want to get murdered, they shouldn't have stuffed themselves with valuable minerals.
  • Artificial Brilliance: Glyphids challenge traditional tactics, as they are able to Wall Crawl and attack from any direction. They will utilize the borehole left by a supply drop as a surprise attack vector, take routes that maximize cover from the Engineer's sentries, make pincer movements to force Gunners into leaving a flank open, and skirt around flames left by the Driller rather than suicidally charge through them.
    • Webspitter and Acidspitter Glyphids aren't intended for direct combat, and are instead better at spitting webs and acid from afar and debuffing anyone they hit. As such, they tend to stick to walls and ceilings, far away from the fracas at large.
    • Praetorians that take a lot of damage all at once (such as losing their armor or taking a high explosive to the schnoz) will immediately stop charging their target and start running away, only to charge from another angle or passage so they can possibly surprise their target.
    • Glyphids that are carrying a live sticky grenade or are in the blast radius of one will flee and scatter in an attempt to minimize the grenade's effects.
  • Artificial Stupidity:
    • Molly's pathing on occasion can get a bit... derpy. Especially around small holes or openings. Thankfully if she gets stuck too long the hatch will open without her so her pathing derping out won't cost you a mission.
    • Bosco won't attempt to aim for the weak spots of enemies. Normally, this is passable, since either it or the player will be able to bust through most enemies' armor easily, but against enemies that are flat out immune to attacks that aren't on weak spots, like a scrambled BET-C or a Glyphid Oppressor, Bosco struggles. This issue is thankfully averted against OMEN Exterminator towers, where Bosco will home in on their weakpoints once exposed.
    • The Drilldozer's pathing doesn't account for potentially damaging obstacles in its path. It won't try to avoid exploding plants, it sees no issue in running over Bulk Detonators, and it will happily run over lava spouts in the Magma Core. The Drilldozer can get very confused about its route to the Ommoran Heartstone, resulting in it doubling back on itself or taking bizarre routes (bonus points for getting itself stuck in the air on tiny pieces of rock while doing so). As you spend the majority of an Escort Duty mission fighting off bugs, these issues can potentially sink a mission.
  • Armor Is Useless:
    • The dwarves' armor suits range from the Driller's, which is heavy-plated Powered Armor, to the Scout's, which is little more than a flak jacket over a skintight space suit. All dwarves have the exact same amount of base health and shielding, regardless of class; all armor upgrades shared between the four dwarves are equally protective as well.
    • Alternate armor skins purchased from the accessory shop or downloaded as DLC allow dwarves to change the equipment they wear on missions, but these have no effect on gameplay either, even if their description says it does (like the increased armor of the Mk 4 Driller suit, or the decreased armor of the Roughneck getup)
  • Ascended Meme:
    • The common fan saying "If they don't rock and stone, they ain't coming home!" (referring to the common expectation of dwarf players returning salutes) was eventually added as one of the possible lines the dwarves will say when saluting.
    • For a while, Bismor was the only crafting mineral to not have a unique shoutout from the dwarves when using the terrain scanner, which eventually became a joke among fans. Some of the new lines reference this.
      "Bismor! Feels so good to say it."
      "I'm so glad to announce that I've found some Bismor!"
  • Assist Character: Bosco, a small drone who will accompany you if there are no other dwarves in your lobby. He doesn't bring as much firepower as another dwarf would, and lacks any mobility tools that the player can take advantage of; in exchange, he's able to fly, mine, fight, and revive a certain number of times per dig. He is also indestructible.
  • Artistic License – Geology:
    • Instead of having ice caps, Hoxxes has a layer of permafrost deep beneath the surface of its continental plates. Which makes no sense. This is even lampshaded in the biome description, as it's driven at least one scientist on DRG's payroll to quit his job at the sheer affront to science done by this find.
      "At least one of our xenogeologists quit in a rage when research started on this region. Instead of having conventional polar ice caps, and in violation of all physical laws we know of, the continental plates of Hoxxes rest on top of a planetwide permafrost layer several miles deep. As always, DRG recommends a "don't ask" approach when dealing with the peculiarities of Hoxxes' makeup."
    • Uranium is depicted as vibrant, glowing green crystal. In reality, uranium is a dull-gray metalnote . Also you render the harmful radiation of it inert by breaking part of the crystal; suffice to say, in reality you can't unprime uranium by physically breaking it.
  • Artistic License – Nuclear Physics:
  • Attack! Attack! Attack!: The Glyphids, as a race of giant carnivorous insects, will never stop attacking Dwarves that invade their territory until the miners finally die or leave. This is likely why that Deep Rock Galactic's mining operation is based on an orbiting space station, rather than a more conventional base on the planet, since the Glyphids would eventually wear down even their defenses.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: Glyphid Praetorians only take damage when struck in the face or thorax, as they have layers upon layers of heavy chitin plate. Dreadnoughts take it even further as even their head is bulletproof, requiring that you shoot their vulnerable thorax (though see Multiple Life Bars below) and demanding teamwork be used to take them down; someone needs to draw its attention whilst everyone else attacks it from behind.
  • A-Team Firing: Downplayed, but present. The Glyphids are so fast and numerous that you're often rewarded far more for blasting away at the horde than you are for trying to aim; most engagements will be at danger-close range anyways. This is encouraged by the weapon design; the Engineer is packing a shotgun, the Gunner has a minigun, and the Driller has a flamethrower - not exactly precision weaponry. Even the Scout, who is the most lightly-armed, has a fully-fledged assault rifle; it's the most accurate of the default primary weapons, but that isn't saying much. Somewhat averted by the Scout's unlockable M1000 Classic, a more traditional (but still scopeless) sniper rifle, and the Gunner's Bulldog Revolver, an extremely powerful, accurate Hand Cannon.
  • Badass Beard: A given when dealing with Dwarves, but only the Scout has one by default, and Dwarves can rock a look without one. Not only is there a very wide variety of different beard options for players, an update added beard physics to the game!
  • Badass Mustache: You can customize any of your Dwarves to wear a large pool of them, but the Engineer has one by default.
  • Bad Boss: Zig-zagged. Deep Rock Galactic openly admits that they value their equipment considerably more than their employees' lives. Mission Control is entirely honest about this, and the dwarves appear to share the same attitude, not being particularly upset if they're left behind on a dig. That being said, DRG also goes out of its way to ensure that their employees are equipped to deal with whatever hazards they're expected to face, supports them with regular supply drops in exchange for Nitra, and fields a well-equipped space rig to dispatch them from. There's also the fact that dwarves who fail a mission or are left behind will respawn in the medical bay with a line suggesting they remember their previous experience and were somehow rescued, leaving it ambiguous whether fallen or abandoned dwarves actually suffer the consequences of their situation.
  • The Bait
    • You can get the "Designated Decoy" achievement for becoming this during a Dreadnought battle, by taking the most damage from it out of everyone else in your team.
    • The Engineer's L.U.R.E. grenade is specifically designed for this purpose, projecting a holographic image of a dancing dwarf that attracts hostile aliens to attack it before zapping them with a burst of electricity when its duration expires.
  • The Beastmaster: Any player can become this, thanks to the aptly-named 'Beast Master' perk. Players with this perk can tame one of the three basic Glyphid Grunt variants to assist them in battle, causing it to immediately turn on it's pack and become extremely loyal to the dwarf that tamed it, following them anywhere they go and attacking any enemy that threatens them. Even Bulk Detonators.
  • Beating A Dead Player: The bugs will just as readily target downed dwarves as living ones, eventually resulting in a huge swarm around them if they aren't revived in short order. This, it turns out, is really useful, because it means less bugs going after the remaining teammates and also makes them an easy target for a well-thrown grenade or three. Meanwhile the downed dwarf is no worse off for it, since they are effectively invincible in this state and there's no time limit on reviving them.
  • Berserk Button: Management's priorities are not quite in order when it comes to punishing dwarves for rowdiness in the space rig. Kicking barrels into the Launch Bay or even the Drop Pod will get you threatened with vandalism fines and generally just berated, even when these can damage the equipment and dwarves. But breaking holiday decorations is what gets management to threaten to close the Abyss Bar down, cancel the holidays even for Mission Control, and flood the rig with Radon gas, going by Mission Control's exasperated lines.
  • BFG: There are constant implications that the armaments your dwarves get for their missions, mostly properly sized if not a little too huge for them, is waaaaaay oversized for mere humans. Even the Scout's assault rifle is apparently pretty huge. In fact, pretty much all of the guns DRG fields qualify; even the turret guns sport barrels that look sized to fire entire carbines of smaller calibres for breakfast.
    Gunner: "It ain't a gun if it don't weigh at least one hundred pounds!"
  • Blessed with Suck: Defeating and rebooting the BET-C gives you a powerful allied mobile gun platform, that shoots and throws bombs, but unlike engineer turrets or Bosco, it can hurt you with friendly fire.
  • Booze-Based Buff: As of Update 18, certain varieties of liquor available at the Abyss Bar like the Red Rock Blaster or Dark Morkite will grant your dwarves a stat buff, the former giving a hefty health buff and the later an increase to resource gathering capabilities, for the next mission. Anything that isn't made of Barley Bulbs, though, will just get you plastered at best.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Compared to the enormous minigun toted by the Gunner, the Scout's assault rifle has a tiny magazine and a much slower rate of fire. However, it does more damage per bullet than the minigun, doesn't have to deal with heat buildup, and starts out fairly accurate without upgrades; whereas the minigun has to chew through a good amount of ammo as it gets more accurate. This suits the Scout as a forward roving class, equipped to handle the infrequent skirmish and use his Grappling-Hook Pistol if he gets in over his head.
    • The Gunner himself qualifies. None of his skills are particularly flashy; in contrast to The Driller, The Scout, and The Engineer, he has no gimmick other than shooting. His primary weapon is a Minigun, with all the subtlety and nuance that implies; his secondary is a massive revolver; his utility item is a spherical shield generator, and his mobility item is a zipline launcher. Compared to the Scout with his Grappling Gun, the Engineer's turrets, or the Driller's flamethrower, these all seem fairly mundane, even if they are incredibly satisfying to use. Try getting through any high-level digs without at least one Gunner on your team and see how long you last without his firepower and shield to back you up against swarms.
    • Each and every one of the classes' platforming tools. Yes, they aren't anywhere near as flashy as the weapons, but just try and complete any high-level digs without them and see how long you last. In general, any of them are a necessity for traversing the dark caves of the planet, and having all of them at your team's disposal means no obstacle will get in your way with proper use.
    • The Dash perk. Compared to getting a glyphid companion, reviving yourself through sheer willpower or having a sixth sense for anything trying to grab you (and killing it when upgraded), all this one does is just make you move faster briefly. However it has a very short cooldown and unlimited uses, and it is a very good general perk. Some very nice applications for dash are: A) escaping a dreadnought's shockwave attack. B) Escaping mactera bomber/Fungus Bogs goo. C) Cross a larger gap. D)moving heavy objects like aquarqs or eggs faster. E)Giving yourself more space to work with when fighting a horde. F)Rushing to teammates when something threatening like a bulk detonator or dreadnought is on you, and so many more!
  • Boss in Mook's Clothing: Several of them can appear as rare random spawns in the caves, and usually are just as threatening as you would expect.
    • Menaces are much less subtle than their fellow ranged brethren, glowing bright blue with a distinctive bulbous shape and burbling warcries. They attack with a rapid-fire barrage of blue/white spitballs and will continue to fire for several seconds without moving unless interrupted. Menaces also have a significantly beefier health pool just under or equivalent to a Glyphid Praetorian, coupled with a unique ability to flee and reposition themselves and retreat from damage near-instantly by burrowing into the cave walls, making them one of the highest mobility attrition units in the Glyphid family.
    • Glyphid Oppressor: A much more durable variant of the Glyphid Praetorian intended to be a new variant of the Mighty Glacier. It is completely invincible from the front with its abdomen being the only damagable portion, meaning you can't just use More Dakka to chew through the armor. It is also significantly wider than a standard Praetorian, with an upward flaring head plate that can completely block a Driller's standard tunnels as it advances. If stunned it will retaliate by performing a loud radial knockback attack much akin to that of a Dreadnaught. Otherwise, it's just another Praetorian variant that dies like any other with enough bullets and skill.
    • Glyphid Bulk Detonator: A thankfully rare variant of the Glyphid Exploder about the size of the Glyphid Dreadnaught and with about as much health. It also has resistance towards special damage types including fire, electricity, and other explosives; So it can almost No-Sell most of the heavy or otherwise armor-ignoring weapons the dwarves carry. Unlike the mook variant, this guy can use explosive melee attacks with no damage to itself and can use this to dig towards targets if its path is blocked. Upon death, the Bulk Detonator stops, primes for three seconds, and explodes in a TEN METER RADIUS that launches smaller (head-sized as opposed to car-sized) explosive pustules that detonate on contact. It leaves quite the impressive crater on the terrain too, sometimes deep enough to register fall damage. If you spot one of these, mark it for your team and RUN THE HELL AWAY! These monsters will end runs if not dealt with properly. In-universe, DRG considers these to be one of the most dangerous threats to its operations, and notes that their explosion upon death is on the kiloton scale (i.e. equivalent to 1,000 tons of TNT).
  • Bottomless Magazines: Averted very thoroughly; even the engineer's turrets need to be reloaded. The only gun in the entire game that has infinite ammo is Bosco's primary weapon. Ammo management is a critical part of getting through more difficult operations. Special mention goes to the Gunner's revolver, which holds only four shots in contrast to the usual six — the rounds are so freakin' huge that there's no space in the cylinder for ONE more, let alone two!
  • Bottomless Pit: Averted, every pit and fissure actually does have a bottom, though some can be so deep you can barely see a flare thrown down there. Jumping down is generally not advised, though - apart from Falling Damage, getting back out can be an ordeal.
  • Brutal Honesty: Mission Control, and by extension Deep Rock Galactic, make absolutely no bones about the fact that they consider the Drop Pod and the MULE far more valuable than their employees' lives. The dwarves themselves appear to be completely fine with this stance; if left behind while the rest of the team escapes, their response is effectively to calmly shrug and admit that sometimes you win, and sometimes you die.
  • Bug War: A Corporate Warfare version between Deep Rock Galactic and the various insect-like creatures of Hoxxes. Unlike most examples, however, the Glyphids and other creatures don't seem to be a Hive Mind or have an overarching goal. They're just reacting to the dwarves' extremely disruptive presence and swarming in reaction to the mining operations. Deep Rock's main goal is gathering the planet's abundant minerals, which the glyphids themselves don't seem to care about in the least, and the dwarves would probably just ignore the insects if they could. Also, it's virtually impossible for the dwarves to hold ground for very long, and the few missions involving large-scale equipment involve quickly dropping in with disposable short-term mining platforms to quickly extract a high-value resource and then retreat before their position is overrun within minutes by the Glyphids.
  • Bunny-Ears Lawyer: DRG's HOXXES IV employees constantly curse and whine, get drunk on the job, play with anti-gravity on the space station, and blow up hundreds of precious fuel barrels for fun. They always get away with this because the company does not have any other employees who are skilled and/or insane enough to take their place.
  • Caps Lock, Num Lock, Missiles Lock: On the PC version the all-important flare button "f", used to provide most of your light in the caverns, is also directly next to the grenade button "g." Woe befall you should these be mixed up in a volatile environment or a tight tunnel with teammates, but thankfully the controls can be rebound.
  • Cat Scare: Cave Leeches are incredibly threatening enemies that can single out dwarves and kill them off one at a time; if they aren't immediately saved by their teammates, a single leech can easily take down one or two dwarves, or even pull a Total Party Kill if encountered during a critical moment or nobody says there's a cave leech above. The incredibly similar but docile Cave Vine, on the other hand, is liable to be mistaken for a Cave Leech and blasted into next week if people see its tendril descending.
  • Chainsaw Grip BFG: Sported as the primary weapons of both the Gunner and the Driller. The Engineer gets one as an unlockable secondary weapon.
  • Combat Medic: The only kind of medics you can expect to see on Hoxxes. All dwarves can revive their teammates, but the aptly-named Field Medic perk makes the process substantially faster, in addition to giving you one free instant revive per dig.
  • Companion Cube: The Dwarves appear to be rather prone to this mentality. The M.U.L.E, All-Purpose Drone, and Drilldozer all receive affectionate nicknames from the miners, and they often treat them like friends. Management has taken steps to crack down on this behavior - by which we mean "they lecture the dwarves about it every so often, very sternly, and then look the other way." Mission Control even refers to the MULE as Molly in several of his lines.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: Subverted: While cryo is still incredibly reliable on the main fodder encountered in the caves regularly, dreadnaughts, detonators, and all of their variants are highly resistant to freezing, and while it DOES happen it will last only for fractions of a second. Korlok Tyrant Weeds and BET-C play this straight and are completely immune to being frozen.
  • Cores-and-Turrets Boss: The Korlok Tyrant Weed is a menacing collective of symbiotic alien plant life organized around a central bulb. Korlok Sprouts serve as its biological turrets, spitting a barrage of acid shots at any dwarven team who disturbs one. The Healing Pods continually replenish the core's health, so are a high priority target. And finally the Korlok's core, a heavily armored bulb with a strange, almost crystalline center. It is this part that is vulnerable, and only exposed after enough Healing Pods and Sprouts have been killed, but beware, when it exposes it's core, the Tyrant Weed also seeds the surrounding area with yet more Pods and Sprouts to defend itself.
  • Crystal Landscape: The Crystalline Caverns: massive teaming caverns filled to the brim with crystals and a vast amount of other valuable resources, making it a particularly good spot for farming, but not only are its caves wide (making a Gunner almost necessary for proper navigation), and the place is teeming with energy crystals that arc chains of high voltage electricity between each other at regular intervals, which can fry a Dwarf in seconds. The Salt Pits are a variant, in that everything down to the majority terrain is made of solidified and sometimes petrified salt crystals, in both red and white varieties.
  • Cutting the Knot: The destructible terrain means you have many opportunities for this. The Driller is particularly well-suited to doing so, given that his dual drills allow him to tear through even the toughest terrain in no time flat.
    • During Extraction, you have to backtrack through the cavern, which can often be a one-way trip without the use of ziplines or engineer platforms, never mind how many obstacles that lie in your way. Alternatively, if you have a Driller, you can just dig straight towards the Drop Pod.
    • Some caves will be littered with poisonous plants, lava geysers, crystals that shoot lightning, or pits of sludge that slow you down. Well placed ziplines and/or engineer platforms will let you move over and around them with no trouble.
    • The Praetorian is heavily armored and immune to gunfire, except for its glowing thorax and face. But explosives or fire ignore armor, so you can always just bomb the hell out of them instead.
    • The Glyphids will happily use this against you as well as mentioned above. Glyphids will happily pour out of driller holes and drop/resupply pod tunnels, and Bulk Detonators and Dreadnoughts will dig towards you by exploding massive holes in the wall if you try to outmanuevre them by going into a space too tiny for them.
  • Cuteness Proximity: The Dwarves are typically extremely jaded and gruff, but they'll still occasionally comment on how cute the Loot Bug is when you pet one. They also pet and babytalk tamed Glyphids as if they're big friendly dogs, rather than murderous space spiders.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!: Do not play this game for too long before switching to a game that's similarly ill-lit. You will find yourself spamming F or whatever button you have mapped to toss Flares as soon as it gets even slightly dark, even outside FPS games.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: Wiping on a dig just causes everyone to wake up in the infirmary. The only thing you lose is any mission rewards. You even get to keep whatever resources you deposited in the M.U.L.E. before the wipe.
  • Death World: Hoxxes is described as the most dangerous planet in the galaxy, and it earned that reputation. This is the reason Hoxxes is still teeming with scores of rich minerals - nobody except Deep Rock has had the balls to successfully launch mining operations on it. Many have tried before and failed. To wit:
  • Die, Chair, Die!: A hard instinct to resist when you can swing a pickaxe just by holding a button in a fully destructible environment. The dwarves will even blurt out lines about it.
    Die, worthless crystal!
  • Diegetic Interface: The game is generally designed such that most of the UI's information is also shown on the in-game objects. Guns carry visible ammo counters on them, a hologram icon shows Bosco's current task and a screen on his back shows how many revives he has left, Doretta Shows Damage on her parts, a giant green meter on the Onsite Refinery's side indicates how much progress has been made to refine minerals, etc.
  • Drill Tank: The Escort Duty mission tasks you with protecting and maintaining one of these as the tank tunnels its way to a valuable deposit. The dwarves affectionately refer to it as "Doretta".
  • Drop-In-Drop-Out Multiplayer: Additional players can join a job in progress, being delivered near the leader via a smaller drop pod. Players can also leave at any time. The AI director will scale the number and durability of bugs appropriately.
  • Dual Boss: The Dreadnought Arbalest, and Dreadnought Lacerator, collectively, the "Dreadnought twins" are a pair of miniature Dreadnoughts, which pupated inside the same cocoon. They complement each other in battle, with the Lacerator getting up close and personal with melee and short ranged fire breath attacks, and the Arbalest attempting to flank the team of dwarves, and attacks from a distance by spitting explosive projectiles. Periodically, or when one is damaged enough, the twins will burrow into the ground, reappear next to each other connected by a tether of energy, which evenly divides their health between each Twin's separate life bar, and regenerates their armor. If one of the two is killed, the other will become more aggressive.
  • Dug Too Deep: Subverted. The Dwarves are equipped for exactly this scenario, and digging too deep is the express goal of their mission.
    • With the addition of Deep Dives, you do this intentionally in a single outing, digging in for a mission, completing it, then digging in deeper for part 2, and then on for part 3, each one more difficult than the previous. And if you're feeling courageous, you get Elite Deep Dives.
  • Dungeon Bypass: It's a game about mining with destructible terrain, this is an inevitability. One strategy frequently used by Drillers (and expected of them by other players) is to save their fuel until the escape pod is called, then drill the team an express tunnel to the escape point, skipping all the backtracking. Quite frequently, this can result in the team beating Molly back to the drop pod!
  • Earthquakes Cause Fissures: A trope present in Magma Core and Glacial Strata — with the fissures opening in random places near the dwarves, and making the mining work that much more difficult... if it doesn't outright kill you from fall damage.
  • Easter Egg:
    • Mission Control has several hidden voice lines responding to various shenanigans particularly-inventive dwarves get up to in the space rig, including kicking barrels into the launch bay, or into the drop pod. He also has several unique responses if you manage to kick all of the barrels in the Space Rig into either of the aforementioned places, although this is much easier said than done.
    • There's (currently) no visible prompt to do so, but pressing E on a Lootbug will cause your Dwarf to pet them, resulting in an appreciative wriggle and a purr.
  • Eat Dirt, Cheap:
    • The space rig's notification boards occasionally mention "morkite ale" and Dark Morkite is a drink at the Abyss Bar; either that's just a name, or the Morkite is mined as nourishment for the dwarves.
      • Could also be beer with Morkite used as a brewing ingredient, vaguely like real life Goldschläger.
    • There's also Red Sugar, which crystalizes on the walls of the caves and — if it's not actual sugar that dwarves can eat — at least has medicinal properties.
      • One callout for Red Sugar notes that the stuff is "highly addictive," indicating that it may be a potent painkiller or anesthetic.
      • Might possibly be created by a known or unknown native Hoxxes lifeform in a manner similar to honeydew secreted by certain insects or Spice.
  • Elves vs. Dwarves: Elves do not make an appearance, but friendly fire may result in a dwarf calling his coworkers "pointy-eared leaf lovers", implying this trope is in full swing. The Flavor Text of a certain hated organic beer at the Abyss Bar implies Elves brew it, making the Dwarves absolutely despise it.
  • Emergency Weapon: Pickaxes can be swung to damage enemies as well as mine, and pickaxes will never dull in a mission...but one probably shouldn't considering using it for that purpose other than some swarmers or maybe a grunt of two at most, especially since swinging it slows you down for a little while and prevents sprinting once you've realized this was a bad idea. That being said, a few perks can make for using the pickaxe for more than very occasional ammunition conservation a bit more feasible.
  • Escort Mission: Update 32 added the Escort Duty mission, where your job is to defend a Drilldozer (a mobile drilling machine on tank tracks, affectionately referred to by the dwarves as "Doretta") as it drills a tunnel towards a valuable Ommoran Heartstone buried deep in the planet. Bugs will target the Drilldozer as it moves from cave to cave, and it periodically stops and needs to be refueled by mining oil shale with a special fuel canister/mining laser device. Fortunately, after the Heartstone is retrieved, the Drilldozer does not need to be escorted back out, all you need to do is make it to the drop pod with the Heartstone intact. Update 33 made it so players can bring Dorretta's head to the drop pod to bring it back with them, but management don't care either way. Heartstones are reportedly worth a fortune, to the point where using heavy machinery in a one-off disposable manner just to get one of these rocks more than pays for itself.
  • Everything Fades: Played straight for enemies, but averted for the utility tools. If you can keep your ammo up there's no limit to the number of platforms and ziplines that can exist. The inevitable Escape Sequence pretty much depends on this.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: The number of harmless life-forms on Hoxxes are massively outnumbered by hostile ones. Space mining is a competitive business, but Hoxxes hasn't been touched due to its incredibly hostile inhabitants even though it's extremely rich in minerals. Hazards besides the Glyphid and Mactera include, but are not limited to;
    • Radioactive/electrified crystals.
    • Bees.
    • Cave Leeches; picture Half-Life's Barnacles, but with more reach.
    • Fungal "vents" that release poisonous gas when you move near them.
    • Plants that explode (and/or release freezing gas) when shot.
    • Lava, sand, and cryo geysers, which can burn you, launch you to your doom, or freeze you solid.
    • Ommoran Heartstones start trying to blow up a Drilldozer that's gotten close to extracting it from its deposit by growing crystal spires that emit deadly lasers, which can kill a dwarf that doesn't get rid of them in time.
  • Explosive Overclocking: Update 25 introduced Overclocks, which are craftable at the Forge from Matrix Cores (awarded for completing special endgame missions). Some of them are "clean" or "balanced" overclocks, averting this trope. The unstable ones play it perfectly straight, though.
  • Expy: The M1000 Classic is an unashamed expy of the iconic M1-Garand, one of the most well-known firearms in history. It even comes with the Garand's trademark 'Ping!' sound while reloading.
  • Fantastic Flora: The collectible Apoca Bloom flowers and Boolo Cap mushrooms — as well as everything you might see in Dense Biozone, Azure Weald, and Fungus Bogs, and the exploding plants that can be seen all over the playable locations.
  • Fantasy Metals: Surprisingly enough, this is completely averted so far. The only metal in the entire game that can actually be mined is gold, and maybe Dystrum. Explanation  There haven't even been any mentions of the usual fare, such as Adamantite. However, there is a wide roster of Fantasy Minerals. Croppa, Jadiz, Magnite, Umanite, Enor Pearls, and Bismor are used as crafting materials. Nitra is used to call in supply drops. Morkite, Hollomite, and Dystrum are used as objectives with no other in-game purpose... although the news screens in the Space Rig sometimes mention "Morkite Ale".
  • Face Death with Dignity: If a dwarf is left behind on Hoxxes while the rest of the team escapes, they take a surprisingly philosophical approach to it instead of panicking or getting angry. This may be excused by the fact that the med-bay implies DRG is somehow rescuing their employees from death.
  • Fast Tunneling: The game. Most kinds of rock take, at most, three strikes with a pickaxe to dig a dwarf-sized hole in it, with softer minerals taking even less effort. This is basically the Driller's department, as he can just drill a tunnel big enough for a team to comfortably run through in no time at all.
  • Fire, Ice, Lightning: Some of your weapons are elemental-oriented or can be modded to shoot elemental ammo. Incindiary and Cryo grenades are available, and Bosco's main weapon is lightning bullets.
    • Fire causes damage over time (if the enemy's heat gauge reaches maximum) and ignores armor.
    • Ice freezes enemies in place and makes them take more damage.
    • Lightning slows enemies, does some damage over time and has a small chance to spread in an electric arc with certain weapon modifications.
  • Floating Continent: Overlaps with Shattered World. Something, or someone, appears to have blown an enormous chunk of Hoxxes into orbit, leaving behind an enormous crater that seems to extend straight down to the planet's core. According to the loading screens, this chunk is where the Dense Biozone is. It has yet to be explained why this chunk has yet to crash back down.
  • Fluffy Tamer: One of the perks added in Update 28 allows Dwarves to tame a single Glyphid Grunt at a time. You can even pet them.
  • Freeze Ray:
    • The Driller's alternate primary weapon, the Cryo Cannon.
    • The Scout has Cryo Grenades which is a Freeze Bomb.
    • The Glacial Strata has Cryo Bulbs- plants which explode and release freezing gas when hit- and Glyphid Frost Praetorians that breathe freezing gas instead of acid.
  • Friendly Fireproof: Averted for the most part. Getting in a Gunner's firing line will not end well for anyone, bug or dwarf, up to 70% damage being caused to allies at the highest Hazard level. Played straight with the Driller's Neurotoxin Grenade, which slowly kills everything but dwarves. Also played straight by DRG-issue Turret Guns, either the Engineer's or those found on the Minehead in Point Extract operations. And played increasingly straight depending on levels of the Friendly perk worn, which mitigates friendly fire coming and going; at high enough levels on both dwarves involved, bombing your friend with a Satchel Charge is a valid option and will probably just tickle him. The natives of Hoxxes aren't exempt from this either.
  • Fungus Humongous: Par for the course in the Fungus Bogs. They go from simply large to enormous caps that can hold up the entire team and take three pickaxe hits to break, like the hardiest of terrain.
  • Gatling Good: The Gunner's namesake is the monstrous three-barreled "Lead Storm" Powered Minigun. While it has the odd property of getting more accurate the longer it's fired, it will also Overheat if the trigger is held down too long.
  • Gargle Blaster: The aptly-named Blackout Stout, one of the unlockable beers at the Abyss Bar. Instant and total intoxication awaits the hardy dwarf brave enough to quaff a tankard of this stuff; it instantly knocks you out cold, no questions asked, even if you were sober before drinking it. A variety of other craftable beers have even more extreme and amusing effects (for the player, that is), such as the Wormhole Special which can teleport you outside the Space Rig.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: If the host has a poor connection, then the collision physics for everything but the terrain ceases to exist, including bullets and the drop pod, meaning that if they don't eventually kick back in then the mission is doomed to failure. This can even occur during solo missions.
  • Gameplay Ally Immortality: Bosco packs as much firepower as a dwarf (and with the right upgrades, twice the mining power), with the added benefits of full 3D flight and total invincibility. His lackluster free will is the only thing keeping him from straight-up stealing your job.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation:
    • The description of the Dense Biozone explains that the local overabundance of flora is due to the area's Floating Continent status creating a dearth of Glyphids to eat the plants, but in actual gameplay they spawn just as abundantly as anywhere else.
    • An example admittedly more due to player agency than anything is the Dwarves' motto of "Leave no Dwarf Behind." In actual gameplay, getting even a single dwarf on the escape pod before it takes off counts as a completed mission for all players, and the escape portion of the mission by far has the greatest density of enemies, so trying to play hero during extraction can often be the very thing that costs you the mission.
  • Giant Spider: The Glyphids occupy a grey area between this and Giant Enemy Crab, being hard-shelled subterranean insectoids. The game itself refers to them as "arachnids."
  • Guns Do Not Work That Way: A minor example with the Engineer's Warthog Auto 210 shotgun. It's a semi-automatic shotgun that uses a magazine, and is pumped after reloading it. Possibly hand waved by the fact that the game takes place in the future, meaning alternative firing mechanisms may have been invented by now.
  • Glass Cannon: On the player side of things, the Scout qualifies if he equips the unlockable M1000 Classic, which allows him to shred through pretty much any target in the game as long as he's accurate enough; it doesn't make him any more resilient, though, and aiming leaves you open to attack from other glyphids. The glyphids, meanwhile, have the Acidspitter and Webspitter variants. Both are fairly fragile, and will flee from direct contact, hugging distant walls of the cavern so they can spit acid or vision-obscuring webbing at you; the Acidspitter's projectiles in particular hurt.
  • Glitch Entity: Played with. Very rarely, you can find strange glowing black cubes buried in deposits within the depths of Hoxxes, with a name that seems like an error code — but those familiar with game development know that this is too coherent and functional to be an actual bug. (And it is your scanner displaying the code, suggesting in-universe anomalous readings rather than a bug.) Nobody knows what they actually are; theories run rampant, and the developers have only said that they should be held onto (not that they can be gotten rid of without a full account reset) as they might become useful in future updates.
    • Note that for now, the cubes give an extra 2,000 XP. Times your hazard bonus.
  • Good-Guy Bar: To let the players partake in the "drink-loving" side of the "standard-issue dwarves" archetype embodied by their characters, the Oktoberfest update added the Abyss Bar; a shipboard drinking establishment where the player characters can drink, dance, and compete in precision barrel-kicking.
  • Grappling-Hook Pistol: The Scout gets a grapple gun that can zip him around the vast caverns of Hoxxes. It's the only "traversal tool" with unlimited use, and the only one that none of the user's teammates can benefit from.
  • Hand Cannon: The Flavor Text for the Gunner's sidearm claims that the gun is chambered for 26mm ammunition. To put that into perspective, the largest developed small arms cartridge in real life is the .950 JDJ, a rifle round measuring about 24mm. The Bulldog's bullets are bigger than that.
  • Hard Mode Perks: The hazard level, mission length, cave complexity, and any additional hazards all have a difficulty value which is added up to get the end of mission "Hazard Bonus". This is a percentage that all your money, EXP, and resource earnings are multiplied by, so the harder the mission, the more you'll make from it. Even getting the hazard bonus up to 100% is quite stiff - a Hazard 3 (of 5) run of a mission with maximum length and complexity but not other modifiers is only 105%.
  • Harmless Freezing: Zig-zagged in the Glacial Strata biome. Getting frozen turns the player into a blue/white ice statue in whatever position they froze in, but its possible to free yourself by either "shaking off" the ice with inputs or having a friend break the ice with their pickaxe with no damage to the victim. Frozen Glyphids, on the other hand, become vulnerable and shatter when sufficiently damaged, ignoring any armor resistances.
    • Played with by the Driller's Cryo Cannon in Update 19; it can freeze enemies solid with minimal damage dealt, but one of the high-end upgrades gives any enemy you freeze with it a chance to just shatter immediately.
    • This is averted with any flying enemy, if they get frozen they'll fall to the ground and instantly shatter, killing them regardless of their health. This makes freezing immensely powerful against Grabbers who tend to run once damaged, and Naedocyte Breeders who normally have beefy HP pools to chew through.
  • Hell Is That Noise:
    • When a large group of Glyphids emerges from the rock, they will give a collective screech as a battlecry. Hearing a large horde of bugs sound the attack off in the distance can be an Oh, Crap! moment bar none.
    • The warbling cry of a Bulk Detonator is enough to send quite a few players into a panic state. See the above entry in Boss in Mook's Clothing for why. To a lesser scale, the gurgled hiss of a regular Exploder about to go off is a more immediate panic-inducer if you hear it very close.
    • The hissing sounds of a Cave Leech that's about to latch onto you. It doesn't help that you'll often only hear it when it's too late.
    • Similarly, though much more frequently, the warbled screech of a Mactera Grabber that's targeted you. Good news, it's usually not too late if you hear it. Bad news, you will hear it closer and closer as it approaches, and it could be coming from any angle.
  • Have I Mentioned I Am a Dwarf Today?: The Dwarves will frequently remind the Glyphids that "DWARVES DON'T DIE EASILY," among other things.
    "Mining is hard work. Good think we're dwarves."
  • Hit-and-Run Tactics: What every mission boils down to. It's totally impossible to hold any ground on Hoxxes, as the dwarves will inevitably run out of ammunition and be swarmed to death eventually. Instead, they drop in, hit whatever resource deposits that they can find, and retreat once the quota is met. In the few cases where there has to be a facility deployed into the caverns of Hoxxes, it's a short term, disposable platform that allows the dwarves to very briefly hold the area and extract a high-value resource before they retreat.
  • Hitbox Dissonance: Molly, mini-Mules, Bosco, and BET-C all have smaller collision boxes than their models. Handy for making it easy for them to follow dwarves while being less likely to accidentally shove them off cliffs. Potentially a problem if Molly decides the best way to the escape pod is through a tiny gap in the ceiling of a high cavern.
  • Hit the Ground Harder: As the Scout, you can evade all fall damage by grappling the ground before you hit.
  • Hired Guns: The Dwarves are all mercenaries as much as they are miners. This appears to be fairly common in the setting, going by the Flavor Text on the "Corporate Marine" helmet.
  • Hold the Line: The actual salvaging in Salvage missions is easy. The difficulty is staying alive during the lengthy, multi-step bug-magnet process of restoring the escape pod.
  • Holler Button:
    • Press the taunt button (V by default) to raise your pickaxe and ROCK AND STONE! The exact line may vary, but that is among the more common lines. Press the taunt button while holding a mug of beer makes your dwarf of choice deliver a toast instead.
    • Press X instead and your dwarf yells out for attention. Good for indicating your position to your squadmates, who are shown the location of the holler-er. This button is similarly context-sensitive; use it while grabbed by an enemy or after being downed, and your dwarf's lines change to more urgent ones.
  • Hot Blooded Sideburns: An option for your Dwarves, and the Gunner has them by default.
  • I Call It "Vera": The MULE, the APD Drone, and the Drilldozer all have technical classifications, classifications DRG would much prefer the dwarves use. Instead, the dwarves refer to them respectively as Molly, Bosco, and Dorretta. Even Mission Control gets in on the fun at some points!
  • I Don't Like the Sound of That Place: All over the place! Come and visit Hoxxes IV; begin your trip with a scientific expedition to the Radioactive Exclusion Zone! Looking to relax? Why not go on a safari through the Fungus Bogs! If you're tired of all that moisture, finish things off with a visit to the Magma Core!
  • Implausible Boarding Skills: While grinding on pipes from On-Site Refinery missions, dwarves can rotate their body in any direction, shoot high-power firearms without falling off, and grind up slopes without building momentum first.
  • Impossible Insurance: A little downplayed, but there are several very particular yet unfortunately common situations a dwarf can face that are explicitly not covered by his employee insurance. With things like "Overconfidence", breaking your knees because you shot to the roof with your Grappling-Hook Pistol, getting crunched under a resupply pod or any environmental burns acquired in the Magma Core, it seems the only things it covers are bug bites and inebriation (which is admittedly a lot).
  • Infinite Supplies: Entirely Averted - once your Dwarf's ammunition or other tools have ran out, you have to refresh it from a resupply pod to use it again. If the group lacks the nitra to call a resupply pod in, all they can do now is use their pickaxes to get more nitra (or in the Scout's case, also his grappling hook), extract to the drop pod, or die trying to do these things. Indeed, compared to other co-op shooters (such as Left4Dead), a harder limit on the player's supplies rendering them unable to effectively fight back is more likely to be Deep Rock Galactic's catalyst for a game ending in defeat as also unlike them, players can never be rendered outright impossible to revive for any point in time (...usually) and enemies that render a single player helpless until they or the player are killed are much, much more rarely encountered.
  • Impairment Shot: The in-game graphics blur as your dwarf gets drunker, and will eventually double. This even includes your dwarf in the Status tab, or the shot of the game's dwarves in the post-game results.
  • I Want My Mommy!: Dwarves may cry out a little "Mommy!" if they have been falling down through the air long enough.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold: The Dwarves are all extremely jaded and gruff as can be expected of dwarves, freely insulting the glyphids, their mining equipment, and each other. That being said, a more tender side shines through when they help each other up, pet lootbugs or tamed glyphids, or get drunk, and their primary motto is "Leave no dwarf behind."
    • Mission Control is something of a Mean Boss, lambasting the dwarves for doing virtually anything aboard the spacerig that isn't drinking or prepping for a dig. However, he's always respectful and polite with the dwarves when they're planetside, he shows a lot of concern for their health while they're on the job, he never lies about the company's intentions or priorities, and he sincerely compliments your dwarf's skills if you get promoted.
  • Jungle Japes: The Fungus Bogs are half this and half Bubblegloop Swamp.
  • Killer Robot: Bosco. Even after he was nerfed, can take out a whole group of Swarmers and most mid-range glyphids before they can even touch you.
  • Klatchian Coffee: Leaf Lover's Special will "kill your buzz faster than a pay cut, and leave you with the same empty feeling in your gut." Sure enough, drinking one removes all drunkenness immediately. The description also suggests not telling anyone you ever drank it, because, well, you're a Dwarf and it's a Leaf Lover's Special.
  • Kneel Before Zod: Downplayed, but present; Deep Rock Galactic's stated objective for Hoxxes IV is nothing less than "the complete subjugation" of the planet." Their propaganda contains such imagery as a hand seizing the planet in a way that would do the Forresters proud.
  • Kung Fu-Proof Mook: Zig-zagged: Generally enemies native to a certain biome have resistances to elemental hazards found within that biome For example enemies in the glacial strata are harder to freeze, enemies in magma core don't burn as easily, enemies in the radioactive exclusion zone are hardened against the radiation, and so forth. HOWEVER, there are some noteable exceptions to these rules that apply regardless of biome:
    • Glyphid bulk detonators are highly resistant to explosives, somewhat resistant to cryo and thaw quickly, and flat-out immune to stuns and fear effects.
    • While most bugs have some form of breakable armor that can be stubbornly chewed through given enough firepower, glyphid oppressors' plates and heads are indestructible requiring you to Attack Its Weak Point.
    • All Q'ronar shellbacks are completely immune to being frozen, stunned, feared/scared, webbed, or gooped. While neurotoxin will still damage them over time, they do not appear to slow down at all to it.
  • Made of Explodium: Where to begin?
    • The lava geysers in the Magma Core and steam geysers in the Fungus Bogs are under pressure and will explode if disturbed, though that at least is logical.
    • Numerous bulbous flowers found in the Magma Core, Dense Biozone and Fungus Bog will glow, swell up, and explode if they take damage.
    • The Glyphid Exploders and Bulk Detonators glow orange with angry, unstable pustules on their back, and will explode (catastrophically in the Bulk's case) on death.
    • One mission modifier, Volatile Guts, takes this Up to Eleven by making every alien explode. What's more, this explosion damages other nearby enemies, which can result in chain detonations where one dead alien sets off all his allies in sequence.
    • The Driller has an optional flamethrower modifier that can allow him to explode aliens if he kills them with direct damage.
  • Made of Indestructium: The only standard-issue Deep Rock Galactic property that can be damaged in any way is you. Molly, Bosco, the Escape Pod, Supply Drops, and the Point Extraction Rig are all completely invincible. Even the BET-C is indestructible, and can only be taken down by killing the energy-sapping parasites causing it to go haywire. The aversions in the game are rather few:
    • The Drilldozer, despite its bulky, metal-plated frame, can get killed fairly quickly if it's swarmed by bugs and nobody's doing anything about it. Damage from players, on the other hand, barely even scratches it.
    • Onsite Refinery pipe nodes can be deconstructed by the player by hitting them with a pickaxe, as long as said node is the most recently-placed one in the pipeline. Also, they spring leaks during the extraction process, which then attract bugs to attack.
    • Finally, the Project OMEN Towers feature indestructible outer shells; the coolant tanks within, however, can be exposed to take down the tower proper.
  • Makes Just as Much Sense in Context: One of the lines a dwarf can deliver while killing a glyphid is "Die like your mother did!" This line has yet to receive an explanation.
  • Marathon Level: Deep Dives take the form of two runs per week, each with three pre-seeded missions one after the other with no break in between. Each mission has two "main" objectives that must be completed, and your health, ammo count, and stored minerals persist between missions. Resource expenditure must be carefully managed, as wastefulness early on can screw you over hard later. Promotional material describes the Deep Dives as "the sort of ultimate Deep Rock fantasy," as it puts all of your combat mining skills to the test.
  • The Medic: Averted for all the dwarves. This class archetype is completely absent from the set of classes a player can choose to be. Dwarves of any class are perfectly capable of reviving downed allies, and directly healing your teammates is impossible (although you can boost their shields or heal yourself). The perks you'd expect a Medic to bring are available to dwarves of any class, and Red Sugar healing crystals appear in the caverns where any dwarf can mine them. Somewhat defied/parodied in a voice line where a dwarf reviving himself with the Iron Will perk will shout "Medics are for pansies!" Bosco, on the other hand, comes equipped with the capability to revive any downed dwarf in a Solo mission. He will fearlessly charge into a swarm to revive you, robotic ambulance sound effects blaring, should you fall to the Glyphid hordes.
    • Of course, there is absolutely nothing stopping you from making a D.I.Y Medic if you're so inclined; the Gunner and the Engineer tend to be the most suited to this, due to their excellent crowd-control and ability to defend themselves against hordes while they're reviving the downed dwarf.
  • Mega-Corp: Downplayed, but present. Deep Rock Galactic is a self-described interplanetary mining conglomerate, and none of the technology they're directly shown to possess contradicts this. That being said, they have the resources and manpower to effectively stage an orbital invasion of a Death World like Hoxxes IV, and the Flavor Text on a few cosmetic items suggest that they're infamous, or at least feared, among the more far-flung reaches of the galaxy.
    • Update 27 brings this into greater focus with the introduction of Project OMEN, which are explicitly described as "a massive network of modular extermination towers." They appear to be military-grade weapon platforms, definitely overkill even by the standards of Hoxxes IV; this suggests DRG is involved in some projects that are only tangentially related to mining. Even before then, there was the lingering question of what exactly the company wants with the Alien Eggs extracted via Egg Hunt operations, one that remains unanswered so far.
    • Releasing alongside the game's launch from Early Access are two mega-corp themed cosmetic packs that intentionally invoke this trope, making the dwarves resemble a squadron of Elite Mooks you'd expect to be going up against in a different videogame, like so.
  • Meaningful Name: "Morkite" literally means "dark mineral". According to Mikkel (Mekill), Co-Founder and Game Director of Deep Rock Galactic, this was on purpose.
    "Basically, it's 'Murk', which in Danish means 'Darkness', and then we added 'ite', as in stalactite, so it becomes 'Morkite'... the Dark Mineral."
  • Memetic Badass: The late In-Universe example, Karl, personifies this trope. Many of the salutes, toasts, and other one-liners in the game reference Karl and how badass he was - and how he would be proud.
  • Metal Slime:
    • Huuli Hoarders. Cowardly bugs who run from players when attacked or spotted, eventually disappearing if they get far enough away. Successfully popping one will cause a heap of crafting materials to scatter across the cave.
    • A patch added Crassus Detonators as enemies you can encounter in the caves. When they die their usual crater is completely coated in melted gold, killing one in the open is a decent payout, killing one in the various tight tunnels and letting it get coated in a sphere can result in several missions' worth of gold payout.
  • Mini-Boss: So far two have been implemented as random cave generation spawns and can be encountered in either regular missions or either variation of deep dive.
    • BET-C: An experimental combat variant of the M.U.L.E. that has gone rogue because of a Xynarch Charge-Sucker infestation scrambling its friend-foe identification system. It's as mobile as Molly is but is equipped with a portable shield generator, machine gun, and a grenade launcher that can and will chew through your shields in one burst. If you manage to kill the parasites, BET-C can be re-booted as a friendly support unit but with reduced damage output and no shield projector. It makes a warbling sound on a one-second interval while idle and hostile, you will hear it before you see it.
    • Korlok Tyrant Weed: A network of stationary hostile flora with a centralized core. It grows shoots that either attack with projectiles like miniature Spitball Infectors, or pods that heal itself. Kill anything that CAN take damage and the core will expose itself. It can only be truly damaged when the core is exposed and only for a brief period before it snaps shut and regrows its defenses. Kill it and it will drop Korlok fragments, which are decently valuable.
  • Min Maxers Delight: Certain mutations are cycled throughout missions to spice up the difficulty. In exchange, these mutations apply a reward bonus upon completion. Most mutations can be difficult to deal with. Others, not so much...
    • Parasites involve little worm things popping out of defeated enemies. It's just another annoyance to deal with and involves more killing. It's a breeze to deal with even as a Scout.
    • Regenerative Bugs allow the bugs to heal after not being damaged for some time. But what kind of dwarf leaves a bug simply injured and not slain? This also has the side effect of making any Steeves a dwarf has basically immortal unless they get stepped on by a Bulk Detonator.
  • Mission Control: His name is Mission Control, and he guides you in your objectives.
  • Money Spider:
    • Huuli Hoarders drop loads of crafting materials when they die. Taking one on, though, needs some mild coordination; it'll squirm and skitter away once it's first attacked, and if given enough time it burrows to escape.
    • Golden Loot Bugs are golden recolors of normal loot bugs that explode into multiple chunks of gold when taken down. Unlike Huuli Hoarders, their passivity makes them a lot easier to take out for their drops.
    • With "Golden Bugs" anything that can be killed will be guaranteed to drop chunks of gold no matter what size, including glyphid spawn, exploders, nadocytes, and even parasites if that hazard exists within the same mission.
  • More Predators Than Prey: How Hoxxes' ecosystem functions are anyone's guess. The Glyphids are so numerous that dying anywhere from the dozens or hundreds in any given operation doesn't put a dent in their numbers, and the only lifeforms present that could be considered prey are the Loot Bugs, Silicate Harvesters, Maggots, and Huuli Hoarders, all of whom are typically rare to the tune of "only a couple dozen in any given cave system."
  • MST3K Mantra: An in-universe example; this is DRG's attitude towards the fact that Hoxxes has a several-miles-thick core of frozen underground ice plates, rather than conventional polar regions, as well as the implied attitude at its other various bits of impossible weirdness. At least one of their xenogeologists didn't share the same viewpoint.
    Description: As always, DRG recommends a "don't ask" approach when dealing with the peculiarities of Hoxxes' makeup.
  • Multiple Life Bars: Dreadnoughts have an extra life bar in addition to their normal one, representing the hardened shell over their thorax. Once this bar is depleted, the shell breaks off, leaving the vulnerable flesh underneath exposed. Put enough rounds in that, and the Dreadnought finally dies.
  • Nameless Narrative: The player characters have job descriptions, not names. Mission Control's name is never given. The aliens obviously don't have names (save for Steeve, but they're all named Steeve). The only "characters" who do are Molly and Bosco, where Management would rather its employees to not give names to the equipment to begin with, and Karl himself.
  • Necessary Drawback: All of the unlockable guns suffer from one of these compared to the vanilla weapons. This is because they are intended to be sidegrades that give the class tactical flexibility, moreso than straight upgrades. For instance, the Gunner's unlockable primary, the Autocannon, deals splash damage, matches the Minigun's single-target DPS, and carries roughly as much, if not more ammo when accounting for total damage. However, it's significantly less precise than the Minigun and relies on slow, manual reloads, whereas the Minigun can simply stop shooting to naturally cool off.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: One line your dwarf can deliver while grinding on a refinery pipeline is "Look at me, I'm Stony Rock!"
  • No Kill Like Overkill: The Dwarves appear to adhere closely to The Seventy Maxims of Maximally Effective Mercenaries. Even the resident Fragile Speedster, the Scout, is packing an assault rifle and a sawn-off shotgun. He's the most lightly armed of the bunch. The Smart Guy is packing a grenade launcher, and don't even get us started on the Gunner. Given that they're up against an endless horde of ravenous, heavily-armored bug monsters, however, this is fully understandable.
  • Noodle Incident:
    • One of the messages that can appear on the Deep Rock Galactic Information Channel: "PSA: Please flush after using the restrooms. Let's not have a repeat of The Incident." A possibly related message in the same Information Channel: "PSA: The L4 bathrooms remain closed for extensive maintenance. The clog is not yet cleared."
    • Whatever it is that happened to Karl. So far, the only things we know are that it was apparently the stuff of legend, that some amount of Skull Crusher Ale may have been involved, and that the four dwarves still bear a grudge against the local wildlife for it all.
  • No Such Thing as Space Jesus: Averted. Lines such as "Let there be light!" From the Scout and "Light 'em up like Christmas trees!" from Mission Control mean that, intentionally or not, Ghostship Games has included Christianity as we understand it in their Space-faring Standard Fantasy Setting. One can't help but wonder how this version of The Book of Genesis describes God creating the Elves and Dwarves.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: Whenever you gather an egg on egg hunt missions, the entire cave groans and shudders. All that happens is maybe a glyphid swarm comes for you, but it's worth noting that Mission control has never said that they're glyphid eggs...
  • Notice This: Morkite, the objective mineral, has a shimmer that makes it visible even in pitch-black conditions. Resources that have been mined but not collected glow faintly to make them easier to spot. Glowing spots on the wall or floor indicate the presence of a buried gem or egg, and said gems/eggs will also give off a lot of light so you don't lose track of them.
  • Not the Intended Use: Supply Drops are meant to be just that - supply drops containing ammo and health for the dwarves. However, they will also gib anything they land on, be it a dwarf or a bug; the only exceptions are Dreadnoughts, who will still lose a respectable chunk of HP. As such, it's entirely possible to use them as makeshift orbital strikes rather than simple supply drops. Also applies to pipelines to some degree, although the rail grinding is completely intentional (and the dwarves even comment that Deep Rock's R&D department "did good work with the pipe riding") Management probably doesn't approve when you decide to ignore the mission objective in favor of using pipes to build a subterranean roller coaster...
  • Nuclear Nasty: On Hoxxes, the Radioactive Exclusion Zone, which is full of mutated, radioactive Glyphids. The local Praetorian variant makes its immediate surroundings suffer radiation poisoning when it attacks; same applies to the Exploder.
  • Oddly Small Organization: Ambiguously. Despite the fact that they are conducting wide-reaching mining operations of an entire planet, Deep Rock Galactic's space rig has accommodations for a crew of four dwarves, not counting Mission Control. It isn't clear whether the Space Rig as it appears in-game is just meant to be one of many on the same ship.
  • Oh, Crap!: The Dwarves have voicelines reflecting this whenever they are falling down through the air long enough.
  • Our Dwarves Are All the Same: Played so straight you could use it for precision measurement. Our heroes are a group of surly, stout-bodied, drink-loving, honor-bound warrior miners. Some of the more ornate weapon skins feature time-honored Dwarven standards such as foaming mugs and fists. Recent updates have also been steadily adding ever-more-magnificent beards, some of which are braided. On the other hand, beards are optional, and their accents are Danish rather than Scottish.
    • Also a meta example. If you shave them and remove their headgear, you'll see that each dwarf is in fact exactly the same model underneath, minus whatever their armor looks like.
    • This is Averted on a more literal level, as each of the playable dwarves is very unique in their skillset and equipment - and of those, only the Driller and the Engineer could be viewed as stereotypically dwarven in playstyle.
  • Our Elves Are Different: Implied. Elves never make an appearance, but their presence in the setting is alluded by "pointy-eared leaf lover" being a common insult among dwarves, with Leaf Lover's Special being a much derided flavor of beer in the bar.
  • Overheating: The Gunner's minigun and the Driller's Plasma Pistol and drills all draw directly from their ammo stores, but jam if they're used for too long without cooling off. The Driller's Cryocannon works similarly, but loses pressure rather than building heat. If it runs out, it simply needs to repressurize a bit to fire again.
  • ...Or So I Heard: When unlocking the Cryo-Cannon for the Driller, Mission Control remarks that, in addition to its obvious use, it's "also handy for keeping drinks cold... or so I'm told."
  • Percussive Maintenance: Several scenarios in the game present the player with some broken piece of machinery that needs to be fixed or activated. Examples include broken mini-Mules that have been left in an abandoned mine, Uplink and black boxes, cargo crates, fuel cell pods, broken or unbuilt pipe segments, and the Drilldozer if it has taken damage. The animation for most of these has you simply whack the machinery in question with a hammer until it turns on, good as new. Pipe segments and the Drilldozer in particular share a unique animation featuring somewhat more sensible tools, but also includes a few less sensible ones, and often includes whacking it with the back side of a wrench as well.
  • Pet the Dog: Or pet the bug, as the case may be; an update eventually gave players the ability to pet the Lootbugs, although the prompt to do so is currently invisible; you can still do it by pressing E on them, however. As of Update 28, you can also pet tamed Glyphids, and with her introduction in Update 32, Doretta can be petted.
  • Planet Heck: The Magma Core. Lava vents, flaming geysers, tectonic shifts that cause chasms to open up with barely any warning... not a fun place to visit.
  • Power Crystal: The ultimate goal of any Escort Duty mission is to defend a mobile drill as it makes its way towards the prize: an Ommoran Heartstone buried deep in Hoxxes. The Heartstone is not only valuable, it is apparently powerful and possibly sentient, as drilling into its outer shell causes the crystal to fight back. It is capable of smashing levitating rocks into the drill, erecting beam towers to burn it with lasers, and creating bursts of energy that push away dwarves and clear out the Engineer's platforms. Once the drilling is complete and the Heartstone itself has been extracted from the shell, it seems to lose its power (or at least the will to fight back) and it can be safely carried back to the Drop Pod by tying it to the M.U.L.E.
  • Powerful Pick: Naturally, the pickaxe can be used as a melee attack against enemies. An upgrade for it lets players unleash an even stronger attack with it, but on a cooldown timer.
  • Praetorian Guard: Dwarves who reach Player Rank 60 can unlock the Regal Aegis armor paintjob. The assignment description implies that the colors are worn by special guards who protect Deep Rock's holdings and enforce their rules. It's worth noting that the color scheme involved - blue, black and white - matches the weapon skins unlocked for buying every mod a weapon has.
  • Precursors:
    • Rarely, on deep, high-level digs, strange black cubes can be dug out of the ground, much like gemstones. They are clearly manufactured devices of some kind, and neither the Dwarves nor their scanners recognize them, suggesting they weren't made by dwarven, human, or elven hands; this suggests that space-mining companies are not the first to visit Hoxxes. The game files even refer to them as "Precursor Artifact."
    • Similarly, large double-helix structures may occasionally spawn in the Radioactive Exclusion Zone. They share the same scrambled name as the cubes, aiming a pointer at them makes the dwarves say similar lines as if they pointed a cube, and their smooth uniformness indicates that these things aren't naturally-made.
    • Dwarves at the bar will occasionally toast to "the empires of old," which may potentially be another example of this trope.
  • Press X to Die: Go ahead, jump into the barrel hoop. The exact same barrel hoop you see violently explodes barrels that pass through it. See what happens.
  • Pupating Peril: Glyphid Dreadnoughts, basically the game's bosses, are usually found inside of cocoons that need to be actively popped. According to Mission Control, this is necessary because having them ambulatory and ready to crash other mining operations (as they may rarely do to you) is bad news, and because their cocooning means they're trying to turn into something even worse than the chitinous, fiery juggernauts themselves.
  • Quick Melee: An odd variant where the actual intended use is for digging, but swinging your pickaxe is as easy as holding a button and it goes through enemies as well as dirt. There are also several perks that can amplify the combat effectiveness of this feature.
  • Ranged Emergency Weapon:
    • The Driller's piddly Subata 120 pistol counts, being a semi automatic peashooter (by dwarven standards at least) on a class all about getting up close and personal. Again, by dwarven standards; it's still packing a ton of ammo and good damage and can put the hurt in anything's weak spots if you can aim it right.
    • The Gunner's Bulldog revolver is an odd case. Unlike most examples of this trope, it is extremely powerful and accurate, fully capable of one-shotting standard enemies and making short work of big bugs such as Praetorians. However, it still fits the trope for two reasons. Firstly, it has a very limited magazine size of only four shots, and its' ammo pool is a petite 28 rounds. Secondly, being able to one-shot enemies only gets you so far when you're dealing with enemies like the Glyphids, meaning that all but the most eagle-eyed players will have to switch back to their Minigun as soon as the bugs close in; the Bulldog won't help hold off a swarm. It's mostly for picking off distant enemies too far away for the Minigun to reach without wasting a lot of ammo.
  • Randomly Generated Levels: The layout of each cavern is generated every time. Missions have "Mission Length" and "Cave Complexity" modifiers that make them deeper or twistier.
  • Real Is Brown: Averted, each of the biome landscapes is a particular dominant colour once you light it up. It makes the actual brown patches of soft dirt (which mark passages between caverns) stand out.
  • Redemption Demotion: The corrupted BET-C automatic combat rigs that can be encountered in the caverns will put up a decent fight, but once the Charge-Suckers are killed and the robot restored to working order, it won't fight as effectively as it did before. It entirely loses the ability to use its shield, and while it retains both the machine gun and grenade launcher, its rate of fire is reduced and it will no longer do the close-range volley attacks it does when you fight it.note 
  • Refuge in Audacity: Sometimes it rains in this game. Be reminded that this game is set in underground caves.
  • Regenerating Shield, Static Health: Dwarves are equipped with an upgradeable shield rig that recharges after a period of not taking damage, but can only restore health with supply drops and Red Sugar. If a dwarf's health is particularly low, he'll slowly regain up to about a sixth of his health bar while his shield is up.
    • The bugs get in on this as well. A Dreadnought has two sets of hit points, (see Multiple Life Bars above), both tied to its glowing abdomen. The abdomen has a hard shell that must be broken off, and soft flesh underneath. The shell always grows back after a short duration, instantly resetting to 100% health. Any damage to the fleshy bits remains, however.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: The Gunner's sidearm is the "Bulldog" Heavy Revolver, boasting the highest damage per shot of any bullet-based weapon, at the cost of only having 4 shots in a magazine (See Hand Cannon above). It can even be upgraded to fire explosive rounds.
  • Rocket Jump: Optional Overclock mods for the Scout's Boomstick and the Engineer's Grenade Launcher allow them to perform this feat at the cost of some damage in the weapon itself.
  • Rollercoaster Mine: Update 32 added in two new missions, one of which revolves around building pipelines to pump liquid Morkite back to an on-site refinery. These pipes can be built in any direction as long as terrain exists to build it off of, and there is no resource cost for building pipe segments. The "roller coaster" element comes in due to the pipes also coming equipped with rails along the top, and the fact that the dwarves can rail grind along them. Many teams playing on low hazard levels go out of their way to build and ride the most ridiculous pipe roller coasters they can because it's just as (if not more) entertaining than actually completing the mission!
  • Science Fantasy: There are vague hints that DRG takes place in a Standard Fantasy Setting that averted Medieval Stasis long enough to become an outright galaxy-spanning civilization. One of the toasts the dwarves will give mention "empires of old". The clean-shaven option is described as "progressive", implying that going beardless is against Dwarven tradition, but that times are changing. Magic hasn't made an appearance (with the possible exception of the Ommoran Heartstone), but the presence of Elves is alluded to.
  • Schmuck Bait: Machine Events on Point Extraction missions. These missions spawn bug waves without warning at random intervals, and at faster ones than with Mining missions. Machine Events do not prevent additional waves from spawning on top of the usual enemies it does. Starting a Machine Event on this type of mission can be a death sentence if you are on a high hazard level and/or don't have a competent team to back you up.
    • Additionally, Point Extraction missions punish slowness moreso than any other mission type, as swarms will spawn more and more frequently as time passes. Taking an extra five minutes to do a machine event can make the rest of the mission a living hell.
    • This also applies to Escort missions. Keep in mind that failing to protect the Drilldozer results in a Non Standard Game Over. The best tactic is to extract the hearstone, then do the event, as by this point, the Drilldozer no longer needs to be defended.
  • Secondary Fire: None of the player weapons feature any; instead the Engineer's LMG Gun Platform can have two different ones powered by the Primary Weapons:
    • The "Warthog" Auto 210 Shotgun has the Turret Whip mod, which lets you shoot any deployed LMG- not just yours, but other players' as well- and have it expend 10 rounds to fire off a supercharged explosive shot.
    • The "Stubby" Voltaic SMG's Turret EM Discharge Unstable Overclock lets you shoot any deployed LMG to unleash a burst of electricity without expending any of the LMG's rounds, useful when swarms reach your turret(s).
  • Sentry Gun: The Engineer's unique Support Tool, the LMG Gun Platform. Customizable with purchasable mods.
    • First Tier mods let you choose between the Gemini System which gives you two sentry guns and additional ammo, or the (single) LMG Mk II which has improved range, ammo capacity and damage.
    • Second Tier offers increased ammo count, quicker setup time or quicker reload.
    • Third Tier includes armor piercing, stun modifier, or increased ammo capacity for the sentry gun(s).
    • Fourth Tier offers two different Systems for the LMG: The Defender System, which limits the gun to a (still wide) forward arc but increases the damage, and the Hawkeye System which extends the firing range and also turns your Laser Pointer into a target designator for the gun(s).
  • Shattered World: Combined with Floating Continent - a solid 20%-30% of Hoxxes has been forcibly ripped off of the rest of the planet, leaving it orbiting over the massive crater it used to occupy; it even seems to have its own biome inside it, the Dense Biozone. Important questions, such as who did this, why they did it, how they did it, how Hoxxes is still intact, and why the debris has not simply crashed back to the surface yet remain unanswered.
  • Shifting Sand Land: The Sandblasted Corridors. It has the 'softest' terrain, making it the easiest to dig in, but it's home to aggressive swarmers and sand jets that can launch you across a room to your death-by-fall-damage.
  • Shock and Awe: Both in service of the players and against them.
    • Engineer:
      • The "Stubby" Voltaic SMG. Also the Unstable Overclocks Turret Arc and Turret EM Discharge.
      • The Breach Cutter's High Voltage Crossover Balanced Overclock.
    • Scout:
      • The Electrifying Reload Unstable Overclock for the Deepcore GK2 Asssault Rifle.
      • The M1000 Classic's Electrocuting Focus Shots Unstable Overclock.
    • The Gunner has the Electro Minelets Unstable Overclock for the BRT7 Burst Fire Gun
  • Short-Range Shotgun: Zig-zagged depending on which class is being played. The Scout's Boomstock is incredibly deadly at close range, but is more or less useless past that, due to how short the barrel is. However, the Engineer's default combat shotgun is quite reliable from anywhere up to 30 meters. This can be greatly extended if the player chooses accuracy and recoil focused upgrades.
  • Shoot the Bullet: The Spitball Infector's acid blobs can be shot out of the air by your weapons, negating the danger of being hit by their highly damaging projectile. Don't try this with Glyphid Acidspitters or Web Spitters however.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better:
    • The Scout's "Jury-Rigged Boomstick" is a double-barrel break action sawed-off that can kill a Praetorian in two shots at close range.
    • The Engineer's "Warthog" Auto 210 Shotgun is a versatile weapon that's handy at all ranges (but the closer the better), which helps him mop up any enemies that get past his sentries.
  • Shout-Out
    • The robot that accompanies the players is the Mining Utility Lift-Engine, or M.U.L.E.
    • One option for facial hair is a thick mustache named The Swanson.
    • One of the headgear options is a mohawk with a description that reads, "The perfect look for monster slaying."
    • A two for one with the Rockabilly hairstyle: "Worthy of the true King Under The Mountain."
    • The Skullcap helmet looks like a Sci-Fi version of Gimli's iconic helmet.
    • You can get a metal mohawk called the Ravager, complete with Mary Poppins reference.
    • A particularly unkempt hairstyle called the Gamekeeper has the description "Ah, go boil yer heads, both of yeh.", making it a clear reference to the heavily-bearded Hagrid.
    • The Reclamator Helmet, which mainly features two beady black eyes, has a quote from Jaws in its description.
    • An achievement for staying atop one of the notoriously glitchy barrels in the Space Rig is called "Barrel Rider."
    • The beers in the Abyss bar contain several references:
      • The name of the Underhill Deluxe beer (which shrinks the drinker) is a reference to the alias that Frodo used in Bree, and the description is a reference to the first few lines of the The Hobbit.
      • One beer is called the Arkenstout a reference to the Arkenstone that Thorin was seeking in The Hobbit.
      • One of the companies that brews several of the beers is The Seventh Dwarves Brewery.
      • One of the available beers is Flintlocke's Delight. Fittingly enough, it causes explosions everywhere when drunk.
      • The Blackreach Blonde has mushrooms in the label that might seem familiar to people that've been to the actual Blackreach. Perhaps to go with those shrooms' glow, it makes you dance.
      • The description for Slayer Stout says that it was popular which dwarves who were seeking an honorable end in battle, just like Dwarf Trollslayers from Warhammer.
    • The BRT7 Burst-Fire Gun is Robocop's pistol in all but name. Sadly, it lacks any auto-aim capabilities, but it still shreds up bugs just fine. Your move, creep. note 
    • While taming Glyphids with Beastmaster, Dwarves may say "STEEVIE... I WONDER?"
    • Speaking of Robocop, the Slit Helmet is very reminiscent of the cybernetic cop's famous headgear.
    • One unlockable victory pose - appropriately titled "Furious Clown" - is Pennywise's ridiculous memetic dance from It (2017).
    • One of the possible dances a Dwarf might perform near the jukebox bears some resemblance to Discord's shuffle.
    • One possible toast the Dwarves can give is "Hello darkness, my old friend!"
    • The Engineer's alternate secondary weapon- The Breach Cutter- is a modified mining tool that fires a line of plasma. It's basically the Line Gun from Dead Space.
    • Marking the Drilldozer with your laser pointer without Bosco in your gamemay have your dwarf say one of two lines that are highly reminiscent of two memes: "This bad boy can dig so many tunnels!" and "This is a Drilldozer. It drills!"
  • Single-Biome Planet: Averted. Hoxxes is home to several biomes and climates, although they're all underground. The surface is a lifeless wasteland.
  • Skewed Priorities: Played for Laughs at every turn. Deep Rock Galactic is very blunt about the fact that they view the lives of their employees as substantially less important than making money, but the dwarves don't seem to care about this at all; they aren't even particularly upset if they're left behind on a dig. Possibly handwaved by the implications that the medbay is rescuing fallen dwarves from death somehow.
    Fungus Bogs description: "We're almost sorry to send employees in here, but the rewards are too great to ignore. So therefore: welcome to the Fungus Bogs! A truly awful region, built mostly from slime, mold, stinging insects, fungus, stinking mud, and corrosive lichen."
  • Socialization Bonus: The price for everything sold at the bar is for one round of drinks, rather than for a single beer, so it's the most cost-efficient to always buy for a team of four (given that your teammates will reciprocate your generousness, that is).
  • Stalactite Spite: Stalactites made of salt appear in the Salt Pits biome, and will fall to deal damage if shot or disrupted via explosion. The green icicles in the Glacial Strata do the same thing, but any other type of icicle found there won't.
  • Standard Fantasy Setting: Subverted. There are implications throughout the game that the setting was this historically, but it averted Medieval Stasis long enough to transition to Science Fantasy.
  • Stout Strength: Well, these are dwarves we're talking about. The Gunner and the Driller are the most noticeable examples, but all four of the playable Dwarves are short, strong enough to cave in a Glyphid's skull with a pickaxe, and tough enough to take a serious beating. Molly also qualifies, being a squat, virtually-indestructible "minecart on legs" who is around the same height as the Dwarves are.
  • Subsystem Damage: Many bugs have a hard outer shell, which reduces or negates damage to the bug's Hit Points when shot. However, the shell itself takes damage and can be cracked and blown off, leaving the bug's flesh exposed.
  • Super-Persistent Predator: No matter how many bugs you mow down in droves, it never seems to occur to them that running away might be a good idea. Justified in this case as the Glyphids appear to be part of a Hive Mind, throwing countless expendable bodies against stubborn threats is what insect swarms do.
  • Suspicious Videogame Generosity:
    • Point Extraction missions have a lot of Nitra lying around the level, and the Mine Head you need to deposit the Aquarqs into even come with a triplet of heavy autocannons to fend off any nearby bugs. This is of course merely to offset the fact that the aliens in Point Extractions are much more aggressive than in any other mission, and you will be swarmed every few minutes at minimum.
    • Escort missions also have quite a bit of Nitra, but this is more due to the levels being far more linear and requiring the Drilldozer to be escorted to the endpoint. Which of course, means a lot of ammo needed to protect it against the bugs.
  • Take Your Time: On most mission types, periodic enemy waves are the only time pressure put on the team until the call for extraction. Even once objectives are complete it can be wise to look for crafting ores and establish ways back up cliffs before starting the countdown (Which can become moot if you have a Driller). Point Extraction missions don't offer this luxury, however, and the unannounced bug waves will become more and more frequent until the team is overrun or leaves. Mining, Escort, and Refining missions have unpredictable enemy waves appearing at random, though not as aggressively as in Point Extraction missions.
  • A Tankard of Moose Urine: Leaf Lover's Special is an "organic" beer available only due to the insistence of Management. Dwarves despise it both due to its Elven origin and its ability to turn you stone-cold sober with a single swig. Ironically, this last effect is quite useful due to the effects of drunkenness in normal gameplay, making Leaf Lover's one of the most commonly-ordered drinks.
  • Tree Trunk Tour: Update 33 brings the new Hollow Bough biome, a biological anomaly beneath the planet's surface filled with cavernous growths resembling the inside of hollow trees, complete with bark coating the "cave" walls. The area is also infested with writhing thorny red vines, which appear to be an invasive species eating away at the wood that makes up the caverns.
  • Trick Bomb: Every class gets a number of throwable devices that either explode or otherwise hinder the Glyphid hordes. At first, these were mostly standard frags, but Update 24 added a diverse selection of grenades and grenade-like objects to each class's loadout.
    • The Scout gets the Inhibitor Field Grenades (or IFG's), which initially were the only nonstandard grenade in the game — creating a slowing field that increased damage against targets within it. With the update, he has two other options that fulfill the crowd-control role: the bug-baiting Pheremone Canister and the Cryo Grenade.
    • The Gunner has a number of high-yield area-of-effect tools, including the notoriously friendly-fire-prone Cluster Grenade, the intense but short-lived Incendiary Grenade, and the spike-covered Sticky Grenade.
    • The Engineer's options are focused on area denial and battlefield control. There's the startlingly lifelike L.U.R.E., the multiple-detonation-capable Proximity Mine, and the chaotic, bouncy Plasma Burster.
    • The Driller has the weirdest assortment, with the sharp-edged and recoverable Impact Axe, the bog-standard HE Grenade, and the highly flammable and non-dwarf-affecting Neurotoxin Grenade.
  • Tunnel King: The Driller.
  • Ultimate Job Security: No matter what kind of shenanigans the dwarves get into in the level hub, Mission Control always sounds like he's on his last straw but never acts on his threats. Kicking dozens of barrels into the launch platform, bringing them into the drop pod, getting drunk off your ass and pass out at the bar, playing with the gravity control, and entering restricted areas are all things you can repeatedly do without a punishment harsher than being told off over comms. All this is because DRG's operations simply cannot function without the dwarves going on their digging missions, and there's no replacing them since no one else is crazy enough, or badass enough, to try digging on Hoxxes IV.
  • Underground Level: The space rig is the only area in the game that ISN'T underground.
  • Video Game Caring Potential: Update 33 added, at the request of players during the experimental branch, the option to carry Doretta's head back to the escape pod after an Escort Mission was completed. Of course, in the developer's own words, "Just don't expect any rewards or praise for doing so - Management couldn't care less!".
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: Virtually every dig you go on will feature Loot Bugs — bulbous, slug-like aliens who explode into a shower of gold and nitra when killed, but are completely harmless. It's up to the player whether they're left unmolested, popped for the rewards, or petted by the dwarves.
    • For that matter, there are several species of neutral wildlife on Hoxxes IV, such as the Silicate Harvester, Cave Cruiser, and Cave Vine, who pose no threat to the Dwarves. This doesn't stop you from shooting or smashing them to death if you're so inclined.
  • Video Game Flamethrowers Suck: Averted. The Driller's CRSPR Flamethrower can wash over an oncoming tide of swarmers and leave nothing but a carpet of charred bug innards in its wake.
    • One upgrade path allows the CRSPR to set the ground on fire, creating a potentially massive Damage Over Time field that ignites Glyphids that charge through it.
    • A later optional upgrade also adds the feature of causing enemies killed via direct damage to explode into a shower of fire and boiling hot viscera; Quite useful for quickly killing lots of small and/or bunched-up things.
  • Video Game Settings: Every level counts as a Blackout Basement you have to light up yourself. Salvage missions are technically Abandoned Mine levels, and while no minecarts are present (the dwarves even have a voice line saying, "Minecarts are so last year!"), On-Site refinery missions can come close to Minecart Madness with criss-crossing paths of pipes equipped with grind rails on the top.
    • The Tutorial takes you to the Shallow Grotto, which is literally a Noob Cave. It looks like nowhere else in the game, and has no crafting materials — just Morkite, Nitra, and Gold.
    • The Crystalline Caverns, Radioactive Exclusion Zone, and Salt Pits are Crystal Landscapes, with worthless (but pretty) crystal formations made of silicate, uranium, and salt, respectively. The Exclusion Zone has some slight crossover with Polluted Wasteland, due to the aforementioned uranium.
    • The Dense Biozone is closest to a combination of Jungle Japes and a waterless Under the Sea, with giant coral in place of trees. The Azure Weald is similar; the many bioluminescent terrain features and dark blue color palette suggests a deep sea aesthetic, contrasted by hanging jungle vines and giant flowers.
    • The Hollow Bough combines The Hedge of Thorns with Tree Trunk Tour, strangely, it is still entirely underground because the trees are buried and petrified.
    • The Fungus Bogs are a form of Bubblegloop Swamp, complete with pools of sticky goo, noxious gas, and big ol' mushrooms. They also have a healthy pinch of Jungle Japes due to the dense foliage and massive roots that serve as stand-ins for trees.
    • The Glacial Strata is, unsurprisingly, a Slippy-Slidey Ice World. The slipping and sliding only happens on black ice, however. Most other surfaces slow you down considerably.
    • The Magma Core is an underground Lethal Lava Land, with lava geysers, flame vents, and patches of molten rock that burn to walk on. It overlaps with Planet Heck for obvious reasons.
    • The Sandblasted Corridors are an underground Shifting Sand Land, with elements of Gusty Glade in the form of sandstorms and Wind Tunnels that can fling you into pits.
  • Villain Protagonist: Downplayed. DRG, with their stated goal of "complete subjugation" of Hoxxes IV, are behaving identically to all those classic Alien Invaders based on European Colonialism, the caveat being that the planet they're invading doesn't seem to have any sapient lifeforms. Still, so many Glyphids die at the hands of their employees on a daily basis that one can't help but imagine PETA suing them to Earth and back.
  • Violation of Common Sense: If a teammate's been almost-killed by bugs and are surrounded by them, one common tactic is to throw a grenade right into the fray; if the crowd is big enough, said teammate might be the epicenter of a satchel charge instead. This only works because downed teammates are immune to all damage until revived.
  • Wall Crawl: A trademark ability of Glyphids and the MULE, allowing the former to attack from every conceivable direction and enabling the latter to follow the team wherever they go.
  • The Walls Have Eyes: A semi-common terrain feature in the Radioactive Exclusion Zone consists of large, seemingly-aware clusters of eyes covering the walls, blinking and looking around or at the dwarves. You can mine them to destroy them.
  • We Do the Impossible: Deep Rock prides itself in actively seeking out the toughest mining operations and successfully making a killing from them. The whole reason they've come to Hoxxes is specifically because its considered the most dangerous planet in the galaxy.
  • Wreaking Havok: Not very much in actual gameplay, but the kickable barrels provide a nice distraction between matches. Don't kick them into the launch tube, though, or you'll get chewed out for it. Apparently the dwarves love kicking the barrels around so much that they made a sport out of it when the Abyss Bar opened.


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