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The year is 2004, and Midway Games has a problem. Last year's edition of their popular NFL Blitz series, NFL Blitz PRO, was the most toned-down, realistic Blitz yet thanks to National Football League lobbyists forcing them to dial back the games' signature violence, and the result was a flop, both commercially and critically. To make things worse, their rivals over at Electronic Arts just signed an exclusive license with the NFL, making Madden NFL (and NFL Street, until that died out a few years later) the only game in town as far as American Football video games went. So now, Midway was faced with a choice: take a premature axe to their iconic football series...or go their own way, start their own league, and create a version of football so brutal that it made the NFL's old complaints look absurd.

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The result was Blitz: The League, originally released in fall 2005 for the PlayStation 2 and Xbox, with Xbox 360 and PlayStation Portable ports the following year. Not content with merely returning Blitz to its arcade roots, The League reveled in Rated M for Manly excess, with gameplay that encouraged dirty hits, steroid use, gambling, and every other seedy vice the NFL would never want to be part of its image. This all came packaged with an entire fictional league called, well, The League, complete with a promotion-relegation system like soccer leagues outside the U.S. use, its own detailed century-long backstory, and 17 teams, each with their own outlandish star players. This all paved the way for a single-player story mode written by the team behind ESPN's controversial football drama Playmakers, where the 18th team of the league, after a humiliating season that ends with them getting sent down to the lowest division and their quarterback retired at the hands of the New York Nightmare's star linebacker Quentin Sands—played by his real-life inspiration, NFL Hall of Famer Lawrence Taylor— go through a total overhaul in an attempt to finally win a championship and get their revenge.

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The game was successful enough to get a 2008 sequel, appropriately named Blitz: The League II, with its own storyline set three years later. This time, you play as Kid Franchise, the League's first two-way player in decades, as he leads his newly-created hometown team up through the ranks and battles the League's corrupt commissioner, who wants his pet expansion team, the LA Riot, to be the next big dynasty at any cost.

However, hopes of a third entry in the series quickly hit a brick wall in early 2009, as Midway filed for bankruptcy and saw its assets bought off one by one. With EA now holding the license to the Blitz name, if not necessarily The League's universe, it's unclear if or when the series will ever come back.

The Blitz: The League games feature examples of the following tropes:

  • The Ace: Kid Franchise, the protagonist of II's campaign, is presented right from the start as a guaranteed star, with enough athleticism to do what no one else in the League can do and instantly become his team's captain. He even has an offer to play pro baseball waiting for him, which his agent uses to make sure Franchise can play for his hometown team instead of the Riot.
  • Adam Westing: The infamously hard-hitting, hard-partying Lawrence Taylor plays Quentin Sands, a star linebacker who shares his jersey number, college background, and lifestyle. Starting with the 360 port of the first game, the even more violent (not to mention hated) Bill Romanowski does the same with his in-game equivalent, Bruno Battaglia.
  • Alternate History: The League has its own elaborate history of the game of football, which diverges before 1900 and presents a consistently more brutal version of events than what happened in real life, but features plenty of its own parallels.
  • Ascended Fanboy: H.J. Latshaw, of the second game's Philadelphia Brawlers, went from ordinary fan to team captain in less than a year because he got in a fight in the stands and the team decided to give him a tryout instead of kicking him out.
  • Badass Decay: By the time the sequel rolls around, Cookie Wallace, captain of the Detroit Devils, gets hit with this so hard as he starts to get past his prime and his ego inflates in response that he drags the whole team down with him. They go from Division I in the first game all the way down to Division III in the second.
    • The Philadelphia Brawlers get it even worse, but not for an immediately obvious reason. They're actually the result of all the corruption of Lyman Strang, the owner of the created team from the first game's campaign, coming back to bite him in the ass, forcing him to sell the team to the League. They promptly move and rename the team, who quickly drop back to Division III, develop a reputation as sloppy hacks who have to cheat to win, and wind up as Franchise's team's first opponents of the season. Yeesh!
  • Bullet Time: On offense, Clash Mode sends the game into this, making it much easier to shake off defenders.
  • Defeat Means Friendship: Karl Tirpitz, a Supermax prisoner who was convicted of 23 counts of aggravated assault and the captain of that facility's team, ends up joining Franchise's team after his early release.
  • Face–Heel Turn: In the sequel, some teams change captains and end up with more antagonistic guys in that spot than they did before. For instance, the New England Regulars' original captain, Vonnie Treonday, was a trash-talker who could back it up, but by 2008, they've got a championship win with the dark clouds of cheating allegations over it, and their new captain, "Packrat" James, is implied to have been arrested on felony weapons charges—only to have them dropped because he has lawyers.
    • Many of your potential options for the rookie and veteran protagonists from the first game's campaign also go bad by the time the second game comes around. Clayton Wescott becomes a full-blown egotist as the Washington Redhawks' QB/captain, Ted Lawless and Kurt Shock both end up on the cheating New England Regulars, Justin Jonas and Darryl Kinsman both end up on the LA Riot's overpowered roster when you hit Division I, and even Tyrone Kilgore signs with the New York Nightmare—though, considering the Nightmare aren't the enemy anymore, it's more of a betrayal to the old player-created team's fanbase than anything.
  • Heel–Face Turn: The sequel also sees multiple teams trade their more obnoxious captains from the first game for relative nice guys. The Las Vegas Aces, for instance, replace the egotistical Kelvin Diggs, who didn't gel with the rest of the roster's team-first mentality, with respected veteran Amos Newell, while the New York Nightmare's new captain, Kyle Carlson, proves much more of an introvert and quiet professional than Quentin Sands.
    • Quentin Sands himself makes a face turn in the second campaign, once he realizes that taking down the Riot and winning another championship is more important than feuding with Franchise over which one should be the star player. He ultimately proves instrumental to not only winning the League Championship, but getting the evidence needed to arrest Commissioner Clive Hanson and have him removed from power.
  • Jerkass: Half the League would qualify for this trope if you put them in real football, what with their normalization of late hits, excessive violence, and trash-talk. However, Baltimore Bearcats captain Bruno Battaglia stands out as one even by this game's standards, with a reputation for violence and general asshole behavior from the beginning. Once he joins your team on the way to Division II, he continues to act like a jerk and sow dissent in the team. And then in the sequel, just to make sure you know he's surpassed Quentin Sands in dickishness, he becomes the LA Riot's first captain and starts knocking people out with a titanium plate he had put in his elbow before the start of the 2008 season.
  • No Celebrities Were Harmed: Aside from the guys who were outright voiced by the linebackers who inspired them, the team captains' list is chock full of players directly inspired by NFL stars.
  • Opposing Sports Team: Downplayed with the New York Nightmare in the first game's story. They're dominant arch-rivals from a gigantic media market, with a scary name, black-and-purple uniforms, and many of the other trappings of this trope, but ultimately, your beef is with Quentin Sands for what he did to your team, not necessarily everybody on the Nightmare roster.
    • The Los Angeles Riot, on the other hand, go full-tilt into this, checking many of the Nightmare's boxes while making the franchise as a whole incredibly easy to hate. The Commissioner created the Riot with the express purpose of having a star-studded franchise in a big market and constantly bends the League's rules to get them to a League Championship as fast as possible.
  • Prison Episode: At one point in Franchise's career, he gets sent to the Milltown Correctional Facility for testing positive for Ultranol, an illegal performance enhancing drug. It just so happens that the prison holds an annual football game against the Supermax Prison Facility, and the unnamed warden promises Franchise an early release if he wins.
    • Unsurprisingly, the "stadium" has a distinct prison flavor, from the poorly-kept field and jumpsuits, to the ambiance and the cheerleaders wearing stripper cop outfits.
  • Stripperific: Cheerleaders in this series usually wear little more than bikini tops, g-strings, mini-skirts, stockings and high-heels. They make the NFL's cheerleaders look wholesome in comparison.
  • The Unfought: Whenever you win a lower division and move up to the higher one, you replace the team that came in last in the higher division. As such, you end up skipping a couple teams in both campaign modes.
  • We Cannot Go On Without You: In the second game, if Franchise sustains a major injury, it is an automatic Game Over.
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