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Apex Legends is a Free-to-Play Battle Royale Game Spin-Off of the Titanfall franchise, developed by Respawn Entertainment, and released on the Sony PlayStation 4, Microsoft Xbox One and PC on February 4, 2019, with a Nintendo Switch version released on March 8, 2021. Inspired by First Person Shooters and Hero Shooters, players are grouped into cooperative squads of three and pitted against others in matches of upwards to 60 players, where they are dropped onto a map to scrounge for weapons, ammunition and equipment, while remaining as the last team standing.

Unlike most Battle Royale Games, Apex Legends grant players the ability to resurrect their fallen allies by taking certain actions within a period of time. Furthermore, unlike Titanfall, players do not have access to the titular Humongous Mecha, nor is Le Parkour, such as Double Jump or Wall Running, present in the game. Rather, players choose the "Legends", a character from an initial group of eight, each possessing different skills and abilities to help their respective squads in combat.

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Set 18 years after the events of Titanfall 2, Apex Legends takes place within a region of the Frontier called "the Outlands", where a competing Blood Sport called the "Apex Games" is played between pioneers, explorers and outlaws.

In 2021, Dark Horse published a comic series based on the game, titled Apex Legends Overtime.

In 2022, Lightspeed and Quantum, the developers of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds Mobile, developed Apex Legends Mobile, and currently is in a soft launch in select countries before its planned global release in summer of the year.


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Tropes that apply to Apex Legends:

  • Ability Mixing: Characters' kits are generally designed such that their abilities can be combined to great effect. Examples include Seer using his passive or ultimate to get a fix on enemy positions so that he can aim his Focus of Attention more accurately; Gibraltar surrounding his Dome Shield with an Airstrike to strongly disincentivize enemies from trying to enter the dome; and Ash trapping the exit of her Phase Breach by throwing down an Arc Snare to catch enemies trying to follow her.
  • Air-Vent Passageway: An air vent functions as an alternate passageway out from the south side of Turbine on Olympus. It's a bit cramped to enter, but big enough for the Legends to stand in.
  • Acceptable Breaks from Reality:
    • Gun mods work across a wide range of weapons, e.g. an extended heavy mag will work on a light machine gun just as well as a revolver despite their obvious differences. Also, see Universal Ammunition below.
    • The absence of fall damage. While it is possible to die by falling off the map, falling from a great height onto solid ground will only momentarily stun legends.
    • The respawn mechanic. Within the context of the arena, death does not seem to be permanent, given that the legends keep coming back after being killed off in seasonal trailers and the game itself. However, no real explanation has been given for this, in-game or by the developers.
    • There are 60 players in a standard match, yet the pool of playable legends is less than half that. There will inevitably be more than one of each legend, likely even being pitted against each other.
    • Shooting a squad mate with a gun does no damage.
    • The three robotic legends — Pathfinder, Revenant and Ash — are treated like conventional organic legends. For the purposes of gameplay fairness, they can still be damaged by Caustic's gas, detected by Seer's heartbeat detector, and healed by syringes, medkits, and Lifeline's drone.
  • Advanced Movement Technique:
    • "Airstrafing": Inherent to the Source engine that Apex is made with, letting go of the forward key and holding a directional input while turning in that direction causes players' momentum to turn in that direction.
    • "Tapstrafing": The game has a mechanic known as "lurch" where, after pressing the jump button, there's a brief moment in time where the player can input a direction to influence their trajectory in that direction. Spamming an input makes that influence stronger and allows players to make 180 degree turns in midair.
    • "Wallbouncing": Pressing jump at a precise moment right when the player initiates a wall climb allows them to jump off the wall, creating erratic movement that makes them harder to hit.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: In this case it is an energy shield controlled by the gamemasters. Players caught outside this zone take damage. At early game rounds, it's manageable and only deals more than Scratch Damage if you stand in the danger zone for prolonged periods of time, but this steadily increases for every round of the game until late-game rings grievously wound players who spend just a few seconds outside it.
    • During the Season 8 "Chaos Theory" event, this concept got turned on its head with the ring flares- smaller but no less dangerous expanding energy fields. The flares would appear either in random clusters or at the center of the map and expand outward.
  • Adventure-Friendly World: The game's general setting of the Frontier, more specifically the Outlands, is this. While players don't have many opportunities to explore it themselves, the vast number of planets contained in it and very minimal overarching government allow for a wide variety of diverse character backstories to arise.
  • Alien Kudzu: The Medusa Vines from the comic "The Legacy Antigen" are this. They're utterly massive in size, easily spanning the length of multiple towering buildings, immune to bullets, fire, and freezing, aggressively grow to the point of threatening Olympus' to crash, and release an airborne substance that can potentially trigger a fatal allergic reaction.
  • All There in the Manual: The Stories from the Outlands shorts that provide important details about characters' backstories or the events that lead to them joining the Apex Games are completely external to the game itself.
  • And Your Reward Is Clothes: Apex Packs, which you receive every time you level up, function as the game's loot box system - offering a multitude of cosmetic items that can potentially be earned, ranging from character and weapon skins to playercard borders to kill quips to Finishing Moves.
  • Animesque: Even more animesque than its predecessor. The art direction is more vibrant with more Color Contrast and less Real Is Brown, characters have more expressive designs, some powers (such as Wattson's electrical effects or Revenant's silencing grenade) look more like superpowers than advanced technology, and the Apex Games Battle Royale format can be equated to a perpetual Tournament Arc.
  • Anti-Armor:
    • Exclusive to Season 2, the disruptor hop-up for the Alternator and RE-45 would easily melt through shields with little difficulty. Season 10 and 11 moved the Alternator to the care package with a weaker version of this hop-up.
    • In Season 4 that ability was given to the new Sentinel sniper rifle and instead of a hop-up you would have to use a shield battery (season 4) or two shield cells (season 5); this lasted until Season 7 made the Sentinel's charge ability a simple damage bonus instead.
    • Arc Stars deal vastly increaed damage versus shielded victims, but their damage is lower than Frag Grenades against flesh.
    • Inverted with the Hammerpoint Rounds hop-up, which lasted from Season 2 to Season 9 and was equippable to the P2020 and Mozambique, then was readded in Season 12 to the RE-45 as well; affected guns recieved a significant damage boost to anyone who didn't have a shield.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Plenty of features have been added to make the game less punishing and more conducive to team-play, even with random teammates:
      • Knockdown shields can be equipped to block damage after getting downed to avoid getting eliminated immediately. You can even deliberately use it to be a further meatshield, in a pinch, for your teammates.
      • After you're eliminated, your teammates have the ability to grab your banner from your death box and bring it to a respawn point to bring you back. This means players who die early are no longer stuck just spectating their teammates until they die or win the game.
      • Related to the above, banners still inside death boxes expire after some time, which allows players to disconnect from a match without penalty if it's clear the team cannot resurrect their ally.
      • The game includes an expansive ping system to minimize the need for voice chat when playing with randoms.
      • All players on a team drop together with one player being put in charge as the Jumpmaster, but everyone has the option to break off from the group. Jumpmaster privilege usually goes to the last person to choose their character to compensate for the fact that the others may have chosen their preferred Legend, but they can choose to let allies be the Jumpmaster. Also, in the event that the projected Jumpmaster is AFK, the role instead goes to the last player to select their Legend and isn't AFK, if one exists.
      • If an ally starts shooting, they have voice lines specifically for shooting at an enemy so players can immediately know combat is starting, even if said ally doesn't ping enemies. Allies also have voice lines for cracking enemy shields and knocking enemies down, informing the rest of the team as to when they have an advantage they can push.
      • Similarly, when strategic information appears for Legends as part of their abilities, they can choose to share it via button press without needing to open up text or voice chat. Wraith and Seer's passive abilities will prompt a quip button to have them state the current presence of danger, Crypto can ping Champion Banners to do likewise, Bloodhound can ping their tracker clues for their team, and Ash can ping the location of deathboxes from her map screen.
      • The trident vehicles on Olympus and Storm Point will eject anyone riding inside if one is driven off the map, preventing poor driving skills from causing a Total Party Kill.
      • The IMC Armories are mostly impenetrable from the outside once they begin hacking, with nobody being allowed inside through the front door. However, in the event that a Leeroy Jenkins leaves behind their teammates and starts the event early, allies can join in late using a teleporter beneath the Armory.
    • Something that returning Titanfall 2 players might appreciate; just like that game, recently unlocked skins will show a notification on the menu that they're available, if the player hasn't taken a look at it yet. Unlike that game, there's are buttons to set all skins as seen, if the player doesn't want to see them and doesn't want to see the notification bothering them for much longer.
    • Compatible attachments are automatically added to a weapon when picked up (favoring the one you have out), reducing the need for inventory management, and most are simply improvements on each other rather than being a wealth of sidegrades (with sights and scopes being the only exception). Furthermore, an attachment will let you know if it's compatible with either of your weapons when you hover over it, and if you change weapons, any incompatible attachments will automatically drop.
    • The Bocek's arrows can be retrieved from the ground; normally this has to be done manually by pressing the interact key, but carrying a Bocek makes retrieval automatic when your character touches an arrow.
    • Some Ultimates, such as Rampart's and Valkyrie's, refund some of their charge if they're deactivated without being used.
    • Similarly, if Pathfinder's Grapple or Zipline fail to deploy, they can be used again instantly.
    • Ultimate Accelerant is bound the same button that actually using the Ultimate does, making using it fairly easy.
    • Hovering over an item will inform you if you've already got something equal or superior to it, and the game won't let you pick up anything equal or inferior to what you already have; the exception to this rule are optics, where higher tiers correspond to higher zoom levels but lower tiers retain use for closer-range engagements. Similarly, in inventory screens, inferior and/or unusable items are marked with a "no" symbol to prevent you from grabbing them inadvertently, or to let you know to drop them if you did.
    • Players entering a zone will have the top left of their screen show the zone's name and the tier of loot to expect (low/mid/high), helping players get used to the hot spots for gear.
    • The original Treasure Pack format tied story unlocks to finding Treasure Packs. This was changed in the season after to having story unlocks release on a weekly or biweekly basis, as linking story to how well a player adhered to a Play Every Day structure ended up resulting in a lot of unwanted spoilers where some players were able to see more of the story than others.
    • Body shields and knockdown shields picked up from killed enemies will be fully charged, sparing you from having to burn shield batteries to recharge them yourself in the former case.
    • Wraith can now see enemies while she is in the void, allowing players to flank more easily and not walk blindly into a group of enemies.
    • Bundles purchased from the store receive a discount if you already own one of its items.
    • In the Arenas game mode, purchased ability and ultimate charges transfer over into the next round if they are not used up in the current one. This prevents players from having to spend precious materials on their abilities every round.
    • If players run out of one ammo type with the C.A.R. SMG, they will automatically switch to the other type if they have them in their inventory. Additionally, the game will block players from switching to an ammo type that they don't have on their person.
    • In an effort to counteract the effect that the growing gun lootpool has on finding desired weapons, a Season 12 change reintroduces the mechanic of certain guns being craft-only, to make it so that less loot weapons need to be sifted through before players find the one they want.
    • Crafting in general is this, as it provides a very reliable source of bread-and-butter supplies like shield batteries and ammo.
  • Anti-Rage Quitting: Abandoning a Ranked game while on a squad that hasn't already had someone abandon will block leavers from playing any mode for upwards of 10 minutes. A similar penalty is given to players who abandon any version of Arenas, since it creates a long-term disadvantage for the team with a lower player count.
  • Anti-Vehicle: If an Arc Star, EMP, or Wattson fence collides with a Trident, it'll be temporarily disabled.
  • April Fools:
    • 2020 saw every Mozambique on the map transformed into a Purposely Overpowered gold variant, essentially giving the usually memetically horrible gun A Day in the Limelight.
    • 2021 brought back the golden Mozambiques and added an equivalent in the P2020, in addition to dropping loot balls from the sky.
    • In 2022, Spider Eggs appeared on unusual locations; when destroyed, they dropped a different golden Mozambique named "Ol' Nessie", which had a two shot clip and launched large, team-aligned, Killer Rabbit Nessie plushes, which reused the spider AI from Storm Point. Storm Point's naturally-occurring spiders in addition to their Prowlers were also reskinned to be hostile Nessies as well.
  • Archnemesis Dad: Octane's father, Eduardo Silva, has now become the one true ruler of the Syndicate after Season 13's plot, spelling out bad news for the Outlands as a whole.
  • Arc Symbol: Each Season is represented by a different symbol that either nods to the featured Legend or the new map added in it. Season 1 had a Leviathan skull to represent King's Canyon, Season 5's sparkle-like beams and diamond evokes the thieving Loba and the new Loot Vaults, Season 7 features a floating platform with a swirling portal similar to Olympus, and so on.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack:
    • Caustic's gas traps and grenades, as well as the Ring itself bypass body shields to damage health directly, forcing players to avoid them or suffer constant damage.
    • Purposefully invoked by players using Revenant's death totem, which causes attacks to bypass their shields in exchange for respawning back at the totem when their health is depleted.
  • The Artifact: Despite in-game story releases no longer being tied to Treasure Packs (see Anti-Frustration Features above), the season's story tab is still listed on the same page as the Treasure Pack tab.
  • Artifact Name: The Flatline was named as such in Titanfall 2 for its firing pattern, being a horizontal flat line. In Apex, the gun's recoil kicks it upwards vertically in addition to its horizontal spread, making this no longer the case.
  • Artistic License – Military: Almost every time Bangalore uses military slang, she slightly misuses it. Aside from "FNG", the writers seem to have just played mad-libs with various military jargon.
  • Ascended Extra: Simulacra are this. They're not present in Titanfall 1 despite Apex lore establishing that a Simulacra conversion initiative existed before the Frontier War, and in 2 their presence is limited to the storyless Stim and Phase Shift Pilots, and Ash, whose Simulacrum aspect isn't explored outside of her rebuilding after Typhon's destruction. Apex greatly expands on their lore, from how they're created, the risks of becoming a Simulacrum, to how they function and think differently, and both the social and individual responses towards becoming one.
  • Ascended Meme: The Mozambique is recognized as a bad weapon by players and devs alike. The 1.2 patch briefly added a unique weapon swap animation where your character forcefully threw a weapon away, as if in disgust. This animation was used exclusively when swapping the Mozambique out. It was later removed in Season 2, when the Hammerpoint Rounds hop-up made the Mozambique actually useful in certain situations.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Finishers are a flashy way to guarantee a kill against a downed enemy, and sometimes the quickest way to do so if they've backed into a corner with the high hp of the purple or gold knockdown shields. However, they take several seconds to pull off, during which you're completely defenseless. Season 3 changed Finishers in that successfully pulling one off will fully recharge your shields (something that was formerly exclusive to the gold armor), giving players some added incentive to use them when the time is right, though it's still extremely risky. The safer option is using a shield battery, which takes about as long to activate but can be used without being seen by the enemy, allows the user to move slowly, and is less disorienting to cancel if attacked mid-use.
    • The gold knockdown shield allows players to self-revive. However, players get little use out of it for multiple reasons: there's nothing stopping enemies from finishing you off, using it requires finding a decent hiding space when you’re significantly slower, utterly defenseless, and enemies are likely swarming all over the place, and if you try to use it for its primary purpose, i.e. as a shield, its bright gold color will telegraph your ability to self-revive and thus instantly make you a target. Some players actually prefer the purple knockdown shield over the gold one since it doesn’t draw nearly as much attention.
    • The Tridents on Olympus. Extremely fast, but make so much noise and make it so difficult for those in the passenger seats to aim that the only practical purpose they serve is to quickly transport your squad to a distant ring.
  • Bad Luck Mitigation Mechanic: The incredibly rare Mythic Shards, used to buy Heirloom weapons and evolving skins, are guarenteed to drop within the player opening 500 Apex Packs.
  • Balance Buff:
    • The EVA-8 Shotgun returns with a fairly tight, non-randomized spread and bullets that can travel beyond close-range (as opposed to vanishing outside a certain range) to help give it more usability in the game's many wide-open areas.
    • As it's now a long-range sniping weapon meant to be used on small humans rather than an Anti-Vehicle gun used against hulking Titans, the Charge Rifle has a significantly faster pre-fire charge.
  • Barrier-Busting Blow: Doors that are blocked from opening, whether it's by an object or another player, can be broken using the melee button.
  • Battle Royale Game: This game stands out from other BR games by having a squad of 3 teammates, and unique characters who each have their own unique special abilities.
  • BFG:
    • Several examples in the game with two of the most notable being the Kraber and the Devotion.
    • Come Season 6, Rampart's ultimate, "Sheila". It's about as long as she is tall, slows the user to a crawl when they're wielding it if it's not placed on a stationary tripod, and does an absolute number on her spine if one of her ground emotes is to be trusted.
  • Body Armor as Hit Points: Body armor (or "body shields") gives you extra hit points that are spent before health and recovered with a different resource (batteries instead of medkits, the former working slightly faster). Armor has a capacity of 50, 75, or 100 health depending on tier. Helmets, on the other hand, reduce the extra damage done by headshots.
  • Boom, Headshot!: Kraber headshots hold the title of having the highest single-hit damage of any gun or ability in the game. Even after Season 13 reduced the headshot multiplier it has, they'll still instantly down anyone who doesn't have at least purple shields and a good enough helmet or another form of damage reduction.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Crafting takes players out of the fight and makes them wait around for their items to finish being replicated. It's also a source of must-have items such as recovery items, ammo, certain guns, and is a risk-free way to upgrade players' shields.
    • The R-301 Carbine in a nutshell. A very basic light assault rifle that happens to have little recoil even without a barrel stabilizer and great damage at all ranges, making it the perfect generalist weapon.
  • Bread and Circuses: Seems to be the Syndicate's plan from keeping the Outlands from disintegrating. They keep the peace, a mediocre-at-worst life status for most Outlands residents, and entertain them with the Apex Games, and for that most Outlands civilians are content with their rise to power despite the shady dealings they have behind the scenes.
  • Breather Episode:
    • After Revenant's foreboding introduction in Season 4 and Season 5's story of betrayal and mistrust, Season 6 cools things down with the fun-loving Rampart and its story being a domestic issue about learning who Pathfinder's girlfriend is.
    • After Season 9's very expansive Legacy Antigen story, which touched almost every Legend's personal arc through the in-game comic and the official Twitter comics, Season 10 dialed it back by having no accompanying story whatsoever.
  • Call-Back:
    • A repulsor tower is one of the points of interest on King's Canyon. And just like the repulsor tower of Titanfall 1, its destruction as of Season 2 allows Leviathans to start invading the area.
    • A major part of Bangalore's backstory is that she was on an IMC warship when the crew mutinied, crashing the ship into an unexplored planet to start a small settlement. These are the exact events that play a part of Titanfall 1's backstory.
    • Valkyrie's backstory involves trying to resolve her father's death. Said father is Viper, the second-last boss of Titanfall 2 who was killed by Jack Cooper, the protagonist of that game.
  • Changing Clothes Is a Free Action: Helmets, armor, and backpacks instantly swap the moment a character pick them up. This is most relevant during heated early-game fights right after dropping, where armor swapping is a lot faster than recharging via cells/batteries and less likely to downgrade the player's armor.
  • Charged Attack:
    • Aiming down sights with a Peacekeeper or Triple Take (as both come with the Precision Choke hop-up pre-installed) will cause your next shot's aim to progressively tighten until all rounds hit basically all the same spot, though doing so causes a bright glow and audible noise. You can also turn off the sights once charged for mobility but it only lasts a brief moment before you'd have to charge it up again.
    • A similar example is used with the 30-30 Repeater; when aiming down sights, the bars that appear on either side of the reticle indicate how charged the next bullet will be, dealing more damage with higher charge.
    • The Havoc rifle requires a brief charge-up before it starts firing at all (unlike the Devotion which ramps up its fire rate). The turbocharger hop up removes this limitation, while the select fire adds a second fire mode that is even more of a charge attack, requiring holding down the trigger to prepare a single powerful blast.
    • The Charge Rifle, as one might expect; it fires a laser that deals a small amount of damage as the weapon charges, eventually releasing a powerful blast that deals significantly more damage.
    • A variant with the Sentinel and Rampage, where their attacks can be greatly enhanced by charging them with items (shield cells/batteries and thermite grenades, respectively).
  • Cherry Tapping:
    • The Frag Grenade deals a max 100 damage to enemies caught in its explosion... and 10 damage on a direct hit. Bonking someone with the grenade to down them is an achievement in of itself, with how weak it is.
    • Invoked and Inverted with Hammerpoint Rounds on the P2020 and Mozambique. Normally, these guns are incredibly weak and not worth using, but Hammerpoints vastly increase their damage output against unshielded targets: over 2 times as much, until Season 12. Thus, players will want to use these "weak" guns to deal the finishing blow on a standing target.
  • Chuck Cunningham Syndrome: Despite being the heroic faction in Titanfall 1 and the protagonists in 2, none of the Militia's major characters from either installment have made an appearance, as of Season 12. The Militia is this in general as well: almost all of the major IMC-aligned forces have some form of major character representation,note  yet the same cannot be said for the Militia.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience:
    • Wattson's fences, Gibraltar and Newcastle's deployable shields, and Crypto's drone are blue/green if they belong to your teammates and orange/red if they don't.
    • Each ammo type corresponds to a different color. Red for shotgun shells, orange for light rounds, yellow for arrows, lime green for energy ammo, teal for heavy rounds, blue for sniper ammo, and a reddish-magenta for care package ammo.
  • Color-Coded Item Tiers: Both gear and cosmetics follow the same pattern for menus: gray for Common, blue for Rare, purple for Epic, and yellow for Legendary. An orangey-red is used for maxed-out evo shields, care package exclusive weapons, Heirloom shards in Apex Packs, and the items that Heirloom shards buy.
  • Combat Pragmatist: As a Battle Royale game, this is only natural. Using sniper weapons to pick enemies off at a distance they can't effectively fight back at, fighting enemies in a disadvantageous position like those outside the ring, and third partying two enemy squads who have already weakened each other are all valid strategies. Some characters are even built to employ these; most of the Defense category excels when they force enemies to fight in an area they set up a Home Field Advantage in.
  • Combat Resuscitation: You will be knocked down, only able to crawl and use a Knockdown Shield, if your health goes down to zero and your teammates are still alive. A second health bar appears that acts as a window of opportunity. If your teammates can reach you before the second bar goes down to zero you can be revived to minimal health. If they fail to revive you in that time they have a limited window to grab your banner. If they do so they can take it to a respawn point to respawn your character.
  • Competitive Balance: While the health, guns, and movement capabilities are generally the same baseline across all Legends, each one is still specialized for their own niche. Even ones that seemingly overlap still diverge, such as Seer, Crypto, and Bloodhound all having Tactical abilities that reveal enemy locations: Seer's health/armor readout and enemy interruption makes him better suited to using it to start third-partying an existing fight, the massive range of Crypto's drone gears him more towards long-term strategy, and Bloodhound's wide-ranged sonar and fast animation make them a generalist in information collection, whether it's determining enemy positions during combat or out of it.
  • Concealment Equals Cover: Bullets do not pierce through most objects. Avoiding damage from an explosion is as simple as having the majority of your body not visible to it. Even if what you're hiding behind shouldn't realistically offer shelter, such as Caustic's gas-inflated traps, it generally works. Even destructible cover like doors and Rampart's walls will completely negate damage from hiders for the attack that destroys them, though followup attacks are fair game.
  • Connected All Along: At launch, the cast all seemed largely unrelated to one another. However, lore and background details added over time gradually begin to reveal a surprising number of connections between them.
    • Mystik, the woman who adopted Crypto, is Caustic's mother.
    • Bangalore obtained information on the whereabouts of her missing brother from a young Crypto, which was later taken by the alternate Wraith seen in the Voidwalker short''.
    • Amélie Paquette (Wattson's grandmother), Aleki Gibraltar (Gibraltar's Grandfather) and Newton Somers (Horizon's son) were members of the team who created Pathfinder.
    • Ashleigh Reid, the scientist who worked under Horizon before betraying her, proceeded to also join the team that built Pathfinder. She is also the woman who became the simulacrum Ash.
    • Lifeline and Octane's fathers were childhood friends, and liked to play together in the same lab where Pathfinder was created.
    • Pathfinder's longevity and Walking the Earth backstory gives him a number of connections, in addition to all of the above: he was working in the restaurant where Revenant killed Loba's parents and witnessed Caustic's escape from Humbert Labs.
  • Continuing is Painful: Respawning a teammate means needing to locate a Respawn Beacon somewhere in the map, which can be pretty difficult at the later stages of the game when most of the map is outside the ring, and especially so if uncommon Mobile Respawn Beacons aren't accessible in the weekly crafting rotation. Once players respawn, they do so with minimal gear, so loot becomes a big issue if their Deathbox with all their stuff isn't easily accessible — doubly so if an enemy squad is close enough to capitalize on an underequipped teammate when the dropship telegraphs that someone is respawning there.
  • Continuity Nod: Multiple to Titanfall and Titanfall 2:
    • Apex Legends and the Apex Games are named after the "Apex Predators", the ruthless mercenary unit from Titanfall 2. In the "Deep Dive" trailer, the Apex Predator's logo can be seen, and "Apex Predator" is the tier name of the highest level of ranked players.
    • The game's Tag Line of "They kill you, they're better. You kill them, you're better" is adapted from Kuben Blisk's personal Might Makes Right mantra heard at the climax of the Titanfall campaign. Blisk even appears in the intro cinematic, much older than in the previous games, to recite it.
    • Some of the Legends hail from planets seen in the Titanfall duology: Bangalore was born on Gridiron, Valkyrie on Angelia, and Wraith on Typhon.
    • The Leviathan skeletons seen in the environment are the same ones from the Boneyard map in Titanfall; in fact, actual Leviathans can be seen walking on a lake outside of the arena.
    • The dropship from the start of each game resembles the IMS Draconis, the massive transport ship used to move The Ark at the second last level of Titanfall 2. Also, Wattson's heirloom weapon has an animation involving a minigame called "Draconis Run", featuring a boss that resembles the IMS Draconis.
    • Some logos of corporations from the previous games show up here, such as Lastimosa Armory's coat of arms being on Ash's sword or Lifeline wearing a headband with Kodai Industry's brand.
    • Wraith was a part of and was experimented on by the IMC's ARES Division, the main antagonists of Titanfall 2.
    • ARES Division scientists as seen in the Voidwalker short wear uniforms in seafoam green and white with red highlights, which ARES Division scientists are dressed in during the past segments of Titanfall 2's level Effect and Cause.
    • Speaking of which: Effect and Cause's events are directly referenced in the Voidwalker event's unique loading screen.
    • Flyers carry deathboxes in King's Canyon and Storm Point; these dinosaur-like avians were first seen in Titanfall. Similarly, on the maps World's Edge and Storm Point, Legends can fight waves of Prowlers, dinosaur-like predators that debuted in the same game.
    • Plasma Drones from Titanfall 2 appear in the Stories from the Outlands video "Forever Family", pursuing Crypto on the streets of Suotamo.
    • The planetary harvester drill on Season 4's map is built by none other than Hammond Robotics, the same MegaCorp from the previous Titanfall games. Hammond Robotics also responsible for manufacturing MRVNs like Pathfinder and is the corporate sponsor of Forge.
    • Revenant is a simulacrum (cyborgs consisting of a human mind uploaded into an android body) and Caustic mentions having worked for Vinson Dynamics. In Titanfall 2, Vinson Dynamics is a manufacturer specializing in creating simulacrums, and one of its members, the simulacrum Ash, was part of the Apex Predators alongside Blisk. Season 5's Broken Ghost quest took it a step further by having you put Ash's head back together piece by piece before reuniting it with her broken-down body stowed away deep underneath King's Canyon, effectively bringing her back to life.
    • Ash cameos briefly in the Season 4 launch trailer on Revenant's monitor, depicting Titanfall 2 multiplayer banner art of her.
    • Season 5's trailer has Stalkers, the robotic infantry units from Titanfall 2, attack Loba when her infiltration attempt goes sour, even demonstrating their previously-known tenacity in the face of limb loss when the last one drags Loba with her as it falls. A Stalker also appears in "The Endorsement", wielding twin Spitfires.
    • When Blisk appears in "The Endorsement", he hands Rampart a card with the Apex logo on it after seeing her fight off her attackers, extending an invitation to the Apex Games to her. This mirrors a scene near the end of Titanfall 2 when he hands a similar card to Jack Cooper after he wipes out the Apex Predators - even some of the dialogue is the same. One particular shot of Blisk crouching in front of the camera is almost identical in both games.
      Blisk: It's your lucky day, eh? Here - you earned this.
    • Robotic combat units known as Spectres appear in Fight Night and in-game on Storm Point, using their Titanfall 1 Militia-side design with the wedge-shaped head.
    • Also in Fight Night, one of Pathfinder's memories is watching a live weather report from himself during the destruction of Typhon, which happened in the final mission of Titanfall 2's singleplayer campaign.
    • In Stories from the Outlands: Northstar, rings form around Valkyrie's arms whenever she pilots it. Rarely does the audience get to see a Pilot of a Titan inside it; the last time these ring controls appeared was in the Gamescom 2014 CGI trailer for Titanfall 1.
    • Also in Northstar, the tablet that Valkyrie holds shows that she's being paid in Credits, the in-game currency used to buy cosmetic items in Titanfall 2.
    • Some of Valkyrie's banners use the image of Viper's helmet, and one portrays his Northstar flying around a city.
    • Ash is an arena overseer in the side gamemode Arenas, in which she watches the Legends fight in smaller arenas — reprising her role in Titanfall 2, where she does just that to the player.
    • The Medusa vines featured in the comic "The Legacy Antigen" are said to have originated from Typhon, the main planet featured in Titanfall 2.
    • The loading screen "The Ghost of Viper" features a cameo of BT-7274, his original chassis overgrown with plantlife on Typhon. Viper's Northstar is also present in the loading screen, discernable by the missing hatch that BT ripped off of it during their fight.
    • During the Genesis event, Bangalore, Gibraltar, Loba, and Crypto all recieved skins based on outfits they wore earlier in the canon. Naturally, Bangalore's skin "Decorated Line" is an IMC footsoldier's uniform.
    • The Stories from the Outlands "Ashes to Ash" shows a flashback of BT ripping Ash from her Titan and crushing her in his fist, a first-person recreation of her Termination animation that the player can do to her in her Titanfall 2 boss fight, even including some visible elements from the arena she's fought in. The sequence is modified slightly; in the original game, BT breaks her into utter nothingness, but in the animation only her torso is crushed.
    • Ash's default banner frame is a rendition of her Ronin Titan's chassis from Titanfall 2. An unlockable banner shows it in her aforementioned boss arena.
    • Multiple from Stories from the Outlands: "Gridiron":
      • Bangalore is hiding from an enemy Ion Titan, visible when an explosion lights up the dust.
      • A villager can be seen chopping a fruit using a hexagon-patterned machete. This design originates in the "Art of Titanfall" books.
      • The IMC Pilot Commander Scryer wields a Smart Pistol, a staple of the franchise that only properly disappeared starting in Apex Legends. He also wallruns to engage in their fight.
      • Scryer's helmet is pretty transparently inspired by Titanfall 1's male IMC Assault Pilot, most evident in its "pointed star" visor. Similarly, the Militia Pilot from Bangalore's flashback has a helmet that strongly resembles Droz's of Titanfall 2, just without the 6-4 branding.
    • The unique select animation for Bangalore's "Mil-Spec" skin features the male Holo Pilot model from Titanfall 2. He also attempts to use the "Now You See Me" execution on her, which is the Reverse Grip knife stab to the face while cloaked.
  • Convection Shmonvection: As of season 3, the arena has shifted to World's End, a map with large patches of exposed molten rock. As long as players don't touch the flow directly, they suffer no ill effects. Heck, you can even walk on the ground, with lava showing through the cracks! Slightly averted as of Season 4, however; there are now large rivers of lava flowing through parts of the map, and while you can't fall into them (you instead hover above them), you'll slowly take damage from the lava's heat.
  • Coup de Grâce: When an opponent is knocked down, you can do a melee-range interact that plays a special animation where you finished them off, regardless of their health or shields. This isn't generally advisable, as them being down means at least one of their squadmates is up (or can revive themselves via a gold knockdown shield), and likely nearby. As of Season 3, there might be some incentive to use it if your own shields are low since Finishers fully recharge them, but it's still highly dangerous and likely to get you killed if you're not careful. The ability to cancel out of the animation was later patched in.
  • Crapsack World: The Outlands don't seem like an especially pleasant place to live. Psmanthe has ridiculously bad wealth disparity, with the richest residence enjoying lives of decadence on its moon and Olympus while the surface city Malta is a Vice City. Gaea's city Suotamo is much the same, and the wildlife populating the rest of the planet are viciously savage. Salvo is a planet wracked with constant war. Boreas' moon has been destroyed, with the side effects of it poised to render the planet unlivable in a few decades. Harris Valley is one of the few places in the Outlands that regularly sees gentle peace, but it's owned by ex-IMC gangsters ready to torch it at a moment's notice. The Outlands might be better off as a whole for the removal of the IMC as its leadership, but their remnant companies such as Hammond Robotics are still present and active in the Outlands, not to mention their connections to the closest thing the Outlands has to an overarching government; the Mercenary Syndicate, who seems eerily close to the old IMC, down to having their enforcers dress in a similar white armor to IMC footsoldiers. The crappy state of the world is rarely the focus of the story though, which tends to use it as a backdrop to focus on characters instead.
  • Critical Existence Failure: Zigzagged. Legends who have their health depleted drop into a weakened "downed" state where they can't do anything but limply crawl around and hold up an energy shield to protect themselves, making it a partial aversion; however, if an entire team gets downed and nobody is being auto-revived nor has a gold knockdown shield, this gets played straight and they die on the spot regardless of how wounded they are in said downed state.
  • Cybernetics Eat Your Soul: In the video "Ashes to Ash", a doctor operating on Ash describes the Simulacrum creation process as causing intense trauma. Between her and Revenant being the only characterized Simulacrums in the entire canon thus far, there's little evidence to suggest that becoming a Simulacrum doesn't cause this trope.
  • Damn You, Muscle Memory!:
    • For Titanfall fans, the Halloween gamemodes where players turn to shadows on death and gain Le Parkour abilities will seem very familiar... with exception to jumping and double-jumping, which use the much shorter Apex jump height rather than Titanfall's floatier gravity. Maneuvers that would seem possible using Titanfall's physics are not possible at worst and just feel awkward at best due to this difference.
    • Gibraltar players who migrated from games like Overwatch will likely put down their shield bubble upon taking enemy fire out of sheer reflex, forgetting (or perhaps not even realizing) that, unlike in the games they migrated from, it blocks your bullets as well.
  • Dare to Be Badass:
    • At the start of each match, one player is declared the Champion, for having the highest placement in their previous game of the whole lobby; other players are challenged to kill their squad by being granted an EXP bonus if they do.
    • During the match, any player may become the Kill Leader, for having at least three kills and the highest kill count of the current match's players, once they secure a kill. Becoming the Kill Leader grants an EXP bonus, though not one as high as being the Champion or playing on their team.
  • Deflector Shields:
    • Though the in-game icon looks like a vest, dialogue refers to armor pickups as "body shield", hence why they consume batteries, cover your whole body, and produce a flash of light when they've been damaged.
    • Knockdown Shields let you deploy a directional energy shield when you've been incapacitated but not killed, protecting you or allies behind you (though it can also block their shots). They're decently durable: the weakest shield has twice the HP of an unshielded player, while the strongest can take dozens of heavy machine gun rounds. That said, they don't cover your full body even in a single direction, so careful aim can bypass them entirely, nor do they protect against executions.
  • Difficult, but Awesome:
    • The Wingman revolver starts with a paltry 5 round magazine and has terrible visual recoil. However, it also has great damage per shot, negligible movement penalty when aiming, and a fantastic headshot multiplier that only gets better with the Skullpiercer Rifling hop-up. With good aim, a player with a Wingman can be easily down any foes at any range without getting shot.
    • The R-99 submachine gun has very high damage per second; one of the highest ones in the game, and without having an attached gimmick like the charge on the Havok and Devotion. It also has a lot of recoil and eats light ammo like candy. Someone who can't aim it will just waste supreme amounts of bullets, but someone who can will basically melt enemies if given the opportunity. The C.A.R. is in the same boat, boasting slightly better damage per second, bullet efficiency, and being compatible with two ammo types and two magazine upgrade types, but it has a harder and not-as-predictable kickback.
    • The Bocek has a weird charging mechanic for each of its shots, requires precise aim for its precise shots, and players will want to make the most out of every shot due to arrows being sparse in how no other weapon uses them. But players who master it have a weapon with great range, high damage, and perhaps the weapon's biggest upside, no reload or overheat mechanics that limit its use.
    • Red Evo Shields provide more raw protection than anything else in the game; the gold Body Shield has protection on the same tier as purple Evo Shields. On the other hand, they won't spawn naturally and the only way to obtain them is to level up a purple shield by dealing damage or spending materials to level it, or looting a red shield off of someone else.
    • The tridents on Olympus can be the difference between a team making it to safety or dying in the ring. However, while they are fast, they can be unwieldy to drive, are very loud, and any damage dealt to the vehicle is distributed across anyone riding in it. Also, they don't come equipped with any weapons and can't be used to run over enemy legends. They are fantastic for mobility, but don't do well in combat.
  • Disc-One Nuke:
    • At Hot Zones, weapons have a chance to spawn as "fully kitted" variants. Fully kitted weapons have the highest tier attachments possible on all its slots except for optics; for comparison, finding one level 4 magazine is uncommon even across the scope of a full game, let alone finding that in addition to a barrel stabilizer, optics, stock, and/or hop-up.
    • Big Maude has a vending machine area, which will have various "Rampart Special" guns; these are fully kitted weapons, but spanning the gamut of attachment quality from rare to legendary. All of them also come with a unique hop-up, Splatter Rounds, which replaces the gun's normal hop-up if applicable and gives them faster reloads. A legendary Rampart Special is a strict upgrade to most fully kitted weapons, and Big Maude contains enough material canisters and supply bins to purchase a legendary Rampart Special shortly after dropping there at the start of the game.
  • Do Not Run with a Gun:
    • You run slightly faster when you holster your weapon.
    • You can't shoot while sprinting, though you can still reload. You can, however aim and shoot while sliding, which keeps you moving fast during the delay it takes between ending a sprint and being able to attack.
    • Raising ironsights has different penalties to movement speed by weapon type. Rifles cut it by more than half, SMGs and shotguns by about a fifth, and pistols not at all.
  • Door Dumb: Doors can swing both ways, but players cannot pull doors open, only push. If something blocks a door from being pushed open, players must destroy it to bypass it.
  • Drone Deployer: Crypto's abilities are related to his drone which can retrieve the banners of fallen allies, detect enemies, and send out an EMP which both slows and damages enemies.
  • Double-Meaning Title:
    • The "Broken Ghost" quest can refer to either Revenant, whose undeath has made him mentally broken, or it could refer to Ash, who is being Brought Back From The Dead by taking her literally broken pieces and bringing them back together at the climax of the story.
    • "The First Ship" is a triple-meaning title: it can refer to the mystery of who Pathfinder's girlfriend is, the developing relationship between Mirage, Wraith, and Rampart, or in the final page, the literal first ship carrying Rampart's stuff that phases to Olympus.
    • The "Legacy" update's title can refer to either Ash, a major character of the previous game Titanfall 2, or Valkyrie, the daughter of another major character from there.
  • Downer Ending: Season 12 ends on one of the lowest notes of them all. On Octane's end, he ruins his friendship with Lifeline, discovers that his father is actually dead and that his grandfather has been posing as him, and ends up throwing his lot in with him to salvage the one relationship he has left as Torres succeeds in taking over the Syndicate. For Lifeline, her arms-dealing mother has become president of the Frontier Corps and she ends up allying with Mad Maggie to overthrow the Syndicate by force. As for Bangalore, she learns from Wraith that Jackson is dead, fractures her friendship with Loba, and ends up resigning from the games so Revenant can take her back home to Gridiron. Things only get better for the latter, if the "Saviors" launch trailer is any indication.
  • Early Installment Weirdness:
    • As a natural consequence of the maps being updated regularly roughly every season, early iterations of most maps don't have as many unique locations as later versions. With the Season 8 version of King's Canyon for instance, Octane's Trials, Caustic Treatment, ARES Capacitor, and Crypto's Map Room all stand where generic or nameless buildings used to be.
    • The earliest version of King's Canyon also has fewer "gimmicks" in lower quantities that help later maps stand out and feel unique. At launch, the only gimmicks it had that wouldn't be reused as a standard by later maps were Loot Ticks and the Supply Ship; the former were rare and difficult to find, and only one of the latter existed for the whole map. In the Season 8 iteration of the map, on the other hand, it's hard to go from one POI to another without seeing the King's Canyon-unique Charge Towers or Explosive Holds.
    • There weren't any in-game stories for players to read; it was primarily portrayed through outside sources. When Season 5 added them in, they had to be unlocked through gameplay instead of being released on a schedule.
    • Skydive Emotes and Holosprays weren't in the original release. The former weren't added until Season 2, and the latter weren't until Season 6.
    • The first Skydive Emotes were a lot less expressive. Compare Pathfinder's Season 2 skydive emote (slowly tumbling backwards and doing a handwave to either side) to the one from the season immediately after (briefly flapping his wings in the imitation of a bird, then getting attacked by Artur and scrambling around in the air in an attempt to swat it away).
    • The first transition screen unlocks from Season 2 are stylistically closer to the gritty, high-detail realism seen in the Titanfall games' art than the more painterly style of later screens. Also, some of them depict alternate skin versions of the Legends, which later seasons' battle pass transitions would avoid doing.
    • Evo Shields, the current default way to obtain shields, weren't actually added to the game until a Season 4 event. Until then, the only way to have armor was by wearing Body Shields, which spawned alongside Evo Shields on the ground and didn't level up.
    • Crafting wasn't added until Season 6. Before then, the only way to reliably find medkits and batteries was looting them.
    • When Arenas was first added to the game, the mode's map rotation went between bespoke maps specifically for Arenas and POIs from Battle Royale maps. Season 11 removed the Battle Royale maps from the rotation in favor of exclusively using Arenas maps.
  • Easter Egg: Nessie plushes can be found in very hidden locations. Uniquely, players can also place their own easter eggs via one of Wattson's ground emotes, which puts down a plush Nessie at the spot she's standing.
  • Enemy Mine: The last ten Legends in Fight or Fright, even if they happen to be in mid-fight, are automatically grouped together.
  • Enhanced Archaic Weapon:
    • Many of the legend's heirlooms appear to be enhanced somehow, such as the portal-like warping around Wraith's kunai or the lava that seems to erupt from Gibraltar's war club.
    • The 30-30 Repeater is a lever-action rifle, one of the earliest archetypical repeating firearms to be created. It also has what appears to be a battery attached to its underside, which charges up the bullets for higher damage when aiming down sights.
    • The Bocek is a compound bow with a mechanism that automatically loads arrows into it; said arrows are able to telescope to take up less space and have an alternate mode where they split upon being fired into a shotgun-blast spray.
    • The Bocek is described as a gift from Ash in the Season 9 gameplay trailer, whose sword also qualifies: it can open up along its blade to reveal an electrical current, slice open portals to reach far away places, and one finisher shows that she can phase out people that she stabs with it.
  • Epic Tracking Shot: Season 6's launch trailer is almost entirely a long reversed tracking shot, starting with ice falling off of a rocket at World's Edge, before quickly moving to the Dome where an extended teamfight is happening, panning across the chaos going on and eventually following a bullet fired by Rampart's minigun.
  • Every Bullet Is a Tracer: All projectiles have a visible trail in the air, though only the ones from energy weapons and certain sniper rifles are long enough to see from most angles.
  • Everything's Better with Plushies: Nessie plushes reprise their Titanfall 2 role as an Easter Egg, appearing in certain out-of-the-way spots for players who know where to look for them. Here, they have a Justified reason for their placement too: Wattson left them lying around King's Canyon as a child, and carries at least one around with her most of the time.
  • Evolving Title Screen: The intro sequence featuring Respawn Entertainment and EA's logos changes depending on the season. For instance, Season 8's intro had an explosion revealing the logos, fitting for the explosives expert Fuse introduced in that season.
  • Explosion Propulsion: If a Frag Grenade manages to deal damage to a victim's health, they get violently flung away from the explosion. What usually ends up happening is that the thrown grenade launches them out of cover, opening them up to be finished off if they're still standing. It's possible to exploit this force to launch oneself around, but attempting to do so will likely leave the user on their last legs if not knock them down outright, not to mention it being possibly slower than running due to the need to heal between launches.
  • Fantastic Fauna Counterpart: Prowlers, which are treated like the universe's version of canines — primarily wolves. Visually, their leathery hides make them look more akin to some sort of dinosaur.
  • Finishing Move: After knocking down an enemy, you can either kill them with a few more shots or perform a Finisher to execute them in style and, as of Season 3, fully recover your shields. However, you are completely open to attack while doing this, so it's not recommended unless you're sure the coast is clear or you have allies watching your back.
  • Firing One-Handed:
    • Hanging from a zipline and shooting results in this, as characters use their left hand to hang and their right to shoot. Some notable results include flipping the Peacekeeper by the lever to rechamber between shots and the Bocek somehow pulling its bowstrings back by an unknown force.
    • Characters who can use abilities while also shooting their guns such as Bangalore and Revenant do this if they do both at once, shooting their ability with their left hand and firing a gun with their right.
    • In most of his third-person animations, Fuse uses his right-sided mechanical arm to fire one-handed.
  • Floating Continent: Season 7 introduced a new map Olympus, which is a floating city that was once a research station, and then a luxury resort of the elite.
  • Forgotten Fallen Friend: "Friend" is a bit of a stretch, but despite being hyped up as a potentially big competitor within the Apex Games only to be murdered live on broadcast to the entire Outlands, interest in Forge gradually waned until — according to a Season 7 loading screen — a museum based on him was forced to file bankruptcy.
  • Friendly Fireproof: Several Legends' tactical abilities can affect teammates and enemies alike. Offensive abilities can slow down allies but with no damage and supporting/defensive abilities can be used by enemy players. In a more general sense, friendly gunfire will hit allies without damaging them, making the act of trying to use your teammates as meatshields while you attack a moot point.
  • Full-Conversion Cyborg: Simulacra return from Titanfall 2, and they're described in more detail here: according to Caustic during the Season 5 quest, most Simulacra contain their original body's brain tissue in their head, making them this trope. If the unbuilt Simulacrum parts indicate anything, said tissue isn't even the complete brain in one piece; the only part that appears big enough for that is the Occipital Hub, which only provides power to and communication between all the other parts.
  • Funetik Aksent: Subtitles will incorporate accents of characters phonetically, most noticeable with Lifeline. Some of her in-universe text messages appear to use her accent too.
  • Futureshadowing: One of the biggest takes to the lore in Apex Legends is its events occur post-Titanfall 2, three decades later. In fact, the official site explicitly states the Frontier War between the Interstellar Manufacturing Corporation (IMC) and the Militia is over, with an implied victory for the latter against the IMC. This means any chronological installment set between Titanfall 2 and Apex Legends will inevitably lead to the IMC's defeat. Furthermore, since Blisk explicitly appears in the CG introduction, he is guaranteed to survive all events pre-Apex Legends as he is the one who creates the Apex Games.
  • Fun with Acronyms: The Ecological Cleanup and Hazard Outreach organization, or ECHO, who have set up camps on King's Canyon and Storm Point, working in response to a spaceship crash's leaking fuel and a massive animal's bloodied carcass, respectively.
  • Game-Breaking Bug: There's a rare glitch in the out-of-bounds detection where, if you jump off of an airborne Supply Ship at the wrong place, the "Return to Battle" countdown, which normally kills you if you stay in an area deemed out-of-bounds for too long, activates almost everywhere as long as you're touching the ground, meaning that after a cumulative thirty seconds of not being airborne by some means, you're dead, no questions asked. Even worse, the glitch doesn't go away if you get respawned, meaning that you're essentially stuck in "The Floor is Lava" hell for the rest of the match. See it in action.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: Legend abilities suggest things about their actual personalities. Some examples:
    • Crypto's Puppet Fighter style focused around sending in his drone and planning around it encourages long-term strategy and advanced thinking, fitting his The Smart Guy role.
    • Octane's abilities involve rapid cooldowns and fast movement, contrasting Lifeline's slow cooldowns and forcing players to stay and wait, symbolizing their relationship.
    • Wattson's fences play very "close to the rules", clearly separating dangerous spaces from safe ones, showing her honesty and niceness. Caustic's gas traps, by contrast, encourage underhanded tactics like hiding them in blind spots to surprise unaware victims or using gas to obscure vision, suiting his more amoral viewpoint.
  • Gameplay and Story Segregation:
    • Wraith demonstrates far more control over her void abilities in lore materials than in the actual game, such as opening a portal without manually placing both ends and teleporting faster and more frequently than the game lets her.
    • The charge rifle seems to function differently in the cinematics than it does in actual gameplay. In the Season 3 launch trailer, the rifle fires a bolt after winding up rather than a beam that grows stronger over a few seconds.
    • Revenant does not appear to need his death totem in order to respawn or enter his shadow state in his debut trailer.
    • Despite what's been shown in the cinematics, Valkyrie cannot use guns while also using her jets.
  • Gentle Giant: The Leviathans that appear in the distant seas around King's Canyon and Storm Point. They are generally ambivalent towards the Legends, though they do prove to be quite harmful if their idle stomping happens to trample someone.
  • Ghost Town:
    • All of the Battle Royale levels take place in abandoned landscapes that humans once resided in, to varying extents. King's Canyon and Storm Point were IMC military bases, World's Edge was a mining outpost, and Olympus was a scientific research facility turned-lavish vacation spot.
    • Kómma, a former IMC Neon City in Solace, some ways away from King's Canyon. Its lack of population and formal management is what allows Ash to host her Arenas games in it, as the map Party Crasher.
    • Angel City eventually became this, as the Angelia-born Valkyrie describes in one Season 9 loading screen.
  • Giant Corpse World: The Downed Beast POI on Storm Point, added as of Season 13, lets players explore the carcass of the titular beast.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: Featured in the trailer to Season 13 is a massive lobster-like creature. It has some sort of Breath Weapon in the trailer, and preys on the Leviathans several times larger than it, if the Leviathan skeletons left behind in Storm Point's sea are any indication.
  • Glass Cannon: The Shadows in the Fight or Fright event are ludicrously strong, but they always spawn with low health and are unable to gain more.
  • Guide Dang It!: While the tutorial does a good job of showing you the bare basics of the game, it's far from exhaustive. Much of the learning that players will do isn't taught by the tutorial and will likely come from watching other players, or a guide.
    • Doors are invulnerable to bullets, with exception to the Rampage's revved up mode and Rampart's ultimate. If the player doesn't have either, they can be meleed once to force them open, twice to break them, and any form of explosive will instantly break them. Useful if anything is blocking the other side.
    • The little loot drones that occasionally show up on World's Edge and the Loot Ticks in King's Canyon might look like part of the scenery at first because you cannot interact with them like you would with many other containers. You have to either punch or shoot them to break them open for their loot. No other containers function like that.
    • Diving during the landing phase is a lot less straightforward than in other Battle Royale Games. Directly diving in the direction of your landing spot isn't nearly as fast as making a sort of staircase motion as illustrated here. This is mostly in part due to how the air drag works, allowing you to go to spots faster and also covering much more area than normally.
    • Stock attachments have the rather vague description of improving a gun's "handling". Higher handling means faster switch speed, reload speed, and reduced ADS time, aim drift, and raise or lower speed when sprinting. Bangalore's ping for them only vaguely alludes to these features.
    • Most movement tech, such as punchboostingnote  and airstrafingnote , are very unintuitive to learn and will almost definitely require an outside source to learn they even exist.
    • Finishers can be exclusively done on enemies that have been knocked down. Except Spectres, which can also be Finisher-ed if they're on low enough health. Useful for an After-Combat Recovery, but it's not obvious that this can be done to start with.
    • Aside from that, there are plenty of other unexplained mechanics for some legends:
      • Much like in previous Titanfall titles, Pathfinder's grappling can be influenced by where you aim and not where you hook, which can give you tons of forward momentum or allow for some interesting flanking opportunities.
      • On the subject of Pathfinder's grapple, you can also hook onto an enemy and pull them towards you both ala previous Titanfall games to either kick them for 50 damage or blast them with your weapon of choice.
      • Bangalore's smoke grenades can be used without interrupting any of your animations such as healing or reloading. As well, you can hold to prep it like with normal grenades to see their trajectory.
      • Caustic's gas traps can be triggered by shooting most of them or deactivated by hitting the yellow part at the bottom. Useful if you don't want to get up close to it.
      • Octane's launch pad can launch in multiple trajectories, chosen depending on whether the user is standing or crouching/sliding when touching it.
      • When placing a fence node linked to an existing one, Wattson can right click to destroy said existing node and, if it exists, place from the node that fence was linked to. Unlike the on-screen prompts to place or put away a node, this isn't told to the player.
      • You can't double amp shots with Rampart's amped cover. If you try, one of the amplifiers will be disabled.
      • The platform on the back of a Trident can be mounted with certain Legend abilities: specifically, Caustic's gas traps, Gibraltar's dome shield, Lifeline's heal drone, and Rampart's minigun.
  • Gun Porn:
    • With a giant roster of more than 25 weapons, this is to be expected. Players can even press the dedicated weapon inspect button to see their held weapon up close from multiple angles; notable animations include examining the Bocek's arrow loader and popping open the Rampage's thermite loader to see its internals (which even shows if a thermite grenade has been loaded into it previously).
    • They're primarily melee weapons, but many of the Heirloom items have special and incredibly elaborate inspect animations, such as Bangalore sharpening her knife with its attached whetstone or Crypto watching his sword unfold.
  • Guns Do Not Work That Way: Some of Titanfall 2's fairly outlandish guns such as the multi-barrelled Alternator and Double Take (which received a third barrel to make it the Triple Take) return in this game, alongside new examples of this trope:
    • The Rampage can have a thermite grenade inserted to have the weapon fire more rapidly. As pointed out here, heat causes problems in conventional firearms, primarily how it can cause rounds to go off early, so intentionally making the gun hotter would realistically be a disaster.
    • The Peacekeeper, which is a quadruple-barrelled, lever-action shotgun powered by batteries. Having a lever action or multiple barrels are both ways to load shells into the firing chamber, so having both on one gun causes redundancy.
    • All of the shotguns in the game fire in perfectly shaped predictable patterns, ie. the EVA-8 fires its shot in a pattern of 9 pellets in the shape of an 8.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: You can punch out other players. Unless you have certain heirlooms.
  • Gravity Master: Horizon is a "gravitational manipulator" whose abilities revolve around the gravity, between her Passive reducing the impact from falls, her Tactical creating a column of reversed gravity, and her Ultimate spawning a Black Hole that pulls in other Legends.
  • Grenade Spam: Became more of a viable tactic with the introduction of Fuse. In addition to his ability to double stack grenades in his inventory (and thus carry twice as many as any other legend while throwing them much farther), he also has his constantly regenerating "Knuckle Cluster" sticky grenade.
  • Hailfire Peaks: The World's End map introduced in Season 3 has craters full of lava and cities frozen in chemical ice within walking distance of each other. The Season 10 changes amplified this; POIs like Climatizer feature exposed lava surrounded by machine-made snow.
  • Heal Thyself: When players get injured, they need recovery items to restore lost hitpoints: shield cells and shield batteries to restore shields, syringes and medkits to restore health, Phoenix Kits to restore both. These items slow down their user and take time to use (cells and batteries are used in a shorter time than their health equivalents), forcing them to play more closely around teammates who can provide cover fire while they heal up.
  • Heavy Equipment Class: Rampart gains a bonus to both magazine capacity and reload time when using any Light Machine Gun, the largest class of weapons. Her ultimate, Sheila, is the largest, most powerful gun in the game; while it can be used by any legend once placed, Rampart is much more efficient.
  • Heist Episode: Stories from the Outlands: Family Business, which involves Lifeline and Octane infiltrating into a Silva Pharmaceuticals factory to steal medical supplies that the Frontier Corps need.
  • Hero Shooter: This biggest selling point of this game is that unlike other Battle Royale Games, players spawn as several different heroes, known in-game as Legends, each with their own unique abilities.
  • Hitscan: Averted. Despite reusing the guns from Titanfall 2 (many of which were hitscan, even some of the Energy Weapons, despite projectile visuals), nearly all weapons use visible projectiles with a travel time and slight arc. The only hitscan weapons are the Charged Attack of a Charge Rifle and the Havoc's alternate mode, if it has a Selectfire Receiver hop-up.
  • Holler Button:
    • Press the ping button (defaults to scroll wheel click on keyboard and mouse) to ping terrain, objects, items, etc., which have associated voice lines for your character. A short press will do a context-sensitive ping, defaulting to "let's go here"; double tap the button to point out enemies; and hold the button and aim to choose more varied, specific pings.
    • Press the quip button (defaults to F1 on keyboard and mouse) for less-gameplay-pertinent quips. Quips will always need to be manually chosen, unless the game prompts the player to quip (such as when they stand around for long enough or spam crouch).
  • Hourglass Plot: Of the playable cast as of Season 5, the two most villainous Legends are Caustic and Revenant. Of the two, Caustic is the more trusted by the other members of the cast, and he even has an almost parental sort of relationship with Wattson. Meanwhile, nobody is willing to work with Revenant unless they absolutely have to, as he has demonstrated himself to be even more violent and ruthless than Caustic. Over the course of the "Broken Ghost" questline, however, Caustic is revealed to have sold out Loba and the other legends to Revenant, explicitly in an attempt to have Loba killed for potentially unearthing his past misdeeds. Furthermore, his bond with Wattson turns out to be merely out of admiration for her scientific mind, rather than out of any real affection, and he deliberately destroys her blossoming friendship with Crypto in the belief that such things would only distract her from her great work. As for Revenant, it's revealed that he actually wants to die, since every moment of his existence is torturous and he longs to end his suffering, but is preventing by his programming from doing so. To that end, he actually helps the other legends in their quest, and officially decides to join Loba on her journey to destroy him once and for all. In short, by the end of the questline, Caustic's status as The Mole has been revealed and he has likely destroyed any trust or good grace he might have had with the other legends, while Revenant has allied himself with them.
  • Human Cannonball: The Gravity Cannons on Storm Point allow players to become these, flinging those who enter them along a slightly-influencable path. They pair amazingly with Horizon's passive, which allows her to land from their launches into an extremely fast slide.
  • Hypocritical Humor:
    • Crypto calls Mirage "old man" despite actually being older than him. FINALLY lampshaded in the Season 5 Quest when Mirage learns his age (for context, Mirage is 30 and Crypto is 31, but Crypto could be mistaken for someone in his mid-twenties).
    • The above example is inverted as of Season 7. Crypto refers to Mirage as “kid” nowadays; meanwhile, Mirage calls Crypto some variation of “old man.”
  • I Call It "Vera": Rampart's ultimate ability is a minigun she calls Sheila. Likewise, Fuse's launcher is called Wally.
  • Imperial Stormtrooper Marksmanship Academy: In the Stories from the Outlands short "Gridiron", a trained Pilot misses all his shots on Bangalore. What makes this example particularly egregious is that he's shooting a Smart Pistol, which aims the bullets for him and should never miss.
  • Informed Equipment: Players can pick up armored vests, helmets, and backpacks, but none of them appear on the player character. The only way to discern armor and helmet tiers is to either be on the same team as the subject in question or to shoot them as an enemy and pay attention to the damage number.
  • Intelligible Unintelligible: Legends that have been turned into Shadows during the Halloween gamemodes speak entirely in animalistic growls, but their pings are still understandable by the HUD and translated in the killfeed as if a normal Legend pinged. Also, non-turned Legends can still quip to them, which results in hilariously one-sided conversations.
    Shadow: (uninteligible growl) [translation: Shield Cell here]
    Valkyrie: "I'll bag that."
    Valkyrie: [after picking up the Shield Cell] "Hey, thanks."
    Shadow: (uninteligible growl)
  • Intergenerational Friendship: Fuse and Maggie, the oldest characters on the roster, end up frequently relating to or interacting with Lifeline and Octane, who are among the youngest characters on the roster, as the parallels in their Vitriolic Best Buds verging on Toxic Friendship arise. Fuse himself is decent friends with Lifeline, the latter seeing his Season 7 relationship with Maggie as eerily similar to her own standings with her coercive mother.
  • In the Style of...: Stories from the Outlands: Fight Night borrows a ton of elements from Film Noir, from the saxophone-heavy soundtrack and The Mafia being the primary antagonists, to a disgraced cop detective as the main protagonist and Pathfinder donning a typical trenchcoat and fedora for the noir fashion aesthetic.
  • Inventory Management Puzzle: Managing characters' inventory is an important part of gameplay and can invisibly determine success. Are you carrying too much ammo, or not enough? Is it worth changing to a single-shot weapon like the 30-30 Repeater or Peacekeeper to get more damage per bullet, or would faster-firing weapons be better? Do you have enough grenades and healing for your next fight? Should you pick up the high-quality attachment that's incompatible with your guns, in the hopes that you find a gun that does fit later? Being able to answer these questions can mean the difference between winning and being jumped with no ammo and low HP.
  • Jack-of-All-Trades:
    • The R-301 is intended to be this, with a controllable recoil pattern, good damage at any range, and having an option for semi-automatic fire when further control is needed.
    • The 30-30 Repeater is also this: users can fire it at a decent tempo to catch enemies in the open, or use its short charge time to maximize cover advantage. The Repeater's high-damage single shots also means it uses up less ammo than most other guns, so it effectively uses less inventory space. Its disadvantages of being weaker in close quarters and having a one-at-a-time reload can be lessened with the two hop-ups it's compatible with: Shatter Caps to turn each bullet into a shotgun blast, and Dual Shell to reload two bullets at once.
  • Jump Jet Pack: Jumpkits return in this game from the previous Titanfall games, though their purpose is more niche; now used for slowing descents and moving on ziplines rather than allowing the ultra-fast movement they previously enabled. Additionally, for most characters they're mounted on the lower back rather than the upper back; the exceptions are Crypto (so that his Badass Longcoat can flap around unrestricted), Revenant (integrated in his upper back; a normal Jumpkit would burn his loincloth), Mad Maggie (whose lower back is occupied by a pair of cuffed wrists in the trailers), and Valkyrie (who has an actual fully fledged Jet Pack).
  • Joke Character: DUMMIE, the Training Dummy that you use as a target in the firing range and is featured in the "DUMMIE's Big Day" event as the only playable character. Its passive ability is seemingly useless, its tactical to spawn a random item is implied to be a leftover from testing the game, and its ultimate has a random effect varying between Mirage's ultimate, showering the player with items, and healing everyone nearby (including enemies).
  • Jump Scare:
    • In the "Shadowfall" mode, spiders and zombies sometimes jump out of supply bins when opened. Killing them releases the loot they hold.
    • If Revenant is selected as the Featured Legend, he'll occasionally bumrush the screen during his lobby animation.
  • Kaiju: Giant dinosaur-like monsters called Leviathans can be seen outside of the arena. In Season 2 to 4, two of these are inside the arena and, while normally indifferent towards players, they'll lift once per round to reveal loot underneath, players can get stomped players to death if they're not careful.
  • Kinetic Weapons Are Just Better: Energy weapons are a bit more powerful than their bullet-firing equivalents, but have severe downsides you need rare attachments to negate, don't get as many other attachments, and their ammo is rare.
    • The Devotion has the potential to deal higher damage than any other normal weapon in the game, but it has a Gathering Steam mechanic where it shoots slowly when the trigger is first held down. A Turbocharger Hop-Up will jumpstart this process.
    • The HAVOC Rifle has some of the best DPS in the game, decent range and accuracy, and a relatively large magazine size. The problem is that there's a short delay between pulling the trigger and the weapon actually starting to fire. Similar to the Devotion, a Turbocharger removes this delay.
    • Supplementing the L-STAR's decent damage is its overheat mechanic; in place of a normal reload, it heats with each shot and cools when not being fired, meaning it effectively has a built-in gold magazine that automatically reloads the gun if put away for long enough and not overheated. However, its plasma balls are slower than most bullets and tap-firing single bullets with it for higher control against distant opponents is awkward.
    • The Triple Take has great damage per shot and has a spread to help cover for inaccuracy. But it needs a second to charge up each shot to make the damage better at longer ranges, and spends three ammo per shot making it less ammo-efficient compared to other marksman weapons.
    • Averted with the Volt, an energy SMG that, while dealing one less point of damage per bullet than its light and heavy counterparts, the Alternator and Prowler, makes up for it with a higher rate of fire than the former and not needing a hop-up to unlock its full potential like the latter.
  • Leeroy Jenkins: One recurring player mentality is to join a squad, then ditch them and drop solo if they choose to drop anywhere but into the most popular drop point on the map, eager to get as many kills as possible.
  • Lighter and Softer: Despite being about a Blood Sport, Apex Legends is less graphically violent than Titanfall, the rating going from "Mature" to "Teen". The Titans themselves aren't around to crush people underfoot or turn them into clouds of viscera, bullet wounds only produce some brief bursts of blood with no lasting stains, and finishers, this game's take on the previous execution mechanic, are much less visceral and/or subject to Gory Discretion Shot.
  • Limited Loadout: Players can only equip two weapons. Ammunition, grenades, and attachments go into an inventory that you can expand by picking up backpacks.
  • Little Useless Gun: The Mozambique and P2020, a shotgun and a pistol respectively that are the worst weapons for their categories in addition to being the smallest. Until Season 9 gave them a proper buff, it was quite telling that the only way to use them in a serious manner was with the Hammerpoint Rounds hop-up to effectively turn them into a high-damage Cherry Tap — and even after Season 9, the game recognizes how weak they are, giving both weapons for free and granting them the cheapest upgrade cost in Arenas.
    • The Mozambique has the highest fire rate of all shotguns, but that doesn't make up for itpunishing-to-miss three pellet spread and low damage output. Ironically, it's also the worst handgun despite being the largest, because of its terrible range.
    • The P2020 pistol is generally only used if nothing else is available, as it's a semi-automatic with the per-shot power of most of the automatics, a short effective range, and a small magazine. It can be aimed fast with no speed penalty, but the penalties for the SMGs are already quite small, not to mention this already puny perk is totally negated by the equally common, fully automatic RE-45. Some consider this weapon worse than the aforementioned Mozambique, citing that while at least the latter can pack a punch in close range, the former is practically worthless regardless of the situation.
  • Loot Drama: In-Universe, the original launch trailer depicts Wraith, Mirage, and Pathfinder discussing who should get the rare loot found in a supply bin.
  • Lyrical Dissonance: The upbeat "Three Little Birds" (better known as "Every Little Thing's Gonna Be Alright") is used to score the cheerful tropical beach setting of the Season 11 launch trailer. The "don't worry" phrase from it is sampled and used to add tension to the half of the trailer that shows how Everything Is Trying to Kill You.
  • Magikarp Power:
    • The Devotion machine gun in season 1-3 and 6 has an insane rate of fire that ramps up over time and has a huge headshot multiplier at the expense of terrible recoil and a spin-up time. However, if a player gets the Turbocharger attachment to reduce the spin-up time and adjusts for the recoil pattern, then the Devotion becomes a bullet hose with the shortest time-to-kill.
    • Until Season 6, Evo Shields. The lowest-tier Evo Shield absorbs only 25 points of damage, which is less than the 50 points of the lowest-tier body shield while being just about as common. However, if enough damage is dealt while wearing the Evo shield, then the shield evolves into higher tiers that can absorb more damage. A fully evolved Evo shield can absorb 125 points of damage, which is 25 points more than the Epic and Legendary body shields. Season 6 removed all Body Shields except the Legendary tier, but this trope still applies somewhat; even though Evo Shields are the primary source of shields still, the stronger shields provided gives one a reason to consider sticking with their 100-shield Epic Evo Shield instead of picking up a currently-superior Legendary Body Shield.
    • The Defense Legend category is this. Their specialization of providing cover or creating areas that make it disadvantageous for enemies to fight in aren't as useful in the early game, as cover is more readily available and hazardous traps can simply be avoided. But as the Ring closes, places where players can hide safely from enemies start getting flushed out by the Ring and it becomes harder to just walk around locations that have been trapped to hell.
  • Matter Replicator: Replicators, which spawn at randomized locations each game and provide useful supplies to anyone who uses them. The currency used to craft things at Replicators is obtained from aquamarine-filled material canisters scattered around the map, usually around already-placed replicators, as well as much smaller amounts from loot bins.
  • Meaningful Name: Each Season after the first has come with a title that relates to the new content it brought.
    • "Battle Charge" introduced Wattson, a legend with a high-voltage kit and an affinity for electrical puns.
    • "Meltdown" released a map with both icey tundra and lava flows. The map's condition has deteriorated with every update since, with lava overtaking it more and more.
    • "Assimilation" gave us Revenant, a robotic character with the ability to turn himself and his team into shadows.
    • "Fortune's Favor" featured a treasure hunt PVE quest, a treasure hunter-themed event, and the loot-stealing Loba.
    • "Boosted" revealed Rampart, a legend with a tactical that greatly enhances her team's damage output.
    • "Ascension" introduced Horizon and a map on a floating city.
    • "Mayhem" brought Fuse, a legend with a love for explosives, kicked off by demolishing a large part of King's Canyon, and introduced the character Maggie who in-universe tampered with the Apex Games to cause the new gamemodes.
    • "Legacy" put both the new legend Valkyrie and Ash in the spotlight, both of whom have strong ties to the franchise's previous installment. The plot of the season's comic also kicks off with a deadly disease hitting Olympus, the cure for which is dubbed "The Legacy Antigen".
    • "Emergence" gave us Seer, a legend with a moth motif.
    • "Escape" introduced a tropical island map, with the trailer even likening it to a vacation-y island escape. There's also the new legend, Ash, whose split personality is attempting to escape her confinement.
    • "Defiance" had Mad Maggie, the grizzled Salvonian rebel, defy death and return as a playable character.
  • Memorial Statue: A Pathfinder statue stands outside of Pathfinder's Fight Night on Olympus, erected to commemorate the discovery of Pathfinder's role in saving the Outlands and to memorialize the Project: Iris team members who died in the cause. Lots of characters have interesting things to say about it, like Horizon commending her old friends for their efforts or Mirage implicitly feeling self-conscious about his smaller hand-portable statue if he's on Pathfinder's team.
  • Mexican Standoff: The final ring is prone to having this between three or more teams, especially in Ranked mode where players more often play for match ranking rather than maximizing kills so multiple teams come up to that eleventh hour. Typically, the teams will all be hiding behind cover with the Ring closing in on a point that has little to no cover, so attempting to initiate a fight instead of continuing to hide behind safety can prove needlessly suicidal until the Ring forces said team out of cover.
  • Mission Control Is Off Its Meds: Most gamemodes that substitute the AI announcer with someone else are this.
    • Mirage sprinkles his pre-recorded Winter Express announcements with self-congratulatory quips, speculation on how well he's doing in the mode, and the occasional off-hand mention that his bar lacks a bathroom, with Rampart setting up shop there.
    • Shadow Revenant spends the Shadowfall gamemode urging the Legends kill each other and generally being psychopathic, whenever he's not verbally tearing them apart or insulting his alternate universe self.
    • Mad Maggie's announcements during Season 8's Battle Royale are very casual and peppered with slang. She also loves insulting Fuse.
    • Downplayed with Ash, whose Arenas announcements are fairly straightforward, but she's not afraid to urge her personal views forward.
  • Money for Nothing: Initially played straight with the Legend Tokens. The Legend Tokens can only be used to buy new characters (which are limited) or skins that require buying a pre-requisite skin with Apex Coins. Plenty of players racked up plenty of tokens with nothing to spend them on. As of patch 3.1 however, tokens can now be spent to re-roll daily challenges to get sets that are more favorable.
  • Money Spider:
    • A weird variant occurs with the Flyers which were introduced in between Season 1 and Season 2. They can be found either flying around in circles or perched on high ledges, and shooting them enough causes them to drop a player's death box containing a random assortment of mid-tier loot.
    • Played literally in the Fight or Fright event, where ghostly spiders pop out of loot bins and can be squashed for loot drops. They're also accompanied by zombified IMC Grunts, who do likewise.
    • Literally again with the nests of spiders found all over Storm Point, along with dens of angry Prowlers. Killing either will drop loot, with a mild tendency towards upgrading what the player's team has; clearing out the entire nest or den will grant the whole team crafting materials to spend on items at replicators.
  • The Multiverse: Wraith is able to jump between universes using her abilities, and at least two other universes have been explored in the canon:
    • The first is an alternate universe where the IMC didn't lose the Frontier War, with IMC compounds still standing and populated there. The playable Wraith comes from this universe; the main universe's original Wraith, or Voidwalker Wraith, switched places with her and was last seen still in this one.
    • The other is a universe where Revenant became ruler of the Outlands through his Resurrective Immortality. Dubbed the Shadowfall universe for the blood sport that Shadow Revenant runs, Pathfinder was the one to discover it by going through the Shadowfall universe Wraith's portal. Finding buried artifacts in it was the main driving force of Season 5.
  • My Friends... and Zoidberg: Visual version: during the dance party in Season 13's trailer held in honor of Bangalore and Revenant's withdrawal from the Apex Games to Gridiron, professional-looking paper flags with the words "Happy retirement Anita" are seen hung up from the ceiling above the bar. A sheet of printer paper has been added at the end with a hasty scribble on it, reading "and Revenant".
  • Nerf:
    • Certain weapons that are either successors to those in previous games (eg. R-301 carbine vs R-101 and R-202 carbines) or are returning in this game directly (eg. Spitfire and Devotion) do so with smaller magazine capacities (reduced by as much as half, which is especially significant with the higher health values) to make magazine upgrades more significant.
    • Also, this game's incarnations of Titanfall 2's Sniper Rifles (the Longbow DMR and Triple Take) feature drastically reduced firing rates and (in the Longbow's case) projectile bullets instead of hitscan. This compensates for the much larger map size and players being easier to hit with precision weapons thanks to the slower movement speed. The Kraber was untouched by this change, as it's a Care Package weapon, though it is restrained a bit by significantly slower handling speed than in the prior games and needs to be unscoped to work the bolt between shots.
    • Damage in general has been tuned down, further so since players now have to deal with normal health in addition to shields. Of note is that many things that were One Hit Kills in the previous game either aren't anymore, or are significantly harder; close-range shotgun blasts, the Kraber, and Charge Rifle shots (even when factoring in the new charging laser damage) all can't kill in one body hit to an armored player where they could in the previous game.
    • On a related note: melee attacks have went from being a one-hit kill instant duel ender with monstrously long lunge reach to being a rather pithy 30-damage strike that's hard to connect. They're still okay for finishing an enemy when a player has no loaded weapons, but they've fallen from grace quite hard.
    • Frag Grenades can no longer be cooked by pulling their pin and waiting before throwing them; their fuses only start once they're thrown. Hiding behind cover for longer periods of time is stronger as a result, as any frags or other ordinance can be more reliably reacted to and avoided once they're thrown.
    • Some returning abilities from Titanfall 2 make their appearance with reduced capabilities, to further put emphasis on team coordination over one individual hard carrying their teammates. Some examples:
      • The Grappling Hook ability has reduced acceleration, time in the air, and only has one charge at a time as opposed to two. When in use, Pathfinder has to completely put his weapon away and reequip it after releasing the hook, requiring a more strategic approach when flanking than being able to shoot immediately after grappling in Titanfall 2.
      • Stim no longer heals the user, instead doing the exact opposite and taking away health when used.
      • Wraith's Into the Void, Apex's equivalent of Phase Shift, has a brief delay when the ability starts and ends, slows the user temporarily while it winds up, can't be used to Tele-Frag, and very clearly indicates the user's position while in use as opposed to having them completely vanish. This is slightly inverted after Season 5 granted a buff that it lacked in Titanfall 2: Wraith can see enemies while in the Phase dimension, aiding maneuvering and minimizing the risk of blindly walking into enemies.
      • Amped Walls don't immediately construct when deployed, only amp shots going through their top half, and are no longer indestructible (being more vulnerable on the top half and especially while not fully built).
      • The Pulse Blade ability returns in the form of Bloodhound's Eye of the Allfather, which lacks the titular One-Hit KO blade and instead scans a wider area directly in front of Bloodhound.
      • Cloak can't be activated as often. Mirage, Apex's only user of the ability only goes invisible when reviving allies, when he's downed for a few seconds, while using Respawn Beacons, and for a very brief moment when he starts using his ultimate.
      • Inverted with Holo Pilot: Mirage's decoys are mostly similar to them, but they have the added benefit that enemies that get fooled into shooting decoys have their position revealed. They were further buffed after launch to allow the user to control a decoy's movements, allowing for much more potent fake-outs.
    • Movement in general has been tuned down: players can't freely wallrun or double jump despite the Legends wearing jumpkits and slides can't be infinitely extended by hopping. Restoring the traditional movement usually requires an external factor, like using jumpkits to boost along ziplines or being granted a double jump from Octane's jump pad.
  • Nerf Arm: Paintball rounds are a hop-up that turns fired bullets into paintballs. The guns become no less lethal, but now reload faster and with expanded magazine sizes. The hop-up was originally added to the game to tease a future character, Rampart, who has faster LMG reloads with bigger magazines; her shop in World's Edge sells weapons that have a version of this hop-up integrated permanently.
  • No OSHA Compliance: While the locations are justifiably dangerous in the context that they're combat arenas for the Legends, some of the constructions stand out, especially considering how some of the arenas were used or are used for other purposes:
    • The Rift at Olympus is a massive ball of phase energy that led to the city being abandoned until its use in the Apex Games, since it posed a risk to visitors. Indeed, the portal will suck in anyone who draws near, and coming in from the other side of it drops users out from a massive height; the Legends have Jumpkits to slow their descent when entering from that direction, but anyone who's unprepared would go splat on the floor.
    • Storm Point's Command Center features four extremely long vertical ziplines to get from its lower area to its upper area. Again, the Legends can drop down them perfectly fine, but anyone without some means of protection would go splat on the floor, likely after getting severe friction burns from grabbing the ziplines.
    • Climatizer and Lava Siphon at World's Edge are installations built over exposed lava in various stages of cooling, with little in the way of guard rails or other safeguards against falling in. And instead of having a sane option of a bridge to get over the lava, Lava Siphon instead features fast-moving gondolas that rarely stop.
    • Olympus' Phase Driver is explicitly called out for being unsafe as all hell by a Season 12 transition screen: it has no failsafes against malfunctioning parts, programming mistakes, or hacking attempts. Perhaps it's that way by design, given that Duardo Silva, a member of the Syndicate, personally used it to frame Mad Maggie for sabotage.
  • Not-Actually-Cosmetic Award:
    • While they all generally stick to a general shape for each gun, certain weapon skins have slightly different models. Thus, certain skins don't obscure as much of the screen, though the differences are very mild at best.
    • Certain finishers can be done faster than others, though most of them only differ by fractions of a second. The different camera angles, however, can prove advantagous in how some finishers are more zoomed in than others, so someone doing a finisher might be able to react faster and cancel their move if they see trouble coming.
    • Holosprays can be thrown down to obscure vision and possibly be used to hide behind. Also, pinging a Holospray will "like" it, even if it's an enemy's spray and/or far in the distance, so vigilant players can use them as a means of checking if they've been spotted and are being pinged to enemies.
    • Defied with ground emotes; the game has an anti-peek system in place to prevent people from abusing their third-person cameras to peek around obstacles without actually exposing themselves.
  • Not the Intended Use: The Triple Take fires 3 rounds in a horizontal spread. It requires some charging to tighten the spread and make it better at long range. But it's pretty accurate fired from the hip anyway, so it's not uncommon for players to just fit a common universal Reflex Sight and use it as a mid-range shotgun, taking advantage of the tight spread and high damage per pellet.
  • Obvious Rule Patch:
    • As Crypto's ult only damages shields, players took to countering this by taking off their shields right before the EMP went off and putting it back on. Patch 3.1 addressed this by making it also damage unequipped shields.
    • Once Revenant's Death Totem was buffed to where it no longer sent players back with only one HP, many players started comboing it with Wraith's portal so that, once teleported back to the totem, they could just hop into the portal to give them effectively two back-to-back pushes against the enemy squad, with the target having little recourse to counter it. A Season 6 patch addressed this by adding a two-second delay between when players return to the Death Totem and when they can enter a portal, giving the enemy squad a chance to recover from the initial push before the follow-up commences.
    • Rampart players who try to place multiple Amped Covers in front of each other in an attempt to stack their damage buffs will find that all but one of the barriers deactivates when they go to shoot through them.
  • "Open!" Says Me: A melee attack can be done on doors to open them instantly if there's nothing blocking it. Hit it once again and it will be completely destroyed.
  • Order Versus Chaos: The Salvo plotline that follows Fuse and Mad Maggie, with Duardo Silva and the Syndicate pitted against Mad Maggie and her Cracked Talons fitting the respective roles. The Syndicate keeps the peace, but are rotten to its internal politics, authoritarian in how they punish anti-Syndicate protests, and are capable of doing some incredibly unsavory things for their own benefit. The Cracked Talons just want the Syndicate to stop messing with Salvo, but will go to lethal extents to protect their freedom, as seen in Season 8's trailer.
  • Palmtree Panic: The map Storm Point is a tropical archipelago that happens to be crawling with spiders, flyers, and prowlers.
  • Piñata Enemy: The Prowlers and spiders from Storm Point. Attacking either will give players points to level up their Evo Shield, killing them drops loot tailored to what a player may currently be carrying, and clearing out a den or nest grants the entire team materials to use in crafting.
  • Player Tic:
  • Post-Mortem One-Liner: Kill quips, which are unlockable voice lines that the player may be prompted to use after securing a kill. All Legends also have voice lines their team hears if they are the one to eliminate the last member of an enemy squad.
  • Power Equals Rarity: The most powerful gun, the Kraber sniper rifle, can only be obtained from the loot "care packages" that occasionally fall throughout the game — it can never be found in loot bins or on the ground. This is likewise with the other care package weapons; whenever a weapon is moved out of standard rotation and into the care package, it often receives a buff to accompany its increased rarity.
  • Pre-Asskicking One-Liner: At the start of every match, the player gets to see a view of the team with at least one player who won their previous game (in Battle Royale), or the only other team in the game (in Arenas) and hear one of these before the game starts proper. Whether they actually kick any ass or get eliminated first thing in the match, though, is up in the air.
  • Previous Player-Character Cameo: An 8-bit style sprite of a Militia Titan Pilot — possibly Jack Cooper — appears on the Mastiff skin "Warp Zone".
  • Punch-Packing Pistol:
    • The Wingman's damage is comparable to the game's sniper rifles, and gets a headshot damage bonus that's usually reserved for rifles — and in the past the Skullpiercer Hop-up offered an upgrade to make them even stronger.
    • The P2020 becomes this to unshielded targets once equipped with Hammerpoint Rounds, dealing a whopping 35 damage per shot with the fastest rate of fire among semi-auto weapons. It's not uncommon to see advanced players carry a Hammerpoint-equipped P2020 as a sidearm, using their primary weapon to burn through an enemy's shields and then swapping to the P2020 to finish them off.
    • The Mozambique shotgun pistol, after spending much of the game's lifetime as something a memetic joke weapon, has slowly been improved through buffs and the addition of Hammerpoints to become not only a solid sidearm, but even a surprisingly capable primary weapon against early-game targets with weak shields.
  • Recurring Riff: This four-note riff that plays as part of the song when players start their drop appears as part of each Season's unlockable music pack, as well as infrequently during the Stories from the Outlands shorts.
  • The Remnant:
    • Season 13's story centers around a group known as the Forgotten Families, a gang of ex-IMC soldiers from its multiple different divisions, left in the Outlands after the IMC withdrew and left them stranded. Despite the Frontier War being long over, they target deserters from their side and kill them.
    • Season 13 also has a takeover by IMC armories emerging from the ground. Originally built as automated support for Pilots in the field if something were to happen at the Storm Point base, their AI will deploy Spectre units as a defense if an intrusion happens.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: The Wingman is considered one of the most effective guns in the game with high damage and good accuracy.
  • Schmuck Bait:
    • Mirage's kit is built around baiting trigger-happy schmucks into revealing their position by opening fire on his decoys.
    • Anyone can go through a Wraith portal, not just her own teammates. If you see one out in the open, there's a good chance the squad that put it there is waiting on the other side, ready to pop anyone foolish enough to head through it.
      • The Anniversary Collection Event trailer shows exactly this: Mirage jumps through a portal, only for the other end to be placed suspended in the air, right above a bottomless pit.
    • Clever players can leave valuable loot like Care Packages out in the open, then just perch on some nearby high ground and wait for the inevitable schmuck to come along.
  • Shaping Your Attacks: All multi-pellet guns (such as the Mastiff and anything with Shatter Caps) shoot in defined patterns, but most of them aren't shaped like anything besides simple lines or abstract scatters. However, the new Peacekeeper shotgun shoots its pellets in the shape of a five-pointed star, while the returning EVA-8 now fires in the shape of a figure eight.
  • Ship Tease:
    • Mirage has gotten this with Wraith, Wattson, Loba, and Rampart:
      • During Season 2 and 3, Mirage and Wattson were paired together on account of their similar personalities. They were shown lying together during the 2019 Holo-Day Bash event, but nothing ever came out of it.
      • During Season 5, Mirage was absolutely smitten with Loba. She didn't seem to return his affections, and it seems to have lessened on Mirage's side post-season.
      • Mirage and Rampart's dialogue became a lot more awkward during Season 7. Wraith also started referring to Rampart as "Mirage's special friend," which she vehemently denied.
    • Loba receives this with both Bangalore and Valkyrie, during the Season 9 comic and in-game interactions, respectively.
  • Short-Range Shotgun: Averted with the Peacekeeper, which can deal damage up to 50 meters and has a tight spread that can be enhanced with a choke attachment. Played straight with the Mozambique, which is about as effective as tossing packing peanuts at ranges beyond 2 meters (not that its point-blank range is anything to write home about).
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: The Peacekeeper in particular fits this trope, having surprisingly good range and enough damage to make up for the slow fire rate. The Mozambique is a subversion thanks to its crappy range and inconsistent damage output. However, this is double-subverted when one finds the Hammerpoint Rounds hop-up that increases the Mozambique's damage against non-shielded opponents.
  • Shout-Out:
    • One Mastiff skin, The Pest Controller, is a big shout-out to the Nintendo Entertainment System, using its black-with-crimson-and-grey-highlights color scheme and also having diagonal line buttons similar to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System's start/select buttons on its pump. Said buttons become more transparently a reference to the SNES on its alternate texture, Warp Zone, which also changes the rest of the palette to resemble an NES Zapper.
    • One of Mirage's voice lines when sending out a holographic decoy has him wonder aloud which whether he's really the decoy himself, only to promptly declare that "this is dream-within-a-dream stuff".
    • Resident "Material Girl" Loba references the song in question when being chosen on the character select screen:
      Loba: The girl with the cold, hard cash is always Miss Right.
    • Rampart paraphrases Lesley Gore in a quote:
      Rampart: It's my party and you can cry if you want to!
    • When Rampart gets a kill with her mounted heavy machinegun "Sheila", she might yell "You get a bullet! And you get a bullet! Everyone gets a bullet!"
    • One of Caustic's kill quips in the Season 7 battle pass is a quote from The Princess Bride.
      Caustic: This is for posterity, so be honest. How do you feel?
    • One of Fuse's quotes is an obvious reference to AC/DC.
      Fuse: If there's dirty deeds need doing, I'll do them cheap.
    • When Valkyrie enters a Trident, she may paraphrase Billy Ocean:
      Valkyrie: Get out of my dreams and get into my Trident.
    • Crypto's "Devil's Advocate" skin makes him look like a certain wacky woohoo pizza man.
  • Sigil Spam: The symbol of the Mercenary Syndicate features everywhere, from almost all of the Season symbols, to the game's desktop icon itself.
  • Simple, yet Awesome: All of the gold equipment (sans the aforementioned knockdown shield) fall squarely into this trope:
    • In season 3 and 4, gold armor granted the Fast Use perk, which cut the time to use healing items and Ultimate Accelerants in half. Five-second Phoenix Kits were exactly as broken as they sound. In season 5, it was dialed back a bit by replacing Fast Heal with Improved Minor Heal, which doubles the effectiveness of Syringes and Shield Cells. While not nearly as powerful as the previous version, it's still highly useful as it allows you to save precious Shield Batteries and Medkits when you only need to restore about half of your health and/or shields.
    • The gold helmet grants the Fast Charge perk, which reduces Tactical and Ultimate cooldowns by 25%. While its usefulness is debatable with Legends who already have relatively short cooldowns such as post-Season 4 Mirage and Octane, it's an absolute godsend for those with particularly long cooldowns like Bloodhound, Lifeline and Pathfinder circa season 5.
    • Prior to season 3, the gold backpack granted the aforementioned Fast Use perk. When that was moved to gold armor in season 3, the gold backpack was given the arguably more useful Guardian Angel perk, which grants allies 50 armor and 70 health upon being revived. While this is indisputably useful no matter who has it, it becomes a borderline Game-Breaker when paired with Legends with some form of buffed resuscitation abilities such as Lifeline, Gibraltar, and Mirage, turning such characters into Combat Medics par excellence. Guardian Angel can also be combined with the Self Revive perk from the gold knockdown shield, letting you revive yourself with a much better chance to escape and/or fully heal.
  • Sniper Pistol: The Wingman, though outdone by actual sniper rifles and limited by its bullet trajectory, velocity, and sights, can be quite effective up to mid range. It's also the only pistol that still gets extra damage from headshots even past a short distance, something it benefits even further from when equipped with the Skullpiercer attachment.
  • Spring Jump: Jump Pads will launch any Legend that touches them straight up, giving them an opportunity to start gliding down from the sky. They're placed to aid rollouts in the Control game mode, and they also feature as part of Storm Point's IMC Armories to give players a head start on moving when they finish fighting.
  • Standard FPS Guns: The game's weapon classes use these as a basic template, with individual weapons diverging out from them.
    • Pistols: The weakest weapon type but fairly common, filling the "starter weapon to be replaced" archetype typically expected of them, though they do have niche upsides such as fast handling. The Wingman occupies the slow, but strong and accurate niche expected of revolvers.
    • Assault rifles: The Jack-of-All-Stats category, which generally has strengths all around but no specializations. Of them, the weirdest is the Havoc, which is a Master of All stats-wise with the limitation of a delay before it actually shoots.
    • Machine Guns: LMGs follow this archetype, typically trading their handling speed and a little bit of their damage per second in exchange for the largest magazine sizes in the game to lay down constant suppressing fire. Of them, the Spitfire plays this trend the closest; the Devotion winds up its firing speed, the L-Star overheats, and the Rampage can be charged with thermite grenades.
    • Marksman Guns: Used by the Marksman weapons. They're better suited to longer range, but not quite as specialized into doing so as Sniper Rifles are. The G7 and 30-30 play this archetype mostly straight, while the Triple Take has a Spread Shot and the Bocek is a bow that doesn't need to be reloaded.
    • Sniper Rifles: Weapons that are heavily specialized into long-range engagements, being uncontested at that range and given high burst damage via headshots to make up for their low DPS. The Sentinel and Kraber lean more towards the very powerful and very slow anti-materiel rifle subtype, while the Charge Rifle borrows shades of the energy gun archetype with its hitscan laser beam.
    • Submachine Guns: Automatic weapons that alternate being common, early game, tuned-down versions of other automatic weapons (Alternator, Volt) and the usual SMG niche of being high DPS burst damage machines in close range with relatively small magazine sizes (C.A.R., R-99, Prowler).
    • Shotguns: The other weapon class best suited to close range, they have lower DPS than SMGs but make up for it by being able to minimize exposure to enemies by peeking around cover. The Peacekeeper's high single-shot damage, slow fire rate, and wide spread when not choked is indicative of the super shotgun subtype, while the Mozambique's fast handling but weaker damage puts it into the shotgun pistol type.
  • Sticky Bomb:
    • Fuse's Knuckle Cluster sticks to any surface it hits, making it very useful for taking out doors quickly. It also stick to other legends (although it will fall off after the first detonation).
    • Arc stars stick wherever they land; while it's difficult to stick to a legend, the results are devastating.
  • String Theory: Ex-detective Maldera owns a futuristic version of a typical document-covered corkboard in Fight Night. Most noticeably high-tech is the laser beam-like glowing that the "strings" provide.
  • Symbolically Broken Object: The golden Cracked Talons grenade that Fuse and Maggie shared symbolized their childhood friendship, and how it quite literally came to an explosive end prior to Season 8.
  • Tank Goodness: Several tanks can be seen parked around King's Canyon. Unfortunately, you can't use them.
  • The Teaser: What usually starts happening around the end of each Season is that minor map or gameplay changes happen that hint towards the next Season, such as the Grafitti Mod Hop-Up added near the end of Season 5 to tease the Season 6 Legend's passive ability, or the phased-out fragment of a Cracked Talons jet landing on Storm Point during Season 11 to hint towards a return to Olympus and the addition of Mad Magie.
  • Teleporter Accident: A new installation on Olympus from Season 12, the Phase Driver, was intended to grant the flying city the ability to teleport around. Instead, it gets hijacked and sabotaged by Duardo Silva, sending Olympus downwards and almost dangerously close above the city Malta. Cleanup after this event has yet to finish: the Phase Driver is surrounded by debris that has been partially phased through the floor, and one of Olympus' balloons is now intersecting with a phased transport ship.
  • Temporary Online Content: Some gamemodes are seasonal or temporary in nature. For example, Shadowfall and Holo-Day Bash are Holiday Modes exclusive for Halloween and Christmas.
  • Throw-Away Guns: ZigZagged; because all untouched guns are guaranteed to have a full magazine's worth of ammo loaded (except the L-STAR and Bocek, which draw ammo directly from the user's inventory), players who need to fend off enemies immediately when the game starts might do well to pick up the nearest gun instead of reloading, as they likely don't have much ammo or attachments for their current weapon so there's nothing really lost in doing so. After that though, when a squad gets settled with a decent ammo supply and some attachments, attempting this strategy is often unwise.
  • Timed Mission: The IMC Armories on Storm Point give players 60 seconds to kill as many Spectres as they can. Once the 60 seconds are up and all surviving Spectres are destroyed, the Armory then gives increasing amounts of loot based on the total number of Spectres killed.
  • Town with a Dark Secret: Harris Valley is a small town on Solace that's uncharacteristically idyllic for the Outlands; it's a green-grass, peaceful, quiet suburb with growing families instead of a sprawling desert city populated by rough-and-tumble mercenaries. Seemingly unknown to its inhabitants however, the place has been sold off to The Mafia, who threaten the safety of everyone unless they can be paid.
  • Trash the Set: While parts of the maps are changed periodically, areas of the King's Canyon map are outright demolished every few seasons.
    • Season 2 began with the signal tower blowing up, allowing the leviathans to roam free and trample parts of the map.
    • Season 5 had Loba trigger an explosion which caused the entirety of Skulltown to plunge into the ocean.
    • Season 8 kicked off with Fuse's introduction being bombed, sending his ship plunging into the canyon and detonating several of the canyon's rock formations...
  • Trophy Violence: Several of the legends have cosmetic "heirlooms" that they use as melee weapons; while most are standard bladed or blunt weapons, Mirage's is a small statuette of himself. The inscription reads "Best Competitor in a Battle Royale - Based on skill, but mostly looks."
  • Underdogs Never Lose: In Stories from the Outlands "Gridiron", Bangalore and Jackson fight an IMC Pilot. In the previous Titanfall games, a Pilot would almost always win against two grunts, but here they come out on top instead.
  • Universal Ammunition: There are five main ammunition types (light, heavy, energy, sniper, shotgun shells), all of which fit in guns of disparate size, type, and firepower; one of the more egregious examples is that shotshell shoots sparkling blasts when in the Mozambique and Mastiff, shoots normal pellets from the EVA-8, and somehow becomes the energy cells used to power the Peacekeeper. Simplified resource management was clearly prioritized over something more realistic.
    • Subverted with care package weapons, which use their own versions of normal ammo, of which it's not compatible with. This can be a blessing and a curse. On one hand, since the ammo is not held in players' inventory, they're free to load up on more items with the reduced inventory load. On the other, there aren't any ways to top up on care package ammo outside of picking up a replacement care package weapon, which can potentially make them Too Awesome to Use.
    • Also subverted with the Bocek, which was introduced in Season 9. It is currently the only weapon that uses arrows as ammunition.
    • The C.A.R. submachine gun, which was added in Season 11, can swap between using light and heavy ammunition, and can be outfitted with either magazine type. It holds the same number of bullets and deals the same damage regardless of what it's loaded with.
  • Unreliable Narrator: Various Season 12 trailers appear to be written from the point of view of an in-universe Syndicate representative. As a result, they're derisive towards the staunchly Anti-Syndicate Mad Maggie, and blame her for the Phase Driver incident on Olympus that the audience saw was actually started by Duardo Silva.
  • Video Game Caring Potential:
    • The game has a dedicated "thank you" prompt, for use after receiving help for teammates (such as being given loot, using a supportive ability, or being revived). Relatedly, that teammate can respond with a "you're welcome" after.
    • The one-armed Loot MRVNs on Olympus will act absolutely overjoyed and grant the player guaranteed gold items if they secure the MRVN a second arm. Unfortunately, because Loot MRVNs are still MRVNs, the only way to get said spare arm is killing other MRVNs.
  • Video Game Cruelty Potential: Starting with Season 2, in addition to the Flyers that you can shoot to drop death boxes containing loot, there are also Flyers pent up in cages, who apart from screeching at you are completely harmless. There's nothing stopping you from shooting them dead.
  • Video Game Sliding: Crouching while running causes the player to do this, granting the player a speed boost while doing so. It's an important facet of gameplay to be able to slide, as it allows players to initiate fights and travel long distances faster, especially when going down slopes.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds:
    • Lifeline and Octane. While Lifeline has little tolerance for Octane's reckless antics and Octane views Lifeline as a stick in the mud, it's abundantly clear that they still care deeply about one another, as evidenced by Lifeline dropping everything to rescue Octane after he charged into a Prowler-infested King's Canyon by himself.
    • Mirage and Rampart are shaping up to be this. They bicker about being roommates and Mirage is stunned by Rampart’s familiarity with the arena. That being said, neither of them have a bad bone in their body and it shows. He affectionately calls her “Gearhead” while she calls him “Witt,” and they find each other pretty (not that Mirage will admit it). A side comic released on Twitter accompanying Season 9 shows that Mirage sees her like a sibling.
  • Weapon of Choice:
    • Rampart gains a bonus when using a Light Machine Gun, and her voice lines indicate a clear preference for that type of weapon.
    • In a similar vein, Maggie gains a speed bonus when holding any shotgun, moving at her full running speed without having to stow the weapon away. Her personal favorite appears to be the Mastiff, with a unique equip animation and dialogue.
      Mad Maggie: A perfect partner.
    • Like Maggie's affection for the Mastiff, Fuse is a fan of the 30-30 Repeater, uniquely equipping it with a flip-cock.
      Fuse: 30-30 Repeater here. Salvo’s finest, except for ol’ Fusey of course.
  • Weaponized Exhaust: Although not usable as part of normal gameplay, one of Valkyrie's finishing move animations involves her burning a downed opponent with the exhaust from her jump jets.
  • Weaponized Teleportation: The teaser for Season 12 features a dogfight between a Syndicate and Cracked Talon jet fighter on Storm Point, with the latter getting phased out moments before crashing — with exception to a broken tail wing that crashes onto Storm Point's north beach. A Season 12 transition screen loretext shows that the phase was initiated by the attacker, presumably to capture and sentence Maggie to death within the Syndicate.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: Forge, a muscular Hyperfighting Federation champion with a robotic left arm who was teased as the Season 4 legend. Turned out he was a just a decoy and the actual champion would be Revenant, who backstabbed him during a live interview.
  • Weirdness Censor: As part of their built-in "Ego Retention System", Simulacra are incapable of recognizing that they are Simulacra. This can be anything as small as replacing certain words (ex. Ash hearing "Pilot" instead of "Simulacrum" when referred to as such), or as big as not recognizing they're pulling off inhuman feats (ex. Revenant climbing up a skyscraper, taking gunshots without flinching, and impaling someone with only his hand). Breaking through this mental censor forms a major basis of both Ash and Revenant's backstories and personalities.
  • Wham Episode: Ashes to Ashes - the final episode of the "Broken Ghost" questline in season 5, reveals that the object the legends were assembling for Hammond Robotics was the severed head of Ash from Titanfall 2. The associated story chapter also reveals that Revenant was seeking his source code as well, and wants Loba to finally end him once and for all.
  • With Catlike Tread: Players who try to use Loba's ultimate in order to get to loot normally inaccessible without meeting some sort of special requirement (for example, loot found within locked vaults or Bloodhound's Trials), only Loba herself will be able to steal it, and as soon as she does, the Black Market will be destroyed and a loud alarm will sound, alerting everyone in the vicinity to her presence.
  • Where It All Began: Olympus, for multiple characters:
    • Pathfinder was built there by Ash, Gibraltar's grandfather, Wattson's grandmother, and Horizon's son.
    • Lifeline and Octane were raised on Olympus, and their parents were as well.
    • Revenant became self-aware while performing a hit on Loba's parents in Olympus' Bonsai Plaza.
  • Yank the Dog's Chain: Desperate revival attempts in badly planned locations often end in this. Lifeline's barrier may force players to wait for the shot but also let them take their time to steady their aim and kill both the Lifeline and the other player once she's done.
    • When watching an enemy try to self-revive, it can be preferable to wait for them to complete self-revive and then shoot them down. Although this will consume the self-revive and prevent stealing it, a player will take less shots to kill after revival than when downed, saving ammo in a pinch. This can easily bite the attacker in the butt though if the player reviving themselves also has a Level 4 Backpack equipped, which grants them extra shields and health on revive.
  • You Are Already Dead: Players that have been directly hit by Arc Stars take damage from the impact, and have about four seconds before the star detonates to deal significantly more damage. Wraith can enter phase to shake off the star before it detonates, but everyone else has no means of preventing the followup damage.
  • You Have Researched Breathing: Players must unbox or buy Quips (short dialogue snippets that can be spoken by Legends) before they can use them.
  • Your Size May Vary: In-game, Season 13's giant sea creature is approximately the size of a circus tent. In the trailer on the other hand, while it still dwarfs the Legends, its volume is more in the range of a large house.

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