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  • Acting for Two: Caroll Spinney as Big Bird and Oscar, before his retirement.
  • Banned Episode
    • The late 1970s episode where Margaret Hamilton reprised her role as The Wicked Witch of the West is currently lost. The one time it aired, numerous parents sent hate mail saying it was too frightening for their children, and at least one Wiccan mother complained that the episode represented negative stereotypes of witches.
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    • The episode "Snuffy's Parents Get a Divorce" never aired as the test audiences didn't seem to get the concept well. No photographs are known to exist. Despite this, years later Sesame Street approached divorce again with Abby.
    • Regarding massive criticism, Katy Perry's "Hot and Cold" segment with Elmo has never been aired on television, due to parents on YouTube complaining that Perry's dress was too risqué for a preschool- to kindergarten-aged educational TV show. While the dress did show some cleavage (behind a mesh panel) and seemed to accentuate her chest in a way that makes it look as if the dress doesn't fit her, most viewers who saw the original sketch on YouTube declared that the ban is yet another sign of parents overreacting to sexuality and near-nudity on TV, yet turning a blind eye to violence, gore, and Nightmare Fuel.
  • Beam Me Up, Scotty!:
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    • Cookie Monster has never used the catchphrase "Cookies are a sometimes food!" It was Hoots the Owl who sang "A Cookie Is a Sometimes Food" to Cookie Monster. After the song, Cookie Monster replied, "Me get it, cookie is sometimes food. You know what? Right now is sometime!" and devoured the cookie.
      • He did, however, say "Cookies is sometimes food" in the Colbert Report skit.
    • Regarding Big Bird's encounter with Sally on Gordon's shoulders in the first episode, Big Bird is always quoted as saying, "Gosh! You're the tallest little girl I've ever seen!" (even Big Bird performer Caroll Spinney says this). However, in the actual episode, Big Bird's reaction is, "Dah! Oh my heavens! She's 8 feet tall!"
    • While the Sesame Street Old School DVDs state that they are intended for the older collector, the earlier seasons are still nonetheless family productions. As such, they never, ever said that they were for "adults only".note 
  • The Cast Showoff:
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    • Emilio Delgado translated the lyrics for "Sing" into Spanish himself. He also got the chance to show off his guitar-playing a few times, as seen here.
    • Alaina Reed's career began in Broadway musicals. She often took the opportunity to show off her singing chops.
    • Bob McGrath shows off on his piano-playing many times. He also takes every opportunity to show off his lovely singing voice (he began his showbiz career as a wannabe pop idol).
    • Caroll (Big Bird) Spinney, an artist on the side, drew the picture of Mr. Hooper for the episode where they discuss Mr. Hooper's death.
  • Cast the Expert: Happens a lot for special episodes.
  • Channel Hop:
    • From National Educational Television to PBS, as NET was leaving the airwaves. Not a literal example, as the educational stations airing Sesame Street were the same in virtually every market.
    • Played straight in the United Kingdom, however (when the show moved from ITV to Channel Four, and then to Cartoonito. Due to being their own shows, UK-based coproductions Sesame Tree and The Furchester Hotel do not count as part of this hop, as they both aired on CBeebies).
    • Starting in 2015, due to PBS having trouble paying the show's licensing fee, the show will air first on HBO, whose deep pockets even allow increasing the episode count to 35 per season, before airing on PBS nine months later.
    • The movie rights have jumped back and forth as well. Follow That Bird was released in theaters by Warner Bros., while The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland was distributed by Columbia Pictures, on behalf of the Henson Company's short-lived film unit Jim Henson Pictures. The upcoming third film will go back to WB, but they will coproduce it with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.
  • The Character Died with Him: When actor Will Lee, who played Mr. Hooper, passed away in 1982, the producers were faced with the usual options for dealing with loss on a kids' show: cast a new actor, or have the character simply leave the show (either with an explanation, such as he retired, or without). Instead, Sesame Street ran an episode where Big Bird understands that Mr. Hooper had died, it was OK to miss him, and that even though life would never be quite the same when someone beloved dies, it will get better. In tribute to him, the portrait Big Bird was going to give him still hangs in his nest to this day, more than 30 years later.
    • One documentary said that the "Mr. Hooper's not coming back" scene was the only scene in Sesame Street history done in a single take because the cast was too emotionally wrecked to do more takes. That the single take captured genuine emotion and showed that grown-ups, too, can feel sad and cry when people they love die, played a huge role in keeping the scene at one take... and also played a major role in the scene's critical acclaim.
    • This episode is also notable for not using a Really Dead Montage. The producers thought that it would be too confusing to talk about Mr. Hooper being gone forever while still showing him on screen. (However, several years after Hooper's passing, a "Really Dead Montage" would be played, usually when a newcomer asks about the store or Hooper himself; it was probably determined that enough time had passed and that the audience generally understood that Hooper was no longer with his neighbors and friends.)
  • Contractual Purity: Kevin Clash was the Muppeteer of Elmo, Baby Sinclair and numerous others. In 2012, he took a sabbatical from Sesame Street after a young man claimed that the two of them had a sexual relationship when he was 16. Clash did not deny the relationship, but claimed it happened after the young man had turned 18. The accuser later withdrew the allegations, but a series of other accusers came forward in its wake. Sesame Workshop expressed their willingness to support Clash, but he decided to resign to spare them the inevitable media scandal that would have resulted. Ryan Dillon has taken over Muppeteering duties for Elmo since.
  • Cowboy BeBop at His Computer: Given that this is a Long Runner aimed directly at very young children, this kind of thing happens a lot.
    • Two words: Veggie Monster. To paraphrase from the link, Sesame Street did a segment in 2005 where Hoots sings a song titled "A Cookie Is a Sometimes Food" to Cookie Monster, about eating a balanced diet; at the end Cookie declares that "Now is sometime!" and eats his cookies anyway. The media simplified this and ran with it to the point where to this day, you'll find people complaining that Cookie Monster has been turned into (or even been replaced by) a "Veggie Monster".
    • Before the debut of Kami, the HIV-positive Muppet, news media were in uproar, under the mistaken impression that this character would feature on the American version of the show. However, the character was only ever intended to be used in the South African version, where childhood HIV and AIDS are huge problems. Likewise, despite some of the more extreme claims, Kami's HIV status does not mean she is gay; by definition, the Muppets do not have a defined sexuality. To make this clearer, Word of God is that Kami contracted HIV from a blood transfusion as an infant.
    • This is mostly caused by the fact that Innocence Lost is an irresistible hook for news stories. If Sesame Street is dealing with some sort of thorny issue, then it allegedly demonstrates how much we've changed/failed as a society. This conveniently forgets that the show has always tried to avoid the Tastes Like Diabetes route and aims to reflect the real world in an honest way.
  • Creator Backlash: A minor one but, as seen here, neither designer Ed Christie nor puppeteer Carmen Osbahr were exactly pleased that Rosita lost her wings. Osbahr claims it was due to merchandising decisions, despite Rosita not having much merchandise at the time.
  • Crossdressing Voices:
    • In the 1970s and 1980s, there were numerous female Muppets performed by males. It's still occasionally done today, but not as often due to there being more female Muppet performers than there were back then. One notable example is Gladys the Cow, voiced by Richard Hunt. Additionally, Hunt and Jerry Nelson and Frank Oz performed many minor/one-off female Muppets, with many of Oz's female characters sounding almost exactly like Miss Piggy.
    • Little Bird was often referred to as a male, though he was typically performed by Fran Brill. Unusually in an early 1990s episode, Little Bird (still performed by Brill) was referred to as a female. Brill also performed a male rabbit named Howie in an early 1970s sketch.
    • Stephanie D'Abruzzo performed the left head of the Two-Headed Monster for the cold open of a Season 47 episode. Likely because Eric Jacobson (who's been the left head's performer since 2016) was already performing Bert in the same scene, thus making this example double as The Other Darrin.
  • The Danza:
    • Bob McGrath, who plays Bob Johnson on the show.
    • Linda Bove As Herself, and Miles Robinson was originally played by Miles Orman.
    • Alan Muraoka as Alan.
    • Christopher Knowings as Chris Robinson.
    • Ruth Buzzi as Ruthie
    • Savion Glover as Savion
    • The character of Gordon's last name was eventually penned as Robinson, in honor of original writer/producer and Gordon portrayer Matt Robinson.
    • Sesame Street has had a lot of Danzas. Even Tony himself has appeared as a guest star.
  • Dawson Casting:
    • Chris Robinson is supposed to be in high school or college, making him 17-18 in his first season. His actor, Chris Knowings, was actually 27 at the time his debut aired.
    • Maria celebrated her 21st birthday in 1979. Sonia Manzano, on the other hand, was 29 at the time the episode aired.
    • In reality, Bill McCutcheon, the actor who portrayed Uncle Wally, was only eight years older than actor Bob McGrath.
    • This also happens to some of the puppets on the show, who are supposed to be children, but are played by adults. The most jarring example is Julia, who is supposed to be a young girl, but sounds like an adult woman.
  • Defictionalization:
    • Outside Philadelphia, there's a theme park called Sesame Place. It includes a perfect life-size replica of the set of the show, and the characters come out to greet guests constantly. Yes, you can take photos.
    • For the show's 40th anniversary, a street corner in Manhattan was temporarily renamed 123 Sesame Street.
    • Pinball Number Count was made into an actual game as part of the show's 50th anniversary.
    • In 2019 "West 63rd Street and Broadway" in New York was permanently renamed to "Sesame Street".
  • Directed by Cast Member: By circa 2005, Kevin Clash got more involved behind the scenes, both directing and executive producing (the latter mostly applied to the "Elmo's World" segments, and other Elmo-related projects).
    • Other Muppet performers - Joey Mazzarino, Matt Vogel and David Rudman - have directed Sesame projects as well.
  • Dueling Shows:
    • Early on with Captain Kangaroo, particularly because a bunch of ex-Kangaroo staffers were working on Sesame Street.
    • Also Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, though the shows were more like Red Oni, Blue Oni companion pieces (Sesame Street was Red, Neighborhood was Blue), and the shows had a Friendly Rivalry, with Crossover episodes on both shows.
    • The street being brightened and cleaned up for Season 25, in addition to the new Around the Corner setting, and the addition of a ton of new human and Muppet characters (Zoe, in particular) was all because of the competition Sesame Workshop faced from Barney & Friends.
  • Exiled from Continuity: Not quite played entirely straight with Kermit the Frog. He doesn't appear too often on the show now that he's owned by Disney, but classic clips featuring him occasionally show up (particularly on the Old School DVDs, which have a copyright notice that mentions him in between the credits and the PBS logo).
  • Fandom Nod: In case you need proof that Cookie Monster isn't "The Veggie Monster".
  • Fake Russian: Count von Count. He even uses Chekov's W-for-V substitution.
  • Follow the Leader: To the point where viewership decreased and the average age of viewers got younger. Sesame Street is so influential that even its followers have followers.
  • In Memoriam: It was first used at the end of episode 1983 when Will Lee (Mr. Hooper died). This also happened with Jim Henson, Richard Hunt, and other cast and crew members that have died.
  • Irony as She Is Cast: According to Muppet Wiki, Allison Bartlett O'Reilly is allergic to dogs. However, Gina doesn't treat any real ones.
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes:
    • Good luck finding full episodes of older seasons. Once a season ends, it's almost never reran, and episodes are never given proper DVD releases. There are Sesame Street DVDs, but the ones that aren't Direct-to-Video specials are just compilations of skits. You can easily find skits on YouTube (the official channel includes classic sketches), but full episodes are very scarce.
    • Poor, poor episode 847 (the one with the Wicked Witch of the West as a guest character)... that episode is a legendary lost Sesame Street episode. Since that episode got huge amounts of negative reception when it first aired, it was decided that the episode should neither be aired again, nor be released on VHS or DVD. If you have a recording of that episode, by all means, do not get rid of it!
    • Averted to an extent with the announcement that nearly every episode of the show will be digitally restored and preserved in the American Archive of Public Broadcasting—but you'll need special permission to view the episodes!
  • Limited Special Collector's Ultimate Edition: The "Old School" line of DVDs, plus the "Sesame Street: 40 Years of Sunny Days" DVD.
  • Long-Runner Cast Turnover: During the 1990s, a number of major actors passed away or began to appear less. Season 37 saw the start of another ongoing turnover.
  • Milestone Celebration: Count It Higher!
  • Name's the Same: Bert & Ernie.
  • No Budget: Since 1993, Sesame Street has been under compounding budgetary strain, and it shows.
  • No Export for You: British viewers saw the show only intermittently and courtesy of ITV and later Channel Four and Nick Jr., because The BBC had declared Sesame Street was "too authoritarian" to show on British TV. What's more, on the latter channel it aired on, it got harsh treatment and was constantly moved around to death slots so that Nick Jr. could give more time slots to it's two highest-rated shows at the time, which were Thomas the Tank Engine and Magic Adventures of Mumfie. For twelve years, the series wasn't shown in Britain at all, although Elmo's World, Bert and Ernie's Great Adventures and Abby Cadabby's Flying Fairy School were shown as part of Channel Five's ''Milkshake!'' strand. From 2008 to 2013 a Northern Irish co-production, Sesame Tree, was shown on CBeebies, with new characters, but classic US sketches appearing on Potto's computer, and in 2014, CBeebies and Sesame Workshop launched the co-production The Furchester Hotel, which features Elmo and Cookie Monster along with an all-new troupe of Muppet monsters. This was soon averted in November 2016, when the show came to Cartoonito as a result of Turner partnering with Sesame Workshop to show the show on all Cartoonito channels worldwide. However, a couple of months after it premiered, history repeated itself when the UK Cartoonito pushed the show to late night and early morning timeslots so that they could give Fireman Sam more airtime, leading to said show dominating the schedule. It's currently unknown if either Cartoonito will return it or if another network will pick it up.
  • Old Shame: Around the Corner era (1993-1998) of this show tends to be looked at as this by Sesame Workshop. Retrospectives tend to skip over this era of the show or only show the barest minimum. Though Vindicated by History as 90's Sesame is still well-remembered by those who grew up watching it and many home video releases produced during that era still remain in-print.
  • One-Take Wonder: After Will Lee died, the show did an episode explaining Mr. Hooper's death in-universe as well. The cast was so emotional, they were unable to do a second take without breaking down.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • Three actors played Gordon (four if you count Garrett Saunders, the actor in the original test episodes): Matt Robinson for Seasons 1-3, Hal Miller for Seasons 4 and 5, and Roscoe Orman from Season 6 to today. Dr. Loretta Long (Susan) has mentioned that kids have asked her about the other Gordons, making her feel like she's been hiding their bodies under the stoop. Likewise, Gordon and Susan's son, Miles, was played by three different kids as well, first by Miles Orman, then Imani Patterson, and finally Olamide Faison.
    • Mr. Handford, who took over Hooper's Store after David and before Alan, was played by Leonard Jackson in his debut season, then by David Langston Smyrl for the remainder of his tenure on the show; Roscoe Orman even lampshaded this by comparing the switch to that of Darrin on Bewitched.
    • On the Muppet spectrum, we have Steve Whitmire for Jim Henson as Kermit the Frog and Ernie (the latter since recast with first Billy Bankhurst then Peter Linz), Eric Jacobson for Frank Oz as Bert and Grover and for Caroll Spinney as Oscar the Grouch, David Rudman for Frank Oz as Cookie Monster, Kevin Clash for Richard Hunt (also for Brian Muehl) as Elmo, Marty Robinson for Brian Muehl as Telly and for Jerry Nelson as Snuffy, and now more recently Matt Vogel for Jerry Nelson as Count Von Count and for Caroll Spinney as Big Bird. For a brief time during the first season, Danny Seagren stepped in as Big Bird while Spinney had fallen ill and was unable to attend tapings.
    • Averted with the beloved shopkeeper Mr. Hooper. Shortly after his actor, Will Lee, died in December 1982, the producers briefly considered – among a variety of options – hiring a new actor to play Mr. Hooper. Before the casting call went out, some bright fellow decided the only acceptable option was to address death head on … and so it came to pass with Hooper also passing away. (It had been suggested that children who had watched Sesame Street long enough would immediately be able to tell the difference between the Lee Mr. Hooper and any replacement and outright reject him, although ostensibly this was not a big matter when three different actors appeared as Gordon in a matter of two years.)
    • Smart Tina from the Roosevelt Franklin's Elementary School sketches was voiced by Loretta Long for the Merry Christmas from Sesame Street album instead of her usual voice actor Sonia Manzano.
  • The Pete Best:
    • Miguel, played by Puerto Rican actor Jaime Sánchez (best known for playing Angel, the Token Minority member of the outlaw gang in The Wild Bunch and for originating the role of Chino in West Side Story), debuted in season 2 and was the show's first Latino character. Sanchez left at the end of the season, and season 3 saw the debut of Maria and Luis.
    • Sort of, although the skits in which Herbert Birdsfoot appeared in continued to be re-used into the '90s.
  • Playing Against Type:
    • Many people (especially kids) wouldn't know this, but this is actually what Gordon and Gina were/are for Roscoe Orman and Alison Bartlett-O'Reilly, respectively. Aside from Gordon, Orman has played a variety of different villainous and unscrupulous characters (including the title role of Willie Dynamite) and – on the Law & Order franchise – no-nonsense judges. Bartlett-O'Reilly had been frequently typecast as a tough girl, a tomboy (which she attributed to her Brooklyn roots), a disturbed woman, or – as a regular on The Sopranos – a mobster's girlfriend. Similarly, Sonia Manzano (Maria) has also been typecast as mentally ill (namely on the Law & Order shows) or tough girls. Emilio Delgado (Luis) has generally been cast as a genial person in his off-Street roles, but has played a focused, nose-to-the-grindstone editor on Lou Grant. Will Lee, in his younger days, typically played nebbishy or neurotic characters, in contrast to the curmudgeonly-but-big-hearted Mr. Hooper.
    • In an example featuring the Muppet performers, as Ernie and Bert, Jim Henson and Frank Oz ended up in a role reversal of the straight man/jokester roles they usually performed as Kermit the Frog and Fozzie Bear. This can be particularly seen in an early segment where Ernie fantasizes about him and Bert having their personalities switched around where Bert acts more like Fozzie and Ernie more like Kermit. It's been said the Bert & Ernie dynamic was more like their real-life selves, with Jim as the sillier one.
  • Promoted Fanboy: Although the Muppets were nowhere near as big in 1969 as they are now, Caroll Spinney was an admirer of Jim Henson's work, and has often compared Henson asking him to join the company to being a drummer and having someone walk up to him and say, "Well, I'm with a band from Liverpool, would you like to be me drummerman?"
    • Kevin Clash, Steve Whitmire, David Rudman, Stephanie D'Abruzzo, and a vast number of the Muppet performers after the first few seasons also fall into the same category as Spinney.
    • Same can be said for a number of the live actors who joined the cast within the last 20 years or so, including Alan Muraoka and Chris Knowings.
    • Stacey Gordon, the puppeteer of Julia, was a die-hard Sesame Street fan as a child and wished that she could be on the show as her favorite character, a Twiddlebug. After meeting someone who worked on the show at a puppetry event and auditioning in-person, she was cast as Julia. Her son, who has autism like Julia, is also a big Sesame Street fan and was happy to see a Muppet who was just like him.
  • Reality Subtext:
    • Mr. Hooper's death.
    • Kermit was Put on a Bus because Disney bought out the Muppet Show Muppets. He still appears now and again in the occasional cameo or legacy segment.
    • In the wake of Hurricane Katrina, PBS reaired the week-long story arc from Season 32 (2001) - with a new introduction with Gordon explaining to parents that children can be frightened by such devastation, whether directly affected by it, or from seeing the coverage on TV. Since then, with devastating hurricanes becoming more commonplace, as of 2012, Sesame Workshop cobbled together the street scenes from the hurricane saga (specifically, the aftermath of the hurricane) into an hour-long special entitled Sesame Street Gets Through a Storm (also known as Friends to the Rescue on DVD), which is subsequently aired on PBS in response to any major hurricane, such as Sandy.
  • Real-Life Relative:
    • Miles and Gabi were originally played by Roscoe Orman's actual son Miles and Sonia Manzano's actual daughter Gabriela, respectively. Both were replaced by other actors as they grew up, however.
    • Loretta Long's mother played Susan's mom.
    • Chris' twin sister is Christy, both on- and off-stage.
  • Recursive Import
    • Plaza Sesamo, the Mexican adaptation, airs in the U.S. — the first foreign adaptation to do so. (It's on Univision's sister channel UniMas.) This is justified due to the expansive Hispanic community in the U.S.; why go through the trouble of dubbing or adding subtitles when the Mexican version does just fine?
    • The Furchester Hotel, the CBeebies co-production that airs in the U.K., is available on Sesame Street's official YouTube channel (thanks in part to its Quarter Hour Short format) and also airs on Universal Kids.
    • The Furchester Hotel is itself dubbed in Latin American Spanish, and airs on American television as Sesame Amigos.
  • Role-Ending Misdemeanor: A battery of sex allegations against Kevin Clash prompted him to bow out gracefully so as not to cause problems for Sesame Workshop on his account.
  • Romance on the Set: Carroll Spinney met & eventually married his second wife, Debra Quinn, who worked on the series in a number of backstage roles.
    • Martin P. Robinson (Telly, Snuffy, Slimey) married former show writer Anne Evans.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers: When Viacom sued YouTube in February 2007, Viacom also claimed Sesame Street clips that had aired on Noggin, because certain clips had the Noggin logo (Viacom owned Noggin, which is part of Nickelodeon). The users that were affected (and got banned from YouTube) were JonnyTBird4789, Nantosuichoken, and many other Sesame Street uploaders. Due to this, Sesame Workshop parted ways with Noggin, and eventually set up their own YouTube account.
  • Shoot the Money: The smaller version of Zoe, a.k.a. "Homunculus Zoe".
  • Spin-Off Cookbook:
    • The Sesame Street Cookbook by Pat Tornborg
    • C is for Cooking and B is for Baking by Susan McQuillan
  • Talking to Himself: All characters of the stop-motion animated segment Teeny Little Super Guy are voiced by Jim Thurman.
  • Throw It In!:
    • A small-scale version of Zoe was originally built for her role as "Mousey the Hatter Helper" in the direct-to-video Abby in Wonderland movie, but the puppeteers liked it so much that, starting in Season 40, they made this Zoe the de facto Zoe. Sesame Workshop, of course, tested this smaller Zoe by having kids visit the set, and they didn't seem to notice.
    • A good chunk of Muppet dialogue is ad-libbed, or at least used to be. Watch an old "People in Your Neighborhood" sketch to see Jim Henson try to make Bob crack up.
    • One recurring feature was having the Muppets interact with children in unscripted segments, resulting in such classic (and adorable) bits as this one.
    • Done in the episode addressing Mr. Hooper's death. The scene where the adults explain death to Big Bird was to be filmed with the adults maintaining composure. It became clear halfway through the first take that nobody was going to get through it without getting choked up, and the sincere emotions stayed in the final episode to show that even adults (who fully understand the concept of death) cry when someone close to them dies and that it is acceptable to cry, sometimes together, when something tragic happens. According to Bob McGrath, they tried shooting another take but by that point everyone was so grief-stricken that they couldn't go longer than a minute without crying.
  • Trope Namer:
  • Viral Marketing: Cookie Monster wants to become host of Saturday Night Live, so he's trying to make his audition tape go viral by getting people to spread the video.
  • What Could Have Been:
    • Caroll Spinney was very close to being aboard the Challenger as Big Bird. But the expenses of sending him and the puppet suit into space were enough to keep him off the shuttle and its explosive fate.
    • Spinney wanted Noel MacNeal (from The Puzzle Place, Bear in the Big Blue House, Oobi, Eureeka's Castle and eventually, Between the Lions) to succeed him as Big Bird, but MacNeal couldn't get Big Bird's voice right. However, MacNeal has performed Big Bird on occasions where neither Spinney nor Matt Vogel (Spinney's understudy and eventual successor for the character) were available, such as the 2010 Macy's parade.
    • Jim Henson originally intended Oscar to be purple, but TV cameras in 1969 couldn't handle that color. The first-season orange Oscar was abandoned for the same reason.
    • The pilot episodes had the Muppets kept separate from the humans and the street, but since the kids paid more attention to the Muppets in test screenings, the Muppets were wisely integrated.
    • Originally, in 2004, Natalie Portman was supposed to have appeared in three episodes as Natalie, a woman who was filling in for Alan at Hooper's Store while he went on vacation for a week. Unfortunately, however, after only the first episode was taped, Portman began losing her voice and was thus unable to continue. As a result, Gabi took over Hooper's Store for the remaining episodes that Natalie was supposed to appear in. Portman's appearance, in fact, clearly displays her ailing speech, although the two songs she sang in the episode were noticeably recorded during a separate session.
    • At one time there was an episode that was supposed to air on September 27, 2010, in which Katy Perry performs a version of "Hot and Cold" with Elmo. However, because the song wasn't kid-friendly enough, and because of the outcry of Media Watchdog groups over her Impossibly-Low Neckline and Absolute Cleavage, Sesame Workshop had to pull the episode a few days before it was to air. You can still watch the video here.
    • An episode where Snuffy's parents get divorced was written and filmed, but got such a negative reaction that it's never been aired. Eventually, a direct-to-video special was produced, in which Abby's parents spilt up. Her mom has since remarried, leading to Abby getting a step brother named Rudy, who joined the cast in Season 47.
    • Robert Guillaume was testing for the part of Gordon at the same time Roscoe Orman was.
    • The producers' original intention with Gordon and Susan was for them to be unmarried domestic partners in an attempt to further show diversity on the street, though Joan Ganz Cooney immediately axed this idea upon hearing it, saying, "Let them be married, for God's sake!"
    • In the early 1970s, the Muppet crew were looking for additional female performers, and Sonia Manzano - who was already a cast member at this point - auditioned. She admits that she wasn't able to master the various tasks involved in puppetry, though she did supply the voice for Smart Tina from the Roosevelt Franklin Elementary School inserts.
    • A member of the writing staff did an interview about the show's pop culture parodies like "Game of Chairs" and "House of Bricks," where he revealed they also considered a sketch based on Breaking Bad, but couldn't figure out a way to relate the concept to kids.
    • Jim Henson was once considered for the role of Big Bird as he was lanky and naturally over 6 feet tall, but Big Bird's builder, Kermit Love, felt that Jim didn't have enough of a bird-like walk. Henson then offered the role to Frank Oz, but Oz hated performing full-bodied puppets and declined.
    • Alaina Reed Hall, who played the role of Gordon's sister Olivia from 1976 until leaving in 1988note , was in talks to return to the series as Olivia during the late 2000s. Sadly, that possibility was scuttled when Hall lost her battle with breast cancer in 2009.
    • Gary Owens was cast in a spy-themed spoof as "The Man from Alphabet" that was widely hyped before the show's initial launch. But the sketches tested poorly and were deemed too confusing for children, and ultimately never made it to air.
  • The Wiki Rule:
  • Working Title: CTW struggled to come up with a good title for the project. 123 Avenue B was seriously considered, but got rejected for sounding more like a drama than a children's show, and being a little too New York-sounding for a show that was trying to appeal to a nationwide audience. Sesame Street wasn't well-liked either, with the fear that children would have trouble pronouncing it, and uncertainty whether the Shout-Out to Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves would be widely understood. But it finally got chosen because it was the suggestion that CTW employees disliked the least.
  • Written by Cast Member:
    • Sometime in the late 1970s/early 1980s, Sonia Manzano expressed concern to executive producer Dulcy Singer that Latin American culture wasn't being represented on the show very well, so Singer, in turn, suggested that Manzano write the material herself (one of the first things she wrote was the memorable "Hola" song for Maria and Luis); since then, Sonia Manzano has been on Sesame's writing staff (and even wrote a number of children's books based on her childhood experiences).
    • In addition to joining the Muppet staff in the early 1990s, Joey Mazzarino also got involved in writing for Sesame as well (his first bit was the Columbo parody, "Colambo"), and as of Season 40, is the show's current head writer.
    • Caroll Spinney pitched ideas that were worked onto the show, but ultimately never received any kind of writing credit for them. This includes the unscripted inserts involving children interacting with the Muppets (such as Joey and Kermit, or John-John and Herry), as well as outlining the entire Big Bird in China special.
  • You Look Familiar:
    • The Orange Gold Anything Muppet, though this is due to the fact that it always has the same features no matter what it is wearing when it appears.
    • Before becoming Mr. Noodle's Brother Mr. Noodle, Michael Jeter made a memorable guest appearance on the show, singing a remake of "Dance Myself to Sleep".
    • Before playing the villainous Huxley in The Adventures of Elmo in Grouchland, Mandy Patinkin appeared on the series proper in The '80s as a New York cop helping Big Bird look for his missing teddy bear; unlike Huxley, though, Officer George was incredibly dry and deadpan, leading many people to wonder if Patinkin was in a bad mood the day of taping, or would rather have not been on the show then. Patinkin also made guest appearances as himself on Shalom Sesame, a crossover program between Sesame Street and its Israeli counterpart, Rechov Sumsum.
    • John Candy had a bit part in Sesame Street Presents: Follow That Bird as a cop who arrests Sam and Sid Sleaze, before reprising his SCTV role of Yosh Schmenge on the series proper.

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