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The first stage play features Aesop and Joseph as its leads.
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The stage adaptation of Identity V, produced by Movista (of Tsukiuta fame). The plays depict the setting and characters from the game, but take the story in a different direction, and are considered an alternate canon from the story of the game.

Each play features different main characters, usually a Hunter and a Survivor, though episode 2 featured three Hunter-Survivor feature pairs in three different versions.

In addition to the Hunter and Survivor sides, each episode also has special comedy performances with alternate costumes. These are also included on the Blu-rays.


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The plays provides examples of:

  • Costume Porn: Lovingly recreated from those in the game.
  • Did We Just Have Tea with Cthulhu?: Sometimes the other Hunters are unsettled by being reminded of what Hastur really is.
  • Friendly Enemies: Outside of the games, the Hunters and Survivors get along quite well. In the first episode, Lucky Guy tells Eli and Aesop that he often goes to the Hunters' side of the manor to spend time with them. In the third episode, Eli stops to chat with Joseph before escaping at the end of a game.
  • Full-Name Basis: Freddy has a tendency to use people's full names when he's complaining about something they do.
  • Massive Multiplayer Ensemble Number: At the end of each performance, the whole cast performs a dance to the episode's theme song.


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Episode 1: What To Draw provides examples of:

  • Band of Brothers: The possibility of real injury or death in the game forces the Survivors to work together.
  • Commonality Connection: Bi'an suggests that Aesop and Joseph could get along, because they both use paintbrushes. More than that, they both tried to capture death with their arts. Joseph responds by insisting that other than that, they're opposites.
  • Death Is Cheap: Survivors who die in the game are simply healed up and returned to the manor. Injuries taken in the game are also healed. No one takes this to heart quite as much as Aesop, who spent his games actively seeking to be killed in as great a variety of ways as he could manage... until Joseph got fed up with him and requested a change to the rules.
  • Friendship Moment: Eli and Lucky Guy come to visit Aesop when he is disliked by the other survivors.
  • Killed Off for Real: What Joseph gets the masters of the manor to allow. No one ends up dying, but Emma does get badly injured.

Episode 2: Double Down provides examples of:


Episode 3: Cry for the Moon provides examples of:

  • 100% Adoration Rating: The Bloody Queen in the mirror world... on the surface, at least.
  • Anti-Escapism Aesop: Mary must be convinced to give up the mirror world, because it's not real — and if she doesn't, it'll all come crashing down, and she'll die... precisely because it was never real to begin with. Questionable, in regards to the extent that the endless, unchanging life of the manor can be considered "real". But yes, a certain Embalmer/Music Master is on board with the idea.
  • Commonality Connection: Eli and Mary, over their Hungarian song.
  • Dances and Balls: Every day is a party in the mirror world! Featuring a lovely ballroom dancing scene, with Aesop, the Music Master, on the piano.
  • Defrosting Ice Queen: Mary's side of the story. Eli's role is basically just to help her defrost.
  • Gorgeous Period Dress: Besides Mary, the rest of the costumes featured in her introduction series in the game make their appearances here — Aesop, Joseph, Patricia, Luchino, Mike, and Murro all have their alternate costumes as Mary's court. The rest of the characters become her servants, and get original (though plainer) costumes as such.
  • Gratuitous Foreign Language: The "Lullabye of the Moon" that Mary and Eli both sing is in Hungarian.
  • Requisite Royal Regalia: Mary and her court in the mirror world.
  • Trapped in Another World: Eli, and the rest of the cast, in Mary's mirror world.


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