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Dungeons & Dragons (3rd Edition) (2000 - 2003) made major simplifications to the rules of Dungeons & Dragons by using the d20 System (which was originally created specifically for D&D 3.0) based on roll-over used in Gamma World long ago. The simplification was comprehensive enough to mean that nearly all character actions will fall into one of three areas — combat, skills, and magic. This means that 3rd edition is also more flexible than 2nd; skills and abilities are more universal, with every class being able to attempt actions like "bluff" or "hide", whereas only specific classes had access to them before.

This time the Character Class System dominates the weaker race system and for powerful and unusual creatures what was racial HD is treated as "class". The standard level limit was set at 20 (higher levels were covered in the Epic Level Handbook), again without racial restrictions of any kind, although each race had a "favored class" that factored into multiclassing. The previous, crufty system of "weapon proficiency slots" was revamped into a somewhat-less-crufty system of Feats. Overall, the game became a lot simpler to use without losing very much of its depth. In addition, much of the material thrown out in 2nd edition — half-orcs, monks, battles with demons, and so on, were added back in (some in the core rulebooks, others in supplements).

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The most obvious flaws: indecisive unification note , skill rank inflation, feats handled separately without any common meaning to themnote  and Linear Warriors, Quadratic Wizards on steroids.

3rd Edition also saw owner Wizards of the Coast create the Open Game License, a copyright structure permitting third-party game developers to sell derivative game materials using the d20 System.

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Dungeons & Dragons (3.5 edition) (2003 - 2007) was an effort to rebalance and fix up 3rd edition. It consisted of lots of little fixes and additional content while trying not to render obsolete what came before. However, the gradual shift from attempts to model the game world to an abstract "chess rules balance" approach becomes rather obvious. Individual settings are routinely treated much more invasively at this point, starting with "how to shoehorn this into X" advice on everything. This was also the most recent edition at the time of this website's creations, so a lot of D&D references on this site are talking about this edition.

     Core Rulebooks 
  • Player's Handbook: Core Rulebook I (2000)
  • Dungeon Master's Guide: Core Rulebook II (2000)
  • Monster Manual: Core Rulebook III (2000)
  • Epic Level Handbook (2001)
  • Monster Manual II (2002)
  • Player's Handbook: Core Rulebook I v.3.5 (2003)
  • Dungeon Master's Guide: Core Rulebook II v.3.5 (2003)
  • Monster Manual: Core Rulebook III v.3.5 (2003)
  • Monster Manual III (2004)
  • Dungeon Master's Guide II (2005)
  • Player's Handbook II (2006)
  • Monster Manual IV (2006)
  • Monster Manual V (2007)

    Supported Campaign Settings 
  • Birthright: Wizards of the Coast gave its blessing to a fan-made crowdsourced update to 3E.
  • Dark Sun: Received third-party updates for both editions.
  • Dragonlance: The last edition of the game to officially support Dragonlance. The IP was discontinued in 2007, before 4E's announcment.
  • Eberron: Debuted during 3.5 Edition.
  • Forgotten Realms: The Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting released with 3E. The Player's Guide to Faerûn advanced the In-Universe timeline two years to 3.5E. The sub-settings on continents besides Faerûn were not officially supported in this edition aside from some Paizo-published Dragon articles, although the settingless Oriental Adventures rulebook is easily re-fluffed to cover Kara-tur.
  • Ghostwalk: Developed as a single book for 3rd Edition.
  • Greyhawk: 3.5E was the last edition in which Greyhawk was listed as the default setting of the core rulebooks. For the most part only the deities are directly mentioned.
  • Kingdoms Of Kalamar: Licensed as an official 3E setting. The license was not renewed in 2007.
  • Pathfinder: The Golarion setting and the first four Pathfinder Adventure Paths were originally written for 3.5E under the Open Game License after Wizards took back the Dragon rights from Paizo Publishing. Paizo developed and marketed its own 3.5-derived d20 System ruleset, the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, beginning with 2009's Council of Thieves Adventure Path, which is compatible with both systems.
  • Ravenloft: Received an official campaign setting book from Wizards for 3E; subsequent materials were published in White Wolf's Sword & Sorcery brand under license. Wizards also released a rules update of the classic adventure module Expedition to Castle Ravenloft.
  • Warcraft: The Roleplaying Game: Published by White Wolf's Sword & Sorcery brand under the Open Game License.

    Adaptations 

Tropes in this game include:

  • Ability Depletion Penalty: In 3.5 Edition "Reserve Feats" grant a character a supernatural ability that's usable at will, so long as they have a spell of a specific type and minimum level available to cast. If they exhaust all their spell slots or castings of that spell, the ability goes offline until they're replenished.
  • Absurdly High Level Cap: After the release of the Epic Level Handbook in 3rd Edition, there was no level cap. In theory, you could make a level one million character if you took the time to do it. No sane Dungeon Master would ever let you use it, or put the time into running a campaign where it could be used, but it was still possible according to the rules and game mechanics (if only in theory).
  • All Swords Are the Same: 3rd edition uses this trope to some extent, only requiring proficiency for exotic weapons and drawing less of a distinction between different sorts of swords.
  • Animal-Themed Fighting Style: The Tome of Battle – Book of Nine Swords introduces nine martial disciplines with poetic names, two of them invoking animals:
    • The "Tiger Claw" discipline makes use of short slashing weapons (including actual claws) and emphasizes jumping on the enemy, close contact combat and bloodlust. Several of its maneuvers are also named after ferocious animals, such as the wolf, wolverine, mongoose, bear or girallon.
    • The "White Raven" discipline, on the other hand, favors cooperation and group tactics, like a flock of ravens.
  • Anti-Debuff: Starting from the 3.0 and 3.5 editions, Paladins have a class ability granting Ideal Illness Immunity, as well as the ability to magically cure diseases (which are implemented as stat debuffs).
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • Resurrection mechanics mean Death Is a Slap on the Wrist for a Player Character that's been around long enough for the player to get attached to. 3rd Edition made death more survivable by removing the Constitution-based chance for a resurrection to fail and render a PC Killed Off for Real.
    • 3rd Edition removed the worst frustrations of the Level Drain mechanic. In earlier editions, monsters with Level Drain applied it with every hit, items and spells that blocked the effect were extremely rare, and drained levels could only be regained the hard way. 3rd Edition replaced this with a "negative level" debuff that disappears after a day and/or can be removed with status-healing magic.
  • Anti-Regeneration:
    • 3rd Edition introduced regeneration as a standard monster ability that converts all damage taken to nonlethal damage and cures a certain amount of nonlethal damage each turn; this makes one impossible to kill without a specific type of damage that does not get converted, usually fire or acid as with trolls. Other possibilities might involve silver for werecreatures or devils, cold iron for fae or demons, and absolutely nothing for the Tarrasque. Damage that bypasses regeneration cannot be healed by it since regeneration only removes nonlethal damage and damage that bypasses regeneration remains lethal. That said, a creature with regeneration still falls unconscious when its nonlethal damage exceeds its current hit points, so a character who can't bypass the foe's regeneration can still (assuming that they are moderately competent in terms of raw damage output) inflict enough damage to knock the foe out and then continue to assault the unconscious enemy to pile on more nonlethal damage, then after ensuring the foe will be unconscious for long enough, do whatever they need to do in the area and then GTFO before they wake up.
    • 3rd Edition also includes fast healing, which heals a certain amount of damage (both lethal and nonlethal) on the bearer each round. This means that fast healing can't be bypassed, but since it doesn't convert lethal damage to nonlethal, a creature with fast healing can be killed by an opponent who can damage them fast enough to outpace the healing and bring them to -10 hp. Fast healing is virtually always low enough that is not difficult for any equal-level adversary with moderate competence in raw damage output to accomplish that task; it just becomes a bit more difficult than it would be otherwise.
    • There are also the Hydras, which, as in Mythology, will regrow two heads for every one cut if the wound isn't sealed — usually with fire or acid for most species, though the fire-breathing pyrohydra requires cold instead. They also have the aforementioned fast healing ability, meaning they regenerate wounds inflicted to the body very fast, although not beyond death, unlike trolls and other regenerating beings.
    • The 3.5th Edition sourcebook Dungeonscape adds Trollbane to the adventurer's arsenal, a poison that makes weapons coated in it deliver lethal damage to all regenerating creatures (not just trolls). Though the stuff being wiped after one strike, it's best to reserve a dose for a Coup de Grâce on a foe brought unconscious by nonlethal damage.
  • Armor and Magic Don't Mix:
    • In 3.X Edition arcane casters can wear armor if they take a proficiency feat, but if they do they risk a percentage chance that the spell will fail to cast, justified as the armor interfering with the gestures involved in spellcasting. Bards and the add-on classes warmage and warlock can wear light armor without hitting this restriction, and can take a feat, "Armored Caster", to be able to wear medium armor without risking spell failure. Of course, a wizard with skill in the schools of transmutation and abjuration doesn't necessarily need armor since they can protect themselves quite well with their spells.
    • Druids are only allowed to wear armor (and other equipment) made from "natural" materials (wood, hides, stone, etc.) or else their powers are unusable. With just the core rulebooks (Player's Handbook, Dungeon Master's Guide, and Monster Manual), this restricts druids to wearing relatively weak armor (nonmetal light and medium armor and wooden bucklers, light shields, and heavy shields). Some of the 3.x Edition add-on books added some esoteric materials that are classified as natural and can be forged into heavier armors.
  • Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence: It can be an Invoked Trope if you like in 3/3.5 edition. Standard class progression stops at level 20, but the Epic Level Handbook contains rules for advancing beyond that, with no actual cap. The easy multiclassing in that edition also means that you can simply add new classes and prestige classes pretty much forever. However, by this point game balance is non-existent so few games ever hit epic levels, and even those that do rarely go very far into them. Deities and Demigods allows your character to engage in this trope rather than just advance forever.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • The 3.X monk. On paper, you've got a monster ninja who can move faster than anything, run up walls, teleport, jump so far he can effectively fly, become completely immune to poison and disease, block and catch enemies, grapple and trip forever, stun or kill enemies with a single blow, punch through castles, and talk to animals. In practice, he can't hit anything, and is squishier than the wizard (who gets lots of good buffs to avert that).
    • 3.X metamagic feats raise the power of spells but treat them as higher level, essentially making them more expensive to use. With very few exceptions, the result is actually slightly less powerful than just using a higher level spell. Several feats and classes reduce the cost of metamagic (Arcane Thesis, notably), making it capable of dealing several thousand damage per round with ease.
  • Bag of Holding: There's a magic item called the Belt of Hidden Pouches, which has a grand total of thirty pouches (ten visible, twenty hidden) that all function as miniature bags of holding — none of them can hold more than five pounds or half a cubic foot, and none of them can hold an item that exceeds 6 inches in any dimension, but the belt itself can hold up to 150 lbs while itself weighing only a single pound, and the pouches never bulge.
  • Beneficial Disease:
    • Several "evil" diseases provide growing bonuses at the cost of penalties in other areas, in effect becoming a Deadly Upgrade. The players were quick to notice that the Prestige Class Cancer Mage from Book of Vile Darkness can adapt to diseases, hoarding bonuses while ignoring the penalties.
    • The same book include some evil spells with a disease component. This means the caster must be infected with the appropriate disease to cast them. Such spellcasters often use another spell called suspend disease to keep the infection from having any debilitating effect.
    • For that matter, Lycanthropy, at least in 3rd Edition. Getting bitten by a "natural" lycanthrope causes you to turn into a slightly weaker (lower damage reduction and can't infect others) "afflicted" lycanthrope and you involuntarily transform every full moon until you become aware of your condition and transform voluntarily, which changes your alignment to the specific species alignment. If you're lucky you get bitten by a Werebear, they're Lawful Good.
    • The non-official Book of Erotic Fantasy introduces several sexually transmitted diseases. One of them, called "Whore's Delight", is only very mildly weakening, but has the weird side effect of making the sufferer's genitals excrete a paralyzing poison. This is used by dishonest prostitutes and their pimps to rob unwary costumers.
    • From the 3.5th edition Monster Manual spin-off, Fiend Folio, among the Fiendish Symbionts are parasites from the lower planes such as the gutworms and soul ticks. They have drawbacks — like slowly turning good characters mad, and generally tempting non-evil ones into evil acts — but also confer some advantages.
      • Gutworms are similar to tapeworms, but they make their hosts globally healthier and can negate poison, although they also tire faster and need twice as much food as normal. A gutworm can also force the bearer into a Berserk Rage in combat.
      • Soul ticks slowly drain the blood of their hosts, but they confer greater power to their Black Magic, and surround them with a protective aura. The bearer may fail to cast good, chaos or positive-energy spells, though, and become vulnerable to holy power as if evil.
  • BFS: In 3rd edition it was possible for a character to wield swords created for creatures much bigger (a human wielding a sword designed to be used two-handed by giants, for example). 3rd also has the "Fullblade", which is explicitly an even bigger greatsword, ala Berserk and Final Fantasy VII.
  • Biomanipulation: Biomancers from v3.5 have exactly this ability, hence the name of their class.
  • Black Magic:
    • Several individual examples: Many 3rd Edition spells have a self-explanatory [Evil] descriptor. The rules are fuzzy, but casting such spells is considered an evil act (although casting an evil spell for a good purpose averages as neutral) and as such good characters using them too often are at risk of an alignment change.
    • The Heroes of Horror sourcebook proposes a variant rule that adds a risk of gaining "depravity" points each time such a spell is used, which in the long run means the caster becomes less and less sane.
    • The Book of Vile Darkness introduces many [Evil] spells, including a whole category of them, Corrupt spells, which are of easy access to most casters (including good-aligned) and are relatively more powerful than other spells of the same level, but are always cast at a cost (called "Corruption").
  • Blade Spam (split-second type): This is the default mode of attack for high-level Weapon Masters (a warrior Prestige Class kit) in 3.x Edition. Able to fight equally well with both hands and using the attack/round tables of a Bare-Fisted Monk, a level 16 Weapons Master gets 6 strikes per round (6 seconds) with a single weapon, 12 when Dual Wielding, and you do not want to get in her way when she's buffed with Haste.
  • Body Horror:
    • The entire point of the "Book of Vile Darkness" and especially the "Libris Mortis." A fair number of psionic abilities in 3.5e invoke this as well - including one which causes the target's skin to grow into a single solid membrane, effectively immobilizing it.
    • The Lords of Madness (with many "eldritch horror" elements), Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss (with some truly foul concepts for demons), and Elder Evils (with some lovely beings such as a world which is actually the undead fetus of a god and an enormous 1-mile wide bloated mass of corrupt proto-life that tries to mutate all life on a world to be like itself). One admires the creativity shown in these books... and questions the minds that came up with these ideas.
    • What happened to the hag countess, also what usually happens to those who die on the 6th layer of hell. Their body fuses with the layer, their souls however stay where their body is. Its such a painful fate that those unfortunate enough to suffer it tend to go mad in a matter of hours.
  • Cannot Cross Running Water: In 3E vampires cannot pass over running water on their own, but can be carried over it in a container. Also, they're not destroyed by immersion in running water if they have a swim speed before becoming a vampire.
  • Cast from Experience Points:
  • Changing Gameplay Priorities: In 3E, AC (Armor Class) is important at low-to-mid levels because it allows you to avoid taking damage from enemy attacks. At higher levels, either everybody has such high attack bonuses that AC becomes meaningless, or use attacks that largely ignore AC, like Saving Throws or Touch AC. Even if you have +5 Full Plate Armor most enemy attacks are going to hit you.
  • Charles Atlas Superpower: Pretty much the entire point of Epic Levels (i.e. level 21 and higher). By training long enough and defeating enough monsters, any fighter or rogue or barbarian can attain a balance check high enough to walk safely upon clouds, or a tumble check high enough to survive re-entry into the atmosphere, or gain the ability to turn invisible while standing in the open under broad daylight. They're just that good.
  • Clingy MacGuffin: Compared to the many cursed items ported from previous editions, a more benign version are the Legendary Weapons from Unearthed Arcana. Once a character has started to take levels in the Scion Prestige Class for such a weapon, it can't be separated from its owner for very long, as fate literally will find a way to reunite them. Adding to the fact those weapons are quite hard to destroy, it insures the character will hardly ever be disarmed.
  • Colossus Climb: The "Giantbane" tactical feat from Complete Warrior includes the "Climb Aboard" maneuver that allows climbing on a giant creature during a fight, becoming harder to hit and following along if it moves.
  • Combat Medic: 3.5 Edition has a prestige explicitly for this and called this.
  • Competitive Balance: 3E, Bards were largely useless as they were really too versatile for their own good, while Druids were Game Breakers; Fighters on the other hand were largely useless in anything that wasn't, um, fighting and other physical activities like riding, climbing and balancing, and often a Druid's animal companion would outclass a Fighter PC in those regards.
  • Continuing is Painful: Resurrection magic is expensive, has a chance for failure that will result in Permadeath, and causes you to lose a level.
  • Counterspell:
    • 3rd Edition has a Counterspell mechanic. A prepared spell may be cast to nullify another caster's attempt to use the same spell. For example, a fireball can counter another fireball (but not delayed blast fireball, which is a different spell). Some spells are specifically opposed to and counter other spells (haste and slow may counter each other as well as themselves). Finally, dispel magic can be used as a universal counterspell but requires a unique "dispel check" to make the attempt. This worked very well with the base list of spells in 3.0 when, for instance, basically any caster intending to deal damage with a 3rd-level spell will have either fireball or lightning bolt slotted. As expansions piled up, however, the sheer length of the spell list made guessing a specific spell to counter essentially impossible, and the suggested house rule of countering with any spell of the same school (general thematic category) and same or higher level became extremely common.
    • While technically not a spell, bards in 3rd Edition have the countersong ability, which lets them counter spells that depend on sound within a 30 foot radius.
  • Crazy-Prepared
    • The wizard has effectively unlimited access to spells, provided he's willing to pay for the scrolls and wands. Lower-level spells and scrolls are cheaper than higher-level ones, meaning any given wizard will probably have the majority of his collection of spells known, wands, and scrolls, in the lower level region. Now, when your budget is measured in values like 18,000 gold, is it really a problem to spend 12.5 gold to have odd, corner-case spells available like Tenser's Floating Disk? The practical upshot of it is that a wizard will typically be walking around with a veritable library of spells that have no practical purpose except to make him look like Batman. This means the Wizard can spend the rest of his time and money on having those really hugely powerful spells that turn the rest of the party into his personal audience. The funny part is that the balance is supposed to be that you can only prepare a certain amount of spells per day, and you have to do it in advance. Unfortunately, they kind of broke this by allowing a single spell to be prepared in an empty slot in 15 minutes. Sure, you need your combat spells in advance, but leaving a slot open at strategic levels for "something without a time constraint" can give you access to something like 3/4 of it all at once.
    • Also, in rules supplements like the Arms and Equipment Guide, you'll find a variety of little bits-and-pieces items, like a stick of chalk, a hacksaw blade, extremely long pieces of string, a piece of ebony wood, and a bag of marbles. Each of these were individual items that had shown up in a variety of different other modules by one lone, clever writer, and since they're mundane items they are remarkably cheap (some not even breaking a single gold piece). It only takes a player willing to comb through the book and dedicate maybe a hundred gold of his budget (which, again, represents thousands and thousands of gold) to always have the right tool for an obscure job.
  • Creator Thumbprint:
    • Gary Gygax had several, including mushrooms, various shades of the color purple, H. P. Lovecraft, his extensive vocabulary, polearms, and infamously difficult adventures/dungeons. On the unfortunate side, problems with ranged weapons from slings to wheel-locks. Only in 3.x Edition was his fascination with polearms finally dropped... to be replaced with some new developer's spiked chain fetish. These things wormed their way everywhere, even underground.
    • On the note of 3.x Edition, former Wizards of the Coast employee Monte Cook enforced Linear Warriors, Quadratic Wizards much more than in previous editions. Martial classes were either mechanically schizophrenic (monks), ridiculously generic (fighters), or straight up terrible (3.5 samurai, which was a straight port of the 3.0 samurai without any reworking). Caster classes were overpowered due to both the number of overpowered spells they could get and the introduction of metamagic feats. Wizards in particular were the worst about it. With 5E, Fighters are far more viable mechanically (retaining a lot of the tools they gained in 4E, for instance being the only class to keep the action surge feature) and Concentration rules for most spells limit the number of magical effects casters can keep up at one time, making the playing field much more even.
  • Critical Hit Class: Third edition has weapons with an increased critical hit range (chance to make a critical hit), due either to their physical nature or magical enhancements. There are spells (like keen edge) and feats that do likewise (e.g. "Improved Critical"). A character can concentrate on gaining as large a critical hit range as possible (though most of the time, different critical range improvements do not stack).
  • Dark World: The Plane of Shadow, which is a shadowy copy of the material plane like a photo-negative.
  • Deadly Dodging: There are several different ways to force attacking enemies to hit their own allies by mistake or blunder into a disadvantageous or even dangerous positions:
    • The Deceptive Dodge feat allows tricking an opponent that attacks in melee and miss you into hitting another close-by target.
    • The Elusive Target tactical feat includes two such maneuvers. "Diverting Defense" works against two foes flanking you; the first to attack miss automatically and may strike its ally instead. "Cause Overreach" is risky since you need to provoke an attack of opportunity, but then if the attacker misses you can safely trip it.
    • Combat Panache is another tactical feat with a maneuver allowing this: "Fortuitous Tumble" plays on the confidence of an opponent who already managed a successful attack through bluffing, luring it into striking an ally with its next blow.
    • Gnome Tunnel Acrobatics from Dungeonscape is yet another tactical feat with a maneuver of this type, "Combat Puppeteer". It allows confusing opponents by moving swiftly between them, leading the attack of opportunity of one of them to hit their ally.
    • From the Tome of Battle – Book of Nine Swords, the Setting Sun martial discipline in particular is dedicated to misdirection and turning the strength of the enemy against itself. Beyond the various throws allowing to put an opponent just at the right spot for it to get hurt by your allies or the terrain, there are maneuvers such as "Counter Charge" (sends a charging foe sprawling), "Scorpion Parry" (deflects an attack so that it strikes someone else), "Ghostly Defense" (tricks an opponent into hitting an ally) and "Fool's Strike" (can lead an attacker to strike itself). Other disciplines are more straightforward, but the Iron Heart one includes "Manticore Parry", which can deflect a weapon strike against another opponent.
  • Deadly Force Field:
    • The prismatic sphere spell is normally stationary. If it can be made mobile (perhaps by modifying it so it can be cast on a movable item/creature) it can be touched to an opponent, inflicting a variety of massive types of damage on the victim.
    • The Forgotten Realms 3.5E supplement Lost Empires of Faerun contains the spell crushing sphere, which envelops the target and crushes it over several rounds.
  • Destination Defenestration: From the Spell Compendium splatbook, the defenestrating sphere spell conjures magical winds that violently hurl enemies away — and, in a stylish quirk, automatically aims them at any window that happens to be nearby.
  • Diagonal Cut: A possible way to simulate this effect in-game is with the "Mosquito's Bite" skill trick, which can make a flat-footed opponent not realize he's been wounded until the next turn. Especially when combined with a Iaijustu Focus move and/or sneak attack.
  • Did You Just Punch Out Cthulhu?: Deicide is a common practice in epic-level games. Gods even have combat stats just like any other monster, and are fully punchable. However they can't be killed except by extraordinary circumstances, and edition deities typically have 20 levels in three different class with another 20 outsider hit dice (and each of these gets the max amount, rather than the 1/2 or random most get). For those not in the know, that means they can take a lot of punishment and resist a lot of effects even without their divine immunities and powers.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: The horribly overpowered full casters in 3rd edition were at least partially intentional, in order to reward players who realize how it works.
  • Dimensional Cutter:
    • From the Oriental Adventure sourcebook, the "Passage" weapon property allows a magic blade to slice open a portal to the spirit world. It acts as a plane shift spell, but the portal stays open 1-4 minutes and any creature can pass through from both directions.
    • The 3.5th Edition Weapons of Legacy sourcebook includes the Planeshifter's Knife, which seems inspired by the Subtle Knife. It was created by an ambitious student mage who wanted to plunder his institution's trove of tomes, but didn't stop to consider whether a college of master wizards would have some way of tracking stolen books. The weapon starts as a simple +1 dagger with an odd habit of balancing on its tip and spinning in the presence of outsiders, but as a wielder unlocks the knife's abilities, they can use it to slash a tear in reality to use as a hiding spot, similar to the rope trick spell. Eventually Planeshifter's Knife allows its wielder to instantly move to another plane, with the caveat that it can only do so after striking an extraplanar creature.
  • Distracted by the Sexy: In the 3.5 supplement Fiendish Codex I: Hordes of the Abyss, one of the Abyssal Heritor feats is "Otherworldly Countenance", which allows to choose between wretchedly hideous or stunningly beautiful. If beautiful, the character can cause a fascination effect a set number of time per day by focusing attention on a subject. Note that no mention is made of the subject needing to be of the opposite sex (or even the same species, in fact).
  • Dog Pile of Doom: The splatbook Cityscape introduces rules for rampaging mobs. While your typical mob is composed of ordinary citizens with no class levels, it is way more dangerous than its individual parts. Even mid- to high-level characters caught in an angry mob are likely to be grabbed, pinned down, trampled and pummeled to death. By its very nature, a mob negates most defenses like armor, agility or invisibility, much like a swarm.
  • Dragon Ancestry:
    • Dragons are known to interbreed so much that it looks as though many sorcerers had a dragon ancestor. The Half-Dragon Template can also be added to almost anything that can breed.
    • Members of the Sorcerer class are usually said to receive their powers from draconic blood, though a number of other supernatural ancestors are also possible. The Dragon Disciple Prestige Class allows a Sorcerer to tap deeper into their bloodline to gradually transform themselves into a Half-Dragon.
    • 3rd Edition D&D eventually added a whole creature subtype for beings descended from dragons — the dragonblooded — with access to unique dragon-themed feats and Prestige Classes (including wings and Breath Weapons). While Sorcerers are not automatically dragonblooded, they can trade away some of their normal abilities in order to count as such.
    • Kobolds from 3rd edition onward are depicted as tiny reptilian servants of dragons, with a tendency to become Sorcerers. Occasionally their draconic blood manifests particularly true in the form of a Dragonwrought Kobold, whose scales shine in the colour of their ancestor. While no inherently stronger than a normal Kobold, they are usually higher level and more likely to possess dragon-themed abilities. In addition they are biologically closer to Dragons than Humanoids, making them immune to certain spells and preventing their bodies from weakening as they age (the latter of which makes them extremely popular among spellcaster players, since old age provides bonuses to spellcasting-related stats that are normally Awesome, but Impractical).
  • Draw Sword, Draw Blood: The 3E Dungeon Master's Guide offers this as a potential quality of intelligent weapons.
  • Evil Makes You Monstrous: The optional 3rd edition book Heroes of Horror presents a system that implements this trope. In this, you don't even have to commit evil acts. Evil is practically a hazardous material, and turns you monstrous either physically (called corruption) or morally (called depravity), depending on the circumstances, if you don't take adequate protective measures or make your saving throws if you are around it.
  • Elves vs. Dwarves: Since both dwarves and elves are standard hero races, they tend to be on decent terms, though usually not seeing eye to eye on much (typically more like eye to groin). The 3rd edition rulebook mentions that while dwarves and elves don't always get along, if one gets attacked the other will be the first to help them, much like brothers.
  • Experience Penalty: In the 3rd edition, multiclassing incurred an XP penalty unless one of the character's classes was their race's "favored class". Humans got to choose their favored class.
  • Expert in Underwater Basket Weaving: 3rd Edition characters can invest in "Craft" and "Profession" skills, some of which are so specific and so orthogonal to the adventuring trade that they're usually only of use to NPCs and as prerequisites for certain obscure Prestige Classes. For example, the Archdevil Mammon, Lord of the Third Circle of Hell, happens to be a fantastically skilled bookkeeper.
  • Face-Design Shield:
    • The Lion's Head Shield, which can roar and bite enemies.
    • The 3.5th Edition Magic Item Compendium has an illustration of a shield with a sculpted skeletal demonic face. Appropriately, it is described as a +1 menacing shield, that is a Supernatural Fear Inducer.
  • Fashionable Asymmetry: The Player's Handbook uses asymmetrical outfits for the iconic characters representing the Bard, the Paladin, the Ranger, and particularly the Sorcerer.
  • Fastball Special: Edition 3.5 has a feat that allows players to do this, appropriately named "Fling Ally". This gets amusing if you combine it with the Charm Person spell and the Distant Shot feat. To quote one post on the Internet, "The Andromeda galaxy is within my line of sight, right?"
  • Feel No Pain:
    • Immunity to pain isn't a much sought-after ability since it has little effect in the game. Only a few spells, feats or special abilities are described as using pain to cause Status Effects. Creatures immune to critical hits (constructs, elementals, oozes, plants and undead) are also considered immune to pain.
    • A couple of drugs from the Book of Vile Darkness, Sannish and Luhix, can grant immunity to pain for a few hours. Sannish last longer, is cheap, has little side effects and isn't too addictive. Luhix (made from plants from the Abysses), on the other hand, is insanely expensive and its vicious addictive level makes it closer to a slow poison than an actual drug — without magic to counter the lasting effects, a single dose is likely to kill even a high-level character in a few days. However, Luhix is stronger as it can protect from pain-induced damage, while Sannish only protects from penalties.
    • The Paladin spell favor of the martyr grants immunity to pain attacks and non-lethal damage, as well as a long list of status ailments, and even allows to stay functional at negative hit points.
  • Fictional Age of Majority: In 3.5 Edition humans reach majority at 15, whereas elves, who can expect to live into their 500s, do at 110.
  • Fold-Spindle Mutilation: The "spiralburst bottle" is a nasty magic item from the Book of Vile Darkness. When it's un-stoppered or shattered, it opens a half-inch portal to the Ethereal Plane that sucks in a single creature or object. Unless the target is a Blob Monster, it ends up a spiral swirl of liquefied flesh and blood, lost in the Ether.
  • Fusion Dance:
    • Edition 3.5 has a high-level power called fusion, for Psions who specialize in Psychometabolism. The power lets the user meld with a willing creature and take on all their abilities, combining hit points, the best of saves, skills, attacks, and ability scores. If both use psionics they even combine their power point pools.
    • The Book of Exalted Deeds introduces Channeling, which allows Celestials (Outsiders from the good-aligned planes) to merge physically with a mortal (as an equivalent of the fiends' Demonic Possession). It works only on willing mortals and gives them serious boost to mental stats, and share all skills and supernatural powers of the Celestial. Powerful Celestials have this as a power, and lesser ones can profit of Channeling too if the mortal cast the appropriate spells.
    • From Magic of Eberron, the spell leap into animal allows a Ranger or Druid to merge with a willing animal (usually their animal companion), leaving only the beast visible. Good for infiltration, but hardly for combat since the caster cannot use any spell or power while merged.
  • Garden Garment: The Arms and Equipment Guide introduces two magical armors that are vegetal in nature (which notably allows druids to use them):
    • The Bondleaf Wrap, a single large leaf from a magical tree that wraps around the body, getting nutriments from it.
    • The Moon-Ivy, a wreathlike choker that grows a flexible bodysuit of ivy around the body overnight, which withers at the end of every day.
  • Geometric Magic:
    • The Binder class from 3rd edition uses a weird mixture of this and Powers via Possession; to be able to wield magic, a binder first draws elaborate arcane sigils to make contact with the Vestiges they wish to invoke, and then allows them to co-habit the binder's body in order to gain access to their magic.
    • The 3.5th edition Geometer is a Prestige Class which grants greater insight into glyphs, sigils, runes and other symbols. Its geometric magic also allows Geometers to replace verbal and material components with a spellglyph written in advance on parchment, and to scribe their spells in a much condensed form taking less pages of a Spell Book.
  • Ghostly Animals: "Ghost" is a template in 3.5 edition that normally can't be applied to animals since most lack the charisma score necessary to become a ghost. There are a few exceptions, however, mostly Dire Beasts and Legendary Animals. There is also a "Ghost Brute" template added in another book that is specifically there to create ghostly animals and other low-charisma creatures.
  • Ghostly Glide:
    • The Expanded Psionics Handbook has the Elocater Prestige Class. The first power gained is "Scorn Earth", the ability to float and move a foot above the ground. Used mostly for practical purposes rather than creepiness, though, but a creative player will sure find a way.
    • Dragon Magazine #359 introduces the "Footsteps of the Mage" feat, permitting an arcane caster to glide without actually taking steps. This confer greater balance and even allows to move with bound feet.
  • Gold–Silver–Copper Standard: D&D is one of the early trope codifiers. Prices are usually listed in gold pieces, unless they're small prices, in which case they're listed in silver pieces or copper pieces. The exchange rates were as follows:
    • 10 c.p. = 1 s.p.
    • 10 s.p. = 1 g.p.
    • 10 g.p. = 1 p.p.
  • A Handful for an Eye: Edition 3.5 has two feats from the Sandstorm supplement. "Sand Dancer" allows to throw sand or dust in an opponent's eyes after doing some tumbling. The upgrade "Sand Spinner" does the same thing, but to every creatures surrounding the thrower.
  • Hand of Glory: The Hand of Glory from the 3.5 edition can be worn around the neck (presumably not alight). It provides an extra place to wear a magic ring along with being able to cast a few spells.
  • Hate Plague:
    • Mindflayers are given magical stones that could potentially have this result in the supplement Lords of Madness.
    • Elder Evils has the Hulks of Zoretha, whose awakening causes the Blood Moon to rise and brings one of these upon the world. Initially, it's just an additional degree of hostility to every interaction, but as it moves on, everything on the planet that is alive and thinking must make a daily Will save or start attacking everyone in sight until someone dies. Once they're fully awake, those that fall to this wrath will become superhumanly strong, but eventually pass out from sheer exhaustion in trying to kill things.
  • Hell Seeker: The Fiendish Codex sourcebooks for 3.5 claim that many evil characters make deals with devils on the assumption that, after they die, they'll rocket to the top of Hell's hierarchy. "None ever look at a lemure [the bottom of Hell's food chain] and think that will be their eternity."
  • Heroic Ambidexterity: Ambidexterity is a feat that allows you to Dual Wield weapons much more efficiently than otherwise, even if you're already trained for it.
  • Holy Is Not Safe: The Positive Energy Plane serves as the power source behind "positive" energy damage and abilities that Turn Undead, but any living being who tries to enter the plane without appropriate protection will find their bodies being overloaded with life energy and risk being vaporized if they spend too long there.
  • Hot Skitty-on-Wailord Action:
    • Dragons were capable of offspring with nearly anything alive, while aasimar and tieflings all have celestial or infernal ancestry, respectively (it helps that shape-changing abilities are common amongst the respective parentage). Further parentage was possible; the number of templates for half-parentage is astounding.
    • There's even a 3.5 sourcebook of half-breeds based around this trope... covering everything from the slightly unusual (human/merfolk) to the completely bizarre (elf/giant eagle).
  • Hover Skates: 3.5 has a psychic power skate, which doesn't actually hover, but fits the trope otherwise by letting people skate along the ground instead of above it.
  • Idealized Sex: According to the Dungeons & Dragons 3.5 module Book of Vile Darkness, only evil people can have a sadomasochistic sexuality. Also, all sadomasochists have evil superpowers — sexual masochism and sadism are evil superpowers in this setting, and sexual masochism is defined as being the same thing as the trope Combat Sadomasochist.
  • I Gave My Word: A dangerous example occurs with Pandorym, one of the Eldritch Abominations outlined in the Elder Evils sourcebook. Originally, it was summoned millennia ago by a cabal of foolish wizards after agreeing to a contract in which it would act as a Doomsday Device to be used against the gods, but the wizards double-crossed it and imprisoned it to use as a deterrent. The gods smote the arrogant wizards dead, but Pandorym was too powerful for them to destroy, so it remained in its prison until the present time. If it ever escaped, its first goal would be to enact revenge by slaying every last descendant of its betrayers; however, its second goal would be to fulfill its end of the original contract. With its alien view of reality it is bound by a strange code of honor to keeps its word, even though its summoners broke theirs. And because its side of the contract was to slay every god in existence, this code of honor threatens all of creation.
  • Immune to Mind Control: In 3rd Edition, the spell mind blank does this as well as provide some immunities to divination.
  • "Instant Death" Radius: A big problem in the 3rd Edition games is certain monsters being absolutely painful to approach via long melee reach and the Attacks of Opportunity provoked from trying to get close enough to melee them, which will usually hit for heinous amounts of damage due to their high Strength, such as any monster that's larger than you.
  • Knife Outline: 3.5 introduces the "Ranged Pin" feat that allows you to make a grapple attempt with a ranged weapon. The flavor text describes it as pinning the target's clothes to the ground or wall.
  • Linear Warriors, Quadratic Wizards: It was at its worst in 3rd/3.5 edition due to significantly lowered character mortality and rules specifically for starting higher level campaigns, leading to far more characters achieving high levels and thus encountering the issue.
  • Loads and Loads of Rules:
    • 3rd Edition in particular stands out by virtue of having numerous subsystems (such as Psionics, Invocations, Binding, Blade Magic, and Incarnum).
    • To give some perspective, the rules for grappling run a whole two pages in the 3rd edition Rules Compendium. The rules for magic items weigh in at 5, and the rules for movement are covered by ten whole pages. And then you have Polymorphing rules, which have been changed so frequently that you need to check the errata instead of the most recently printed book just to make sure you are up to date.
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic: 3.5 has the Fate Spinner Prestige Class, where you can shift around good and bad luck, as well as the Fortune's Friend, where having supernatural good luck and unlikely events is a class feature.
  • Made of Indestructium: 3rd Edition Major Artifacts. At this point they say if you destroy one, you also attract the attention of whatever created it. They are probably not happy you destroyed their Magnum Opus. And are many levels higher than you if not a god. If you're lucky, they may be dead, but something powerful enough to create a major artifact tends to not just die...
  • Magic or Psychic?: In 3rd edition, most magic-using classes function by Vancian Magic while Psionics are limited by Mana.
  • Magikarp Power: Wizards in 3.x, due to Linear Warriors, Quadratic Wizards. Same with most casters, especially the infamous CoDzilla combination of "Cleric or Druid".
  • Matchlight Danger Revelation: The illustration for the corpse candle spell in the Spell Compendium sourcebook is exactly this trope. The wizard using it finds himself entirely surrounded by spectral undead, along with the caption:
    Corpse candle sometimes reveals things you wish you hadn't seen.
  • Mechanically Unusual Class:
    • The sorcerer, in third edition, is a wizard but with spontaneous casting instead of memorization.
    • Similarly, warlocks, which debuted in Complete Arcane, exist pretty much solely to have a completely different magic system from everyone else, based around spells that they could cast infinitely and generally completely abandoning Vancian Magic: they instead run on selections of spell-like abilities that are for the most part usable at will. They're so blatantly just there to be mechanically different that they don't even really get their own origin, just a slight word-swap of the sorcerer class description substituting fairies for dragons.
  • Meditating Under a Waterfall: Among the many Planar Touchstones described in the Planar Handbook, there is Mimshan's Curtain, a waterfall located in the Outlands (the True Neutral plane)invoked. This was the meditation spot for the legendary monk Mimshan, and anyone wanting to gain the benefits of the Touchstone has to meditate under the waterfall for 24 hours.
  • Move in the Frozen Time: In the 3rd edition, the Epic Level Handbook includes a feat called "Spell Stowaway" which allows a character to pick one spell and share in its effects each time it's cast within 300ft (as long as it would have a clear path to travel to you). One of the examples (used by the Phane monster) is choosing time stop so that you join the caster in their accelerated timeframe.
  • Moving Buildings: Stronghold Builder's Guidebook has locomotion as a feature for a fortress as an option. how fast and what kind of movement depends on what you're willing to pay.
  • Mundangerous: In 3rd edition, being on any surface (marbles most prominently) that requires something to balance without 5 ranks in the "balance" skill (which is otherwise not gotten as it's a rare class skill and most times you need to balance you can just fly), will result in being "flat-footed", a fairly big disadvantage, and it effects any land-based foe without the balance ranks.
  • National Weapon: Many deities have a preferred weapon that their followers tend to use. For example, the holy symbol for Kurbag is a double-bladed axe. In 3E, the Spiritual Weapon spell summons a weapon made of pure force that is described as taking the form of the user's deity's favored weapon (or a form specific to alignment for characters without a deity).
  • No-Gear Level: Stripping gear tends to occur if you get captured or contained. The impact varies based on edition: 3e also has unarmed attacks provoke attacks of opportunity (unless you have a feat).
  • Non-Damaging Status Infliction Attack:
    • Special attacks such as tripping or disarming opponents, sundering weapons and armor, and grappling and pinning can all be used by martial characters to weaken opponents without inflicting actual damage. These usually incur an attack of opportunity by nearby enemies unless the user spends a feat on the "Improved" version.
    • Many low-level spells such as color spray, sleep, hypnotic pattern, and cause fear inflict no direct damage, but can immobilize entire groups of enemies at once. Since the damage dealt by spells tends to be dependent on caster level, such "save-or-suck" spells are often a more efficient use of limited spell slots than throwing fireballs around.
    • Clerics can Turn Undead, generating divine power to frighten off hordes of zombies and skeletons. At higher levels this ability can instantly destroy weaker undead monsters.
  • Non-Health Damage:
    • There are various ways for threats to damage The Six Stats. Getting knocked to 0 for any mental stat renders you some form of catatonic, while losing all strength or dexterity makes you physically helpless. Losing all constitution just kills you.
    • The Joystealer, a monster, deals damage to the player's charisma. This can be absolutely devastating for certain player classes, such as bards, which rely heavily on the charisma stat.
    • Most poisons work by damaging one or more ability scores rather than hit points. If it's Strength or Dexterity damage, dropping to zero causes the character to become too weak to move or paralyzed (respectively) until they regain at least one point in the relevant ability score. If it's Constitution damage, dropping to zero is fatal. If a mental stat falls to zero, the character is reduced to a helpless, blithering idiot.
    • The Allip is the ghost of a madman whose touch causes insanity, represented as damage to wisdom.
    • The spell shivering touch is a Minmaxer's Delight because it's low-level, yet deals enough Dexterity damage to paralyze a full-grown dragon and has No Saving Throw.
  • The Nudifier:
    • The disrobe spell from the third-party supplement Book of Erotic Fantasy. Although it doesn't affect magical items, it's still a good way to score a Defeat by Modesty.
    • A few core spells can be diverted from their normal usage to this effect. Notably, a baleful polymorph spell leaves items and clothing unaffected, thus even if dispelled, temporarily suppressed by Anti-Magic, or reverted by a natural shapechanger, the subject will end up stark naked. Even a disintegrate spell can be aimed toward clothes instead of the one wearing them, although it's overkill. The invisibility spell can also be directed at objects, in which case the clothing isn't removed, but the visual effect is the same.
    • Magic of Incarnum introduces soulmelds, which have the appearance of various clothing or pieces of equipment, but are entirely made of soul energy. Although those are solid (and nigh-invulnerable), it wouldn't be a good idea to be wearing nothing but shaped soulmelds, as they can still be "unshaped" by a specialized form of Dispel Magic, or cease to exist in an Anti-Magic zone.
  • Obvious Rule Patch: Has its own page.
  • One-Handed Zweihänder: There's a feat called Monkey Grip that allows a character to use two-handed weapons as one-handed weapons. As the system is one of the bigger cases of Shields Are Useless, there is an inherent damage boost to two-handed weapon use and even with the feat you suffer a penalty, it's common to see comments on how bad it is.
  • Paying in Coins: A module for Edition 3.5 has an example where doing this is to your advantage. You run across some barbarian halflings who use a barter system—which means 1 gold piece (weighing about 1 third of an ounce, or 7.5 grams) is not much use to to them. However, the equivalent in copper pieces (100cp = 1 gp in this edition) means 2 pounds of metal they can melt down and use.
  • Percussive Maintenance: The Complete Scoundrel sourcebook includes the skill trick "Opening Tap". It gives a rogue a chance to open a lock without any tools, just by tapping it with a hard, blunt object.
  • Perpetually Protean:
    • From the Monster Manual II, the Grimalkin is a shapeshifter whose true form is a large blue-gray housecat, but which can turn into any animal close in size. Their chosen form depends on the situation, but in combat they will change shape every round to confuse the opponent and make it difficult to adopt a strategy.
    • One of the many monsters featured in the Epic Level Handbook is the Hagunemnon, a pretty obvious Shout-Out to the Haggunenons of The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Like their inspiration, they are constantly taking on new shapes and possess a xenophobic hatred of all non-shapeshifters. More worryingly, they are known to travel extensively in search of new shapes to copy — and they prefer to kill their targets once they've finished acquiring their forms...
  • Poison Is Evil: In 3.5, according to the Book of Exalted Deeds, using poison to deal damage is an evil act because it causes undue suffering. Using ravages, however, is a-ok, because ravages only wrack and torture the bodies of evil creatures. (Using poison against an evil creature is still evil even if it has the exact same effect.)
  • Power Glows:
    • An entire series of cleric spells and psionic powers in 3.5 allow you to charge up power in your body and then shoot it as laser beams. As long as you haven't exhausted your stock of energy blasts, you actually function as a 60-foot light source, the color of the light being determined by how powerful the spell is you're using.
    • Also the Nimbus of Light feat and its improved version from Book of Exalted Deeds, surrounding the character with an aura quite harmful to undead.
  • Power-Strain Blackout:
    • The Wilder psionic class has the wild surge power, which can boost Psychic Powers above their current level, but with a risk of causing a "psychic enervation", which daze them for a full round afterward and cost more power points.
    • The "Reserve of Strength" feat allows a spellcaster to boost his caster level, and push the level cap on a spell effect, but in exchange for being stunned for 1-3 rounds, depending on the importance of the boost. If the character is immune to stunning, the spell becomes instead Cast from Hit Points.
  • Prestige Class: A major focus of add-on books: by the time of the change to 4E there were probably in the low hundreds of prestige classes, and only about thirty base classes. Given the increased flexibility they offered to builds, it was common for characters to be pre-planned with a specific prestige class (or several) in mind.
  • Psychic Powers: 3rd edition has the psion, psychic warrior, soulknife, wilder, ardent, divine mind, lurk, and erudite all as base classes. If you go to third-party books, even more exist.
  • Psychometry: In D&D 3.5, Seers have access to a power called object reading that lets them touch an object and learn information about its previous owners. There's also a magic item called "gloves of object reading" that grants a similar ability.
  • Public Secret Message: The 3E skill "Innuendo" serves this exact purpose. It was removed in 3.5E (turned into a part of the "Bluff" skill), presumably because it was too specific to be worth spending skill points on.
  • Quirky Bard: Bards are a versatile support caster who in practice traded versatility for power, never outshining any class in any specific role while also being rather rubbish in simple combat. The 3.5E splatbook did a lot to turn the Bard into a more effective Jack-of-All-Stats.
  • Random Transportation: There's the legendary and infamous Comeback Inn, where the customers literally can't leave unless someone from the outside pulls them out. The 3.x Edition campaign book reveals that the building has been very heavily enchanted: exiting the doors will teleport you back into the building, attempting to jump out the windows or off the roof plops you back in the main hall, and trying to use spells like 'dimension door' or 'teleport' just moves you about the Inn. The only people immune to the enchantments are the innkeeper himself and his direct employees. And the usual way you can leave is if you pay your bill and the innkeeper was happy with your behavior as a guest.
  • Reduced to Dust:
    • This is the result of a disintegrate spell being cast on a creature that fails its save against it.
    • Undead that fail their saving throw after being struck with a magic weapon with the Disruption property or killed by the disrupting weapon, sunbeam or sunray spells are reduced to dust.
  • Ring on a Necklace: The wearer of a Hand of Glory necklace can benefit from a third magic ring (over the usual limit of two at a time) by putting the ring on one of the Hand's fingers.
  • Running on All Fours: From the 3.5th edition Monster Manual IV, the varags are feral goblinoids who move and run on all fours. Thus, they are twice as fast as most similar-sized humanoids.
  • Sacred Flames: The 3E divine spell flame strike calls down a bolt of fire from the heavens that does half fire damage and half divine damage. The divine half is not subject to damage resistance to fire-based attacks.
  • Shapeshifting Excludes Clothing:
    • The baleful polymorph spell makes clothes and equipment fall around the transformed victim. Note that creatures with the Shapechanger subtype can regain their true form at will, but that doesn't solve the problem of recovering their gear. In most other cases, shapeshifting does include clothes, though.
    • The disintegrate spell can turn a creature to dust but leave its equipment intact. It can be specifically aimed at disintegrating an item and leave the wearer intact if the caster chooses so (most don't, especially when valuable magic items are concerned).
  • Shapeshifting Heals Wounds: 3.5 Edition: Downplayed with the polymorph and shapechange spells, which restore Hit Points equal to a full night's rest when the target transforms. However, shapechange lets them transform once per turn, so they can quickly heal completely.
  • Shields Are Useless: A commonly held opinion about shields in 3E due to what they give you (a linear increase to AC compared to extra attacks or double Power Attack damage), the fact that most magic attacks ignore your shield bonus, and the existence of animated shields.
  • Signs of the End Times: The 3.5 sourcebook Elder Evils provides one sign for each Elder Evil.
    • Zargon the Returner is heralded by an increase in extreme weather.
    • Father Llymic's awakening causes the sun to dim and magic that creates light to weaken, until both disappear entirely. It also gets colder and colder, and the glazier Llymic is imprisoned under starts moving at an accelerated rate.
    • Atropus the World Born Dead's arrival causes necromancy to become stronger, the dead start to randomly rise as zombies and skeletons, until every dead person rises as zombies, stronger than usual. The entire world is desecrated, and healing magic weaken. A strange black dot in the sky gradually grows.
  • Songs in the Key of Lock: The 3rd Edition DMG mentions a note played on a lute as a possible key to open a magical door.
  • Snake Charmer: The Complete Adventurer book has a magical item called "Flute of the Snake", which can be used both to control and summon snakes.
  • Spell Book:
    • Still the standard for wizards, who learns new spells by scribing them in a spell book, and prepare them by consulting it every morning. The "starter" spell book of an apprentice wizard is free, but adding new spells to it and buying new books can get very expensive. Sorcerers notably don't need one, their magic being "in their blood", but they have a much reduced spell selection in exchange.
    • The Wu Jen is another arcane base class using a spell book (or an oriental-flavored equivalent). A few Prestige Classes also uses spell books without formal wizard training — Chameleon, Corrupt Avenger, Cultist of the Shattered Peak, Deathmaster, Ebonmar Infiltrator, Hoardstealer, Merchant Prince, Prime Underdark Guide, Telflammar Shadowlord, Thayan Slaver...
    • The archivist class uses divine magic (the kind clerics and druids use) through a prayerbook in a manner similar to wizards instead of praying for them like other divine casters.
  • Spell Levels: 3rd Edition brought about spell level 0, increasing the number of levels to 10. Clerics and druids had their "max" for spell levels increased from 7 to 9, to put them on the same power plateau as arcane spellcasters. As such — clerics, druids, sorcerers, and wizards have ten spell levels (0-9); bards have seven (0-6), and paladins and rangers have four (1-4).
  • Spin to Deflect Stuff: The feat to perform this is called "Spinning Defense" (from the Dragon Compendium). It requires a polearm and focusing entirely on defense, but allow the use of Deflect Arrows an unlimited number of times (while it's usually limited to one projectile per round).
  • Spin-Off: Pathfinder, created by the former publisher of Dragon magazine, began life as a setting for 3.5 Edition before being developed into its own derivative ruleset and marketed as an alternative to Dungeons & Dragons 4th Edition. The rules for Pathfinder 1E are so similar that it's been jokingly called "3.75 Edition": nearly any 3E splat can be ported to it in minutes.
  • Stamina Burn: Characters who heavily exert themselves may take either nonlethal damage (which knocks things out instead of killing them) or the Fatigued and then Exhausted conditions, which last until they've had a chance to rest. They can also be inflicted in other ways:
  • Stealth Hi/Bye: The 3.5 edition supplement Exemplars of Evil has a monk alternate class feature called "Invisible Fist". It allows one to turn invisible for 1 round every 4 rounds. Very useful in fights, of course, but can also be used to make sneaky entrances and departures, without wasting any resources for such theatrics.
  • Sticky Situation:
    • Tanglefoot Bags are alchemical items that burst open when thrown, miring the target to a mild degree.
    • The Race of the Dragons sourcebook adds the sticky floor spell, that entangles all creatures in contact with the floor. It is a favorite of kobold sorcerers to protect their lairs.
  • Supernatural Fear Inducer: Starting with 1st edition, quite a few AD&D monsters have the ability to cause fear as an innate power:
    • Various spells such as scare and cause fear (the reversed form of remove fear) can temporarily frighten an opponent.
    • The 1st Edition psionic power Telempathic Projection allows the user to implant fear in an opponent's mind.
    • Certain creatures have the ability to cause fear in opponents, such as androsphinxes (roar), beholders (one of their eyes), some demons, devils, dragons (roar), mummies and satyr (by playing their pipes).
      • All dragons in some editions are constantly surrounded by an aura of fear that sends any low-level character into panic. They can, however, turn it off for a brief time. A few other monsters also have fear auras, such as liches.
      • In 3.5 it's not a magical or psionic effect: dragons are just plain scary. Mechanically, if a dragon with greater hit dice than you does anything threatening, you have to roll your save.
    • One of the beholder's ten small eyes can cause fear in the victim it looks at.
    • Demons:
      • The demon princes Demogorgon, Juiblex, Orcus and Yeenoghu can instill fear in a target as one of their innate abilities.
      • The demon prince Graz'zt causes fear in all within 60 feet who see and hear his displeasure.
      • The Type II, Type III, Type IV and Type VI demons can act on other creatures as if using a Wand of Fear on them.
      • Babau, Bar-Igura, Baron and Marquis cambions, chasme, and rutterkin can cause fear by touch.
    • All devils have the ability to engender fear in living things. The exact details are different for each devil.
      • Arch devils inflict fear by looking at others. Asmodeus with his gaze, Baalzebul with his glance, Dispater by staring, Geryon by glaring, Amon, Mammon and Mephisto by gaze and Belial by stare.
      • Other named devils: Bael in a 20 foot radius, bearded devils and Titivilus by touch, Glasya and Hutijin by speaking to victims, and Moloch with a Breath Weapon.
      • Barbed devils cause fear by striking an opponent, bone devils generate fear in a five foot radius, erinyes affect anyone who looks at them, ice devils radiate fear in a ten foot radius, malebranche exude fear in a five foot radius, and pit fiends shed fear in a 20 foot radius.
    • All dragons of adult age (51 years) and older radiate fear by flying overhead or charging. Depending on how many hit dice the victim has, it can cause them to flee in panic, be paralyzed with fear or just take a penalty to hit.
    • Brass dragons have a breath weapon that consists of a gas that causes fear in anyone who breathes it.
    • When a dragonne roars, the sound can inflict fear on anyone who hears it, which will sap 50% of their strength.
    • Just seeing a lich causes any creature with less than 5 Character Levels or hit dice to flee in panic.
    • The sight of a mummy can make any creature paralyzed with terror.
    • A satyr can play music with its pipes to inflict fear on any opponent that hears it.
    • The roar of an androsphinx can create fright in any creature within 500 feet, making them flee in panic for 30 minutes.
    • Any being that looks into a yeti's eyes is rigid with fright for the next three combat rounds.
    • The Phantasmal Killer spell forces the target to save, or immediately die of fright.
  • Swiss Army Tears: In the evil sourcebook, The Book of Vile Darkness, crystallized angel tears count as minor artifacts. When collected using the proper ritual in places where celestials have felt great sorrow or pain (or harvested from a captive angel Forced to Watch horrifically evil deeds), the tears can be fired from slings or thrown as Unholy Hand Grenades.
  • Talking Weapon: The 3.5E Dungeon Master's Guide describes a talking sword so chatty that it's said to be best suited for a deaf swordsman.
  • Tele-Frag: The Blood Magus prestige class has this as an ability. You can teleport by simply entering one living being, and coming out of another one you know, wherever they are. It's normally harmless for everybody involved, but if you wish, you can make what the game charmingly calls a "catastrophic exit", literally exploding your way out of the destination point.
  • Teleport Interdiction:
    • Dimensional anchor prevents the affected being from being moved by any forms of teleporting and planeshifting.
    • Anticipate teleportation (D&D 3.5 Complete Arcane), while not blocking teleportation entirely, delays teleporters' arrival to allow ambushing them.
  • Teleport Spam:
    • Every edition has the blink dog, a monster who teleport spams as a free action.
    • In 3.5, the totemist's Blink Shirt soulmeld, specifically inspired by blink dogs, gives teleportation every round of every day.
    • Lots of teleportation spells and abilities can be combined with the Telflammar Shadowlord, who gets a full attack every time he teleports. All of this is brought to its apotheosis with the Chrono-Legionnaire build.
  • Tutorial Failure:
    • One 3.5 Prestige Class that fits this trope would be the Abjurant Champion; a Magic Knight class that grants a character bonuses to Abjuration spells (such as shield). It mentions mage armor as being another such spell, seemingly disregarding the fact that mage armor is placed in Conjuration.
    • Complete Psionics includes feats that make a character a descendant of the Mind Flayers. This completely ignores the process Mind Flayers reproduce by note .
    • The "Apostle of Peace" class is required to take the crippling "Vow of Poverty" which disallows the character from owning almost any wealth. The picture of the class has quite a few magic items (which are very expensive) in it. May be justified if the character has an immediate need for the items, for whatever reason, but the expectation is that as soon as the need is gone the item would be sold and the gold donated or given to one's god. That being said, its actually a truer example of how many players actually play such characters.
    • The Ruby Knight Vindicator example character worships Saint Cuthbert, but the class requires Wee Jas worship. (It suggests DMs should make versions for other deities the deity requirement, but it's officially just a suggestion.)
    • In 3E, The Epic Level Handbook has a creature it claims even the gods can't stand against, but that seems questionable when that creature's stats are compared with some of the gods' stats in Deities and Demigods. Judging from the Deities and Demigods stats and the stats of the titular creatures of the book Elder Evils, the gods could easily crush the elder evils even though the latter's book's intro describes them as so powerful that even the gods would think twice before fighting them.
  • Useless Useful Non-Combat Abilities: The skill list for 3E had a lot of skills that were arguably redundant with each other. Subsequent editions and most adaptations slimmed down the list considerably in the interest of Rule of Fun.
  • Vow of Celibacy: The 3E supplement Book of Exalted Deeds includes a "Vow of Chastity" feat, among several other "Vow of X" feats following the same basic format. This one in particular requires the character to abstain from both marriage and sex, and in return grants +4 to saves against charm and phantasm effects. Breaking it voluntarily costs you the feat's benefits permanently, while breaking it due to Mind Control costs you the benefits until you can get an atonement spell cast for you. (There's no ruling in the book on how it interacts with rape.) This feat is a prerequisite for the Beloved of Valarian Prestige Class.
  • Walk on Water: Beyond the various water-walking spells, powers and magic items ported from previous editions...
    • The 3.5th spell balancing lorecall allows one to "balance" on liquids and semi-solid (like mud or snow) if the character has enough ranks in the Balance skill. However, the difficulty of the check increases every round, so the subject is going to sink sooner or later.
    • The Elocater Prestige Class has a psionic power called "Scorn Earth" which makes one float 1 feet above the ground. It works above liquids too, and thus allows moving above water without trouble.
  • Wall Run:
    • The 3.5th edition Expanded Psionic Handbook has a psionic feat which pretty much allows to treat walls as any flat surface: "Up the Wall". If you can't reach an horizontal surface at the end of your movement, though, you fall flat on your back.
    • The skill trick "Walk the Walls" and the Monk alternate class feature "Wall Walker" are more limited in distance, and only allow moving up or down.
    • The spell balancing lorecall allows balancing on vertical surfaces if the character has enough skill ranks in Balance, and move up and down with much more freedom of movement than when climbing.
  • Weapon of Choice: 3rd Edition has feats like "weapon focus" and "weapon specialization", which only work with one specific type of weapon.
  • Your Magic's No Good Here: When creatures from the Prime Material Plane travel to other planes of existence they find that magic (spellcasting and items) don't work the same way they do on the Prime. Some spells/items have different effects, some don't work at all and some backfire. On rare occasions, it's possible to use magic that can't be used on the Prime.
  • Zombify the Living: The 3.5 Edition supplement Sandstorm has the Dead Throne, an Artifact of Doom that brought the desert warlord Ten-Ap back from the dead and gave him the ability to turn the living into mummies.

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