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  • The Abridged Series:
  • Acting for Two:
    • Notably, Megumi Hayashibara voices Rei, Yui, and Unit-01 (...and Pen-Pen, Asuka's adoptive mother, and a couple of minor background characters). The trope is employed very deliberately in the case of the first three, seeing how they all share a connection.
    • Besides voicing Asuka, Yuko Miyamura also voices a couple of background characters throughout the show.
    • In the Netflix Latin American Spanish dub, Asuka's mother and grandmother are both played by Mildred Barrera.
  • All-Star Cast: The Netflix English dub's cast features an extensive line-up of well-known actors, ranging from voice-over veterans like Ryan Bartley, Carrie Keranen, Erica Lindbeck, Johnny Yong Bosch, Ben Diskin, Christine Marie Cabanos, Lucien Dodge, Kirk Thornton, D.C. Douglas, Xander Mobus, Doug Erholtz, Billy Kametz, Abby Trott, John Paul "JP" Karliak and Ray Chase; live-action actors such as Henry Dittman, Stephanie McKeon and Daniel MK Cohen; and Rebuild of Evangelion alumnus Clifford Chapin.
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  • Alternative Foreign Theme Song: The Netflix version (outside of Japan) replaces the various variations of "Fly Me To The Moon" that plays over the end credits with "Rei I", presumably because of licensing issues.
  • Anime First: An odd example. The manga ran for almost a year before the series began, but it was made specifically for promoting the anime. And then it ran for almost two decades because of Schedule Slip.
  • Approval of God: The evening before the Netflix release, Spike Spencer, who voiced Shinji in works related to and including the original TV series, tweeted his enthusiasm for the new cast. He even congratulated Casey Mongillo and Stephanie McKeon for respectively taking up the mantles of Shinji and Asuka.
  • Big Name Fan:
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  • Cash Cow Franchise: Let's face it, the volume and variety of merchandise that's been created for Evangelion is up there with KISS.
  • Celebrity Voice Actor: The Netflix English dub had three famous actors outside of the anime industry:
    • Asuka Langley Soryu is voiced by the Irish singer/actress Stephanie McKeon. While she's also known for doing voice acting, albeit exclusively for non-Japanese media until Evangelion, for some Western viewers and listeners, she's known for playing Aisling O'Brien in the Irish TV Soap Opera Fair City, her work as a West End actress in London, as well as her relationship with her husband, fellow Canadian singer/actor/composer Kyle Riabko.
    • Film and TV actor Daniel MK Cohen, known for his work in the Lego City Adventures series, voices Makoto Hyuga.
    • Kozo Fuyutsuki is voiced by John Paul "JP" Karliak, best known as the voice of Wolfgang in Skylanders and Boss Baby in The Boss Baby: Back in Business.
  • Channel Hop:
    • The TV series and first two films were originally owned by Gainax, but when Anno formed Khara, the studios jointly owned the rights to the series. That was until 2014 when Khara eventually bought out Gainax's rights after a legal battle between the two entities.
    • ADV Films and Manga Entertainment respectively handled the English home media releases of the TV series and first two films. Then, in October 2020, GKIDS picked the rights up for a 2021 release.
  • Children Voicing Children:
    • For the Brazilian Portuguese dub, Fábio Lucindo (Shinji) and Priscilla Concepción (Rei) were 15 years old by the time the series first premiered on Locomotion. Fernanda Bullara (Asuka) was also one year younger than Lucindo and Concepción.
    • In the French dub, Donald Reignoux was 16 years old when he first voiced Shinji.
  • Cowboy BeBop at His Computer: The Netflix description for the first episode states that an angel "returns to attack Tokyo-3." Except this angel has never been seen before. Gendo does state that the angels have returned after 15 years, but this is the first appearance of this particular angel.
  • Creator Backlash:
    • After the release of The End of Evangelion, Kazuya Tsurumaki said that producing the film was unnecessary, since he thought the original Series Finale was fine.
    • Tiffany Grant, who voiced Asuka in the English dub of the original TV series and its related works, was understandably disappointed with the Netflix release for quite a few reasons. Besides having to tone down her performance during her first and only audition for Asuka, Grant was also appalled by the re-translated scripts (including Asuka's limited German dialogue) as well as Khara's involvement.
    • Donald Reignoux, the French voice for Shinji, disliked his work on the original TV series in general for quite a few years.
    • Conversely, Carrie Keranen and the actors from the Netflix English dub said they enjoyed working with Khara and VSI for its release.
    • Fabrizio Mazzotta and Netflix felt that their first Italian dub was an unmitigated disaster. While VSI Rome's dubbing manager wanted to maintain the original translations, longtime writer Gualtiero Cannarsi instead rewrote the script from scratch and Mazzotta didn't react to the news well. Even the new voice actors threatened to walk out because of it. In the end, Netflix decided to redub it yet again, this time with a more accurate script.
  • Creator Breakdown: The anime's increasingly more serious and depressing plot was a result of Anno's struggles with depression born of the stress from Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water's Troubled Production and disillusionment with the Otaku lifestyle at the time. Some parts of the manga suggest Sadamoto isn't too happy either, though not as "broken" as Anno.
  • Creator's Favorite: Anno commented during an Anime Expo Q&A panel that he considers Asuka his favorite character because "she's cute".
  • Darkhorse Casting: A few of the lead voice actors in the Netflix English dub were unknowns in the anime industry compared to the other roles; Daniel MK Cohen had major roles in short films and the same goes for Stephanie McKeon in musicals, TV series and films as well as John Paul "JP" Karliak in various TV series.
  • Dawson Casting: In most languages, Shinji, Rei and Asuka are not voiced by middle school-aged students. However, in the original Brazilian dub produced by Locomotion, they were actually voiced by real-life middle school-aged children.
  • Directed by Cast Member:
    • The English dub of the TV series was directed by Matt Greenfield, who voiced Makoto Hyuga and the Evangelion units in the original series. Amanda Winn-Lee directed the dubs of the first two films and the Director's Cut episodes.
    • In Locomotion's Latin American Spanish dub, Enrique Cervantes is Ryoji's voice actor as well as its ADR director. Meanwhile, Gerardo García, in addition to directing the Renewal dub, also replaced Cervantes as Ryoji.
    • As for the Netflix release:
      • In the English dub, Carrie Keranen is the main ADR director as well as Misato's voice actress.
      • América Torres not only voiced Ritsuko Akagi in the Latin American Spanish dub but was also its ADR director.
      • Jorge Saudinós directed the European Spanish dub and was also Toji Suzuhara's voice actor.
      • The Brazilian Portuguese dub included Shinji's voice actor, Fábio Lucindo, directing both the TV series and films. Oddly enough, the very first dub of the series in that language was directed by none other than the voice of Shinji's father, Fábio Moura.
  • Dueling Dubs:
    • Two English dubs of the TV series were produced as of 2019. The first was dubbed at what was then ADV Films in Houston back in 1996. The second was recorded at VSI Media's Los Angeles studio for its re-release on Netflix, this time featuring newer actors.
    • The series was also redubbed into Spanish (Latin and European), French, German, Italian and Brazilian Portuguese for the Netflix release. The European Spanish cast is completely different like the English ones. There was only one reprisal in German and Italian, and two in French. Latin America (Mexico/Brazil) had the most reprisals, mostly from the Animax dub of Renewal.
  • DVD Commentary:
    • The Movies feature commentaries by Amanda Winn-Lee, her husband and Taliesin Jaffe, which are generally beloved/despised (some have even nicknamed it "Commentary of Evil") for being mostly riffing, with a lot of conjecture about the possible meanings behind the films' abstract symbolism, and details on the process of dubbing the films and remastering the audio.
    • The Platinum Edition of the TV series featured commentaries on several episodes as well, albeit less memorable ones.
  • Defictionalization: Operation Yashima, the plan to reroute all of Japan's electricity into a single sniper rifle to take down an Angel, was the name given to a Twitter campaign to support Tokyo Electric's plan to conserve electricity after the 2011 disasters.
  • Development Hell: It's largely forgotten by now, but The End of Evangelion was in this for a brief period, which is why so many Japanese viewers who went to see Death and Rebirth were pissed off at the sudden cut-off of an ending. There's also the live-action movie (a co-production between Studio Gainax, ADV Films and WETA), which has allegedly been "in pre-production" since 2003; unfortunately the negotiations fell through due to the lawsuit between ADV and Gainax. Rebuild of Evangelion also counts; 2.0 was delayed a full year after its original release date, and 3.0s is around eight years after 2.0s. Keep in mind that the tetralogy was supposed to be finished by now.
  • Enforced Method Acting: During one of the recording sessions for The End of Evangelion, Yuko Miyamura allowed herself to be strangled by Megumi Ogata for Shinji's vision of strangling Asuka. That particular take, however, was never used.
  • Executive Meddling:
    • One of many theories regarding how the final episodes came to be as notoriously bizarre as they are is that the original scripts for the last two episodes were rejected by TV Tokyo due to their graphic content; thus the current ending was made due to last-minute budget cuts and/or as a way of giving the network the finger, and the rejected scripts eventually became The End of Evangelion.
    • Also, Anno's original intent was to use a piece of the Polovtsian Dances for the opening theme. The studio, concerned that viewers would be confused by such an opening, requested that it be replaced with a catchy J-pop number, and thus "A Cruel Angel's Thesis" was born.
    • The rather controversial more literal re-translation of the anime for the 2019 Netflix release was the result of Khara gaining creative control of the translation process, just like they were for Funimation's release of the third Rebuild film due to the negative reception of the dub's theatrical run in North America. Not only that, but Carrie Keranen confirmed in a now-deleted tweet that the studio also had to personally approve the new voice cast in order for the project to get the final greenlight.
  • Fake Nationality:
    • The Japanese-American-German Asuka Langley Sohryu is voiced by Houstonian Tiffany Grant in the original dub of the TV series and films, as well as the Rebuild films.
    • Dubliner Stephanie McKeon makes her anime debut as Asuka for the Netflix dub. Fittingly enough, McKeon actually was born in Western Europe.
  • Fan Nickname:
    • "Tang" for LCL.
    • Mind Rape (The Trope Namer).
    • GNR, or Giant Naked Rei, glowing white naked Rei that Lilith transforms into.
    • "Puppy-kun" for Shinji, at least for Eva fans who like him.
    • EMK, or Evil Manga Kaworu, for the Kaworu who kills a kitten in the manga — hence the meme "every time you masturbate, Kaworu kills a kitten."
      • To differentiate between the three Kaworus, fans mostly call them “Animeworu”, “Mangaworu”, and “Qworu” (because another name for Rebuild 3.0 is Q - similar to how the Tentative Name Ayanami Rei appearing in that specific movie is called Rei Q). The manga Shinji and Kaworu are also nicknamed “Shaun” and “Karl” respectively and the specific manga Shinji/Kaworu relationship is called “Karlshaun”, although this isn’t too popular.
    • "Yui-mama" for Unit 01.
    • "Uberpimp" for Gendo. Super Gendo, Super Adam Gendo and others for his insane AT Field-generating incarnation in the manga.
    • Zeruel's arms are often called toilet paper.
    • "Harpies" for Evangelion units 05-13 because they look like grotesque cyber-vultures.
  • Flip-Flop of God: Despite her initial misgivings towards being replaced for the Netflix dub, Amanda Winn-Lee, who voiced Rei in the original series, congratulated Ryan Bartley for voicing the character to the point where they met each other at the 2019 Delta H Con in Houston.
  • Fountain of Expies: Because of the series' influence on other anime and its impact on the anime industry itself, several of the characters would become inspirations for many other characters that came after them.
    • Rei is easily the most influential character of the series in terms of appearance and characterization, to the point that she inspired a whole trope by herself.
    • While not quite to the same extent as Rei (largely because the Tsundere trope had already been established before this series came along), Asuka inspired the creation of a whole slew of tsunderes similar to her. Many of the modern archetype's attributes (warm-colored hair, twin tails, perfectionist personality, affinity for kicks, rivalry with a mellower girl) were either popularized or innovated by Asuka.
    • Shinji inspired a staggering number of plain-looking Classical Anti Heroes with low self-esteem in fantastical settings. They remain very popular more than two decades after Evangelion, and in many genres they have completely displaced the more classically Japanese tropes of Idiot Hero and Hot-Blooded.
    • Kaworu has managed to inspire quite a few similar characters like him; if a series has a white or grey-haired Bishōnen who's Ambiguously Gay or bisexual and has Foe Romance Subtext with the male lead, chances are he had some influence from Kaworu.
  • Genre Relaunch: Evangelion was the work which arguably saved the anime industry, which was in dire straits because of a couple of high profile box office failures, most prominently Royal Space Force: The Wings of Honnêamise. Don't forget that Honneamise was also a Gainax production...
  • God Never Said That: Anno has never actually said that he wanted the series to be a Deconstruction or a backlash to any trends in anime. He also never stated that the show's ending or End of Evangelion was meant to be a reaction to the backlash about the end of the original series. A lot of old myths about the series are likewise untrue, such as Rei being intended to be creepy: Anno's exact words was that Rei represented the "most inexpressible" part of him; Megumi Hayashibara backed this up in a later interview. That said, see the below entry about Lying Creator.
  • I Knew It!: For Netflix's English dub:
    • Quite a few people predicted that Carrie Keranen and Johnny Yong Bosch would voice Misato and Toji. They were right.
    • Many fans have also correctly guessed the dub would be recorded at VSI's Los Angeles studio.
  • Image Source:
  • Keep Circulating the Tapes:
    • The original 16mm camera negative for episode 16 no longer exists for some reason (unlike the rest of the series), so an inferior internegative had to be used for the Renewal (AKA Platinum) restoration, giving it a more washed out look compared to the other episodes.
    • The series has been out of print in North America for some time, with only Rebuild of Evangelion continuing to be released; the Blu-Ray release of the show hasn't been released there at all. Additionally, ADV Films' original DVD release of the series contained French and Spanish dub tracks, making it the only instance of the French dub being released in North America.note  That was until 2021, when GKIDS picked up the home video rights.
    • ADV's English dub ran on Cartoon Network from October 2005 to April 2006 and has never been rebroadcast on American television since then. As of 2020, nearly 15 years later, it still has not.
    • Double Subverted when Netflix announced in 2018 that they would be streaming the series worldwide in spring of 2019, albeit with a new dub. The Netflix version also removed "Fly Me To the Moon" from the end credits outside of Japan likely due to the licensing issues.
  • Late Export for You: For Latin American Spanish and Brazilian viewers, the Netflix release of the End of Evangelion films will be the first time those films will be translated to Spanish and Portuguese respectively, as they didn't got those films as neither Locomotion (the previous Latin American licensor) not it successor Animax were able to do so before. Spaniards were more luckier on this regard.
  • Lying Creator: The amplitude of self-contradictory and at times seemingly absurd statements about the series from Hideaki Anno has led many to accuse him of this.
  • Missing Episode: Fortunately, it is not a full-on example, but following the original broadcast, Episode 16 was hit with a variation of this, when the episode's original master reel went missing, and was never recovered. Though the episode is still available, all subsequent versions of it, including the DVD, Bluray, and digital release, have been made and scaled up from a lower-quality copy, leading to the incarnation of the episode most viewers have exposed to having an unintentional washed-out look with a color saturation that is somewhat off.
  • Multiple Languages, Same Voice Actor: The Evangelion units sometimes have the same voice actor for both the Japanese and Netflix English dubs.
  • Name's the Same: Richard "Rick" Peeples, who voiced Keel Lorenz in the ADV release, shares the same nickname and surname with Roderick "Rick" Peeples of Prison Break fame.
  • No Export for You:
    • On the American market the series saw its last release on DVD under ADV Films in 2008, after which the series went out of print due to ADV's financial problems, and while the show saw occasional re-releases in Japan, the opportunities for Western viewers to get their hands on a legitimate copy of the series was steady dwindling, and the outlook became worse when ADV later lost the right to license the series entirely. Subsequently, the complete series was released in a HD version on a Blu-ray boxset in 2016 in Japan, but despite large interest in North America, the boxset never saw a release there. It was first with Netflix announcing in November 2018 that they had gained the streaming rights to the HD version of the series on the Western (and by western, we mean the American continent, the U.K., Spain, France, Italy and Germany, see more details above) and market that the situation was somewhat rectified, and the event also renewed the American fanbase's hopes that the Blu-ray boxset might also see a release in their part of the world some day.
      • Following the 2019 Netflix re-release, however, many long-time fans and critics, including Tiffany Grant, have complained that what has been put out is effectively case of Bad Export for You, chiefly because "Fly Me to the Moon", a song that was basically seen as about as iconic to the series as its theme song, has been removed from the soundtrack outside of Japan, and not only from the end credits, but in the most egregious cases also from scenes within the episodes themselves. Other complaints included the new translation, which is a more literal one from the original Japanese script, as well as the new Los Angeles-based voice cast, but these changes are not as universally agreed upon, with some fans even seeing them as a genuine improvement over the old ADV dub and translation.
    • On the other hand, this is still played straight in some regions, as the Netflix version is not available (or not dubbed) in neither Polish, Dutch, Danish, Russian and above all, all Middle Eastern feeds (Turkish, Hebrew and Arabic, for obvious reasons) and even in other Asian feeds like the Chinese (mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan), Thai, Indian, and Korean ones. Oddly enough, it is available in the Japanese feed and also in the Greek one, through sub-only in this last one.
    • Literally none of the video games have ever left Japan
  • No Dub for You: Latin America got most of the series of course, but didn't get an official dub of The End of Evangelion until 2019 with the re-dubbing on Netflix a good twenty years after the fact (mainly due to rights issues).
  • Old Shame: Evangelion became this trope for Shinji's original French voice actor, Donald Reignoux. He admitted he had a terrible time during the dub's recording sessions and refused to work at Chinkel for years. Nowadays, Reignoux's far less negative about the series since he reprised Shinji for the second Rebuild film and has continued to play the character ever since. Interestingly enough, Chinkel is owned by VSI Media, which produced the Netflix dubs for the series.
  • The Original Darrin:
    • With regards to Netflix's Latin American Spanish dub:
      • Georgina Sánchez, Asuka's second voice actressnote  resumes her role here after she was replaced by Nallely Solís for episodes 21-24 of Renewal and Azucena Martínez for the second Rebuild filmnote .
      • Circe Luna, the regular voice for Rei, also returns to reprise her role after she was replaced by Gaby Ugarte for Renewal and Ana Lobo for the third Rebuild film.
      • Likewise, Rodrigo Carralero, having taken over for Ricardo Tejedo as Aoba in the Renewal remaster, returns here after being replaced by Héctor Moreno for the Rebuild films.
      • When the Animax version was being recorded, Roberto Mendiola replaced Enzo Fortuny as the voice of Hyuga. Mendiola himself was replaced by Manuel Campuzano for the first two Rebuild films. When the third Renewal film premiered in Latin America, Fortuny was finally brought back to reprise his role. As a bonus, Fortuny stayed on to retroactively voice Hyuga in the Netflix version.
      • Marisol Romero, Misato's second voice actress,note  also returns here after being replaced by Yanelly Sandoval for the first two Rebuild films and Vivian Magos for the third one.
      • Gaby Willer also returns as Asuka's stepmother from the Locomotion dub.
    • As for Netflix's German dub, Horst Lampe reprises his role as Keel Lorenz after being replaced by Bernd Kuschmann for the first two films and Erich Räuker for the third Rebuild film.
  • The Other Darrin:
    • While the Japanese cast has remained remarkably consistent over the years, the English dub is notorious for at least changing part of the cast throughout the franchise.
    • It's even worse in the European Spanish dub. Only Shinji retains a single voice actor through the franchise (Albert Trifol Segarra) while the rest of characters have at least two or three, and often very different sounding among them. Asuka and Kaworu, who have a different VA in almost every medium of the franchise, are the worst examples.
    • The French dub does not fare much better. Only Shinji and Misato retain their voice actors through the majority of the franchise, with End shuffling up most of the cast and 1.0 recasting everyone. Fortunately a decent chunk of the original cast (including the aforementioned two) return for the later films.
    • In the Latin American Spanish dub that aired on Animax, quite a few actors were replaced, including Asuka and Rei, who were respectively voiced by Georgina Sánchez and Gaby Ugarte. Sánchez herself would later be replaced by Nallely Solís for the Director's Cut of episodes 21 through 24 due to the former living outside of Mexico City at the time of recording the episodes.
    • With regards to the 2019 Netflix release:
      • None of the English actors of the TV series and films reprised their roles. The series was re-recorded in Los Angeles rather than in Houston where the original series was recorded. Even then, when Manga's dub of Death & Rebirth and The End of Evangelion were partially recorded in Los Angeles and New York City in addition to Houston, none did return, not even Spike Spencer, Amanda Winn-Lee or Tiffany Grant. Makes sense with Keel Lorenz's ADV voice actor Richard Peeples, who died in January 2014.
      • The same example from the above but for the European Spanish dub, everyone was recast, including Albert Trifol Segarra (Shinji's voice actor since the original TV series).
      • Despite Donald Reignoux and Laurence Bréheret coming back to voice Shinji and Misato for the French dub, everyone else was replaced.
      • Likewise for the German dub, Horst Lampe returned to voice Keel Lorenz but everyone else was recast.
      • In the Italian dub, everyone else suffered the same fate as the other dubs, except for Oliviero Dinelli, who voiced Kozo Fuyutsuki in every incarnation of the Evangelion series. Interestingly enough, a couple other actors from the original series returned for this dub as different characters. For example, Domitilla D'Amico, the original voice for the younger Asuka, returned here as Misato.
      • In the Latin American Spanish dub, some side characters and some main characters, including Tojinote  and Keelnote , were recast either due to their voice actors having passed awaynote  or are now living out of townnote . Interestingly enough, some of the Rebuild actors return as different charactersnote  or as additional voicesnote . Oddly enough, Mildred Barrera, who voiced Kyoko (Asuka's mother) in the Netflix and Renewal versions, is replaced with Patricia Acevedo in the dub of End.
  • Playing Against Type:
  • The Production Curse: The original European Spanish dub of The End seemed to be touched by this. Firstly, the distribution company changed from Manga Films, who had licensed the series, to Selecta Visión, which brought a change of studio with its consequent mess. Then, members of the series's cast started to fall off due to the most varied reasons: Ana Pallejà was replaced by Iris Lago as Asuka when the former actress went on maternity leave, Juan Carlos Gustems was unable to reprise Gendo due to scheduling conflicts and was replaced by John Massotkleiner, María Moscardó claimed she was retiring from voicing animation (only for her to do it again a mere year later) and was thus replaced by Carmen Calvell, Eduardo Díaz replaced Josep María Zamora as Lorentz due to the latter's retirement, and José Luis Mediavella was apparently not even contacted. Most of those characters would receive very controversial replacements in a clear attempt to reduce the budget that didn't sit very well with the fans. Then, if all of this was not enough, the new studio would later be accused of legal malpractice. It is safe to say few people in both sides ended up satisfied with this work.
  • Promoted Fanboy:
    • After ADV Films released the series in North America, Tiffany Grant (Asuka's English VA) became a professional fangirl.
    • Ray Chase, the English voice of Gendo Ikari in the Netflix re-release, is an Evangelion fan.
  • Real-Life Relative:
    • In the Latin American Spanish dub of the TV series, both of Shinji's younger voices in flashbacks has been done by Víctor Ugarte's sisters. Gaby in the Locomotion dub and Xóchitl in the Animax dub... due to the former being The Other Darrin for Rei in the second dub.
    • The Netflix European Spanish dub features ADR director Jorge Saudinós as Toji and his younger brother Alex Saudinós as Kensuke.
    • In the Netflix Latin Spanish dub, América Torres not only voices Ritsuko Akagi and is the ADR director, but her son Ethien Desco provides additional voices. Her husband (and Ethien's father), Esteban Desco, also provides additional voices, most notably the ship's captain in the eighth episode.
  • Real Song Theme Tune: "Fly Me to the Moon", written by Bart Howard and made famous by Frank Sinatra, serves as the TV series' ending song.
  • Role Reprise:
    • The Manga dub of Death & Rebirth and The End of Evangelion managed to bring back the voice actors for Shinji (Spike Spencer), Rei (Amanda Winn-Lee), Asuka (Tiffany Grant), Kaji (Aaron Krohn), Misato (Allison Keith), Ritsuko (Sue Ulu), Kensuke (Kurt Stoll), Toji (Brett Weaver), Aoba (Jason C. Lee) and Gendo (Tristan MacAvery in his final role before he moved to Syracuse, New York).
    • As for the Netflix version:
      • In addition to Víctor Ugarte returning as Shinji for the Latin American Spanish dub, most of the primary characters have their actors from both the Locomotionnote  and the Animax Renewalnote  dubs.
      • The French dub brings back Donald Reignoux and Laurence Bréheret as Shinji and Misato, respectively. They are notably the only surviving original cast members to make a return.
      • The Italian dub has Oliviero Dinelli once again returning as Kozo Fuyutsuki.
      • Horst Lampe reprises his role as Keel Lorenz for the German dub.
      • In the Brazilian Portuguese dub, Fábio Lucindo (Shinji), Priscilla Concepción (Rei), Fernanda Bullara (Asuka), Fábio Moura (Gendo), Vágner Fagundes (Toji), Rafael Meira (Kensuke), Yuri Chesman (Kaworu), Wellington Lima (Aoba) and Fátima Noya (Miki) once again reprise their roles from the Locomotion and Animax releases. In addition, Silvia Suzy (Ritsuko), Tatiane Keplmair (Hikari), Alfredo Rollo (Hyuga), Alessandra Araújo (Naoko) and Élcio Sodré (Shiro) also reprise their roles from the Animax version.
  • Romance on the Set: By sheer coincidence, the voices for the three Eva pilots in the ADV dub married the voices for three Nerv technicians. Amanda Winn (Rei) married Jason C. Lee (Shigeru), Spike Spencer (Shinji) married Kendra Benham (Maya), and Tiffany Grant (Asuka) married Matt Greenfield (Makoto). Of those however, only Winn and Lee are still together.
  • Rule 34 – Creator Reactions:
  • Schedule Slip: The manga, and how. The first chapter was released months before the anime started (December 1994), but thanks to a somewhat sporadic release schedule and a couple of long hiatuses (understandable since the manga was a side-project for Sadamoto), the last chapter was published in June 2013. That's over 18 years for 14 volumes of material! The English translation took 11 years for its production run, from February 2004 to February 2015.
  • Screwed by the Lawyers:
    • The ending theme song, "Fly Me to the Moon", required royalties to be paid to the estate of its original songwriter, Bart Howard. For this reason, this theme was dropped and replaced by one of Shiro Sagisu's cues, "Rei I", for the international Netflix releases.
    • The lawsuits between Khara and Gainax over the income from projects that Anno contributed to switched the original story credit from Gainax to Anno himself from the Blu-ray re-releases onwards.
    • Gainax, ADV and Weta began arranging plans to produce a live-action film adaptation of Evangelion back in the early 2000s, but it got stuck in Development Hell. The film was further delayed thanks to a lawsuit made by ADV Films over Gainax refusing an option to produce that film in 2011 as well as Khara gaining the franchise's copyrights from Gainax in 2014.
  • Screwed by the Network: Khara had the VSI Group redub the entire series from scratch for its Netflix release with a new Los Angeles-based cast, likely thanks to Khara gaining total control of the Evangelion rights from Gainax as well as their involvement in the 3.0 dub following the negative reception of the theatrical release.
  • Short-Lived Big Impact: Evangelion was one of the most influential anime shows of the Giant Mecha Genre and in general, but only lasted one season and 26 episodes.
  • Shrug of God: After fans were upset with the ambiguity of the series, Hideaki Anno declared that it was up to viewers to determine their own meaning and reprimanded them for expecting all the answers on a silver platter. Over the years he has offered, at best, several vague and contradictory statements as to the meaning(s) and intentions of the series. He has, however, occasionally spoken out on a couple of details, such as Jossing the fan theory that Misato was the one who shot Kaji stating that it was a unknown assassin who carried out the deed either on SEELE or NERV's behalf.
  • Star-Making Role: Shinji Ikari for Spike Spencer in English, Víctor Ugarte in Latin America and Albert Trifol Segarra in Spain.
  • Talking to Herself: In the Girlfriend of Steel game series, Megumi Hayashibara voices both Mana Kirishima and Rei.
  • Technology Marches On: Back in the series' heyday in the mid-to-late 90s, Shinji listened to his music on an S-DAT player, as the format still had a following among Japanese audio enthusiasts when the series was made, while in the West record industry concerns about piracy relegated it to professional use. Nowadays, with the sporadic manga releases, it's been replaced by a Mini iPod. Rebuild of Evangelion has him keep the S-DAT player despite being released in 2007.
    • While Apple still makes very small MP3 players, the product officially named "iPod Mini" has been retired.
  • Throw It In!: Tiffany Grant improvised and wrote much of the German dialogue for Asuka in the first English dub.
  • Trope Namer:
    • Assimilation Plot: Used to be called "Instrumentality", but was changed after it was realized how spoileriffic that title is.
    • Gainax Ending: Congratulations!
    • Mind Rape: Arael's invasive mental contact with Asuka, described as such during the scene.
    • Rei Ayanami Expy: Rei's strange personality and appearance would go on to become the basis for many similar characters in future works.
    • Unfamiliar Ceiling: The Japanese title of the second episode. Ironically, Shinji ends up in the NERV medical ward so often it eventually becomes a familiar ceiling.
    • Zettai Ryouiki: Literally "Absolute territory", but has since taken a life of its own.
  • Troubled Production: Oh, boy, strap in for this...
    • The show began while Anno struggled with a clinical depression following a Creator Breakdown from the stress of working on Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water (which had a severely Troubled Production of its own), and relied on several sponsors for its support. Several of these sponsors pulled out as the show became increasingly dark. Given that this was before Evangelion became a Cash Cow Franchise, it's a wonder that Anno and Gainax got the show finished.
    • Not to mention a severe case of Real Life Writes the Plot: A whole chunk of a mostly finished script for the second half of the series ended up being trashed and rewritten from scratch, because of a central plot point in it had a strong resemblance to the Aum Shinrikyo cult's terrorist attack on the Tokyo subway in March 1995.
    • This trope also extended to the American side of the Pacific with ADV Films. Commentary for the English dub will often make reference to it being made on budget that consisted of a metaphorical shoestring and paperclip, involved renting out space to do recordings with substandard equipment, and had a good portion of the cast played by members of the production team besides the voice actors, among other things. They weren't exactly in danger of going out of business, but it's still pretty amazing that the dub was as good as it was all things considered, though it also goes a lot of way to explain why it was as uneven in places as it was.
    • The Latin American Spanish dub suffered from this trope, big time: Originally it was planned to be dubbed with a different voice cast. For some reason, the licensor (possibly ADV Films) decided to dub the series in Colombia, using the same studio who dubbed the very unpopular dub of Rurouni Kenshin. For unexplained reasons, they only dubbed a pilot episode, but they were never be able to dub the entire series. Later, the dub was planned to be made in a Spanish-speaking studio in Los Angeles (possibly All Post/Point.360, who produced some Latin Spanish dubs for TMS Entertainment in the late 90's) and, after too much criticism, it went back to Mexico again, albeit with a very different cast from the original Mexican one. Interestingly enough, some of the same cast would later go on to reprise their roles in the Netflix dub.
  • Unintentional Period Piece:
    • The JSSDF soldiers that raid NERV in End of Evangelion all carry H&K G11 rifles, which would have been considered futuristic... in 1997. The G11 program fell apart in 1990 and the rights repurposed by 2004 with only a few functioning rifles ever being built and is considered and abject and expensive failure instead of the future of military arms.
    • Plus, the series is set in a fictional vision of 2015. Notice the lack of smartphones. Shinji using a Digital Audio Tape player also sticks out, given that today the format exists as a footnote in audio tech history, noted only for the severe legal issues with the recording industry that plagued it upon release. It could be slightly justified by the fact that the In-Universe backstory is that the Second Impact, which occurred in 2000 and killed off a large portion of humanity in addition to causing severe damage all around led to an Alternate History. This was addressed rather creatively in the ending of the manga adaptation where Shinji is seen using a smartphone to talk to his aunt. In this version, Shinji stops "Instrumentality" and retroactively prevents The Second Impact from ever happening in the first place, creating an alternate reality where human technology developed as it did in the real world. The nearly two-decade production that plagued the manga actually ended up helping it in this regard.
  • What Could Have Been: Enough for its own page.
  • The Wiki Rule: Pick from EvaWiki or Evangelion Wiki on Wikia.
  • Word of Saint Paul:
    • Tiffany Grant, Carrie Keranen and Amanda Winn-Lee all confirmed that Khara had to personally approve the new voice cast in order for the Netflix release to get the final greenlight.
    • Grant also noted that the rights to the ADV dub have long since reverted to Khara.
    • Ray Chase, the voice of Gendo in the English Netflix release, confirmed Khara's involvement in the dub as well.
  • Writing by the Seat of Your Pants: A downplayed case. The series does by and large follow the plot as it was outlined in the original first draft proposal, with the first half or so sticking more or less beat-for-beat to that outline. But a case of Real Life Writes the Plot with the Aum Shinrikyo cult's terrorist attack on the Tokyo subway leading to much of the script having to be scrapped and rewritten, as well as Anno being in treatment for his clinical depression and taking up an interest in psychology as a result, meant that the show starts seriously deviating from said proposal around Episode 16 and forwards. The abstractness of Episode 25 and 26 is pretty much the ultimate culmination of this, as Anno and the team were running seriously short on time at this point, and therefore could not make their originally planned ending, and so instead had to go for something that was more easily achievable in the time left to them.
  • Written by Cast Member:
    • Matt Greenfield, Makoto Hyuga's voice actor and the ADR director, wrote the scripts for the original ADV dub. His future wife, Tiffany Grant, helped write the German dialogue for Asuka.
    • Carrie Keranen, the Netflix English dub's ADR director and voice actress for Misato Katsuragi, co-wrote the scripts with Oscar Garcia.

  • Looks like everyone has an interesting Meaningful Name. Makinami, the Meganekko in Rebuild, has two variants:
    • When the kanji for nami (波) is placed behind maki (真希), this will literally mean "wave winding", which can reference "momentum" and/or "velocity". In turn, this relates over to the speed of light mentioned earlier, in which light is found to have both mass and velocity in the form of an electron/photon. For comparison to this "speed of light", her personality (as it is on the Characters page) is most often described as a hard-hitter who normally presses Berserk Buttons on the battlefield.
    • The second variant is when the kanji for unusual(!) (which is 希) is removed from the above. This new term (波真, which is now nami shin) now has an entirely new meaning: True Wave. This would be best represented by how, near the ending of Rebuild 2.0, Makinami unleashes an entirely new form of the EVA. She explains this as a pilot "rids itself of its humanity", and she uses a code word to unlock this new form: The Beast. Note that the Angels are, as per NERV's research, supposed to bear a 99.89 percent similarity to humanity. That research, along with the above information, makes this "Beast" form not a coincidence.
  • On another note, the interconnecting theme to the pilots here is how they have some usage of the equation for momentum of light used in Chemistry(!) and other sciences. Applying Fridge Logic based on the above given information, we have (in SI Units): Makinami (representing momentum, in kg*m/s) = Ayanami (representing frequency, in "1/s") x Shikinami (representing wavelength, in "m") x Shinji (representing mass, in "kg"; remember his name literally means anchor).

  • The Evangelions were based visually on Go Nagai creations Devilman and Mazinger Z. Anno cites the terrifying face, slender build, hunched back and chest plate as coming from Devilman, while its glowing eyes with the red markings were derived from Mazinger Z. The first shot of Evangelion, with its large head, was a direct homage to the first episode of Mazinger Z.
  • The opening shot of The End of Evangelion is a mirror image of the closing shot of Evangelion: Death. The opening shot of Rebuild of Evangelion 1.0 is a reflection of the closing shot of The End of Evangelion, with a few... scenery details removed.
  • The US voice actors for the three main Children all married the original voice actors for the Bridge Bunnies: Amanda Winn-Lee (Rei) is married to Jason C. Lee (Aoba); Spike Spencer (Shinji) was formerly married to Kendra Benham (Ibuki); and Tiffany Grant (Asuka) was formerly married to Matt Greenfield (Hyûga).

  • Frame by frame on Episode 22, during the Mind Rape sequence, we get some... creepy analysis of what the Angel is doing. In order (apply Does This Remind You of Anything? throughout):
    • Gnoll, a cross between a gnome and a troll. "Groll" (German for "resentment") is also accurate.
    • Menarche, which is female puberty (specifically, a girl's first menstrual cycle).
    • Schema, which is a pattern of thought-behaviors. In other words, automation of the human mind.
    • The kanji for "baka!".
    • A series of German lines that, when combined, mention that Asuka was actually saddened when her mother died.
    • The repeated use of "nein" (no) and "tod" (death).
    • Slightly censored characters that read "sex", which could allude to a number of things, to do with Asuka wanting to be "mature", a metaphor of what the angel is doing to her, etc.
  • As an interesting note for both Latin American and Spaniard viewers, Evangelion is, to this date, the only Studio Gainax series dubbed to Spanish and Portuguese respectively, at least for Latin American viewers. Spaniards are a bit more luckier, as they got Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water and Otaku no Video first, through only Nadia got a dub there. Also, for both Latin Americans and Spaniards alike, this is also the first Studio Khara work (not including Rebuild of Evangelion) dubbed in that language, now that they own the rights of the franchise.


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