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The Makers of Uno are a series of Card Games published and distributed by International Games, Inc. (IGI), the makers of the card game UNO. When Mattel purchased IGI in 1992, the company kept the moniker for their card games, although only Uno and Skip-Bo survived the Channel Hop.
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Below is list of games with the "Makers of Uno" inset on the box. Those in bold are currently in print. Note that the year represents its debut launch, not when the company acquired the rights to publish.

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    International Games, Inc. 
  • UNO (1971)
  • Grabitz (1974)
  • O'NO 99 (1980)
  • The Dukes of Hazzard Card Game (1981)
  • Catchword (1982)
  • Color Cubes (1982)
  • Funny Train Card Game (1982)
  • G.I. Joe Card Game (1982)
  • Skip-Bo (1982)
  • Slap Jak (1982)
  • Color Bunch (1983)
  • Land Rage (1983)
  • Letter Ladder (1983)
  • Luck Plus (1983)
  • Rage (1983) (Now owned by Ideal)
  • Sequence Rummy (1983)
  • Space Rockets Card Game (1983)
  • Walk N' Wait (1983)
  • Gremlins Card Game (1984)
  • Snorks Card Game (1984)
  • Sting (1984)
  • Rummy Rumble (1985)
  • Vantage (1985)
  • Stun (1986)
  • Top That! (1987)
  • Baha (1989)
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Heroes in a Halfshell Card Game (1990)
  • Trumpet (1990)

    Mattel 
  • Phase 10 (1982)
  • 5 Alive (1990)
  • Blink (1995)
  • Mad Gab (2000)
  • Boom-O (2000)
  • Qwitch (2002)
  • Cinq-O (2003)
  • Kuuduk (2003)
  • Kaboodl (2004)
  • Pictionary Card Game (2004)
  • Whac-A-Mole (2004/2009)
  • Scrabble Dash (2009)
  • Story Smash-up (2010)
  • Angry Birds: The Card Game (2011)
  • Card 'N' Go Seek (2015)
  • BOLD (2016)
  • Lowdown (2016)
  • Snappy Dressers (2016)
  • Basher Science Card Game Series (2017)
  • DOS (2018)
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Information about the card games Uno and Dos can be found here.

The Makers of Uno provides examples of:

    Skip-Bo 
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: Averted, the changing colors (present in most versions) do not mean anything.
  • Discard and Draw: Ending a turn requires placing a card from the hand to one of the four personal discard piles. When there's two or more overlapping cards in one discard pile, only the top card can be played.
  • Extra Turn: A player who rids of their hand gets to draw five more cards and keep playing. Placing the last card on hand on the personal discard pile does not count.
  • House Rules: Enforced. The manual allows smaller stock piles for faster games.
  • Luck-Based Mission:
    • A new center pile requires a "1" or a "Skip-Bo" card. A starting round can drag on should neither players have such cards to place. Skip-Bo Jackpot speeds up the game by letting players buy a number using coins at the same value before using the next value card (e.g. 5 coins for a five then placing a six).
    • Skip-Bo Dice (1995) is a press-your-luck style of game in which the dice must follow ascending value. Unfortunately, the first five dice (four green, one red) must be placed on the board before picking up the next set of dice, and this makes the probability of getting past the first five numbers (especially the lone red die) really low.
  • Spiritual Successor: Of the games Spite & Malice and Flinch.

    Phase 10 
  • Adaptation Expansion: The iOS/Android version has multiple Phase 10 variants, including a new even/odd set (a set only having odd or even numbered cards) and single-color mixed sets.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: The Twist Space allows a player to chose one of the two phases next to the space or pick at random one of the harder Twist Phases. A Twist Phase doubles movement (four spaces for a clear, six spaces for going out) at the risk of going backwards for failing a phase.
  • Discard and Draw: A player starts by drawing a card from the card deck or the one on top of the discard pile and ends their turn by discarding a card. Twist has three available discard piles to choose from.
  • Do Well, but Not Perfect: Winning in Twist is simply passing phase ten. However, if someone lands on phase ten, they have to go out in order to win. The optimal strategy is to land on the second-to-last space and simply complete the phase (or land on the third-to-last place and go out) to pass phase ten.
  • Fake Longevity:
    • Especially with more than two players as those who didn't complete the phase are stuck until they are able to do so. Twist mitigates this problem by advancing those who didn't complete their phase to the next space on the board.
    • There are official variants that reduce the amount of playtime:
      • All ten phases are treated as ten separate rounds. When one is finished, everyone moves to the next one. Those who didn't go out earns points for the round, with the lowest total-scoring player at the end of the game being the winner.
      • The number of phases are reduced. Similarly, players may go for only the even or odd phases.
  • Level Editor: Anyone can create their own ten phases, and the iOS/Android version has their own alternatives.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: Masters Edition allows players before a round to choose any phase they want after looking at their initial hand.
  • Not Completely Useless:
    • Unlike traditional Rummy, a run does not require cards of the same color/suit note . The only time where color is a requirement is phase eight (seven cards of one color). Twist has two extra color phases (eight and nine of one color).
    • Wholly averted with the iOS/Android version, where many Phase 10 variants do have a single-color requirement for runs and even/odds.
  • Scoring Points: Players who didn't go out count points based on the cards left in their hand (single digits - 5 pts, double digits - 10 pts., Skips - 15 pts. and Wilds - 20 pts.). When there is a tie in phase ten, the one with the lowest score is the winner.
  • Second Place Is for Winners: As long as one sets down their phase, they are able to proceed to the next one. This is downplayed in Twist since going out moves one further down the board (three spaces instead of two).

    O'NO 99, 5 Alive, and Boom-O 
  • Actionized Sequel: 5 Alive and Boom-O feature an extensive amount of action cards compared to O'NO 99.
  • Area of Effect: Present in 5 Alive and Boom-O:
    • The Bomb card blows up everyone who does not own a Zero or a Hold card respectively. For Boom-O, if all players do have a Hold card, then the player who played the Bomb card is blown up instead.
    • A player who plays all of the cards in their hand wins the round. Everyone else will flip over one of their life cards, and all cards are reshuffled and redrawn.
  • Artistic License: The ticking time bomb in Boom-O can tick down and up as it pleases.
  • Hot Potato: The main gist of the games.
  • Spiritual Successor: All of them are variants of the Card Game 99. Sorry! Revenge (by Hasbro) takes up the mantle of the three games, with the added twist that reaching 21 wins the round while going over 21 makes everyone else win the round.
  • Timed Mission: Players place cards to rise up the number. The person who makes the number go over 99 (O'NO 99), 21 (5 Alive), or 60 (Boom-O) loses one of their life cards. Boom-O is the closest it gets with the time theme.

    Unsorted 
  • Advertising by Association: The primary use of the moniker. This also helps distinguish DOS from the similarly named game called DOS!: Twice the fun of UNO.
  • All or Nothing: A player can keep flipping over cards in BOLD as long there is at least one consistent match (either color, container type, container size, or background shape). One could stop can keep the points, or continue going for more points at the risk of losing them all (and have the next player have them memorized for their turn).
  • Compilation Re-release: For Mattel's releases, they usually sell a compilation of Uno and another game in one box. There's also the "8 Games Mega Card Game Pack" which includes every game (except Card 'N' Go Seek) under the Makes of Uno moniker in 2018.
  • Exact Words: In Card 'N' Go Seek, a person can bring in something that matches the card's description. For example, something sweet could mean a piece of candy, a label with the word "Sweet" printed on... or your adorably sweet dog.
  • Luck-Based Mission: Typical for a card game, one's chances of winning is dependent on the initial hand. It is possible for a player in Phase 10 to set down their phase at turn one.
  • Oddball in the Series: Cinq-O is purely a dice game. The rest of the series have cards as the main component.
  • Scoring Points: Most games have a scoring mechanism that lasts over multiple rounds. Games such as Skip-Bo and Uno have players forego this rule for just "going out".
  • Spiritual Successor: Several games are commercialized versions of standard 52-deck games: Uno is based on Crazy Eights, Lowdown is of Golf, Blink is Speed meets Crazy Eights, and so on.
  • Themed Stock Board Game: Averted, none of the games bar Uno have a licensed-theme variant.
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