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Arkham Horror: The Card Game is a Collectible Card Game — specifically a living card game — spinoff of Arkham Horror. Like its predecessor, AH:tCG is based on H. P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos and takes place in the 1920s, and is a fully cooperative game, with the players teaming up to fight the forces of the Mythos controlled by the game.

Players control investigators that try to penetrate the occult mysteries of Arkham, Massachusetts. Play consists of investigators moving across various locations, investigating the locations to discover clues and battling enemies and the forces of the Mythos. The plot of each scenario is determined by "act" and "agenda" cards: the act deck describes the objectives that the investigators are trying to accomplish, usually by collecting enough clues from the locations; and the agenda deck describes the forces of evil and progresses slowly but surely as time goes on. If all cards in the act deck are completed, the scenario ends in a win for the players, and if all cards in the agenda deck are completed, the scenario ends unfavorably (but not always as a loss for the players).

Each scenario has multiple possible endings, depending on the actions the investigators take during the scenario and the result of the race between the act and agenda decks. Scenarios are generally linked together in a campaign, with the results of each scenario affecting how later scenarios play out. This being Lovecraft, happy endings are hard to come by.

Players are represented in-game by investigators, each with their own special ability and deckbuilding requirements. The investigators are split into five roles that represent the broad archetypes of Lovecraftian protagonists:

Several expansion campaigns have been released, in addition to one-off scenarios and custom fan made content.

Campaigns:

  • Night of the Zealot: The ghouls of Arkham abandon the shadows and take to the streets - aided by their god, Umôrdhoth.
  • The Dunwich Legacy: A cult attempts to take vengeance on Dr. Armitage after the events of The Dunwich Horror.
  • The Path to Carcosa: The play The King in Yellow threatens the invasion of an alien world. Or are you just losing it?
  • The Forgotten Age: An expedition into the jungles of Mexico discovers a threat to the very fabric of time itself.
  • The Circle Undone: At a charity event hosted by the Silver Twilight Lodge, four people have utterly vanished, and the dead are strangely restless...
  • The Dream-Eaters: An intertwined double story as one group becomes lost in the Dreamlands and another works in the waking world to return them home, with the fate of both worlds hanging in the balance.
  • The Innsmouth Conspiracy: The team of investigators got stuck in Innsmouth, without memory of how they got there. Will they remember in time to prevent an upcoming catastrophe?
  • Edge of the Earth: The second expedition to the City of the Elder Things goes disastrously, and now investigators must not only survive, but find the answer to what lies behind the Mountains of Madness...
  • The Scarlet Keys: Strange vanishings are going on around the world: things, animals and even people have been disappearing without a trace, vanishing not only from the physical world but also from memory and history. The investigators work to discover the truth behind these disappearances and find a way to stop them before it's too late, all while constantly clashing with the mysterious organisation which calls itself the Red Coterie.
  • The Feast of Hemlock Vale: A survey team from Miskatonic goes to research the nature of the previously off-limits Hemlock Isle, but soon finds out that the island is horribly disfigured by some alien entity...

Standalone Scenarios:

  • Curse of the Rougarou: A cursed beast stalks the swamps of the New Orleans bayou.
  • Carnivale of Horrors: The celebrants of the Carnivale of Venice are the sacrifices for a dark ritual.
  • The Labyrinths of Lunacy: The investigators must work together to escape a madman's deathtrap.
  • Guardians of the Abyss: The investigators explore Cairo and the Sahara Desert to solve a sleeping sickness where no one will wake again.
  • Murder at the Excelsior Hotel: A murder occurs at the prestigious hotel, and the investigators must solve this case before the police arrive and possibly accuse them of this murder... or they become the next victims.
  • The Blob That Ate Everything: A throwback to B-Movie horror with multiple groups trying to take down the giant critter.
  • Barkham Horror: The Meddling of Meowlathotep: Originally announced simply as an April Fools' Day joke in 2019, but fan reaction was so popular that it was released for real later that year. This expansion is set in an alternate universe, where evil cats have become a grave danger to the world, and the only force that stands in their way is a team of heroic investigator dogs.
  • War of the Outer Gods: Three Ancient Ones are attacking at once; fortunately, they're just as hostile to each other as to the humans, which gives the investigators a chance to stop them before it's too late.
  • Machinations Through Time: Nobel-winning scientists and their breakthroughs have vanished from history, leaving humanity devastated. The investigators are sent on a time-traveling adventure to find out who disrupted the past and is messing with the future.

Note: Until more cleanup is done on the page, this page includes unmarked spoilers. You have been warned!


Arkham Horror: The Card Game features examples of:

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     Mechanics and recurring scenario/campaign tropes 
  • Achievement System: Each "Return To" expansion provides a list of optional achievements that players can try to go for. Most are campaign-specific, but two recurring ones are achievements for finishing on Expert Difficulty and for finishing with three or more Ultimatums active.
  • Bonus Dungeon: Most standalone scenarios can be played mid-campaign by paying experience, in order to earn their rewards for the rest of the campaign.
  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: It's a Cosmic Horror Story; even if you win, you'll be loaded down with trauma and extra weaknesses. In some cases, investigators may not even live to see their victory. This serves a double purpose: to show the horrors that the investigators faced to save the world, and to balance the ability to transfer survived investigators into a new campaign with all their gear.
  • Challenge Run: Most "Return To" expansion provide optional "Ultimatum" rules, which add challenges such as additional deckbuilding restrictions or scenario rules for the entire campaign. There's even a recurring achievement for winning a campaign while using three or more Ultimatums at once.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity: Enemies with "Elite" trait are immune to many cards' effects, or only suffer weaker effects from those. This mainly applies to cards that allow to instantly defeat an enemy, or cripple them in some other way.
  • Collateral Damage: Friendly fire is one of the main risks in combat: if an investigator attacks an enemy that is engaged with another investigator and the attack misses, the other investigator suffers the damage the attack would inflict instead. Finding a way to lower or negate the chances of accidentally hitting your companions is a critical objective for any combat-focused investigator.
  • Continuing is Painful:
    • Getting Defeated means, most of the time, suffering either Physical or Mental Trauma, which makes you start each following scenario with damage and/or horror (respectively) already on your investigator, making it easier for you to be defeated yet again. On top of that, some scenarios reserve a special punishment for any investigators who were defeated, which triggers even if their teammates ultimately won the scenario; actual effects range from extra weakness that are added to the investigator's deck for the rest of the campaign, to dying or going insane.
    • If an Investigator perishes or goes mad, whether from trauma or a scenario resolution, you will have to pick another Investigator to continue playing, which means losing your deck, all the experience stored and all cards upgraded. Good luck recovering from that.
    • In the scenarios themselves, being Defeated means you cannot continue playing, and must sit out until the scenario ends. Also, Defeated Investigators drop all their clues in their location, which can range from a completely inconsequential penalty, to more or less dooming the team into losing the scenario, if the Defeated player was the one dedicated at vacuuming up clues. Also, while only surviving Investigators still draw encounter cards, the scaling health and clue values only check the amount of players present at the start of the scenario, and do not change if someone is Defeated or Resigns, which leads to a Difficulty Spike for the remaining players, as they need to do work balanced around a bigger group of players.
  • Counter-Attack: Enemies with the "Retaliate" keyword will counterattack if you try to attack it but fail the skill test (unless the enemy is exhausted). The Forgotten Age expansion introduces the "Alert" keyword, which does the same on a failed evasion attempt.
  • Critical Failure: The auto-fail chaos token; if you draw it, you automatically fail the skill test, no matter how high your skill value is. By default there's one auto-fail token in the chaos bag, meaning you have about a 1/16 chance of drawing it in a skill test.
  • Death Is a Slap on the Wrist: Zig-zagged.
    • For most campaign scenarios, if your investigator loses all their health or sanity, you are defeated, but not dead. Instead, you take trauma, which reduces your health or sanity starting from the next scenario of the campaign, thus making it easier for you to be defeated next time; but if trauma reduces your health or sanity to 0, your investigator dies for real.
    • Some scenarios avert this, usually (but not always) those later in a campaign, with defeated investigators specifically being instantly killed / driven insane as part of the scenario's resolution. Since this only gets revealed after the end of the scenario, when you play through a scenario for the first time, you're never sure.
    • If an investigator dies or goes insane, they are eliminated from the campaign entirely... but you can still pick a different character from your collection of available investigators and build a new deck for them, starting from scratch for the next scenario.
  • Deer in the Headlights: "Frozen in Fear" is a recurring Treachery card; under its effects, investigators freeze in fear, requiring them to spend an additional action the first time each turn they attempt to move, fight or evade (and investigators only get three actions per turn).
  • Difficulty Levels: The game can be played on four difficulties: Easy, Standard, Hard and Expert (standalone scenarios usually have only Standard and Hard), which determines the chaos bag composition, with harder difficulties having greater negative chaos tokens in the chaos bag and more dangerous effects on the Skull, Cultist, Tablet and Elder Thing symbol tokens.
  • Draconic Abomination: Byakhees somewhat resemble highly deformed dragon/insect beings. They are mainly associated with Hastur.
  • Draw Extra Cards: Any investigator is allowed to spend their action(s) to draw extra card(s).
  • The End of the World as We Know It: Full spectrum of world-ending scenarios, from Merged Reality to Time Crash. The ultimate goal of any campaign is to prevent it.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Minimum one otherworldly monster per campaign, ranging from monstrous minions to Great Old Ones and Outer Gods.
  • Episodic Game: Prior to the release of the Edge of the Earth expansion, the game used the system of so-called "mythos pack cycles": each full storyline (or "cycle") consisted of one "Deluxe Expansion," containing new investigators, new low-level player cards for each class and the first two scenarios of a new campaign; and six "Mythos Packs," each containing the next scenario of the campaign and more player cards, including high-level ones. These were released one by one at a rate of about one per month. Since Edge of the Earth, the new release model instead has two big boxes: an "Investigator Expansion" containing all investigators and player cards, and a "Campaign Expansion" including all of the scenarios. Old expansions are being gradually re-released in the new format.
  • Evil Is Deathly Cold: "Chilling Cold" is a recurring encounter set, which involves both thick fog and unnatural frost that can cause investigators to drop their assets or damage their health.
  • Expansion Pack:
    • Each new expansion comes in two boxes, one containing new investigators and player cards, and one containing a new campaign.
    • Prior to release of the Edge of the Earth expansion in 2021, the "mythos pack cycle" system was used, with each campaign consisting of one big "deluxe expansion" (containing new investigators, new player cards and the first two scenarios) followed by six "mythos packs" (containing the next scenarios and more player cards).
    • The first five campaigns also received "Return To" expansions, which alter the rules or cards of each of the scenarios, making it worth to, well, return to them and play again. Each one also contains new player cards, usually upgraded or downgraded versions of player cards from the same campaign.
  • Final Boss, New Dimension: The final scenarios of most campaigns take place not on Earth, but in some Eldritch Location appropriate for the current Big Bad.
  • Fish People: Deep Ones appear in a few of the scenarios. They are mainly associated with Cthulhu.
  • The Goomba: While enemies vary greatly in their power, some recurring enemies are not only weak, but also lack any abilities, sometimes even keywords.
    • Rats show up mostly for adding atmosphere, and, in the case of Night of the Zealot campaign, teach the players how the "Hunter" mechanic works. They don't pose a threat on their own... unless buffed up by something else, which does occur in some scenarios.
    • Ghouls, when they show up, don't have any abilities on their own; their stats have a lot to desire for either. The only enemy weaker than them stat-wise is the aforementioned Swarm of Rats.
  • Healing Factor: Among the Agents of Shub-Niggurath is the Dark Young, which can heal two damage per round (and most attacks deal two damage). Fortunately, if it actually dies, it doesn't respawn.
  • Hearing Voices: "Dissonant Voices" is a recurring treachery card; under its effects, investigators can't play Assets or Events. Fortunately, it only lasts one round.
  • Heroic RRoD: The "trauma" mechanic, which symbolises the dangers investigators faces scarring them for life. Traumas are usually earned as consequence of running out of Stamina and/or Sanity, or as effects of scenario resolutions, and result in investigators starting the next one already having some damage/horror, making it progressively easier to gain more of them. If it reduces them to zero starting Stamina/Sanity, that investigator perishes, forcing the player to pick a new one.
  • It's a Wonderful Failure: Bad endings for any campaign always lovingly describe just how dire consequences of failing your task were. All the more reasons to try again and do better this time.
  • It Only Works Once: Occasionally, locations have benevolent abilities rather than various dangers and penalties (healing, extra cards or resources, etc). As a general rule, such abilities can't be triggered more than once per scenario; once anyone uses them, they remain disabled for entire team. When there's no such limitation, it often means that there's a good reason for that.
  • Kaizo Trap: Goat Spawns (recurring enemies associated with Shub-Niggurath) have not exactly impressive stats, but they have one nasty ability: when they are defeated, they deal 1 Horror to each investigator in their location. If you were unprepared, this may cause defeat by horror to one or more investigators.
  • Know When to Fold 'Em: There are often Resign actions included in the scenario cards, to give you an escape option. Losing often makes your next scenario worse, but if you were going to lose anyway, you can avoid a total loss or trauma penalties by resigning. Some scenarios outright kills (or drives insane) all defeated investigators, and death means you have fewer investigators to finish campaign, not mentioning investments which were wasted on perished character(s), so outside of really daring situations, such a "sacrifice" is rarely worth it. Some scenarios simply lack "win" conditions; you must achieve as much as possible and retreat while you can, and being too greedy can nullify all your achievements or cost you so much it becomes a Pyrrhic Victory.
  • Long Bus Trip: Michael McGlen, Agatha Crane and George Barnaby, recurring investigators in other Arkham Files games, have yet to be reintroduced in LCG.
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic: So-called blessed and cursed tokens, originally introduced in The Innsmouth Conspiracy expansion, and later reintroduced in The Feast of Hemlock Vale. They work similarly to the normal chaos tokens in that you draw them and they modify your total score during a skill test (increasing or reducing it, respectively), though they don't replace the other tokens by themselves, only modify the score. After any such token is drawn, it must be removed from the bag, until something adds it back again. Both expansions introduce the cards that directly interact with such tokens in some way, adding/removing them, or giving them extra function.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: "Dreams of R'lyeh" treachery from core box (of "Agents of Cthulhu" set) decreases Willpower and maximum Sanity by 1 until it gets dealt with by passing a Willpower test.
  • Multiple Endings:
  • Multiple Life Bars: All investigators have two separate "life bars" — Health, and Sanity, representing how much damage/horror that particular investigator can handle before being defeated. Most investigators have 14 total Health/Sanity, with some maintaining balance, and others having leaning towards having more of the one at expense of the other. Some assets have their own Health and/or Sanity values (particularly, Allies), and can be used to soak up damage/horror intended for their owner, but depleting their durability forces the player to discard them.
  • New Game Plus: After campaign completion, surviving investigators can be re-used in another one with all the cards they acquired before, including story assets. This is balanced by also having to carry all trauma and weaknesses over as well. Also, although the designers have stated that this is allowed, they have also stated that scenarios are not balanced for starting a new campaign using characters from a previous campaign.
  • Non-Damaging Status Infliction Attack: Besides the actual attack (through Fight action), investigator may try to Evade an enemy, putting their Agility stat against enemy's Evasion rating (instead of Combat stat against Combat rating); on success, they disengage from enemy, while enemy gets exhausted, meaning that it can't attack anyone till next round, including through attacks of opportunity. Of all classes, Rogues excel at that type of combat the most (and have special cards to get extra benefit from exhausting enemies), while Guardians often struggle to utilise it at all, both due to low Agility and due to limitation of their class' card pool.
  • No Saving Throw: Infamous "Ancient Evils" treachery encounter has exactly one effect: it increases current Doom by one, as well as moving the agenda forward if the limit is reached. This reduces your already limited time without any skill test to prevent it so unless the investigator has an encounter negation card like Ward of Protection on-hand there's nothing they can do. Whenever altered versions of this treachery appears, be it Return to... pack or something scenario-specific, they universally provide options to avoid triggering its effect, though sometimes alternative may be no less painful.
  • Once a Season:
  • "Open!" Says Me: "Locked Door" is recurring treachery (primary for indoors locations), which prevents investigators from, well, investigating the locked location. Locked door can be unlocked (Agility test)... or just smashed through by force (Combat test).
  • Our Ghouls Are Creepier: Ghouls are ugly darkness-dwelling humanoids (with their faces being vaguely dog-like) with taste for human flesh. You occasionally see them as low-level enemies, particularly in the core game. Some attack direclty, others try to grab you though holes in the floor.
  • Random Event: The encounter deck will deal you random enemies, obstacles, and horrors every round. Notably, every scenario builds this deck differently, so the darkness will always fit your setting.
  • Religion of Evil: Almost all plots involve cult worshipping current antagonistic Eldritch Abomination, with "Dark Cult" being a recurring encounter set starting from the core game, appearing at least once per campaign. Most campaigns also feature they own, setting-appropriate versions, often using "Dark Cult" as template.
  • Starfish Aliens: Being a Lovecraftian-themed game, Arkham TCG has its share of weird-looking monsters from other worlds. Some of them are recurring across campaigns and scenarios:
  • Timed Mission: Almost all scenarios are timed in one way or another. Most scenarios ends when the final agenda's doom threshold is reached, but sometimes there may be other ways. While losing single scenario usually would not result in immediate campaign failure (though final ones always have this effect), consequences often include traumas, new weaknesses, worsening conditions in subsequent scenarios, and death/insanity for most or all investigators involved.
  • Unique Enemy: It is not uncommon for certain enemies to be present only for one scenario of the campaign, and/or even only having one copy of an enemy without Victory (so he doesn't qualify as a Mini-Boss you only need to beat once to take care of permanently) in the Encounter Deck. From the core encounter set, Ravenous Ghoul and Wizard of the Order are the starting example.
  • Universal Ammunition: Every Weapon with limited ammunition would use the same kind of tokens as "ammo" — be it a revolver, a shotgun, a bow or some alien ray-gun. Though ammo-recharging cards generally only affects "Firearm" assets, so bows or grenades are typically left out.
  • Vertical Kidnapping: Several campaigns involve Night Gaunts who can (and will) abduct investigators and take them to different locations. They always appear exactly once.
  • You Dirty Rat!: Rat swarms are recurring (but usually pathetically weak) enemies, who appears in nearly every campaign (The Forgotten Age being the first exception) exactly once. They are so unnaturally aggressive, they even have the "Hunter" keyword, meaning they would actively pursue investigators.

Player cards tropes

    General mechanics 
  • Anti-Frustration Features: When building decks for any scenario in standalone mode (as opposed to campaign mode), investigators may receive bonus experience points for creating their deck. They may receive up to 9 points for free, after which they may (up to four times) receive 10 more by including an additional basic weakness card, for a total of 49 experience. This is done to offset the fact that the players skipped previous scenarios and thus didn't develop their decks or earn story rewards.
  • Arch-Enemy: Some weaknesses (especially personal weaknesses of specific investigators) take the form of enemies that, throughout the campaign, will continuously hunt down, harass and/or make the life of the investigator they "belong" to harder, no matter how many times they are defeated or avoided.
  • Arrange Mode: "Taboo rules" (provided in separate section of official FAQ) were released to nerf cards that were too powerful or overused (like Double or Nothing) and investigators (like Rex Murphy), while also buffing unpopular ones (like Winchester). Notably, while they are not mandatory to use (unlike updates to FAQ), if players decide to use them, they must use those rules in their entirety, without picking ones they like and ignoring the rest.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Despite many flashy tools being introduced in each expansion, level 0 core set cards still remain very popular choices due to being time-proven and easy to understand (not to mention, easy to access, coming from the core set).
    • The pre-made starter decks use this trope as their design philosophy. The cards in them may not be strong or cool, but they do help newbie players understand the basics of playing as that investigator without getting themselves killed.
  • Breakable Powerup: Almost all allies, and many other assets, give you a continuous boost or ability but must be discarded if they take too much damage or horror.
  • Cap: Investigators can't include more than 2 cards with the same title in their decks (or 3 for "myriad" cards and 1 for "exceptional" cards), even if their subtitles and/or levels are different.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: Investigators and player cards are colour-coded depending on their class. Guardians are blue, Seekers are orange, Rogues are green, Mystics are purple and Survivors are red. Neutral cards are grey and multi-class cards are yellow.
  • Deck Clogger: The weakness cards. Every investigator starts with at least two weaknesses — their unique personal one, and a randomly-picked basic weakness — that is mixed with their player cards, and can be randomly drawn instead of something useful. Some weaknesses even shuffle themselves back into your deck instead of being discarded, potentially to be drawn again.
  • Draw Extra Cards: In addition to drawing 1 card during each upkeep phase, you may draw more cards during your turn by spending 1 action each, and most of the classes have ways of drawing multiple cards at once.
  • Early Instalment Weirdness: The original core set printed the investigators' signature cards and the story assets as level 0 cards, even though the rules state that signature cards and story assets explicitly don't have a level. Starting with the game's first expansion (The Dunwich Legacy deluxe expansion), signature and story assets were printed with a whited-out level indicator to indicate this more clearly. When the core set signature cards and story assets were reprinted in later printings of the core set and in the Revised Core Set, they were given the whited-out level indicator.
  • Everyone Has a Special Move: Each investigator has at least one unique ability and signature card which only they may use, which makes playing as them different from any other investigator from the same class.
  • Limited Loadout:
    • Every investigator can include only so many cards in their decks (30 cards for most of them; signature cards, weaknesses and cards earned via story reasons don't count towards the limit).
    • Every investigator may have up to 8 cards in their hand, and must discard any excess cards at the end of the round. Weaknesses and "hidden" cards do count towards the limit, but can't be picked for discarding.
    • Every investigator has two "hand" slots, two "arcane" slots, and one each of the "body", "accessory", and "ally" slots (with The Circle Undone expansion also introducing "tarot" slot, which each investigator also has one of). Each slot may be occupied by only one asset at a time, and most assets takes up at least one of them. Players have limited opportunities to expand amount of slots available, usually at the cost of sacrificing something else, and often only allowing assets with certain traits into those bonus slots.
    • Assets with the Footwear and Mask traits don't take up any slot, but their card text limits each investigator to one each in play at a time.
  • Necessary Drawback:
    • Each investigator's strong sides are counterbalanced by their own unique weakness cards. These are required to be played or dealt with as soon as they are drawn, and usually go directly against the investigator's preferred playstyle, but some give the investigators a new task to deal with, with harsh penalties for failing it or ending the scenario with it incomplete, and some may even screw entire team if left unchecked.
    • Each investigator starts with at least one basic weakness (chosen at random at their deck's creation). These are generally not as harsh as signature weaknesses, but still may screw them over if drawn at the wrong time.
  • Point Build System: How experience works in this game. Players earn experience points by defeating monsters and collecting clues during scenarios, and can spend them to buy new cards for their decks between scenarios.
  • Punch-Packing Pistol: Pistols and melee weapons tend to deal about the same amount of damage and give about the same boost to fighting stats.
  • Rate-Limited Perpetual Resource:
    • Most cards cost various amount of "resources" to play. Each investigator receives 5 resources at the start of scenario, and 1 more during Upkeep phase, but with nearly every non-skill card costing at least 1 resource to play, it's very easy to go broke and have to wait until you accumulate more, or spend precious actions to generate resources, both of which you likely can't afford). Of all classes, the ones who're the least bothered by it are Rogues, having tons of resources-generating cards, while Guardians and Mystics are perpetually starving.
    • Nearly everything (moving, investigating, fighting, playing cards, etc) costs at least one action, and investigators receive only 3 every turn.
  • Revolvers Are Just Better: Revolvers are amongst most common Weapon cards, mainly belonging to Guardian or Rogue classes, as well as showing up as signature Weapons for several investigators. They tend to be cheap and reliable, making them popular sidearm choices.
  • Starter Equipment:
    • Generally, at the start of the game, investigators can only afford level 0 cards, as they cost no experience to purchase. Such cards are balanced around the fact that it's what the player would use at the very beginning of a campaign, and generally don't offer much beyond simply letting you not die and finish your task (albeit exceptions do exist). Many such cards gains upgrades later on.
    • Every investigator has a recommended pre-made deck, which allows new players, who don't know how to play a particular investigator, to jump into the game right away. Instructions for these decks explain why specific cards were chosen, to hint what to upgrade first.
  • Tarot Troubles: The Circle Undone expansion, as befits expansion built around the topics of fate and Tarot, introduced bunch of player cards with that topic in mind, both good and bad, with more being added in Return to the Circle Undone (along with bunch of cards dedicated to make using those cards easier and more efficient):
    • 12 cards were introduced as assets (2 per class, plus 2 Neutral), each having their effect thematically linked to associated Tarot, and subtitle hinting at what logic was used to give this card to specific class. Class-specific cards from main expansion are generic stat boosters, while those introduced in Return to... got more unique effects. All of them cost 3 resources to play, but have the special effect to let you play them for free when the scenario begins if they are in your starting hand.
    • Two basic weaknesses have their effects tied to negative meaning of the associated Tarots.
    • Return to the Circle Undone added actual Tarot cards, with an option to use them for "reading" your fate, thus determining the optional rules for scenario you're about to play, both good and bad ones. Two new cards, "Observed" asset and "Damned" basic weakness, are tied to this mechanic, letting you (and only you) to play with extra beneficial Tarot effect, or forcing you to play with extra negative one, respectively.
  • Uniqueness Rule: If a card is "unique" (has a star printed before its title), only one copy of it is allowed to be in play at a time (even if their subtitles are different).
    • Every investigator is "unique", meaning that every player must play a different investigator.
  • Universal Ammunition: All firearms, whether revolvers, shotguns, bows or high-tech lightning guns, use the same generic "ammo" tokens to keep track of their uses, and can all be reloaded by any cards that refill ammo tokens.

    Guardian class tropes 
Guardians dedicates themselves to protecting their less combat-capable teammates and fighting monsters head-on. Many their cards are related to either combat or teamwork.
  • Action Hero: The average Guardian represent a gun-toting badass that can mow down droves of Eldritch Abominations with enough bullets or weaponry. This is not universal however, as some Guardians do break the mold being instead support party members that "defend" their fellow investigators in other ways beside fighting (like Carolyn and Carson).
  • Always Accurate Attack:
    • "Toe-to-Toe" event lets you attack an enemy for decent damage without making any tests (and thus, never risking to fail), at the cost of also suffering an attack from said enemy. While risky, it's very useful against foes with high fight and low damage stats, which would be hard to quickly kill otherwise.
    • "Mano a Mano" event instantly deals 1 damage against an enemy of your choice engaged with you when played. The drawback is that you have to use it on your first action of the round. There is also an upgraded version that deals heavier damage.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • On paper, the "Keen Eye" asset is supposed to give investigator stable source of Combat (core stat of Guardians) and Intellect (stat that Guardians struggle to boost) boost at the cost of some resources. On practice, Guardians almost never can afford spend 2 resources per turn to get those bonuses; on top of that, level 0 version costs some resources to even put into play in first place, and the level 3 version, while it is always in play being a "permanent", obviously costs experience to purchase that could've been spent on something else instead.
    • "Hallow" event lets you remove 1 Doom from current agenda — one of the very few ways to get more time — but requires accumulating 10 blessed tokens, whether in the bag or on cards (not an easy task, especially since investigators may just draw them by accident, wasting them), which it then burns all at once. It's also not cheap to play, and costs experience to purchase.
  • Battle Bolas: "Bolas" can be used to essentially cripple "hunter" enemies; once the bolas gets thrown at them and ties them up, it not only penalises their evade stat, but also makes them exhaust each time they move, which makes them an easy target, and negates their main danger (them being able to pursue investigators).
  • Big Guy: Zig-zagged:
    • Guardians tend to have best Health (around 8-9) and Combat (around 4-5) stats, making them great at fighting monsters directly and tanking damage for their more fragile teammates. But they tend to have low Sanity (around 5-6), which makes them vulnerable to horror-based attacks, potentially dropping them straight into Glass Cannon territory in horror-heavy scenarios.
    • Guardians have the largest pool of combat-oriented cards, be they weapons, upgrades for weapons, tools to kill enemies in non-standard ways, and so on. They also have cards specifically dedicated to quickly engage the enemies (such as "Riot Whistle" asset), saving actions which may be used to actually attack those enemies.
    • Guardians have many assets specifically dedicated to absorbing damage and/or horror, sometimes even those intended for the other investigators. Such cards are also often more resilient than analogues from other classes, with Allies in particular consistently having at least 4 total Health/Sanity.
      • "True Grit" and "Something Worth Fighting For" gives you slotless damage/horror soak (respectively), with a gimmick that you can absorb damage/horror taken by other players, too.
      • "Obsidian Bracelet" can absorb damage and/or horror taken by you or your teammates, but with caveat: the damage/horror has to be caused by treachery card.
      • Brother Xavier, Tetsuo Mori, Girish Kadakia and "Agency Backup" Allies all can take the damage/horror taken by the other players; of those, Xavier and Tetsuo have extra effect when they get defeated, Girish has means to heal himself, and Agency Backup is just tough enough to take a hit or two and stay functional.
    • Guardians have many cards which are specifically dedicated to taking hits in place of their more fragile comrades, including by resolving treacheries targeting the other players:
      • "Self-Sacrifice" skill allows you to take all consequences of failing a skill test in place of another, more vulnerable investigator.
      • "Solemn Vow" asset can link you with the other investigators, and, when they are at the same location, healing that investigator's assets at the cost of damaging your own. It's specifically designed to protect key players while they're working on the main goal. It has a "Myriad" keyword, which means you can have up to 3 copies of the card for free instead of the usual 2, which can let you tank for all the other teammates even in a 4 player game.
      • "Heroic Rescue" event allows Guardians to distract the enemy from their more vulnerable teammates, taking the hit directed at other player, as well as automatically engaging with attacking enemy, to continue the fight.
    • "Wolf Mask" gives you temporal boosts to Combat and Agility (stats that are critically important for managing enemies), but requires spending offerings which can only be replenished by engaging more enemies.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • "Machete" and ".45 Automatic" are the working horses of low-level Guardians, providing cheap and reliable source of damage without hard-to-manage gimmicks that would plague cards from expansions. Them both being introduced in the core game also means them being accessible right away, without need to buy any expansion.
    • "Vicious Blow" is a skill card that lets you deal extra damage on an attack when committed to a fight action, and nothing more. But being a class that primely specialises in combat, and having tons of cards that wouldn't work until you kill someone, it's often all that Guardians need. The upgraded version only further ups its damage, instead of adding extra functionality.
    • "Evidence!" event is a staple of Guardians deck, letting them finding clues by just beating something, but it's one of the most generic and straightforward cards in their arsenal, which further cements them into role of designated fighters. On similar note, "Scene of the Crime" event finds free clues if you have an enemy at your location (without making said enemy attack you), which is even easier to use (albeit it has to be done on first action only).
    • "Ace of Swords" Tarot card gives a simple boost to your Fight skill: nothing particularly interesting on its own, but having better Fight means landing your attacks more consistently, which is extremely important for any combat-focused Guardian, and because it takes its own Tarot slot it doesn't compete with other assets that boost Fight, and in fact stacks with them.
  • Brandishment Bluff: "Hold Up" event (appropriately marked by Tactic and Trick traits) lets you bluff an enemy at your location (via Parley action) into thinking that you're armed, which buys you time to actually pull out your gun (or whatever Item you think can serve you); it's handled by a dummy "attack" that deals zero damage and lets you play the chosen card by reduced price.
  • Burn Baby Burn: The Guardians can use the "Kerosene" asset to burn recently defeated enemies to regain sanity, either for themselves, or their teammates and Allies.
  • Canine Companion: Guardians can actually take the Guard Dogs into battle, as an Ally asset that can not only absorb the damage, but can also cause damage to the enemy when hit. Upgraded version gets more Health and Sanity, allowing them to absorb more punishment, and also gains the ability to provoke enemies into attacking (at the cost of exhausting itself) as a free action.
  • Cast From Hitpoints:
    • "Blood Eclipse" event allows to attack using Willpower instead of Combat (which some investigators like more than the others); it can be further reinforced by sacrificing some health, to give a boost to both stats and damage. Level 1 version always takes away 2 Health, while level 3 version allows to decide how much you want to spend, scaling the effect with amount of blood spilled.
    • "Strong-Armed" skill lets you cancel any amount of chaos tokens you draw (you still have to draw replacements), but at the cost of taking damage for each cancelled token. This effect can be used as many times as you want, as long as you have enough health.
    • Some Guardian-class Allies have abilities that damages themselves as a cost of activation:
      • "Beat Cop" can deal some damage to an enemy, at the cost of being discarded (level 0 version) or damaged (level 2 version).
      • "Agency Backup" can take damage to damage an enemy without fighting or even engaging it, or take horror to discover a clue without investigating.
      • "Field Agent" can discover a free clue for you, at the cost of suffering some horror.
      • Grete Wagner allows to discover a "free" clue after you defeat an enemy, but takes 1 damage when you do so.
  • Cast from Money:
    • "Physical Training" lets you spend resources to boost either your Willpower or your Combat. Level 4 version gets its own supply which it recharges every turn.
    • "Combat Training" lets you spend resources to boost either your Combat or your Agility... but as soon as any horror lands on it, it breaks. The upgraded version remains just as frail (albeit it can now soak some damage), but it also gives some static boosts besides its paid effect.
    • "Keen Eye" lets you spend resources to boost either your Combat or Intellect. Compared to the analogues of other classes, its effects last or entire phase rather than just one test, but it also costs more (2 resources) while giving less stats (+1 per 2 resources) — on a class not exactly known for powerful economy.
  • Charged Attack: Nephthys seals the blessed tokens which are supposed to leave the bag, and later burns them to attack her enemies for 2 damage, 3 tokens per attack. As there's exactly 10 tokens available, she can make 3 attacks at most.
  • Church Militant: Brother Xavier is literally a priest with a gun, who helps you fight enemies.
  • Combat Medic: Besides having a big arsenal of combat-oriented cards, Guardians also have various options to protect or heal their teammates, both from damage and from horror:
    • "Book of Psalms" heals small amount of horror from a chosen investigator, as well as adds free blessed tokens; however, it has only 4 "secrets", and becomes unusable once they run out.
    • "Emergency Aid" allows to instantly heal 2 damage from investigator at your location, or their Ally.
    • "First Aid" allows to heal 1 damage or horror from investigator or Ally, but has finite number of supplies, and has to be discarded once they run out.
    • "Hallowed Mirror" gives you access to several copies of "Soothing Melody" event, that lets you heal investigators or their Allies.
  • Combat Pragmatist: Most Guardian-class cards are about engaging the enemy head-on. "Ambush" event, instead, makes them prepare a trap for an enemy who's about to spawn in their location, so they can catch it by surprise.
  • Counter-Attack:
    • "Counterpunch" allows you to counterattack after an enemy attacks you, even if attack was cancelled. The upgraded version gets a boost both in damage and accuracy and allows the investigator to resolve their attack before the enemy.
    • "Dodge", at level 2, allows to not only cancel enemy's attack, but also let you test Agility to cause small damage to the attacker.
    • "Survival Knife" asset allows to stab the enemy who just damage you, with extra damage and accuracy. Upgraded version can trigger even ''before'' the enemy attacks you, and is more powerful.
  • Damage Over Time: "Grievous Wound" causes attacked enemy to suffer 1 point of damage every turn until they finally die. Elite enemies are immune.
  • Damage Reduction:
    • "Armor of Ardennes" asset reduces any damage assigned to it by 1, up to 0, but only once per turn.
    • "Flesh Ward" allows to, up to 4 times (before charges runs out), ignore 1 damage or 1 horror you just received from an enemy attack.
  • Death or Glory Attack: Downplayed with "Daring" skill; it's only usable during attack or evasion, and gives your enemy "Retaliate" and "Alert" keywords (meaning that failed test would trigger a counterattack), but rewards you with a free card draw if you succeed.
  • Determinator: The Guardians' resilience is reflected in their card pool. Guardians have access to cards that will allow them to shrug off damage and/or horror for the sake of protecting their allies.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: "Enchanted Armor" is an asset which, theoretically, has no upper limit of how much damage and horror you can put on it, but each time it receives any, you must pass a Willpower test which scales with amount of tokens — and if you fail, the most recent amount of damage and horror that caused you to fail would be dumped straight on you, while the card would get discarded. It also occupies not only a body slot, but also an arcane slot.
  • Double-Edged Buff:
    • "Enchant Weapon" event boost your Weapon's effectiveness, but also makes it take up Arcane slot; this may seriously hinder investigators with access to magic (and this card was introduced in the same expansion as one of game's two Magic Knights).
    • "Geared Up" permanent gives you discount for playing some Items on your first turn, but also makes you skip it, as it takes away all three of your default actions.
    • "Shotgun" scales up its damage with how well you perform. If you fail and hit another player, it still scales up its damage with your performance — the damage against that player, that is.
    • "Telescopic Sight" turns any two-handed Firearms into a Sniper Rifle, but also makes you unable to shoot from it at close range (so you can't use it to fight foes engaged with you). Thankfully though, a later Taboo removed this drawback.
  • Draw Aggro: Various Guardian-class cards allows to protect the other investigators from dangers, and facing them yourself instead:
    • "First Watch" event allows you, when investigators would draw encounter cards during the mythos phase, to look a number of encounter cards on top of the encounter deck equal to the number of investigators present, and then distribute them as you wish, potentially saving weaker team members from a really bad encounter and taking upon yourself to resolve a dangerous treachery or fighting a lethal monster.
    • "Riot Whistle" asset gives you extra action to engage, thus making you preserve the actions which you may use to actually kill the enemy.
    • "Martyr's Vambrace" is an asset that can absorb up to 2 damage and horror, but its real value is redirecting any encounter card (be that an enemy or a treachery) that another investigator drew to yourself; if it is a treachery you also get a +1 bonus to a skill test cause by the card's revelation effect.
    • "Taunt" is a level 0 event that makes the enemies at your location immediately engage you, all at once. At level 2, it also allows you draw extra cards (so you can actually finish off the attackers), and level 3 version is no longer restricted to your turn only, as well as instantly causes some damage.
    • "Get behind me!" event allows to draw all attacks intended for the other investigators in your location to yourself (as well as making the enemies engage you afterwards), while also cancelling small amount of horror those attacks would otherwise deal.
    • "Heroic Rescue" event allows to redirect attack intended for another investigator to yourself. It also forces that enemy to engage you (and deals damage to it), ensuring that the enemy wouldn't just re-target them again.
    • "Let me handle this!" event allows to resolve an encounter card drawn by other player as if it was drawn by you, with +2 skill boost when passing any tests imposed by it (making it more likely to resolve it unharmed).
    • "Get over here!" forces a non-Elite enemy to move from a connecting location to the location of the investigator who played that card. The upgrade not only allows you to target enemies two location away, but it is also Fast (a rarity among cards that allow you to perform a fight action), meaning that it won't take any of your base three actions if you play it and can be used even outside of your turn, which is very useful when facing certain annoying enemies, like Acolytes.
  • Draw Extra Cards: Guardians have the fewest options to get any extra cards beyond normal draw actions, with those they do have often coming with drawbacks; it's not uncommon for such cards to either require actively fighting in order to work, or only helping with getting the cards you would fight with:
    • "Daring" skill lets you draw an extra card to replace it, but only if you actually succeed on a test you used it for.
    • "Self-Sacrifice" skill lets you (or the investigator you helped with it) draw 2 cards, but only if the test fails.
    • "Second Wind" event lets you draw 1 extra card, along with healing you, but you must use it on your first action.
    • "Enchanted Mirror" asset gives access to "Soothing Melody" event, which not only heals, but also gives a free draw.
    • "Prepared for the Worst" event allows to quickly find a Weapon in your deck. Upgraded version allows to immediately put it in play, as well as allows to use it to help the other player.
    • "Boxing Gloves" asset, besides boosting your accuracy when attacking, as an added gimmick allows to quickly find Spirit events in your deck for further use.
    • "Glory" event lets you draw 2 cards, but only after you defeat an enemy.
    • "Stick to the Plan" lets you pick (before you even draw your opening hand) up to 3 Tactic and/or Supply cards and stash them until the right time, instead of relying on good luck with drawing cards and avoiding losing what's in your hand prematurely.
    • Upgraded "Taunt" event lets you draw 1 card per each enemy affected by it.
  • Early Instalment Weirdness: The "If it bleeds..." event, which was printed back during The Dunwich Legacy expansion (the first one) of the game, completely lacks any trait, while every single player card has one. This somewhat hurts the card too, as it cannot benefit from no other card or mechanic that cares about traits.
  • Encounter Bait: "On the Hunt" event allows to, instead of drawing whatever encounter deck wants to send you, draw specifically an enemy, and make that enemy spawn engaged with you, even if it normally shouldn't, so you can smite it right away, before it causes any harm (though you would still need to draw an encounter card if you failed to spawn any monster). The upgraded version even rewards you resources for defeating the enemy you just spawned and cost zero resources, making it more cost effective, on top of letting you skip drawing a replacement encounter card if no monster spawned.
  • Encounter Repellant:
    • "Warning Shot" scares the non-Elite enemies away from your location, though you need to have a firearm asset in hand and one spare ammo to use it.
    • "Fool me once..." event allows, instead of discarding a treachery after resolving it, to attach this card to to the treachery and keep it out the encounter deck and encounter discard pile. If any investigator draws a copy of the treachery, you can discard that treachery and "Fool me once..." to cancel it; considering that some truly nasty ones comes in pairs or even trios, sometimes it may save lives.
  • Equipment Upgrade:
    • "Custom Modifications" is an upgrade event that, by default, makes your Firearm able to ignore any token with the expection of Autofails. However, it itself can be upgraded to give it more abilities, like making it unable to hurt friends if you miss, making it more accurate, making upgrade itself easier to install mid-fight, and so on.
    • "Hunter's Armor" is, by default, rather expensive and not particularly durable, well, armor asset. But you have a plenty of ways to make it more awesome: make magic and take arcane slot rather than body, double its durability, make it reflect damage back at attacker, and so on.
    • "Runic Axe" weapon asset has several (replenishable) charges that you can spend to give it extra abilities. You can upgrade it in various ways, to either give it more abilities, or make it more efficient (by making it cheaper, speed up its recharge time, or letting you use two abilities per charge spent).
  • Extra Turn:
    • The "Police Badge" asset is normally used to passively boost Willpower, but when needed, can be discarded to instantly perform 2 extra actions.
    • "Galvanize" event allows to instantly ready a Guardian-class asset under your control, and take an extra action. The drawback is that you must spend it on fighting someone.
    • "Riot Whistle" asset gives an extra action, but it can only be spent to engage an enemy. It's still beneficial, as not wasting an action on that means having more to actually kill the enemy.
  • Friendly Fireproof:
    • The "Blackjack" asset has only one gimmick: it can be used to attack the enemies engaged with the other players without the risk of hurting your teammates if you miss. Its damage is quite low, however, so it's pretty much the only use it has. The upgraded version is more expensive to put in play but deal extra damage per hit but only if ther targeted enemy is engaged with another investigator, not with you.
    • One of the possible upgrades for "Custom Modifications" event allows it to make whatever asset it's attached to unable to harm teammates when you try to attack the enemy targeting them, but miss.
  • Friend on the Force: Most Guardian-class Allies are related to either police or Agency, and prove themselves surprisingly effective in fights against Eldritch Abominations.
  • Gathering Steam: "Hungering Blade" has only generic +1 damage boost by default. But the gimmic of this card is that it also shuffles 3 copies of "Bloodlust" weakness into your deck, and accumulates "offerings" each time you slay someone; "Bloodlust" merely damages your sanity by default, but if you have enough offerings, you may attach it to the Blade, giving it stacking boost to accuracy.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: Many Guardian-class event cards shows the investigators engaging in fistfights with cultists, gangsters, monsters and various other terrors from beyond:
    • "Get over here!" forces a non-Elite enemy to move from a connecting location to the location of the investigator who played that card, only to get engaged and punched in the face.
    • "Clean Them Out" makes you perform an attack action and gain 2 resources by doing so (the card itself costs 0). Not terribly useful on its own given that you are attacking just for one damage, but helps to fuel the economy of other assets and events and allows you to take out enemies with one HP left without wasting bullets or using more damaging events.
    • "Counterpunch" allows you to counterattack after an enemy attacks you, even if attack was cancelled.
    • "One-Two Punch" allows an investigator to attack the same enemy twice in one action, first dealing one damage and then two, it's tricky to use however because the first attack is less accurate than the second and you need to land it in order to attack again. The upgrade version solves that problem by making the first attack always land, on top of improving the accuracy of the second attack, makes both deal an additional damage and allows you to target another enemy in your location with the second attack instead of the first target.
    • "Mano a Mano" allows to instantly hit an enemy engaged with you for some testless damage, though you have to use it as your first action.
  • Great Detective: Most Guardians' Allies are fighters of various kinds. Alice Luxley is a detective instead, who relies on her brains rather than brawns, and boosts your Intellect stat instead of offensive or defensive stats. Even her abilities do the typical routine of Guardian-class search cards in reverse, as well: she causes damage to the enemy after you discover a clue, rather than the other way around.
  • Gut Feeling: "Guided by Faith" event lets investigator to rely on their, well, faith rather than their wits when looking for clues, and thus, investigating using Willpower instead of Intellect. Revealing at least one blessed token (a couple of which it adds just before the test starts) gives you extra clue, which is also purely random.
  • Heal Thyself:
    • "Second Wind" lets you heal 1 damage from yourself (2 if you previously drew a treachery), but you must only play it as your first action.
    • Girish Kadakia has a special ability that boosts skill tests performed by investigator at his location, and heals him if that tests succeeds; this makes him one of the few assets capable of self-maintaining, instead of relying on other cards for being healed.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Guardians have access to several cards that can be used to damage or dispatch multiple enemies at once compared to other classes:
    • "Dynamite Blast" event can cause 3 damage to everyone in its blast area, targeting either your or connecting location. All versions share prohibitively high cost and risk of friendly fire, but upgraded versions at least can be used without the risk of attacks of opportunity, with level 3 version also not being restricted to only being usable during your turn on top of not taking an action.
    • "Mk 1 Grenades" makes investigator's attack deal a (fixed) damage of 2 to every enemy (and investigator, other than the user themselves) in the same location as their target. Despite being a Weapon asset, they don't take up any slot, making them a solid a solid backup weapon.
    • "Flamethrower" can only target the enemies engaged with investigator, but instead of normal attack, it allows to spread 4 damage between all foes currently engaged with the investigator (with bonus damage from any source adding to that amount), making it excel at quickly clearing herds of weaker enemies. The downside is that it comes with limited ammo, and takes both hands slot and a body slot.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: A recurring theme of the Guardian class cards; sometimes, one has to spill their own blood, so the others wouldn't suffer:
    • Many of their Ally cards have special abilities, which only triggers on damage/defeat, or requires damage/discard as a cost.
    • The "I'll see you in hell!" is an event that instantly defeats you and all non-Elite enemies engaged with you at the cost of triggering physical trauma which would persist even outside of scenario (or even kills you, if you already accumulated enough).
    • "Self-Sacrifice" is a skill card that can only be committed to a skill test performed by another investigator. It provides no skill icons, but allows the investigator committing the card to suffer the consequences of a failed skill check in place of the performing investigator. Then either the investigator that committed the card or got the card commited to them can draw 2 cards.
  • Holy Burns Evil: "Radiant Smite" is an offensive spell event, which lets you seal some blessed tokens on it for better accuracy and damage, which you can then return if you actually defeat an enemy. The card's image shows some sorceress invoking Elder Sign, a symbol traditionally associated with benevolent deities of this -verse.
  • Item Amplifier:
    • Several Guardian-class cards are used for making your Weapons (particularly Firearms) better:
      • "Marksmanship" event only works with Firearms or Ranged cards, but lets you target enemy at a connected location, while ignoring "Retaliate" and "Aloof" keywords, as well as deals extra damage unless you're fighting someone engaged with you.
      • "Enchant Weapon" makes a Weapon deal more damage and allows to, when using it, boost your Combat with your Willpower, making it much more likely to succeed. The downside is that it now takes Arcane slot on top of whatever it was taking before. It also gains a Relic trait, which unlocks some special synergies with certain other cards and abilities.
      • "Extra Ammunition" event allows to reload a gun, yours or your teammate's. It's one of the few ways to restock ammo without discarding the asset first.
      • "Venturer" Ally lets you quickly reload your or your friends' Firearms, albeit he has limited supplies to do so.
      • "Custom Modifications" allows to, once per attack, ignore non-Autofailure token while using Firearms asset, drawing other one instead. It itself can be upgraded, giving it even more abilities.
      • "Custom Ammunitions" makes chosen Firearms asset deal extra damage against Monster enemies.
      • "Strong-Armed" skill boosts your damage when using Melee or Ranged assets.
      • "Tinker" makes a chosen Weapon or Tool asset take one fewer hand slot, thus essentially letting you keep more of those in play at once.
      • "Hand-Eye Coordination" event lets you use Weapon and Tool cards without spending actions.
    • Several Guardian-class cards are specifically dedicated to improving usability of your and your teammates' Allies:
      • "Inspiring Presence" is a skill that allows to instantly ready an Ally card at your location and heal it.
      • "Motivational Speech" allows the chosen investigator to play Ally card by greatly decreased price. It is also a "Parley", so it can be used to play said ally when engaged with an enemy without triggering Attacks of Opportunity.
      • "Trusted" can be attached to a chosen Ally card to boost their Health and Sanity values by 1.
    • Several cards improves Items in general, which covers wide selection of cards (Weapons included):
      • "Reliable" boosts all skills when resolving effects of the upgraded Item card.
      • "Geared Up" permanent asset lets you play any amount of Items from hand at reduced price at the start of the scenario, thus putting key cards into play right away, but at the cost of making you essentially skip first turn, as it takes away 3 actions.
      • Tetsuo Mori, when defeated, lets investigator at his location to quickly find an Item card in their deck.
      • "Well-Mantained" event allows to preserve an Item you're about to discard, along with all the other Upgrades installed on it. It can't self-preserve, however.
    • Several cards helps with playing certain kinds of events that are particularly common in Guardian decks:
    • "The Star XVII" Tarot increases Health and Sanity value of all your assets that have those by 1.
    • "Ever Vigilant" event allows to instantly play up to 3 (up to 4 for upgraded version) assets from hand with their price reduced by 1.
    • "Galvanize" event lets you instantly ready a Guardian-class asset, as well as do extra action, which you would likely spend using the card you just readied.
    • "Helping Hand" is a skill card that has no skill icons on its own, but doubles all icons on other cards committed to a test.
    • "Rite of Sanctification" lets you decrease a price of any card you or the other investigator plays, but requires sealing up to 5 blessed tokens to fuel it, which serves as its charges (one token per use).
    • "Tinker" event makes a chosen Tool card take one less hand slot.
    • "Hand-Eye Coordination" event lets to use a Weapon or Tool asset's ability without spending actions required to trigger them.
    • "Cleaning Kit" asset doesn't do anything on its own, but the supplies on it can be spent by other assets as their supplies or ammo. Upgraded version not only increases the amount of supplies, but also gives significant skill boost when you're spending these supplies during skill test, making you less likely to waste them.
  • It Only Works Once: "Miracle Wish" removes itself once it plays, meaning that you have no means to either trigger its bonded event, "Evanescent Ascension", again, or resupply it with "wishes".
  • Jack Bauer Interrogation Technique: "Interrogate" event allows to pass Combat check on an enemy to discover clues, with obvious implications that the information just gets beaten out of them.
  • Kill It with Fire: Guardians have access to the actual "Flamethrower" as their Weapon option. It allows to attack all enemies engaged with you, but is limited by its high cost, taking both your hand slots and a body slot at once and not being able to hurt enemies not engaged with you.
  • The Leader: Guardians have many cards specifically dedicated to coordinating the efforts of their entire team, instead of just supporting someone particular.
  • Lightning Gun: "Lightning Gun" Weapon asset is extremely powerful, providing massive bonus to Combat and damage on each attack, allowing to zap nearly any enemy to bits, be they cultists or Eldritch Abominations. On the downside, it costs whopping 6 resources to put in use, takes both hands and only has 3 charges, not to mention that it's level 5 card, with experience not being that easy to get either.
  • Loot-Making Attack: Many Guardian-class cards generate resources, cards or clues only if you're actively fighting and killing your enemies:
    • "Evidence!" event lets you discover a clue, but only after defeating an enemy. Upgraded version lets you find 2 at once depending on the health value of the enemies you defeated this turn.
    • "Clean Them Out" event gives you resources when you attack an enemy.
    • Upgraded "On the Hunt" event lets you spawn an enemy (instead of a random encounter card), and gives you resources if you kill it.
    • "Relentless" asset storages excessive damage that you do; you can discard it whenever you want, gaining all that damage as resources.
    • "Glory" event lets you draw 2 extra cards, but only after defeating an enemy.
    • "Taunt" event (excluding level 0 version) gives you 1 card per each enemy that engages you due to its effect.
    • Grete Wagner lets you find extra clues after defeating an enemy, albeit at the cost of causing damage to her; upgraded version can discover clues even in connected location,
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic:
    • "Eat lead!" event that allows, when using Firearms assets, to spend extra ammo to draw that same amount of chaos tokens, and pick the one you like more. It's nearly always only usable when you're fighting someone, but it's not that Guardians have many other options to manipulate chaos bag.
    • The fully-charged "Empty Vessel" asset turns into "Wish-Eater", which can cancel symbol chaos tokens (excluding auto-failure) and even heal investigators. It regress into basic form after three uses.
    • "Strong-Armed" skill lets you sacrifice some health to cancel chaos tokens you draw (you still have to draw replacement ones).
    • The Innsmouth Conspiracy and The Feast of Hemlock Vale expansions introduced several cards dedicated to either adding or preserving the blessed tokens, which boosts the skill value when drawn:
      • "Blessing of Isis" turns the second revealed blessed token into Elder Sign, which triggers the investigator's special ability, as well as gives varying stat boost.
      • "Sacred Covenant" allows to preserve blessed tokens which would otherwise be wasted on a skill test the outcome of which they can't change, thus, ensuring that the team would still benefit from them (as it may be hard to actually put those in the bag).
      • "Hand of Fate" generates blessed tokens when investigator gets attacked, on top of cancelling said attack.
      • Upgraded "Holy Rosary" (level 0 version belongs to Mystic class instead) allows to, after passing a Willpower test on treachery card, add some blessed tokens into bag.
      • "Righteous Hunt" event lets you quickly engage an enemy, even if it's couple locations away from you, and generate blessed tokens equal to enemy's horror value.
      • "Ancestral Token" asset adds extra blessed tokens into bag when its owner kills an enemy, with exact number scaling with monster's basic health.
      • "Absolution" event reveals 3 random tokens for free, and any amount of extra tokens for 1 resource each; it then adds 1 blessed token for each non-symbol token revealed, and heals 1 horror from investigator or Ally for each blessed token you reveal this way.
      • "Purified" skill doesn't help you during actual skill test, but, if you succeed, lets you either add up to 5 blessed tokens or remove up to 5 cursed ones (with power scaling with your performance during the test).
      • "Miracle Wish" event triggers when at least one blessed token gets revealed at your location, putting into play its bonded asset, "Evanescent Ascension", that lets investigator who's about to fail a skill test resolve their Elder Sign effect (on top of other tokens drawn), potentially turning the situation into their favour. It has limited charges, with exact value varying depending on how many tokens were revealed initially.
  • Machete Mayhem: "Machete" is amongst the most popular Weapon choices for starting decks, due to how easy and reliable it is, despite its only gimmick being dealing additional damage to enemies engaged with the investigator (and only if there's exactly one enemy). The situation was bad enough for the card to be nerfed by the first wave of "Taboo" rules, specifically so it would stop showing up in starting decks (though this decision was eventually overturned with the introduction of many other assets challenging the Machete's position as the main Level 0 weapon for Guardians).
  • Magic Knight: Downplayed, Guardians have some magical weapons and spells at their disposal, but for the most parts, their arsenal is relatively mundane. They have the second-least amount of assets taking the "arcane" slots, after Survivors.
  • Meditation Powerup: "Spiritual Resolve" is a ritual asset that gives you extra protection against damage and horror, which can be further prolonged by discarding other copies of it from hand to heal it.
  • Mighty Glacier: While they are strong, most Guardians have only 2 Agility, which makes it hard to escape ambushes in dire situations, and makes them vulnerable to certain kinds of treacheries.
  • Money Multiplier: Compared to the other classes, Guardains have very few options to make extra resources; all of them have some limitations:
    • "I've had worse…" event can give you resources, albeit you have to tank some damage/horror with it first.
    • Upgraded "Leadership" skill gives free resources if the test is successful, to either yourself (if you commit it to a test you took) or to you and a friend (if you commit it to a test taken by an another Investigator)
    • Both the basic and upgraded version of "Stand Together" event gives you and your teammate free resources, but only if you stand in same location.
  • More Dakka:
    • ".32 Colt" enters play with impressive 6 ammo, albeit it doesn't give you any boost to your stats when used (only boosting the damage output), making it more prone to miss its target unless used by someone who already has high Combat stat. Upgraded version further promotes this style, by giving you an option to spend 1 resource to return it to hand, so you can put it back into play fully recharged.
    • "M1918 BAR" allows to spend up to 5 ammo in one attack, dealing damage equal to ammo spent; by default, it has 8 ammo, but it can be further increased with the right cards, even beyond its printed uses value.
  • Multi-Melee Master: Befitting their roles as the main fighters of most investigation teams, Guardians have the biggest quantity and variety of melee weapons among all classes, which include swords, boxing gloves, truncheons, axes, machetes, survival and war knives.
  • Multiplayer-Only Item:
    • Downplayed with "Fighting Lessons" Skill; you can use it on yourself to get a generic stat boost, but its special gimmick only plays out in the multiplayer game, as it can be used to assist the other player at any location.
    • "Stand Together" event specifically instructs you to choose the other investigator at your location, for you both to get some free resources (and cards, if you use upgraded version).
    • "Teamwork" event lets investiators at your location swap their Items and Allies (something normally impossible).
    • "Safeguard" asset exists mainly to follow the vulnerable teammate who's performing important task which requires them moving around, so the Guardian is always ready to protect them from whatever danger arise. The level 0 version only allows you to follow an investigator for one location, but the upgraded version lets you follow them every time they move, potentially saving you a massive amount of actions you would have spent just to move around.
  • Multi-Ranged Master: Guardians have a huge variety of firearms they can use to defend themselves and their companions, going from mundane pistols and machineguns, to more exotic weaponry like flamethrowers or the "Lightning Gun".
  • Necessary Drawback:
    • Guardians pay for their high Health with reduced Sanity, usually only having 6 (or only 5 for some).
    • Guardians are great combatants, but generally mediocre clue-searchers, generally having 2-3 Intellect at most.
    • As Guardians are intended as the team's frontline, they are rather slow; most Guardians have only 2 Agility, with few having 3 (out of 5). This also makes them vulnerable to certain treacheries.
  • No-Sell:
    • "I've had worse" event allows investigator to shrug off huge amount of damage and/or horror received, and gain resources instead. The Level 2 version of the card cancels up to 2 damage and/or horror, the level 4 version up to 5.
    • "Dodge" is a level 0 event that allows to outright cancel enemy's attack directed at an investigator in your location. The level 2 upgrade reduces the resource cost of the card from one to zero and also allows you to do an agility test to deal 1 damage to the attacking enemy, making it even easier to use.
    • "Delay the Inevitable" allows to cancel all damage and horror directed at chosen investigator. The downside is that it has to be prepared in advance by attaching it to the target, and costs resources to maintain.
    • "Shield of Faith" allows to cancel up to 5 attacks, but requires sealing some blessed tokens on it first (which acts as its "charges").
    • "Trench Knife" weapon asset makes Engage actions no longer provoke attacks of opportunity, and in fact it grows more accurate the more enemies you are enaged with. Unfortunately it is not a strong weapon on its own.
    • Upgraded ".45 Automatic" lets you ignore "Retaliate" keyword, meaning that failed attack with it wouldn't trigger a counterattack from an enemy.
    • "Hand of Fate" allows to cancel enemy's attack against investigator at your location, as well as generates free blessed tokens for your team.
  • Not So Invincible After All: "If it bleeds..." event allows you and all investigators in your location to restore some sanity after defeating a Monster enemy, as seeing the nightmarish abomination falling restores their faith in possible victory.
  • One Bullet Left: "One in the Chamber" event card only works when there's one ammo left in your Firearms asset... but it gives massive boost to the skill test when you use it, highly increasing your chance to make the best out of that ammo.
  • One-Hit Kill: The level 5 version of "Monster Slayer" event allows you to defeat a non-Elite enemy with one hit, assuming the attack itself lands (which can be tricky to, as the card itself doesn't boost the accuracy of the attack). Base level 0 version merely boosts the damage, however.
  • "Open!" Says Me: "Breach the Door" event lets investigato to just smash the door (Combat test), permanently reducing location's shroud: can't hide your secrets behind the locks if there's no locks anymore.
  • Pain & Gain:
    • "Lesson Learned" can only be used when you suffer damage from enemy's attack, but allows you to find up to 2 clues at your location.
    • "I've had worse…" event, on top of cancelling damage/horror, gives you free resources, same amount as cancelled damage/horror.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • "Handcuffs" asset not only allows to "evade" by using Combat instead of Agility, but also prevents non-Elite enemies from readying or accumulating Doom. The downside is that it only works on Humanoid enemies (who're not always presented), and can't be retrieved until that enemy dies or gets discarded. The upgraded version also removes all doom the enemy already has on a succesful evade, on top of being "fast" to play.
    • "Ofuda" asset temporarily disables most keywords on chosen non-Elite enemy, and thus, special abilities associated with them.
  • Religious Bruiser: Majority of Guardian-class cards added in The Innsmouth Conspiracy and The Feast of Hemlock Vale expansions which interact with blessed tokens (introduced in the same expansions) in one way or another have religious theme (not always solely Christian): faith, blessed items, assistance from gods, etc. This comes from the most resilient and combat-oriented class in the game.
  • Shotguns Are Just Better: Guardians use shotguns as the strong, but not always reliable, firearms:
    • Playedwith regarding ".35 'Winchester'"; it's the weakest amongst shotgun variants, being a level 0 asset that takes both hands and only deals extra damage by revealing specific tokens during the skill test to attack with it, but it is also the only one which comes with more than 2 shots, which may be crucial at times.
    • "Shotgun" is a level 4 asset that provides a great Combat boost and scales its damage depending on the amount you succeed by. A major downside is that if you miss, the damage to your teammates would scale up, too. It also takes 2 hand slots as well to properly handle.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • "Defensive Stance" skill either gives you boost to Combat equal to your Agility, or boost to Agility equal to you Combat. How strong is the skill boost will of course depend on the Investigator's skill values.
    • "Gang Up" event boosts your attack, giving it +1 Combat and +1 damage per each class you control (counting your investigator); this means that players who're mixing up some off-class cards are more likely to get stronger effects out of it than "class loyalists".
    • "Holy Spear" has pretty standard +2 Combat and +2 damage boost by default, but allows you to seal some blessed tokens on it, which you can then spend to double these values. It can't generate them on its own, however, so you have to find some other ways to do so.
    • "Leadership" skill only gives you one "wild" icon by default, but gives much stronger boost when you commit it to other player's skill test. The upgraded version gives you resources if you pass a test you commited this card to, and gives you and another Investigator cash if you commited it to someone else instead.
    • "Steadfast" skill gives you +1 Combat and Willpower by default, but doubles its effect if you have at least 5 total Health and Sanity left, and tripples if you have 10 or more.
    • Amount of "wishes" on "Evanescent Ascension" scales from 1 to 10, depending on how many were revealed during same skill test at your location when you summoned it via "Miracle Wish" event.
    • "Machete" deals extra damage when it is used fighting one enemy engaged with you, and just one. If you are engaged with multiple enemies or none at all, then it won't hit as hard.
    • Upgraded version of "Blackjack" Weapon deals extra damage when attacking a monster engaged with another investigator, which further solidifies "Blackjack" as a "help a friend in sticky situation" card.
    • "Take the Initiative" skill gives you (and only you, you can't use it to help others) +3 "Wild" icons by default, but loses one for each action that was taken by anyone this phase prior to it being used. It's rather awkward to use during normal investigation phase, given that you may simply be not the first player, which would likely disable it, but it is a very useful defence tool for the Mythos phase, before any player can act.
    • "Well Prepared" lets you pick an asset you control and gives a boost equal to its skill icons for one skill test; whether it's useful or not depends on what kinds of assets you have in play, and whether their icons fit whatever test you got yourself forced into.
    • "Task Force" event lets each investigator at your location to either resolve action ability of their asset without spending actions, move to a connected location or find 1 clue at their location. As it costs extra action to play, it's nearly useless if you're the only player, but can be immensely helpful in coordinating a full team.
  • Situational Sword: Many Guardians' cards are pretty powerful, but require to fulfil certain conditions to actually benefit from them... and then there are these cards, which just don't work at all, unless you meet these conditions:
    • Level 0 version of the "Blessed Blade" Weapon only deals extra damage if a blessed token gets revealed as part of the attack. You can add one such token into bag before attack by exhausting the Blade, but it's by no means guaranteed that you would actually draw it. Upgraded version makes extra damage guaranteed, and instead preserves all drawn blessed tokens, as well as gives twice as many through its pre-attack ability.
    • ".35 'Winchester" only deals extra damage if you draw a "+1", "0" or Elder Sign token during an attack.
    • "Katana" Weapon deals 2 extra damage on attack, but only if you succeed exactly by 2 (no more, no less), which makes it very unreliable. Alternative ability lets to attack using your Agility instead of Combat, but that effect is nearly useless for Guardians themselves (most of whom have only 2 Agility), while investigators who have access to Katana as off-class option, always have access to other, more practical Guardian-class Weapons, too.
  • Slide Attack: "Sweeping Kick" event gets extra accuracy from investigator's Agility, and immediately exhaust a targeted enemy if attack is successful, giving even generally-slow Guardians the means to get out of ambushes.
  • Sniper Rifle:
    • "Springfield M1903" asset can't be used against enemies engaged with you, but provides good stat boost and damage. It was very unpopular (as it was essentially unusable unless someone else draws aggro first), so Taboo rule turned it into a proper sniper rifle, by allowing to target non-Elite enemies further than the normal range would allow, while ignoring Retaliate and Aloof keywords. Now, if you also attach a Telescopic Sight to it, it can shoot from across half the map.
    • "Telescopic Sight" event can be attached to two-handed Firearms asset, making it unable to shoot at close distance (read: against enemies engaged with you), but also allowing to target enemies outside of your location, with no risks of counterattack (it ignores Retaliates and Aloof keywords).
  • Spam Attack:
    • "One-Two Punch" event lets you do a second attack (with boost to its accuracy and damage) if your first one lands. Upgraded version makes first attack always accurate, and further boost the second attack's effectiveness.
    • "Butterfly Swords" Weapon asset lets you do a second attack (with boosted accuracy and damage) if the first one lands, albeit at the cost of disabling it for the round. Upgraded version no longer has such restriction, instead letting you disable it to boost damage of second attack.
    • "Flurry of Blows" event lets you attack with a Melee card you control without paying for its action cost (though event itself costs extra action), repeating the effect up to three more times (so you deal one more attack than it should be possible). If it was still your turn, it ends immediately.
  • Stance System: "Eyes of Valusia" Spell, in its default form, lets you "parley" with an enemy, to give each investigator a bonus when performing further tests against same enemy; doing so accumulates charges. You can swap the Eyes for "Blade of Yoth" at any time, turning it into a combat-oriented Spell instead, which uses charges that you've accumulated up until this point. You can swap it back, but that would waste the unspent charges.
  • Status Buff:
    • "Intrepid" skill, if you pass whatever skill test you've used it for, gives you temporal boost to Intellect, Combat and Agility, making you more likely to pass further tests on the same round.
    • "Blood Eclipse" event lets you use Willpower instead of Combat, which swaps which cards can or can't affect it. Whether it's actually better than brute force heavily depends on who plays it and what cards they have, however.
    • "Fang of Tyr'thrha" Spell event not only lets you attack any enemy at any revealed location, but also boosts your Combat with your Agility (making you much more likely to succeed), and lets you teleport to that enemy if you think it would be of any benefit.
    • "Gang Up" boosts your Combat for one attack, with effect dependant on diversity of the cards you control.
    • "Marksmanship" event temporarily lets you use Firearms or Ranged cards against enemies at the connected location, while also granting an immunity to Retaliate and Aloof keywords and let you deal extra damage with the attack.
    • "One-Two Punch" boosts your Combat for duration of attack, and lets do a second, even stronger one if it lands.
    • "Radiant Smite" lets you use your Willpower instead of Combat (usefulness varies from user to user) and lets you boost your accuracy and damage by sealing blessed tokens (which are released back into the Chaos Bag if the attack doesn't defeat the targeted enemy; if it does they get removed instead)
    • "Sweeping Kick" event boosts your attack with your Agility, making it more likely to land.
    • "Bestow Resolve" ritual asset lets you commit one card a skill test, treating all its icons as "wild" (meaning, they count as matching for any test), which drastically increases selection of cards you can sacrifice.
  • Support Party Member: If a Guardian isn't a Big Guy or an Action Hero specialised in combat, they tend to focus on healing, protecting and supporting other Investigators instead.
  • Taking You with Me:
    • Brother Xavier, when he's defeated, deals 2 damage to an enemy at your location, possibly taking out the attacker who just defeated him.
    • "I'll see you in hell!" event instantly defeats all non-Elite enemies engaged with the investigator playing the card regardless of their current health, but then causes said investigator to get defeated and suffer one physical trauma, which can potentially kill them if too much is accumulated.
  • Walking Armory: "Bandolier" asset has exactly one function — providing additional hand slots specifically for Weapon assets (at the cost of taking body slot), allowing investigator to keep more Weapons ready for battle and switch between them on the go. The level 0 version just converts your body slot into an extra hand slot for Weapons, but the level 2 version gives you two extra slots, as well as gives you small boost to Willpower while you have at least two "hands" occupied with Weapons.
  • Weaponized Teleportation: "Fang of Tyr'thrha" Spell allows to pick an enemy in any revealed location, teleport to it and attack it with boosted accuracy (it adds your Agility to your Combat for attack) and heavily increased damage.

    Seeker class tropes 
Seekers dedicates themselves to supporting their teammates with their great knowledge of the occult. What they lack in combat skills, they make up for with special training and skills, making them great clue gatherers.
  • Absurdly Ineffective Barricade: Downplayed with level 0 version of "Barricade" event; while it does prevent the enemies from entering your location, it does nothing to stop them from spawning there, which is even more likely to happen. Upgraded version removes that flaw. Elite enemies, as always, are unaffected.
  • Alchemy Is Magic: Seekers have several aclchemy-related cards, mixed into their magic and occult-themed cards. They're amongst prime source of Seekers' magic, both offensive and utilitarian.
  • Anti-Debuff:
    • "Logical Reasoning" event not only heals some horror from a chosen investigator, but also lets to discard a Terror treacherie without bothering with its normal conditions. Both basic and upgraded versions requires having at least 1 clue, with upgraded one letting you use either of the the effects up for each clue you have, up to 3 times.
    • "Otherword Codex" lets you search encounter deck, pick a card amongst top-9 ones (be it treachery or enemy), and then discard a copy of it that is already in play. Elite enemies are immune.
  • Attack Its Weak Point:
    • "Expose Weakness" event allows them, through their own Intellect, analyse their enemy and come up with a plan how to defeat it by striking the most vulnerable part, temporarily reducing its combat stat (thus making an attack more likely to land).
    • "Anatomical Diagrams" asset allows to reduce the enemy's combat and evade values (assuming investigator has enough Sanity left to study), the logic being that they discover the monster's weak points and how to exploit them.
  • Badass Bookworm: Downplayed, Seekers are generally speaking not people of action, but the fact that they are willing to put their lives in danger to save Arkham from otherworldly threats speak volumes of how badass they are. They have enough understanding of the Mythos to be vital in foiling the plans of cults and stop eldritch monsters from invading our world and they have the second highest amount of Spell cards and Arcane-slot Assets in their class (after Mystics) through their research on the unknown alone.
  • Blood Magic: "Occult Lexicon" Tome gives Investigators access to "Blood Rite" event, that lets them sacrifice some of their blood (not enough to cause damage, though) to either get resources, or cause damage to an enemy. Upgraded version of the card lets them choose between using the basic effect of "Blood Rite" with the added benefit of reshuffling the card back into the deck to be drawn again and reused, or trigger a stronger effect, at the cost of discarding the card as usual.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Magnifying Glass: it's cheap, "fast" (doesn't cost an action to play), and gives you a stat boost when investigating. It lacks the clue-getting potential that more flashy cards have, but it is one of the few investigation tools at your disposal with no drawbacks.
    • Dr. Milan Christopher: he boosts the Intellect skill (the skill Seekers use the most) and generates resources when you investigate (which, as a Seeker, you do all the time). Other, more exotic Allies have stronger and more flashy abilities, but often, all you really need is to have resources to actually play all those cards you stockpile in your hand and a high enough Intellect to collect clues without trouble.
    • Deduction: all it does is let you discover an additional clue when committed to a successful investigation, with no caveats, yet this simplicity is exactly why it's so popular. More exotic cards tend to have some extra conditions or restrictions.
    • "Death • XIII" Tarot card does nothing beside boosting Intellect, making Seeker better at their main job of investigating, and said Intellect boost stacks with other Tools and Allies that provides it.
  • Cap: When you have more than one card with "Research" trait, only one such card can trigger during same search in the deck.
  • Cap Raiser:
    • "Ancestral Knowledge" Permanent boosts deck size by 5, albeit it also forces you to include at least 10 skill cards.
    • "Forced Learning" Permanent boosts your deck size by 15, but comes with a Double-Edged Buff to your card-drawing routine during upkeep phase. You can only purchase it when creating your deck — i.e., at the start of campaign.
    • Seekers are the only class that can increase their maximum hand size (letting them keep more cards in the hand before they reach limit and have to discard excessive ones):
      • "Arcane Enlightenment" asset boosts hand size by 1, but takes up arcane slot.
      • "Laboratory Assistant" Ally boosts hand size by 2; she's extremely frail, however.
  • Card Cycling: "Glimpse the Unthinkable" lets you shuffle any non-weakness cards from your hand back into deck, swapping them with something new, hopefully more useful. Upgraded version also lets you fill the hand to maximum if you're below hand limit, but only works once per game.
  • Cast From Hitpoints:
    • "Feed the Mind" lets you quickly draw tons of cards if you pass an Intellect test; basic version has built-in limiter, but upgraded does not, which makes you draw as many cards as you can, but also causes horror for each card above your hand size.
    • One of upgrades for "Forbbiden Tome" lets you move damage from your assets onto an enemy.
  • Cast from Money:
    • "Scientific Theory" lets you spend resources to boost either your Intellect or your Combat... but as soon as any horror lands on it, it breaks. The upgraded version triples its Sanity value, but also gets 1 point of Health you have to worry about; on the bright side, it also gives some static boosts besides its paid effect.
    • "Hyperawareness" lets you spend resources to boost either your Intellect or your Agility. Level 4 version gets its own supply which it recharges every turn.
    • "Higher Education" lets you spend resources to boost either your Intellect or your Willpower. It's relatively cheap at 1 resource per boost, but you must accumulate at least 5 cards in your hand before it becomes usable, and it provides weaker boosts than analogues of other classes.
    • Some of their cards requires dropping clues in their locations (or at the very least having any in supply) before they can be used. On the one hand, Seekers have the least troubles with gaining those clues back, on another, clues are often needed for progress on your objective.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff: "Gray's Anatomy" can mark a card, so next time it would be damaged, it would receive some extra damage. It can also do so in inverse, marking a card to receive extra healing from any source.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: Upgraded "Ancient Stone" has varying number of max secrets, depending on difficulty of the test that you've passed to decipher it, which encourages trying harder challenges to get a stronger outcome.
  • Discount Card: "Shrewd Analysis" lets you, when purchasing an upgrade for card you previously researched, purchase second upgraded card for free; the downside is that if you do so, you have to take two random upgrades and take one for each card you purchase, limiting your control over what you want to have in your deck.
  • Double-Edged Buff:
    • "Forced Learning" permanent boosts deck size by 15 cards (by itself, a double-edged gift), and makes you draw two cards each turn — while discarding one of them, thus creating an issue with getting the cards you've discarded later. And then there's issue with getting horror if your deck ever runs out (before it resets)...
    • "Miskatonic Archaeology Funding" permanent gives you extra slots for Miskatonic-related Allies, but also makes you unable to reliably use them as damage/horror soak (you can't assign to them more than one point from each source).
  • Draw Extra Cards: Seekers have by far the largest selection of cards to draw even more cards — and they need it, because their gameplay puts huge emphasis on Events, that have to be discarded after single use.
    • Any class has access to cards for quickly searching in the deck, but Seekers have the highest amount, including the cards that aren't restricted in what kind of cards they can search for. They also commonly have special effects triggering when doing the search.
      • Mr. "Rook" lets to search amongst certain amount of cards, with caveat that if you find a weakness, have to draw it as well.
      • "No Stone Unturned" event helps investigator quickly find the card they need in the deck; basic version only searches top 6 cards, while upgraded lifts the limit and becomes "fast" (no action cost, no risk of attack of opportunity).
      • "Old Book of Lore" Tome helps with searching the top 3 cards in any investigator's deck, with upgraded version letting immediately play the just-found card with discount.
      • "Captivating Discovery" lets you search top 6 cards of your deck, but only lets you draw them if you spend some resources (1 resource per 2 cards).
      • "Eureka!" skill lets, after passing a skill test, search for something you want amongst first three cards of the deck.
      • "Guided by the Unseen" asset lets you or the other investigator quickly find a card that is fitting for skill test they're performing, and allows them to commit them by spending the "secrets" on it; the main purpose is to make it easier to use skill cards, but it can be used with any type of cards if user knows what they're doing.
      • "Practice Makes Perfect" event lets you quickly search a Practiced skill in your deck and use it for a test, then lets preserve it in your hand instead of discarding if you succeeded at the test. This ability significantly increases effectiveness of such cards, as you can draw them when you need, instead of hoping to find them naturally.
      • "Research Librarian" Ally allows to quickly find a Tome in your deck — but only when he enters play. Afterwards, he's fully expendable, lacking any other functions.
      • Whitton Greene, besides her passive abilities, lets you search for Tomes or Relics in your deck, but only if you investigate a location, or put it into play.
    • Many cards provide the extra draw as added bonus to their default effect:
      • "Surgical Kit", besides its own healing abilities, lets investigator using it draw an extra card if any of their cards heals someone on top of healing their own Sanity.
      • "Surprising Find" skill is normally a rather generic "+1 to any skill" commit, but when you find it amongst the other cards while doing a search, it gets set up to be used on first eligible test you perform, giving you an extra card if you pass.
      • "Blood Rite" event (accessed through "Occult Lexicon" Tome) lets you draw 2 cards, with an option to discard up to 2 cards from hand to get resources or damage someone.
      • Chemistry Set" can let you draw 1 card, as one of its possible effects.
      • "Dream-Enhancing Serum" asset lets you draw 1 extra card when you draw a copy of a card that you already have in your hand (albeit it exhausts itself, so you can't trigger it twice in a row).
      • Upgraded "Glimpse the Unthinkable" event lets you, if you're below your hand size limit, draw enough cards to fully fill your hand. But it only works once per scenario.
      • "Laboratory Assistant" lets you draw 2 extra cards when you play her, and rises your hand limit by 2 for as long as you keep her alive.
      • "Tooth of Eztli" gives you boost to Willpower and Agility while resolving a skill test on a treachery card (two most-commonly tested stats), and lets you draw 1 card if you manage to pass it.
    • Seekers have plenty of cards which are specifically dedicated to letting their user draw extra cards, and often are either stronger, or less awkward to use, than their direct analogues from other classes:
    • "Alchemical Distillation" asset has ability to draw 2 extra card as one of its default abilities (other one is get 2 resources).
      • "Cryptic Research" event lets you or your teammate draw 3 extra cards without spending actions.
      • "Deep Knowledge" event lets investigators at the user's location draw 3 cards in total, albeit at the cost of adding extra cursed tokens.
      • "Grim Memoir" asset lets you draw extra cards if you succeed by enough while investigating using it (which it makes easier by boosting your Intellect).
      • "Preposterous Sketches" event lets you draw 3 cards, on condition that your location has a clue.
      • "The World • XXI" Tarto lets you draw one extra card once per turn at any moment and without either spending actions or provoking attacks, albeit you must already have at least 8 in your hand (the maximum default handsize).
      • "Deep Knowledge" event lets you and/or other players at your location to draw 3 cards in total, albeit you have to add some cursed tokens into bag to use it.
      • "Empirical Hypothesis" asset, as long as you can supply it with evidences, lets you trade these "evidences" for extra cards with 1:1 ratio. Upgrading this card
      • "Feed the Mind" Spell lets you draw several extra cards if you pass an Intellect test. Basic version is limited to 3 cards at most, while upgraded lifts the limit, but also causes you horror if you exceed your hand's limit.
      • Jeremiah Kirby lets you pick "odd" or "even", and then reveal 5 cards from your deck; you're allowed to keep the cards the cost of which matches your pick; the others gets shuffled into deck.
      • "Knowledge is Power" event, when used on a card in your hand, lets you discard said card afterwards to draw something else.
      • "The Necronomicon", amongst other possible effects, can let you draw 2 cards.
      • "Thorough Inquiry" event lets investigators at your location draw 5 cards in total. It cots extra action, so it's not very practical for user themselves, but it's very useful in a team.
      • Gabriel Carillo lets you draw 1 extra card at the start of your turn, but you have to add 1 cursed token into bag.
    • Several cards lets you draw another card once you resolve their effect, ensuring that you wouldn't stay empty-handed; these cards are "Expose the Weakness" and "Mind Over Matter" events (both only after upgrade), and "Surprising Find" skill.
    • "Ancestral Knowledge" permanent asset lets you, before the game even begins, storage some skills which you can then draw at the right moment, instead of hoping to find them naturally, which may or may not happen. The card demands you to include at least 10 Skills into your deck, albeit it also boosts the max deck size by 5 to make it easier to afford.
    • "Forced Learning" permanent asset makes you draw 2 cards during upkeep phase instead of the usual 1, albeit it forces you to discard one of picked cards (the card you discard can't be a weakness). As the card involves lots of discarding, it increases deck size by 15 as compensation.
    • "Studious" permanent asset lets you start with an extra card in the opening hand, up to a total of 7 with two copies of it.
  • Encounter Repellant:
    • Disc of Itzamna protects you from enemies that would otherwise spawn right on top of you; basic version merely lets you auto-evade it or deal damage to it, while upgraded discards it outright. Both versions are one-time use only, as you have to discard them afterwards.
    • Dr. William T. Maleson lets you can an encounter card you don't like (shuffling it back into deck), and draw another, albeit at the cost of dropping one of your clues. Upgraded version can use his ability on another investigator, as well as letting you choose between two encounter cards instead, canceling and discarding the other
    • "Forewarned" event lets you cancel a non-weakness treachery before it triggers, albeit you have to drop one of your clues to do so.
    • "Barricade" event makes non-Elite enemies unable to enter your location (and upgraded version also prevents them from spawning, kicking them to the nearby location instead). The downside is that if anyone leaves the barricaded location (strangely, entering is fine), the barricade gets discarded.
  • Equipment Upgrade:
    • "Alchemical Distillation" asset lets investigator test their Intellect in hope to get something useful. By default, it only gives resources or cards, but can be upgraded to unlock more functions, or improve the distillation itself, either making it last longer, or improving effects' strength.
    • "Empirical Hypothesis" asset generates "evidences" as you fulfill one of specific conditions, which can be then spent to draw cards. The card can be upgraded in multiple ways, either gaining more conditions, letting other players trigger them, or give it other abilities besides just card-drawing.
    • "The Raven Quill" by default, merely reduces the cost of upgrading specific Tome or Spell assets (or upgrades itself for free instead), but can be upgraded to give it various extra abilities that makes the card upgraded with it much stronger. Interestingly, it's one of the few events to have the Item and Relic traits (usually reserved to assets), on top of being an Upgrade.
  • Extra Turn:
    • "Guidance" event allows to give another investigator (who didn't act yet this round) an extra action on their turn.
    • "Press Pass" asset allows to gain an extra action after spending a clue (or dropping it in a location).
  • Furniture Blockade: The art for "Barricade" event (which prevents non-Elite enemies from entering location) shows how the monster tries to enter the room through a door blocked by a pile of furniture, in vain.
  • Gathering Steam:
    • Seekers have several cards which gradually gets stronger as the player fulfils certain tasks over the course of scenario:
      • "Hawk-Eye Folding Camera" asset requires discovering the last clue in a location to get "evidences"; it fully charges at 3 "evidences", giving its owner boost to Willpower, Intellect and maximum Sanity.
      • "Dissection Tools" asset requires an enemy to be defeated in the owner's location to get "evidences"; it fully charges at 3 "evidences", giving much-needed boost to Combat, Agility and maximum Sanity.
      • "Microscope" asset provides no benefits at first, but gains "evidences" per each enemy evaded or defeated at your location. When you're investigating with it, it boosts your Intellect per each evidence (by 1 for basic, and by 2 for upgraded version; capping at +3 and +6, respectively), at the cost of spending more actions. Once enough evidences gets accumulated, it allows to spend up the excessive ones to discover that many extra clues.
    • "Higher Education" asset doesn't work at all unless you gather at least 5 cards in your hand, but provides stable access to boosting your Willpower and Intellect.
    • "Pendant of the Queen" asset has to be collected from 3 pieces before it works, but once restored, provides excellent tool for mobility, clue gathering and enemy neutralisation. It has limited charges though, turning back into separate shards once discharged completely.
  • Glass Cannon: Over the time, Seekers gained plenty options to defeat, neutralise or cripple their enemies, but most of those cards are Events which only work once and go to the discard pile after use. They're still among the most vulnerable Investigators in the game though, usually having really low Health (around 5-6), low-to-average Agility and consistently below-average Combat stats.
  • Great Big Book of Everything: "Encyclopedia", a Tome asset, allows to choose and boost any skill until the end of the round; knowledge is power, indeed.
  • Guile Hero: Seekers lack either strength or agility, so they have to rely on their wits and improvise the alternative ways to deal with enemies, using cunning traps, alchemy and science. Perhaps that's why their offensive cards are so heavily represented by events and skills cards.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack: Damage caused by "Gaze of Ouraxsh" event can be divided amongst enemies at your location as you see fit.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: The "Ghastly Revelation" event allows them to instantly discover up to 3 clues, and then either give them to the other investigator or place them at any other location in the game — after which they gets defeated and suffer a mental trauma.
  • Item Amplifier:
    • "Dream-Enhancing Serum" asset makes only one copy of each card count towards the hand size.
    • "Unearth the Ancients" event lets you, rather than pay for putting your Seeker-class assets into play, do investigation (with difficulty matching the card's cost) and put the card into play for free if you succeed instead of discovering clues. Upgraded version lets you put up to 2 cards at once, albeit the test's difficulty would rise as well, on top of also letting you discover a clue with the test.
    • "Lab Coat" helps with using other Seeker-class assets, by turning your failures while using them (unless you failed by too much) into success, albeit with barely passable result (so not all cards actually benefit from it).
    • "Research Notes" asset exists for one simple reason: to help you gain back clues that you drop by using other cards, making them much less awkward to use in scenarios where clues equals objective-progression.
    • Several Seeker-class Allies are tailor-made for investigators heavily relying on assets with certain traits, allowing to keep more of them in play:
      • Abigail Foreman can keep one extra Tome in play, which doesn't take any slots while attached to her. She also allows to play effects on attached Tomes twice, making them even more effective. You can quickly swap the attached Tome with one from your slots.
      • Charles Ross gives discount for Items cards you (or other players at your location) play, and allows to pay for other players' Items.
      • Dr. Charles West III allows to keep one extra Tool at play while keeping your precious hand slots free for something else.
      • Dr. Elli Horowitz allows to keep one extra Relic at play (which greatly varies in the slots they take), and can quickly search for a Relic to draw as soon as she enters play.
      • "Library Docent" ally lets you return a Tome you no longer need to your hand, and replace it with another one from hand, at a reduced price. The drawback is that you have to do that when she firstly enters play.
      • "Knowledge is Power" event lets you use ability of Tome or Spell asset in play or hand completely for free, including actions that where required.
      • "Miskatonic Archaeology Funding" Permanent asset provides extra Ally slots for Miskatonic associates (and thus, their abilities). You're greatly limited in dumping damage/horror on those Allies, but it's unlikely that you would take that card just for having more cannon fodder anyway, especially given how fragile Seeker-class Allies tend to be.
      • "Arcane Enlightenment" lets Seekers put more Tomes into play, at the cost of giving up on one of their Arcane slots. It also boosts your hand size by 1.
    • Couple of cards exists to resupply other cards with "secrets", which are always in limited supply:
      • "Ariadne's Twine" asset lets you drain your assets of "secrets" to get extra resources, or, conversely, recharge them directly from your resource supplies (something usually not readily available). You can also charge the Twine itself, which does nothing on its own, but counts when you have to spend some "secrets" for the other cards' effects.
      • "Astounding Revelation" event lets you recharge some of your other cards with "secrets" when you draw that card while using any Search ability (or gain resources instead).
      • "Eldritch Sophist" Ally allows to quickly recharge another card with secrets. His own supply dries out after three uses, but he can also move secrets and charges from one asset to another, not just himself, allowing you to "recycle" the uses of another card in play.
    • "Steady-Handed" asset lets you, when you succeed on a test, to succeed either by 1 more or 1 less; while the former can have many uses, the latter is needed pretty much exclusively to render cards with "succeed exactly by..." mechanics actually usable. It also heals you 1 horror if you succeed by exactly 2, so this card's effect helps even itself.
    • "Farsight" asset allows to, once per turn, play any events without spending actions or provoking enemies. The drawback is that it doesn't work unless you have at least 8 cards in your hand.
    • "Fine Tuning" Upgrade lets to instantly ready just-exhausted Tool or Science-trait asset it's attached to, essentially letting you use them twice per turn.
  • Item Caddy:
    • Seekers have plenty of cards specifically dedicated to making them stockpile cards in their hand, including cards that rise the hand limit itself.
    • Seekers have the largest amount of cards dedicated to searching their decks, including not restricted to certain traits.
  • It Only Works Once:
    • "Eidetic Memory" copies any non-Exceptional Insight event from any player's discard pile, but then both cards gets removed from the game, meaning they can't be reused until next scenario.
    • Upgraded "Glimpse the Unthinkable" becomes much stronger than its basic variant, fully filling your hand, but can't be used more than once per scenario.
  • Knowledge Broker: It's implied that Mr. "Rook" is trading dark secrets, hence why he provides investigators with ability to search for stuff (searching top 3, 6 or 9 cards)... and why sometimes it backfires (if you reveal a weakness, you must draw it).
    "Are you sure you want to know? There is no going back."
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic:
    • "Pnakotic Manuscripts" asset allows to avoid revealing chaos tokens altogether, and thus, not dealing with the negative effects they may produce. Unfortunately, it has limited supply of "secrets" to do that.
    • "The Blasphemous Covenant" asset (from The Innsmouth Conspiracy) allows to treat "cursed" tokens (which normally gives "-2" penalty) as "+1" tokens, albeit it also prevents them from leaving the bag when drawn. Quite often it's used to fix consequences of Seekers' own machinations, given how many of their cards from same expansion actually adds those tokens.
    • "Analysis" skill allows to ignore a chaos token just drawn and replace it with another. You may do that unlimited amount of times per skill test, but you must drop 1 clue each time you use it, making it costly to use.
    • "Esoteric Method" skill adds cursed tokens into bag after skill test, with exact amount depending on by how many points you succeeded or failed.
  • Magikarp Power: Several expansions includes certain setting-appropriate Seeker-class cards; few exceptions aside, they're borderline useless by default, but, if specific tasks gets performed, can be upgraded (by spending experience) into something tailor-made for specific tasks, either by researching, deciphering, etc.
    • "Strange Solution" does nothing on its own, until you manage to pass a non-trivial Intellect test to research it, which allows to turn it into one of four possible variants with powerful abilities, either supportive or offensive.
    • "Archaic Glyphs" require discarding some of your cards to let you "translate the glyphs"; once translated, Glyphs gives you some extra abilities that you can use while investigating (which is generally the main role of the Seekers).
    • "Ancient Stone" has to be bought first (for 1 exp) and "deciphered" (by investigating a location with extra +3 shroud), but if you do so, you would get an extra clue, as well us upgrade the useless stone into a card that gives your card draws (something Seekers do regularly) an extra effect of your choice. Notably, the more you suceeded by on your investigation attempt to decipher the stone, the more uses it has when the upgraded version is played.
    • "Dream Diary", by default, merely gives you rather awkward to use skill card, "Essence of the Dream", bonded to it. Pass a skill test with it with particularly good result, and you translate the diary, which not only doubles the power of the Essence (albeit only after specific circumstances, different for each upgrade), but also makes you always start your turn with it in hand, instead of spending actions to draw it like fir the default version.
    • "Cryptic Grimoire" starts without abilities (other than filling the bag with cursed tokens, which is usually outright harmful), but can be upgraded to get new abilities once you fill the bag with 10 cursed tokens.
    • "Archive of Conduits" is useless by default; you have to put 4 "leylines" on the 4 different locations of your choice, which you have to then investigate. Do it, and you would be able to upgrade it into a tool of your choice, that uses those "leylines" to achieve various benefits.
    • "Forbidden Tome", by default, only lets you draw 1 card (spending 1 secret each time). Once you spend all resources and stockpile tons of cards, it gets powerful supportive abilities (one of the two, on your choice).
    • "Ravenous Myconid" is rather useless at first, requiring constantly charging it with "growths" through its bonded card, "Uncanny Growth". But, once it accumulates at least 3, not only it pays back its price, it also gets "classified", letting you upgrade it into one of three more specialised breeds: "Sentient Strain" that can protect you from treacheries, "Carnivorous Strain" that can instantly defeat an enemy, and "Nurturing Strain" that provides its owner with much-needed damage/horror soak, that can even heal itself.
  • The Medic: Alongside Guardians and Mystics, Seekers get many cards that can heal damage and horror from themselves and other investigators. Fitting for a class that usually includes scholars and students among their numbers.
    • "Bizarre Diagnosis" lets you heal up to 3 damage from investigator or an Ally, but requires dropping one of your clues in order to be used.
    • "Medical Texts" makes you do Intellect test; pass, and you can heal an investigator, fail, and you'd cause them further damage.
    • "Surgical Kit" lets you either heal 3 damage from investigator or Ally at your location (albeit at rather prohibitive cost of 2 actions), or amplify another card's or investigator's ability that does so (spending limited supplies); or you can just combine both, as it can self-boost.
  • Money Multiplier: Seeker-class cards that give them extra resources tend to require either investigating or doing card searches in order to trigger.
    • "Astounding Revelation" can give you resources (or alternatively let you play 1 "secret" on assets you control), but only if you find it while searching for some other cards in your deck.
    • "Burning the Midnight Oil" gives investigator 2 resources, but only when they start investigating.
    • "Crack the Case" event lets you and/or your teammates get free resources after clearing location from clues.
    • "Cryptic Writing" event gives you free resources (with upgraded version giving even more if you have at least 10 cards in hand). If you draw it during your turn it doesn't cost an action to play either.
    • "Alchemical Distillation" asset has ability to get 2 extra resources as one of its default abilities (other one is draw 2 cards).
  • Necessary Drawback:
    • Most Seekers have below 3 Combat and/or Agility (making them weak offensively), compensating for how great they are at clearing the locations from clues. To make them less vulnerable to treacheries, they at least have decent Willpower (3 on average, some have more or less).
    • Seekers generally have good Sanity, making them less vulnerable to horrors, but also poor Health, making them more prone to die if they get injured.
  • Non-Action Guy: While Seekers do have (limited) combat options, they are not combat-oriented and often have poor basic Combat (1-2), Agility (around 2), and Health (6-7) stats.
  • No-Sell: "Prophesiae Profana" asset allows to choose a location as "locus", and grants complete immunity to attacks of opportunity while outside of it. It was later nerfed with a taboo to only prevent the first attack of opportunity each round.
  • Nurse with Good Intentions: "Medical Texts", a Tome asset, allows to heal yourself or another investigator... or damage them even further, depending on how well you deal with Intellect test.
  • Power at a Price: Several cards introduced in The Innsmouth Conspiracy and "The Feast of Hemlock Vale" expansions requires adding cursed tokens into bag as part of their effect, which can seriously harm the efforts of entire team:
    • "Deep Knowledge" event lets investigator(s) at your location draw 3 cards in total, but makes you add 2 cursed tokens into bag.
    • "Stirring Up Trouble" event lets you instantly find 2 clues at your location, but forces to add cursed tokens into bag, with number matching your location's shroud (so the harder prize you got with it, the harsher the penalty).
    • "Cryptic Grimoire" asset requires accumulating 10 curesed token in the bag before it can be deciphered.
    • "Prismatic Spectacles" asset boosts investigator's skill value for duration of one investigation (regardless of which stat they use), at the cost of adding two cursed tokens. However, if you do reveal a cursed token (which nullifies the stat bonus), you can exhaust it to discover an extra clue if you pass.
  • Power Copying: "Eidetic Memory" event lets you copy any Insight event in any investigator's discard pile, in its entirety (including price); the downside is that after using it, both cards gets removed from the game.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • "Existential Riddle" event makes you pass non-trivial skill test (which thankully gets easier the more cards you have in hand), but on success permanently turns the chosen enemy "Aloof" (if it is non-Elite), making it unable to attack you unless you engage it first.
    • "Orphic Theory" asset lets you disable all effects of a chosen treachery currently in play (excluding cards attached to Elite enemies) for the rest of the round by spending one of its "secrets".
    • "The Eye of Truth" skill, if used to pass a test on treachery card, permanently removes this card (albeit you lose the Eye as well), and boosts any further skill tests on the other copies of card you just removed, for entire team.
    • "Transmogrify" event gets attached to an enemy, not only disabling its ability to move, but also rendering it "Massive", meaning that it can be attacked or evaded without engaging it first (as you're engaged with it by default); the latter also gives you "free" clues once per round.
    • "Confound" event puts your Intellect against enemy's evade rating, and, if you succeed, not only finds some extra clues, but also automatically evades the enemy and prevents it from reading on the next round.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • "Chemistry Set" has varying effects, all of which triggers if you succeed with exact results (no more and no less).
    • "Gaze of Ouraxsh" event only deals 1 guaranteed damage; the rest of its effect makes you draw 7 random tokens, with each Autofailure or cursed one adding 1 extra damage.
      • Upgraded "Truth from Fiction" event lets you charge your cards with secrets, with stronger bonus if your location has clues. Basic version can't be played at all if your location lacks clues.
    • "Join the Caravan" lets you move to any revealed location... with prohibitive price of 5 resources. However, for each class you control (counting your investigator), you reduce the price by 1, making it much more practical to use if you you're using a lot of off-class cards.
    • "Otherwordly Compass" reduces your location's shroud for one investigation, with effect's power scaling with the number of revealed locations connected to yours.
    • "Plan of Action" skill has its effect varying depending on when you use it. Use it before or during first action (likely during Mythos phase) and it will give a boost a Willpower and Agility. Do it during or after third action, and it'd additionally boost Combat and Intellect. Do it anywhere in between first and third actions, and it would just give the basic "+1 to any type of skill test" boost, but would let you draw a card if you pass.
    • "Survey the Area" skill, instead of having any consistent bonus, either gives you boost to Intellect equal to your Agility, or boost to Agility equal to your Intellect.
    • "Well-Funded" skill gives you 1 "wild" icon by default, but gives another one if you control at least one Tool or Science asset, and one extra if you control three or more.
    • "Curiosity" skill gives meager +1 Willpower and +1 Intellect by default, but doubles its skill icons if you have at least 4 cards in hand, and triples if you have at least 7.
    • Several cards have prohibitively-high cost (either in resources, or in actions), which goes down if you fulfil certain conditions, making them much more reliable:
      • Both upgrades for the "Forbbiden Tome" asset have their abilities cost four actions (you normally have 3), but drops the price by 1 action for every 4 card in your hand (it can't drop to zero, however), which makes them way more practical if you do some preparations first.
      • "Extensive Research" lets you instantly find 2 clues at your location, with a drawback that you have to pay ridiculous amount of resources (12 for basic version, 10 for upgraded)... which decreases by 1 for each other card at your hand.
      • "The Stygian Eye" event gives you huge stat boost for all your stats till the end of the round, but has ridiculous price of 10 resources by default... which goes down by 1 for each cursed token already in the bag.
      • "Extensive Research" event lets you instantly find 2 clues, but costs ridiculous amount of resources to play. However, price goes down as you keep stockpiling cards in your hand.
  • Situational Sword:
    • Seeker have several cards that are only usable if they have certain amount of cards in hand (a value that never stays static for long):
      • "Celaeno Fragments" asset gives you stat boosts per each 5 cards in your hand, maxing out at +2 Intellect and +1 Willpower if you gather 15 cards. It's the only effect it has, and it's not guaranteed to even keep it for long.
      • "Higher Education" asset lets you temporarily boost Intellect and Willpower by spending resources, but you can't use it unless you have at least 5 cards in your hand.
    • Some Seekers' cards can't be used unless your location has a clue; given that Seekers are the class whose purpose is to gather clues, they may accidentally disable half their hand if they're uncareful:
      • "Fieldwork" asset gives you stat boost for one skill test when you enter a location, but only if it has some clues.
      • "Inquiring Mind" skill gives great stat boost, but can't be used at all unless your location has a clue.
    • "Fey" skill can be returned to hand after ending the test, but only if you revealed at least one cursed token. It's the only gimmick the card has.
    • The ally Jeremiah Kirby, when enters play, lets you pick "even" or "odd", and then reveal 5 cards of your deck; you can draw the cards whose price matches what you selected, but have to shuffle back those that don't. Whether this ability would be useful or not is always luck-dependant, and if it didn't trigger, you wouldn't get another shot until he leaves play and gets resummoned. Also because skill cards have no resource value, they can never be drawn through Kirby.
    • "Tooth of Eztli" asset gives you stat boost when resolving a treachery... and only while resolving a treachery. All the other times, it just takes up the slot.
    • Whitton Greene gives you passive stat boosts (Intellect for the basic version, with additionally Willpower for the upgraded one), but only when you control at least one Tome or Relic. Other than that, she has rather situational ability that lets you draw a Tome or Relic from your deck under very specific conditions.
    • "Written in the Stars" event makes you discard top card of your deck, but then lets you commit it to every eligible skill test for the rest of your turn (weakness instead gets shuffled back into deck). You usually can't predict whether using this card would even be a good idea, and have to rely on blind luck.
    • "Prophesiae Profana" makes you choose a "locus"; you get boost to your Intellect and Agility, and immunity to attacks of opportunity... but only for as long as you stay out of locus.
    • "True Understanding" skill lets you find an extra clue if you succeed on a skill test... but can only be used on "scenario cards"-induced skill tests: treacheries, effects caused by act/agenda cards, special effects of specific locations or enemies, story cards — but not on generic fight, investigation and evade tests, or anything caused by your other cards — and it has to happen exactly where you want to find those clues. As result, its effectiveness can vary wildly from scenario to scenario.
  • Protective Charm: "Disc of Itzamna" asset, depending on which version is used, can either allow to automatically evade a monster which spawns in your location, or discard it immediately; both versions requires also discarding the Disc itself, so it's one-time rescue (and you can't keep more than one in play, as it's Unique).
  • Science Hero: A recurring theme of Seeker-class:
    • Most Seeker-class investigators worked as scientists before joining the team (often at the Miskatonic University), and are now using their skills to support their teammates. Even those who weren't in its employ are often related to Miskatonic and its sciences in some other way.
    • Many Seeker-class cards are science-related: scientific gear, special skills, science books, or actual scientists as the Allies.
  • The Smart Guy:
    • Seekers tend to have the best Intellect (around 4-5) stats amongst all investigators.
    • Seekers don't have many options for combat, but of those they have, most involves them either coming up with some improvised plan how to harm the enemy through their brains rather than their brawn (or makes it more vulnerable), or uses some products of alchemy instead of conventional weapons.
    • Seekers have by far the largest selection of cards for clue-gathering; unlike similar cards from the other classes, they don't rely on blind luck, espionage, magic prescience or beating info out of their foes, but instead primely do that through their intelligence and scientific gear. Same applies to their Allies who're assisting them in searching.
      • "Art Student", thanks to her keen eye, instantly finds some clues when she enters play. However, she has no means to find more aferwards.
      • "Connect the Dots" event lets you, once you clear location of clues, find two more in another location, on condition that it has lower shroud.
      • "Cryptographic Cipher" asset lets investigator either reduce location's shroud, or investigate without spending actions, at the cost of making shroud higher.
      • "Deciphered Reality" event lets you find one clue in every revealed location in play, albeit makes you compete against the highest currently-available shroud.
      • "Control Variable" event lets you find a clue at your location whenever anyone draws a cursed token during skill test.
      • "Deduction" skill lets investigator find an extra clue at their location while investigating. Upgraded version lets to find even more, if they perform well enough.
      • "Fingerprint Kit" asset not only boost the chance to succeed at investigation, but also helps you find 2 clues per investigation instead of the usual 1. Upgraded version let's you find 3, on top of boosting your Intellect further, but costs even more resources to play (with the base version not being cheap to begin with)
      • "Seeking Answers" event lets you finds clues in a location connected to the one you succesfully investigated. The upgraded version lets you find 2 clues at your and/or (a) connected location(s).
      • "Working a Hunch" event lets to instantly find a "free" clue without spending an action (being a "fast" card) at the mere cost of 2 resources.
    • "Testing Sprint" event lets you investigate your location and everyone location that is connected to it, in ascending order of their shroud values. If you ever fail the test, process cuts short, but if not, you can find tons of clues in one go.
    • "In the Know" asset lets you investigate any revealed location, instead of just yours, as if you were there.
    • "Vantage Point" event temporarily reduces shroud of just-revealed location, and lets to move a clue there from any other location.
  • Spell Book: Plenty of Seeker-class Tomes are magic in nature:
    • "Archaic Glyphs" and "Archive of Conduits" are the magic tomes that have to be researched before your investigator gets access to spells hidden within them. Weirdly, their upgraded versions counts as Spells rather than Tomes, and occupy arcane slots instead of hand slots like the base versions.
    • "Celaeno Fragments" is an ancient occult book, which, once mastered, shares its wisdom with investigator, boosting their Intellect, Willpower and Sanity.
    • "Cryptic Grimoire" is a black magic tome that, once translated, lets to turn the evil force against itself, giving user extra benefits from cursed tokens.
    • "Esoteric Atlas" not just shows the direction, but lets to instantly made it where you want.
    • "Forbidden Tome" requires some research before it gets deciphered, but gives its master either its wisdom or its power.
    • "Grim Memoir" contains occult wisdom that helps with investigating.
    • "Occult Lexicon" contains the blood rites (letting access to namesake event), to either get power or hurt your foes.
    • "Old Book of Lore" has all sorts of occult knowledge, letting investigator search for and draw extra cards (and play them for cheaper with the upgrade version).
    • "Otherworld Codex" has the magic that can banish your enemies and various threats (into the discard pile of the Encounter Deck).
    • "Pnakotic Manuscripts", the ancient occult work, has the knowledge that lets investigators turn the tides of fate (do a skill test without revealing chaos tokens).
    • "Prophesiae Profana" contains instructions how to create a power locus, that boosts the spell-caster powers, as long as they stay away from it.
    • "The Necronomicon" (specifically the less harmful Petrus de Dacia Translation) helps with all sort of tasks: boost skills, draw cards, find clues or even hurt the enemies, as long as its owner keeps supplying it with "secrets".
  • Sprint Shoes:
    • "Hiking Shoes" asset lets the Seeker, once they're done with exploring their location, quickly move to a connected location, on condition that it either has unclaimed clues or isn't revealed yet. They also boosts the user's Agility, which, amongst other effects, makes it easier to escape from enemies.
    • "Pathfinder" asset essentially exists just to give investigator an extra move each turn. It doesn't work if they're engaged by an enemy, however, so it's not an escape tool.
    • The level 0 version of the "Shortcut" event lets a chosen investigator immediately move to connected location withotu spendign an action. Upgraded version instead opens a permanent shortcut in a chosen location that any investigator may use in same way (albeit it works once per round as it exhaust with each use).
    • "The Truth Beckons" event lets you move to any unrevealed location along the shortest path. The drawback is that you have to move there, so if anything makes you stop (location effects, treacheries, etc), or you run into enemy on the way, you have to stop. You also can't use it if you're engaged with any enemy.
  • Squishy Wizard: Like Mystics, Seekers have access to some magic spells, artifacts and occult books. Also like Mystics, they tend to have poor survival capabilities when caught off-guard. Their Allies are also among some of the most fragile, consistently having low Health and Sanity, with only few exceptions.
  • Status Buff:
    • "Arcane Insight" temporarily decreases location's shroud, making any investigations there easier.
    • "I've got a plan!" event lets you to attack using Intellect instead of Combat (thus, using Seekers' strongest stat instead of one where they traditionally suck), and deals extra damage that stacks with a number of clues you have (capping at 3). The upgraded version is not only cheaper to play but also grants you an Intellect boost for the attack, making it more accurate.
    • "Mind Over Matter" event lets investigator use their Intellect instead of Combat and Agility for duration of the round. The upgraded version has the even stronger effect of adding your Intellect's value to your Combat and Agility instead (on top of letting you draw a card when played).
    • "Occult Invocation" event lets to attack using Intellect instead of Combat, with an option to get a stat boost for the attack and cause more damage if you discard some cards while using it.
    • Some upgrades to "Strange Solution" asset lets investigator to fight or evade with basic skill value set to 6 instead of investigator's normal value. Given that Seekers generally suck at both, this effect is rather strong.
  • Sufficiently Analyzed Magic: Seekers have the second largest amount of Spell, Ritual and Occult cards after Mystics, but have no magical gift on their own unlike them: they just can cast spells as well through their deep study of supernatural forces.
  • Support Party Member: Seekers have low combat capabilities, but are excellent as supporters for the actual fighters (usually Guardians) of their team. Their ability to gather clues quickly and advance through the acts is key to win many scenarios, and it's not an uncommon strategy for bigger groups of players to focus on protecting their Seeker while they work on gathering clues. That said, a Seeker completely focused on getting clues lags behind when the objective of the current act isn't related to clues.
  • Talking the Monster to Death: "Persuasion" event lets you convince an enemy into buzzing off and getting shuffled into encounter deck. The drawback is that it only works on Humanoid enemies (althought it got a Balance Buff taboo that removed this clause eventually), and you have to pass Intellect test which gets even harder if the enemy can cause horror.
  • Useless Useful Spell: In theory, "Mouse Mask" gives you very useful boost to Intellect (core stat for any self-respecting Seeker) and Willpower (crucial for spells if you can access them, and helps with treacheries), but it has a major drawback: like all other animal masks, it has only 2 charges, but unlike them, it can only replenish them when you (and only you) reveal or put into play a new location — meaning that it's very easy to permanently run out of ways of ways to reliably recharge it without discarding first. The situation changes completely in the rare cases where you do have the ways to reveal or put locations into play repeatedly, with one investigator, Luke Robinson (who, having Mystic/Seeker dual class, benefits from both stat boosts), being able to recharge it almost indefinitely thanks to his Pocket Dimension.
  • Teleportation: "Esoteric Atlas" Tome lets investigator instantly teleport to another revealed location, albeit with limited radius. Basic version restricts you to location exactly 2 connections away, while upgraded one lets you pick any location within 3 connections away.
  • Throw the Book at Them: Appropriately-named "Throw the Book at Them!" event lets you pick a Tome under your control, and get a boost to Combat for one attack, equal to card's printed cost; implications being that the bigger the book, the more painfully it smacks. Card's image also shows a girl smacking huge spider with a book. As an added bonus, this attack lets you either stun an enemy (thus, automatically evade it), or immediately use the chosen Tome's ability (ignoring action cost).

    Rogue class tropes 
Be they criminals who joined the common good by a sheer twist of fate, or just adventurers seeking a new challenge, Rogues aren't afraid to fight "dirty", as long as it gets things done. Many of their cards are dedicated to either outsmarting and outmanoeuvring their enemies, or to obtaining resources to fuel their advance essentially out of thin air.
  • The Ace: Rogues are encouraged to be so, as many of their cards follow the template of "if you succeed by X you get this additional benefit" (this is also present in cards of other classes, but is especially prevalent in the Rogue card pool), meaning that a good Rogue doesn't just succeed in a task, they do so in the most amazing way possible.
  • Aggressive Negotiations: Main gimmick of "British Bull Dog" asset is that you can instantly grab it (for free) from your hand after failing a Parley with enemy. You achieve more with a good word and gun than with good word alone, indeed.
  • Anti-Debuff: "Counterespionage" event allows to cancel a (non-weakness) treachery, drawing another card instead. For extra cost, it may aid someone other than you, or allow you to draw the card from your deck instead of encounter deck.
  • Awesome, but Impractical:
    • Tristan Botley costs a whopping 5 resources to play him (most players would go bankrupt trying to use him)... or can be played free of charge and without even spending actions, if you reveal 3+ cursed/blessed tokens in total during same test (which is extremely unlikely to happen).
    • While it doesn't have a resource cost, "Clean Sneak" event's utility is hampered by the fact you need multiple exhausted enemies in your location to trigger multiple effect, as just one of them is significantly weaker compared to effects of more specialised Rogue events. With a limited amount of actions, even the most evasion-focused Rogue will struggle to have 4 exhausted enemies in the same location at once and have enough action to play "Clean Sneak" (unless his teammates are also good at evading) and trigger all its effect, and even if they did, they would have to deal with 4 foes at once next round.
  • Back Stab: Some cards specifically targets already exhausted enemies, helping to ensure that they wouldn't live to try to murder you again:
    • "Sneak Attack" event allows to deal damage to exhausted enemies without having to pass a test. Upgraded version can be used even if the enemy is ready as long as it is not engaged with you.
    • ".25 Automatic" asset gives bonus to Combat and damage, but only against exhausted enemies. Its upgraded version allows to attack just-evaded enemy immediately.
    • "Dirty Fighting" asset gives huge boost to most tests against exhausted enemies, and allows to immediately attack the enemy you just evaded.
    • "Hatchet Man" skill, if used to evade an enemy (thus exhausting it) boosts the next attack against it for the rest of the turn.
    • Delilah O'Rourke not only allows to deal some testless damage against an enemy, but boosts that damage if you target exhausted enemy. The drawback is that price of her services stacks with enemy's evade value.
  • Blood Magic: "Decorated Skull" gains charges as investigators, assets or enemies keeps getting defeated at its current location. Those charges can be then spent on "free" resources and cards. It has a slow pay out however, as you need to trade an action to spend a charge to draw a card and gain a resource, but the upgraded version let you spend up to 3 charges per action.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • Compared to the other Armor cards, "Leather Jacket" lacks any special abilities — it's just "Fast", meaning that you can put it on just when you're about to get hit, instead of perparing it upfront.
    • "The Moon • XVIII" Tarot card boosts Agility, not terribly interesting on its own, but it gives Rogues more consistent ways to evade enemies and aids them with cards that care by how much you succeed by, giving a better scaling effect.
  • Cap Raiser:
    • "Underworld Market" Permanent, on top of its prime effects, boosts your deck size by 10.
    • "Underworld Support" reduces your deck size by 5; given that it's intended strictly for so-called "Highlander" runs (the rules of which it actually enforces, banning its owner from including more than 1 copy of any card), it's a Double-Edged Buff rather than straight-up nerf. You can only include it when forming your starting deck at the beginning of campaign.
  • Cast from Money:
    • Several Ally options are actual mercenaries who requires paying them some resources every turn, or they would abandon you. Thie "Hired Muscle" is a tough guy who boosts your Combat, while a "Treasure Hunter" boosts Intellect. They are balanced around being cheaper to play on the upfront however, costing only 1 resource each.
    • "Trigger Man" has to be paid 1 resource each time you use whatever card you gave him.
    • Lola Santiago lets you skip investigating, and just spend resources according to location's shroud to get a clue.
    • "Small Favor", "Intel Report", "Decoy" and "Counterespionage" events all can be significantly empowered if you spend extra resources; all of them share Service trait.
    • Delilah O'Rourke allows to do testless damage agaisnt an enemy (with bonus damage if it's exhausted), but charges according to the enemy's evade value.
    • "Hard Knocks" lets you spend resources to boost either your Combat or your Agility. Level 4 version gets its own supply which it recharges every turn.
    • "Moxie" lets you spend resources to boost either your Willpower or your Agility... but as soon as any horror lands on it, it breaks. The upgraded version remains just as frail (albeit it can now soak some damage), but it also gives some static boosts besides its paid effect.
    • "Streetwise" lets you spend resources to boost either your Intellect or your Agility. It costs 2 resources per boost (which is above most analogues), but also provides stronger boosts.
  • Combat Pragmatist: When it comes to combat, Rogues prefer to use dirty-but-effective tactics and instruments—backstabbing, Hidden Weapons, etc. Since the world is at stake and their enemies are trying to bring doom upon us all, it's hard to blame them. One of their cards is even called "Dirty Fighting", which fittingly improves Rogues' combat capabilities, but only when fighting an exhausted enemy.
    • "Cheap Shot" boosts a chance to hit the target, by adding Agility to user's Combat, as well as gives a chance to automatically evade it, thuse temporarily disable. The upgraded version even retunrs to your hand if the attack was effective enough. Card's image shows a woman throwing some powder at many-eyed monster, likely with intent to blind it.
  • Coup de Grâce: Some Rogue cards exists specifically to easily finish off weakened enemies.
    • "Coup de Grâce" event deals exactly 1 damage and ends your turn immediately, but lets you draw 1 card if you manage to kill an enemy with it and doesn't provoke attacks of opportunity. All this makes this card useful to finish off wounded enemies if your previous attacks failed to do the deed.
    • "Garrote Wire" is only usable against enemies with exactly 1 health remaining, but gives you extra accuracy, and attack counts as free action (so it doesn't spend any of your default 3).
  • Crimefighting with Cash: A lot of Rogue-class economic cards involve them getting actual money, either through gambling, stealing, shady business or, in case of some of them, actual legal means. Those money goes to sponsor their world-saving.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff: "Hatchet Man" is a skill that can be committed to boost your Agility by one for one test, but its real appeal is that if the card is committed during successful evasion attempt, the next attack against this enemy on same turn would deal extra damage.
  • Death or Glory Attack:
    • "Double or Nothing" skill doubles the difficulty of the test it is committed to, but causes the test's effects to resolve twice if successful. It ended up being so broken in certain scenarios, it was the only card outright forbidden by the "Taboo" rules, as it was deemed impossible to balance.
    • "Charon's Obol" asset provides its wielder with bonus experience at the end of each scenario, but kills its wielder if they gets defeated by any means; and, being "Permanent", it can't be removed once purchased.
  • Difficult, but Awesome: A recurring quirk of Rogue cards is to tie a strong effect to exceeding the test difficulty by certain amount; on the downside, when you can't achieve the maximum output, they often perform worse than their more boring analogues.
  • Discard and Draw: Beside the obvious pun of this being what every player will do in a card game, "Adaptable" is a level 1 permanent asset that allow you, between scenarios, to swap up to two level 0 cards for the same number of any level 0 cards from your collection that you have access to in your deckbuilding options (or up to four, if you have two copies of Adaptable). That makes cards that would normally be situationally useful for one scenario much more viable to run, as you no longer would need to waste exp to include them back for specific occasions, especially on replays where you know what you will have to face next.
  • Double-Edged Buff:
    • "Charon's Obol" permanent gives you "free" experience at the end of each scenario that you survive, but kills your investigator outright if if you ever get defeated for any reason.
    • The level 0 version of the "Daredevil" skill, after you commit it to a skill test, automatically finds the next applicable Rogue-class skill in your deck and commits it to the skill test... while discarding everything on its way to it beside weaknesses, which get shuffled back into your deck afterward (or get drawn immediately, if you're playing with the Taboo rules). The upgraded version removes this drawback.
    • "Geas" asset gives you a stat boost for every skill. It also prohibits you from doing certain actions on a threat of fully filling the bag with cursed tokens and discarding itself.
    • "Skeptic" skill makes you treat each cursed token as "+1" (their normal modifier is "-2")... but does the same with blessed tokens, which normally counts as "+2". However, Rogues by default can only add cursed tokens, which mitigates this issue outside of multiplayer.
    • "Underworld Support" Permanent asset reduces deck size by 5, but makes you unable to take more than one copy of any card (by title). The harmful side is obvious, but some builds actually appreciate reduced deck size, as it means getting important cards quicker.
  • Draw Aggro: Inverted with "You handle this one!" event; it makes another Investigator handle encounter card you just drew, in hope that they're better prepared for it than you, while you get a free resource.
  • Draw Extra Cards: Rogues have the second-best arsenal of tools to draw extra cards, after Seekers, albeit they tend to require some conditions to be fulfilled first to work, keeping in theme with their high risk, high reward playstyle.
    • "All-In" skill lets investigator draw varying amount of cards (up to 5), depending on how they perform on the test it was applied to. Unlike nearly all other card-drawing effects, it lets you shuffle any weaknesses you drew back into your deck rather than forcing you to resolve them.
    • "Easy Mark" event gives you 2 resources and 1 card. As extra gimmick, it lets you play the other copies of it from your hand at no cost (and you can have up to 3 of them in your deck instead of the usual 2, as it is a "Myriad").
    • "Lucky Cigarette Case" asset lets you, if you perform well enough on a test, draw an extra card. Upgraded version instead lets you search in your deck, with effect scaling with your performance, giving you more control over what exactly you draw with it.
    • "Pickpocketing" asset lets you draw an extra card once you evade an enemy. Upgraded version let's you choose between gaining a resource or drawing a card as your reward, or do both if you performed well enough instead, on top of being "fast", letting you play the card just when you are evading someone instead of having to prepare it beforehand.
    • "Lucky" Penny" asset lets you treat cursed tokens as blessed, and vice versa; turning blessed token into cursed (something which would normally be strictly harmful) lets you draw 1 card.
    • "You owe me one!" event lets you play a card from other player's hand, then both players can draw 1 card each.
    • "Clean Sneak" provides you several options that you can use if you have exhausted enemies at your location (one option per enemy), one of them is draw 1 card.
    • Upgraded "Contraband" event gives you a choice between doubling supplies/ammo on asset, or put exactly two extra tokens; doing the latter lets you draw 1 extra card.
    • "Coup de Grâce" event lets you draw 1 card if you actually kill someone with it.
    • Upgraded "Daring Maneuver" event lets you draw 1 card, but you can only use it when you succeed at any skill test.
    • "Decorated Skull" asset generates charges when investigators, Allies or enemies gets defeated at its user's location, which can be then spent to get more cards or resources; basic version only lets you spend charges one at the time, while upgraded lets you spend up to 3 in one go.
    • Henry Wan offers you to play a game: draw some random tokens, getting 1 resource or 1 card if you draw a "good" one, but leaving you with nothing if you draw a "bad" one.
    • "Liquid Courage" asset, on successful Willpower test, lets you draw 1 card, on top of its sanity-healing effect. Failing makes you discard one card instead (but also heals more).
    • "Money Talks" event lets you draw 1 card once the skill test you've used it for ends (regardless of outcome).
    • "Three Aces" skill, on top of making you pass a test automatically, lets you draw 3 cards and gain 3 resources.
    • "Underworld Market" permanent creates a second mini-deck of 10 Illicit cards (it boosts the normal deck size by 10 to compensate for it), which reveals 2 top cards each turn, and lets you draw 1 of them at the cost of 1 resource, while putting unbought cards at the bottom in any order. This lets to set up for using your Illicit cards at exact moment, albeit with less control over it than similar cards of other classes.
    • "Untimely Transaction" event lets another investigator play an Item from your hand; they get the card that's not normally available to them, while you get to draw 1 card (to replace that Item), and gain resources equal to Item's cost.
    • "Dirty Deeds" event lets you quickly search your deck for Illicit asset and immediately put it into play and trigger its effects.
    • "Bewitching" permanent lets you stash away 3 different Trick cards for later use. When you'd later engage an enemy, you can draw one of stashed cards, or search top 9 cards of your deck for a copy.
  • Encounter Bait: "Kicking the Hornet's Nest" event makes you immediately spawn an enemy from the top 9 cards of the encounter deck, but in return gives you a free clue from your location and resources equal to the enemy's health value.
  • Equipment Upgrade:
    • "Damning Testimony" is a quirky asset intended for investigating (on condition that there's at least one enemy in play), by default only finding an extra clue on success. However, as you invest experience into it, it can be upgraded to either boost investigation itself (get a stat boost, investigate enemy's location, etc), or cause problems to the enemy while you're investigating.
    • "Friends in Low Places" event helps to quickly find whatever a Rogue needs, by using their connections; as this card gets upgraded, so do the connections become more useful, gaining new abilities and improving the old ones.
    • "Honed Instinct" event gives you extra action, if it's your turn, but has very specific conditions when it can trigger: either on act/agenda advancement, or if you pass a test with very good result. Upgrades either adds more options to trigger it (way easier to fulfill), make the card itself more powerful, or even letting you to do two actions (but making this card once-per-game effect).
  • Every Man Has His Price: "Snitch" event lets you, for a small extra fee, discover 2 clues at your and/or connected location(s) after passing a test when using another Parley effect on an enemy. The idea is that you bribe that enemy into telling you info.
    "I shouldn't be telling you this, but since you seem trustworthy..."
  • Exact Eavesdropping: "Eavesdrop" event lets you find some clues by overhearing an enemy; the slower enemies would be easier to spy upon.
  • Experience Booster: Rogues have some cards that can help them gather experience as fast as they gain resources, which is appreciated given the many Exceptional cards they have available in their card pool that have double printed exp costs:
  • Extra Turn: Rogues have the largest selection of the cards aimed to give them extra actions each turn, in one way or another (often with some extra gimmick):
    • Leo De Luca provides the investigator with additional action each turn; due to how valuable the time in this game, he's one of the most popular picks for an Ally.
    • "The Gold Pocket Watch" allows to, once per game, either skip a phase you don't want, or repeat a phase you do want.
    • "Ace in the Hole" event allows to do 3 extra actions on your turn. The downside is that it costs tons of experience to purchase, and you can't have more than one copy, due to it having "Exceptional" keyword.
    • "Quick Thinking" skill, if you succeed in a test by 2 or more, gives an extra action; unlike most such cards, it can be used even if it's not your turn. As it's a skill card, it only works on skill tests, but you don't have to spend actions to play it.
    • "Borrowed Time" asset allows to spend resources to get up to 3 extra actions on the next turn.
    • "Swift Reflexes" event allows to take an extra action, even during another investigator's turn (except during actions).
    • "Haste" asset allows, after doing two actions of same type in a row, do another one for free, which is really useful when investigator is tasked with important, but time-consuming mission.
    • "Eye of the Djinn" allows, if a cursed token was revealed during its effect, to perform an extra action for free.
    • "The Red Clock" asset can be charged with resources, and once it accumulates 3 charges, it allows to do an extra action on the current turn (two actions for upgraded version).
    • "The Black Fan" asset gives an extra action each turn, but only while you have at least 15 unspent resources, which makes it hard to use for most players.
    • "Honed Instinct" event allows to take an extra action when either Act or Agenda advances, or you succeed at skill test with great result. Most of its upgrade options adds even more ways to trigger it, and one allows to take two turns instead of one (at the cost of removing it from the game).
    • Upgraded ".41 Derringer" asset lets you do an extra action after attack, but only if you succeed with particularly high result.
  • Fragile Speedster:
    • With all their speed, Rogues tend to have below-average Willpower stat (typically 1-2), making them vulnerable to treacheries which forces them to test it. They make up for it with not only a good Agility stat (usually around 4-5) but also with having the biggest amount of cards granting them extra actions compared to the other classes.
    • It's not uncommon for their cards to replace Combat with Agility during attacks, or add their Agility to their Combat skill value. As their basic Combat is low-to-average (2-3 for most of them), it's often appreciated.
  • Friend on the Force: One of Rogue-class events, "Intel Report", lets them, rather than do investigation themselves, bribe someone else to do it, and then just read the report, gaining free clues. They may even pay extra to get more clues, or finding them outside of their current location.
  • Gathering Steam: "The Black Fan" asset doesn't start providing any benefits until you gather at least 10 resources, and maxes out at 20+ resources. But fully-charged, it boosts your max Health and Sanity, all your skills and gives you an extra action.
  • The Gambler: Many Rogue-class cards are themed after gambling; some of those are about gaining the money, others are about "cheating" the game in some way.
    • "Sure Gamble" event switches negative modifier of the drawn chaos token into positive one, so, say, your "-9" suddenly becomes "+9".
    • "Hot Streak" event allows to invest few resources to win much more.
    • "High Roller" asset works like actual gamble: "bet" resources to gain stat boost, and regain them if you pass.
    • "21 or Bust" event assigns to all non-number tokens some value, and allows to play some sort of "blackjack", with a chance to "win" much more than you bet... or lose and gain nothing.
  • Geas: The "Geas" asset gives you permanent stat bonus, on condition that you would abstain from doing certain things (either drawing, playing or committing any cards during your turns, with the Investigator choosing and swearing what they will avoid doing every time they play the card); failing this obligation makes you add whopping 10 cursed tokens into bag, as well as making you discard it, losing access to its benefits.
  • Good Guns, Bad Guns: Most "bad" guns (commonly associated with gangsters, like "Sawed-Off Shotgun or" ".45 'Thompson'") belongs to Rogue class, and have Illicit trait, though only certain Rogues can qualify as Token Evil Teammates themselves.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: Rogues can use "Knuckleduster" Weapon to engage their foes in melee; it boosts the damage, but does nothing to make attack more accurate, and makes the enemy counterattack if you miss.
  • Guile Hero: Many Rogue events have the "Trick" and/or "Gambit" keyword, representing them using dirty tactics or improvised plans respectively to take their foes by surprise.
  • The Gunslinger: While Rogues have some melee weapons, like switchblades or knuckle dusters, the majority of their armory are firearms.
  • Heroic Second Wind: "Cheat Death" event allows to shrug off being defeated through damage or horror, heal 2 health and sanity, discard all cards from threat area and move into enemies-free location. It only works once per scenario, however.
  • Hidden Weapons: Some Rogue-class Weapon cards are represented by hidden guns or switchblades, allowing investigators to quickly put them in use during combat without becoming a target for attacks of opportunity.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism: "Liquid Courage" asset (actual can with alcohol) allows to regain some sanity by drinking booze. As the side effect, it's possible to get drunk and lose some cards.
  • Instant Armor: Unlike other cards of the same type, "Leather Jacket" can be put into play without spending an action, being "fast"; as result, you can use it just when you're about to get hit.
  • I Surrender, Suckers: "False Surrender" event allows to parley with enemy, only to then play a Weapon by reduced price, and, if the player wishes so, attack with using Agility instead of Combat.
  • Item Amplifier:
    • Not only Rogues have tons of "Illicit" cards, they also have many cards directly helping with utilising those to their greatest potential.
      • "Fence" asset lets you make any Illicit card you play "fast" (costs no actions, doesn't trigger attacks of opportunity). If the card is already "fast", it instead lowers its price.
      • "Hidden Pocket" event upgrades your Clothes or Armor asset, making them provide you with an extra hand or accessory slot... but only for Illicit cards.
      • "Trigger Man" Ally can be supplied with Illicit card, and once per turn can use its ability without spending actions (though it costs resources). However, he has multiple drawbacks, not presented in similar cards from other classes: you can't swap the card, you have to pay your mercenary for every use, and he doesn't use your stats, instead doing tests with skill value of 4 (for better or for worse) and in spite of being attached to "Trigger Man", the card would still take any slot it occupies.
    • Chuck Fergus has all his abilities dedicated to making Trick or Tactic cards you play more awesome, by decreasing their price, making them "fast" or boosting your skills while you use them. The level 2 version only let you choose between one of these three options, but the level 5 version let you choose two.
    • "Adaptable" permanent lets you swap up to two level 0 cards with other level 0 cards, for free; the purpose of this card is to take some situational cards for one scenario, and replace when they cease to be useful.
    • "Black Market" sets takes 5 cards, picked from deck(s) of any player(s), and sets them aside — so anyone can play them as if those are in their hand, allowing for otherwise-impossible combos or gaining access to important cards earlier than you normally would. The sale ends on next turn, returning all unsold cards back to owners.
    • "Double, Double" asset lets you, well, double the effect of event card you just played, triggering it again as if it's in your hand (albeit you also need to pay for it again).
    • "Hit and Run" event makes you put an Ally from your hand into play (at no charge beyond playing event itself), get whatever benefits you want from it, and then return it back by the end of your turn, assuming it stays alive. "Sleight of Hand" event does the same thing, but with Items instead.
    • Rogues have plenty of Firearms cards, but rarely benefit from them all that much due to generally low Combat. "Sharpshooter" asset solves it, by letting them to attack using their Agility, or by letting them test against enemy's evade stat (which is much lower than combat for some tough enemies).
    • "Contraband" event doubles amount of ammo or supplies on a chosen asset.
    • "Daredevil" skill helps to find the other Rogue-class cards that can be committed to a skill test; basic version just discards the cards until you find something (potentially trashing your entire deck), save for weaknesses which gets shuffled back, while upgraded version merely searches there.
    • "Daring Maneuver" event gives you stat boost when you pass a skill test (with the upgraded version offering a bigger skill boost on top of card draw), which works best with other Rogue-class cards that often require passing by certain amount in order to trigger their special effects. "Knight of Swords" Tarot does the same effect, but its effect is weaker yet consistent (with an option to get stronger effect if you discard it).
    • Joey "The Rat" Vigil lets you play Items as a free action, albeit you have to pay 1 resource to Joey himself each time. The upgraded version lets you sell items (by discarding them) you no longer need for 2 resources, letting you recycle assets that served their purpose.
    • Lonnie Ritter, on top of boosting your Fight slightly, can heal damage from any Items (also healing some horror on herself, as a bonus), making her one of the few reliable healing and tanking tools in the Rogue's card pool. Unlike most such cards, she doesn't have limited supplies, instead just using the player's resources (which are easier to replenish).
    • "Underworld Support" permanent reduces your deck size by 5 and bans including more than one copy of each card (by title), which helps the decks relying on some key cards being easily findable, and thus find large deck detrimental.
  • Item Caddy:
    • Rogues have by far the most number of options to generate resources to fuel their cards, be it through gambling, stealing, or other means.
    • Some of Rogue-class cards rewards exceeding the test difficulty, via extra effects not available otherwise; a recurring ability is to return the card back to your hand after the test is done (or at the end of the round), essentially allowing to reuse the same card without discarding it.
  • It Only Works Once:
    • "Cheat Death" event lets you to survive otherwise-fatal damage/horror, but only once per scenario.
    • Basic version of "Lucky Dice" lets you to ignore any chaos token at the cost of 2 resources. It can ignore auto-failure, but doing so removes them from the game for the rest of scenario.
    • "The Gold Pocket Watch" lets to, once per game, either repeat a phase twice, or skip it outright.
  • Lightning Bruiser: Downplayed, Rogues not only have usually high Agility (4 Agility on average, some have 5), but also have the second highest Health after Guardians (around the 7 to 8 mark). On top of that, because Agility-testing treacheries are more likely to deal Health damage, they are harder to wound than Guardians (who have usually bad Agility), but they have just as low Sanity as them (usually 5 to 6) and even worse willpower too (around 1 to 2), which make Rogues very vulnerable to horror and other nasty treacheries effects. They also have poor-to-average Combat across the board (mostly around 2 to 3), requiring them to fight dirty to compensate.
  • Little Useless Gun: While Rogues have many firearms that are straight up illegal to own because of their massive firepower, some of them are peashooters clearly designed as a last resort self-defense tool, to be easy to conceal at cost of their firepower or as very much just for show.
    • The ".41 Derringer" has a decent accuracy modifier, but has only 3 shots and requires you to succeed by a certain amount to deal full damage, otherwise it would do as much as punching someone with your bare hands. The upgrade makes it easier to deal the extra damage and rewards you for succeeding by a lot by giving you an extra action.
    • The "Colt Vest Pocket" has an impressive ammo amount of 5 and is one of the cheapest firearms to play, but has the gimmick of getting discarded at the end of the round you played it, which makes it hard to use all 5 shots if you don't have some extra actions to spare. The upgraded version only forces you to discard it at the end of the round if you fired a shot at least, on top of being slightly more accurate.
  • Loan Shark: Bianca "Die Katz" can lean you tons of resources, but you then have to pass an Agility test (and the more resources you get, the harder the test). Failing renders her hostile (obviously depriving you of her Ally card), and making her randomly show up later to attack you. Defeating her only shuffles her back into your deck, the only way to permanently get rid of her is to pay back your debt.
  • Lovable Rogue: The general archetype of the class is of a showy, opportunistic, wisecracking scoundrel who succeeds in their tasks effortlessly, use their money and connections to get far and that you cannot help but root for because they are still going against doomsday cults and eldritch horrors.
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic:
    • "Sure Gamble" event allows to turn a negative modifier of the chaos token into a positive one; obviously, the worse the token drawn, the more powerful this card can become.
    • "Lucky Dice" asset allows to spend resources to ignore any chaos token (excluding auto-failure), and draw another one instead in hope that its result would be better. However, if this card makes you draw an "auto-failure" token, this card gets removed from the game. Its upgraded version works slightly differently, but overall idea remains the same.
    • "Lucky" Penny" asset allows to toss a coin when you reveal either blessed or cursed token, potentially reverting their effect. Why would you do that with a blessed token? Because it rewards it with a free card draw.
    • "False Covenant" asset allows to ignore just drawn cursed token, and draw another token instead, in hope that it would be better.
    • "Skeptic" skill allows to treat both blessed and cursed tokens as "+1" instead of their actual modifier (+2 and -2, respectively); it's slightly worse for blessed ones, but much better for cursed.
    • "Dark Ritual" asset seals 5 Cursed tokens when you play it, temporarily removing them from the bag. However, you must pay 1 resource each turn to maintain it, or all those tokens would go back at once.
    • "Priest of Two Faiths" Ally lets you add several blessed tokens into bag right when he spawns. However, he then starts generating cursed tokens each turn, unless you're willing to discard him right away.
  • Magic Knight: Rouges have the second highest amount of coventional weaponry after Guardians and the third highest quantity of spells event and assets after Mystics and Seekers.
  • Master of Unlocking: When Rogues have to investigate, they have "Lockpicks" asset, that boosts their chances to succeed, but has a risk of breaking if you don't perform well enough; upgrading makes it more durable.
  • Money Multiplier: Rogues have huge arsenal of economic cards, mainly geared towards supplying them with more resources.
    • "I'll Pay You Back!" event makes you take all resources from another investigator supply. At the end of the round, you return them everything from your resource supply, potentially giving them much more than they have paid you. Rogue themselves is unlikely to benefit from it, but it may be a massive boon to their teammates.
    • "Embezzled Treasure" asset has to be "charged" with resources over the course of scenario, but once it ends, you can give any investigator(s) up to 5 starting resources (on max charge) for the next one, distributing as you see fit.
    • "Watch this!" skill lets you "bet" up to 3 resources, and if you succeed by enough you gain double the amount you spent.
    • "21 or Bust" event lets you bet 2 resources in a gamble, but lets you win 2-7 resources if you succeed.
    • "Another Day, Another Dollar" permanent asset lets you start the game with 2 extra resources, up to a maximum of +4 with two copies of it.
    • Dario El-Amin lets you spend an action to gain 2 resources per turn, for as long as you don't have any enemies at your location.
    • Gregory Gry (a gambler) has stockpile of resources, which you can try to win when performing a skill test: failing wastes them, winning makes those money yours.
    • Henry Wan offers you to play a game: draw some random tokens, getting 1 resource or 1 card if you draw a "good" one, but leaving you with nothing if you draw a "bad" one.
    • "High Roller" asset makes you spend 3 resources for sizeable skill boost, then, if you pass, gives those money back.
    • "Hot Streak" event costs some resources to play, but returns much more than you've invested. The upgraded version has the same pay out, but is cheaper to play, making you gain more compared to the basic version.
    • "Investments" asset slowly generates supplies, which you can then spend all at once to get massive resources influx.
    • "Pay Day" event gives you one resource per action you performed during your turn (counting playing the card), at the cost of ending it immediately.
    • "Sneak By" event gives you free resources when you try to evade someone.
    • "Stylish Coat" asset gives you extra resource the first time another card gives you some during your turn.
    • "All-In" skill lets investigator draw varying amount of cards (up to 5), depending on how they perform on the test it was applied to. Unlike most such cards, it has built-in protection from weaknesses, shuffling them back rather than forcing you to draw them.
    • "Cheat the System" event gives you 1 resource for each different class amongst cards you control.
    • "Easy Mark" event gives you 2 resources and 1 card. As extra gimmick, it lets you play the other copies of it from your hand at no cost (and you can have up to 3 of them in your deck instead of the usual 2, as it is a "Myriad").
    • "Kicking the Hornet's Nest" event spawns an enemy on top of you, but gives you 1 free clue and resources equal to the enemy's health value.
    • "Lone Wolf" asset gives you free resource each turn, as long as you avoid other players.
    • "Pickpocketing" asset lets you draw an extra card once you evade an enemy. Upgraded version let's you choose between gaining a resource or drawing a card as your reward, or do both if you performed well enough instead, on top of being "fast", letting you play the card just when you are evading someone instead of having to prepare it beforehand.
    • "Thieves' Kit" asset gives free resources if successfully investigated with it.
    • "Grift" event lets you scam an enemy for up to 6 resources, but with a risk of provoking that enemy into attacking you.
    • "Scrimshaw Charm" asset, once per turn, adds 1-3 cursed tokens into bag, but pays you 1 resource for each token (plus one for free).
    • "Decorated Skull" asset generates charges when investigators, Allies or enemies gets defeated at its user's location, which can be then spent to get more cards or resources; basic version only lets you spend charges one at the time, while upgraded lets you spend up to 3 in one go.
    • "Bank Job" event costs extra action, but gives investigators at your location 8 resources in total. Rogues themselves are unlikely to need it, but it's one of the best ways to quickly fund their teammates, which is likely the intended purpose.
  • More Dakka:
    • "Swift Reload" event allows to quickly (so quickly, it actually has "fast" keyword) reload a gun with some missing ammo, allowing you to continue fighting.
    • "Contraband" event allows to pick an asset controlled by investigator at your location, and double the number of supplies or ammo on it (which can be life-saver for some Weapons). Upgraded version allows to add 2 supplies/ammo and draw an extra card instead.
    • "Beretta M1918" and "Mauser C96" Weapons normally exhaust themselves after you attack with them, limiting their usage to once per turn, but if your attack is successful enough, they can be readied immediately, allowing you to do a second attack right away.
    • "Chicago Typewriter" asset lets you spend extra actions to get extra accuracy, implication being you doing a longer burst of fire.
  • Multiplayer-Only Item:
    • "You handle this one!" (drops encounter card on other player) and "You owe me one!" (plays a card from other player's hand under your control, gives 1 card to both) events are unusable in singleplayer, as effects of both require other player to interact with.
    • Downplayed with "Copycat" skill; you can use it in singleplayer (it gives a single "wild" icon), but its gimmick only works in multiplayer: it lets you find and commit fitting skill from other investigator's discard pile (returning it to owner's deck afterwards), letting you use otherwise-inaccessible cards.
    • "Untimely Transaction" event lets another investigator play a card from your hand, giving them access to cards they can't play normally. For obvious reasons, it can't be used in singleplayer.
  • Necessary Drawback:
    • Rogues are nearly-invulnerable to Agility-testing treacheries, but also extremely weak to Willpower-testing ones, as most of them have only 1-2 Willpower (rarely 3).
    • As they're mainly built around neutralising enemies by evading them, or just avoiding them altogether to stealthily steal the clues, they generally don't have high Combat, reducing their chances to actually kill the target.
  • No-Sell:
    • "Obfuscation" Spell allows to cancel attacks of opportunity directed at you; as it's an asset, it's not one-time use as most similar cards, but it has limited charges. It is also fast however, so you do not need to play it in advance to avoid getting hit.
    • "Quick Getaway" event allows to cancel enemy's attack, by evading that enemy.
    • "Narrow Escape" event allows to cancel enemy's attack of opportunity, and gives you huge boost to next action this turn.
    • Upgraded "Suggestion" Spell lets you spend its charges to cancel enemy's attacks against you.
    • Upgraded "British Bull Dog" asset ignores "Aloof" keyword, letting you shoot at such enemies without wasting time on engaging them first.
  • No Cure for Evil: Rogues are the black sheep in mostly-heroic cast, consisting primely of criminals, crooks and scoundrels of some kinds. Thus, they're the only class almost entirely lacking any healing options, and few cards that they do have having serious drawbacks, like risk of backfiring (Liquid Courage), or being extremely limited on what they can heal (Lonnie Ritter).
  • Only in It for the Money: Several Ally options are actual mercenaries who requires paying them some resources every turn, or they would abandon you.
  • "Open!" Says Me: "Breaking and Entering" event boosts investigation attempt with the user's Agility, without rising alarm and with a chance to covertly neutralising an enemy there (by automatically evading them). The upgraded version even returns to your end at the end of the turn if you fulfil certain conditions. The card's image shows a duo of thieves entering the room, one of them holding a crowbar.
    If you're careful, it's just "entering."
  • Outlaw: There are very few Rogue Investigators (and Allies) that do not have the "Criminal" trait.
  • Power at a Price:
    • "Crystallizer of Dreams" lets you preserve events you would normally discard after using, to later commit them to skill tests, but comes with a nasty side effect: an Eldritch Abomination protecting it, which may randomly pay you a visit when you draw a card, forcing you to fight it as well.
    • The Innsmouth Conspiracy introduced plenty of new cards which gives Rogues some boons... at the cost of adding cursed tokens which may hurt them or their teammates later:
      • "Faustian Bargain" event gives you and/or other investigators at your location 5 resources in total to spread amongst themselves, but requires adding 2 cursed tokens into bag.
      • "Justify the Means" skill makes you add cursed tokens into bag, equal to test's difficulty, but in return makes you pass the test automatically.
      • "Ríastrad" event lets you add up to 3 cursed tokens into bag, providing scaling bonus to accuracy and damage per each token added. This allows you to perform a devastating magic attack, but tokens you just added would remain in the bag and may harm you later.
      • "Priest of Two Faiths" Ally adds 3 blessed tokens as soon as he spawns, but demands adding 1 cursed token each turn to keep him in play, or he would abandon you.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • "Disguise" asset not only boosts your chances to evade an enemy, but also prevents it from reading on next turn, disabling it for double the time.
    • "Slip Away" event not only makes evading enemy easier, but also makes it unable to ready the next round.
  • Pragmatic Hero: Even the more benevolent and altruistic members of this class that are working with the police (and investigators representing them) to save Arkham are willing to get their hands dirty and break the law to do so.
  • Professional Killer:
    • Delilah O'Rourke lets you easily damage an enemy without fighting it yourself, but has to be paid every time.
    • "Small Favor" event lets to damage an enemy without fighting — by just hiring someone else to do it.
  • Sawed-Off Shotgun: Rogues use shortened versions of shotgun, compared to Guardian-class versions. As result, they take only one hand. They comes in the following variants:
  • Screw the Rules, I Have Connections!: All but two Favor cards in the game belongs to Rogue class (excluding two Neutral ones, which don't follow the theme), and lets them break some of established in-game rules; all such cards involve getting, well, favors from either the other players, or some shady people Rogues are connected to.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here: "I'm Outta Here!" event allows you to immediately resign, right from the place where you currently are; can be quite useful in scenarios with lengthy Escape Sequences. However, it only works if there's currently available Resign option, to prevent its use for Dungeon Bypass where it's not intended by design.
  • The Scrounger: Joey "The Rat" Vigil allows to quickly play an Item from your hand (for small extra fee), or (after you upgrade him) to sell no longer needed Items from play to get 2 resources back.
  • Set a Mook to Kill a Mook: "Stir the Pot" event lets you, when in location with multiple enemies, pass Intellect test to make one of them to attack all the others (potentially killing), while you disengage from them all and escape.
  • Sinister Switchblade: "Switchblade" asset isn't particularly strong, but can be swiftly and covertly put in play, without risking attacks of opportunity. As may be expected, it has "Illicit" trait: only the gangsters would wield such into battle, after all... or our Unscrupulous Heroes.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • "Well-Connected" asset gives skill bonuses stacking with amount of resources you have; you normally can use it only once per turn, but upgraded version allows to spend some extra resources to use it twice.
    • "Calculated Risk" skill, instead of static skill boost, gets a "Wild" icon per each action you previously took on same turn — including the one you spent to initiate the skill test in the first place.
    • "Cheat the System" event gives you 1 resource per each card of different class you control (including your investigator); if you only control your own class, this card is borderline useless, but gives much more resources if you actively use off-class cards.
    • "Cunning" skill doubles its skill icons if you have at least 5 resources, and triples if you have at least 10. Otherwise, it gives you meager +1 Intellect and +1 Agility.
    • "Momentum" is a skill that, if you pass whatever test you used it for, makes the next test easier (reducing its difficulty)... with exact power of the card depending on how well you succeed on the first test (ranging from doing nothing, to reducing difficulty by 3).
    • "Nimble" skill gives rather weak Agility boost on its own, but if you pass a skill test, it lets you move several times... with number of moves depending on how well you performed on a test (with a chance to do nothing if you barely passed it).
    • "Savant" skill gives you extra stat boost, equal to your lowest stat other than the one tested. As result, its exact strength can vary wildly depending on who is using it and when.
    • "Vamp" event, rather than have any fixed effect, lets you pick an enemy at your location and any number of stats (one stat for basic version), then test each chosen stat one by one, giving you stat-specific reward for every success: Willpower for Doom-clearing, Intellect for clue-searching, Combat to damage and Agility to evade. As result, its purpose and effectiveness can vary greatly depending on who's using it, and where.
    • "Diabolical Luck" has only one generic "Wild" icon by default... but it can be committed to the test automatically if you reveal as cursed token, which gives it three more icons, fully compensating for the cursed token (that counts as "-2") and actually going into positive.
    • "Stir the Pot" event makes one of the enemies at your location attack the others. Basic version is fixed at 2 damage no matter what, but upgraded uses enemy's combined damage/horror value to determine its effect, meaning that it can go above 2 damage, but also that you may run into situations where any worthy target is too hard to provoke.
  • Situational Sword:
    • Recurring quirk of Rogue-class cards is that they provide stronger effects, or return to your hand... but only if you succeed by better amount than required minimum, giving you reduced effect otherwise. Some cards outright don't do anything special unless you oversucceed:
      • The ".41 Derringer" Weapon asset always provides extra accuracy, but only deals extra damage if you succeed with high enough result.
      • "Switchblade" Weapon does nothing to help you hit the enemy, but boosts your damage... if you hit with good enough result. Upgraded version does boost accuracy a bit, but does nothing to address the unreliability of its extra damage.
    • Dario El-Amin is an Ally that provides a much-needed boost to Willpower and Intellect, but only for as long as the who played him Investigator has at least 10 resources (a value that constantly fluctuates). Fortunately, he's also willing to share some of his own... while there's no enemies at his location.
    • "Lone Wolf" asset gives you 1 resource each turn... but only if you have no other investigators at your location.
    • "Three Aces" skill merely gives you one "Wild" icon by default... but lets you pass a test automatically if you commit all three copies to same test. It then lets you draw 3 cards to replace what you just spent, and 3 resources before discarding itself (or removing itself from the game with the Taboo ruleset).
  • Skeleton Key: "Skeleton Key" asset may be used to reduce shroud of any location to 1, as long as it is attached to it. Given that it has both Relic and Cursed traits, its ability to fit to any and all locks is likely magic in nature.
  • The Sneaky Guy:
    • Rogues tend to have great Agility (usually around 4), which, in combination with their cards, allows them to safely exhaust enemies, disabling them for a turn. In combination with good Intellect (3-4 for most of them), it makes them go-to pick for dangerous raids in the hornet nest, to gather clues right under enemy noses and make it back alive.
    • "Clean Sneak" event gives you a choice between gaining resources, clues, drawing a card or just damaging the enemy, for every exhausted enemy at your location. The downside is that each effect can be picked only once. It counts Swarm enemies (introduced in the same expansion) as one instance, so it can't be abused.
    • "Fox Mask" boosts investigator's Intellect or Agility for one test at the cost of spending offerings; to gain more offerings, you must leave location with at least one enemy — basically, trick the enemy and leave them behind, in a true foxy manner.
    • Rogues have an arsenal of various tricks to further enhance their abilities to safely evade most monsters:
      • "Cat Burglar" Ally allows to disengage from all enemies and move to a connected location (without attack of opportunity), essentially serving as emergency escape button. He also gives a slight permanent boost to Agility.
      • "I'm outta here!" event lets to resign at any moment and place, for as long as there's an option available (skipping checking for conditions, like non-exhausted enemies, clues, etc). This is rather situational card, but some scenarios have at least someone retreating as a win condition, often, someone with specific story cards.
      • "Decoy" event lets you evade any non-Elite enemy automatically. It can be empowered by spending extra resources, to target one more enemy, and even interact with someone outside of your location.
      • "Disguise" asset not only boosts a chance to evade someone, but also makes them stay exhausted for one more round.
      • "Elusive" event disengages every enemy from you, and lets you to escape into any revealed location as long as it doesn't have enemies. It later got a Nerf with Taboos to only let you move to a connecting location, to prevent players from using it to warp from one side of the map to the other.
      • "Stealth" asset lets to reduce an enemy's evasion rating (making it easier to evade it); however, instead of exhausting it, it just makes it unable to re-engage you for the rest of your turn. You better leave the location before the Enemy Phase starts, because it WILL re-engage and attack you if you are still around! Upgraded version let's you attempt this evasion without taking an action.
      • "Think on Your Feet" event lets you to escape into connected location if an enemy spawns at your location. Upgraded version also lets to do that if they just move there from elsewhere.
      • "Scout Ahead" event not only lets investigator to move up to 3 times, but also protects from running into any enemies while doing so, letting just sneak past all foes and continue with whatever task you wanted to perform.
      • "Lightfooted" skill lets you, after evading one enemy, automatically evade another.
    • The cards aimed at investigating tend to, rather than make the user sit down and do the study, let them sneak up on enemies and spy on them, or infiltrate inside some private property:
      • "Eavesdrop" event lets you, rather than bother with investigating, find some clues on sneaking up on enemy and overhearing them. It tests agains't the enemy's evade rating, but uses player's Intellect rather than Agility.
      • "Followed" event lets investigator to follow an injured enemy to find where it's going and get some clues.
      • "Pilfer" event lets to "investigate" using Agility rather than Intellect, with 2 extra clues as a reward. Upgraded version even returns to your hand at the end of the turn if you succeeded by enough.
      • "Under Surveillance" event lets to prepare a trap for an enemy: when it enters the marked location, it gets exhausted automatically, while investigator, who set up the trap, spies on it to get some free clues.
      • "Snitch" event makes investigator find 2 clues (either in their or a connected location)... by just bribing someone into giving up the info they need.
      • "Fake Credentials" asset lets investigator just sneak in with fake ID and ask around, getting the info they need. It's very easy at first, but works progressively worse after each successful attempt, and once you inevitably fail, you get attacked immediately (basic version) unless you throw that document away, or return it into hand (upgraded version).
  • Sprint Shoes: "Scout Ahead" event lets to move up to 3 times in one action, without engaging any foe you may run into.
  • Status Buff:
    • "Backstab" event lets investigator use Agility instead of Combat for one attack, giving swift, but frail investigators a fair chance in combat.
    • "Money Talks" event allows to use half of your resources supply instead of your stats during a skill test you are taking, rounded down. Upgraded version allows you to play this on any skill test, letting other Investigators test their wealth in place of their skill as well, on top of letting you draw a card.
    • The "Lockpicks" asset adds investigator's Agility to their Intellect while investigating, albeit with a risk of breaking it (forcing you to discard it). Upgrading it gives you supply of several lockpicks, giving you some room for error.
    • "Pilfer" event and "Thieves' Kit" asset both lets to investigate using Agility instead of Intellect; as an extra bonus, the former lets you find more clues, and the latter gives you resources.
    • "Slip Away" event boosts your Agility with your Intellect while you're evading, and exhausts an enemy for one extra turn if you succeed.
    • "Suggestion" Spell boosts the user's evasion attempt by adding their Willpower to the test, but drains it charges each time the user fails to succeed with high enough results, forcing you to discard it once they run out. Upgraded version no longer has this issue, but it also gets a use for those charges, so you still have a reason to be careful.
    • Tristan Botley boosts two of your stats every turn, until your next turn begins.
    • "British Bull Dog" asset lets you fight using Agility instead of Combat, which makes it significantly easier to use by most Rogues than other Firearms (given that they generally prioritise Agility over Combat).
  • Talking the Monster to Death: Downplayed with "Blackmail File"; you don't have to fight or run from monster, you just scare them into compliance by blackmailing them with something, which makes them disengage from everyone and turn "aloof" until the end of round (wouldn't engage anyone without players acting first); fittingly, it counts as "parley" action. But it regains its composure by the next round.
  • Trick-and-Follow Ploy: "Followed" event lets you spy on a chosen enemy (manifests as investigation) to find extra clues; the more injured the target is, the higher your chance at success. As it's a spying mission, you don't trigger attacks of opportunity from your mark, even if you do so in the same area as it.
  • Unscrupulous Hero: While most of them aren't bad people, Rogues are willing to use questionable tactics and allies if it gets job done, as well as outright break the law; considering that the foes they face are threatening humanity itself, they have a point.
  • Useless Useful Spell: "Opportunist" skill is one of the cards that returns to the user's hand if they pass a test with good enough result. Would be good, if not the fact that it provides humble 1 "wild" icon, and the bar of triggering it is succeeding by 3 or more, meaning that on most tests where you succeed with such results, "Opportunist" is unlikely to be the card that made a difference. Upgraded version lowers the bar to 2, but doesn't get any extra icons or abilities.
  • Video Game Stealing: Some of their cards explains their mechanics as investigator stealing something.
    • "Burglary" and "Thieves' Kit" allows you to steal resources, "Pickpocketing" allows to steal cards (and resources too once upgraded), "Pilfer" allows to steal clues.
    • "I'll take that!" event triggers once you successfully investigate or evade an enemy, and allows you to play an Item from your hand for reduced cost. The event then gets attached to card just played, making it "Illicit", as you essentially stole it.

    Mystic class tropes 
Mystics seek to learn and tame arcane power, to use it for humanity's well-being—despite all the risks it brings. Some of their cards are dedicated to altering the behaviour of monsters, treacheries, and even chaos tokens, and while the cost of failure may be great, so is the reward.
  • Alchemy Is Magic: Mystics have "Alchemical Transmutation" as a Spell option, which allows them to make some "free" resources.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: "Explosive Ward" makes you discard any number of your Arcane-slot assets. It then deals testless damage to an enemy engaged with you (without attacks of opportunity), with a catch that maximum damage is only restricted by the number of empty Arcane slots you have after doing that (you have 2 slots by default, but can acquire more). Sadly, Elite enemies are immune.
  • Attack Reflector: "Hypnotic Gaze" event not only cancels an attack directed at investigator, but has a chance to redirect damage to the attacker if right chaos token is drawn; upgraded version can redirect horror instead of damage, making it more versatile.
  • Auto-Revive: "St. Hubert's Key" takes away 2 max Sanity in exchange for boosting your stats, but if you get defeated by horror, it gets discarded (reverting the penalty), while reviving you with those same 2 missing sanity points. As it merely gets discarded, you can find and use it again.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: "Flute of the Outer Gods", in theory, lets to seal massive amount of cursed tokens, and then spend them to damage enemies or kick them out of your location. On practice, it costs tons of exp to purchase (it's level-4 Exceptional card, meaning that it chosts whopping eight exp), and costs tons of resources to play (you play 1 resource per each token you seal on it, up to 10) for a class not known for having very strong economy. Most of the time, you can't afford to us it, and when you can, it's often an overkill.
  • Bad Powers, Good People: Mystics use the forbidden and dark powers of the Mythos to aid their investigations, with all the nasty implications and sideffects that come with it, but unlike the cultists they fight that collude with similiar forces, they are trying to save the world instead of dooming it. Best exemplified by spells like Shrivelling or Wither, that make (according to their art and story description in Circle Undone) their opponents melt.
  • Blood Magic:
    • "Binder's Jar" asset allows to cancel an attack from enemy, but requires to defeat some enemies with same traits as the attacker first, which works as its "charges". It also gives you extra arcane slots for each enemy atatched to the card.
    • "Blood Pact" shows investigator cutting his arm to spill blood, as part of some ritual. The card itself gives temporal stat boost, at the cost of accumulating doom.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • "Holy Rosary" is a popular pick for low-level Mystics, as it provides cheap and consistent boost to Willpower with no drawbacks. At higher levels, it would likely be overshadowed by more gimmicky accessory-slot cards.
    • "Ritual Candles" asset has exactly one use: give you small stat boost when you reveal a negative symbol token. Given that it's both reliable, cheap and takes a hand slot (which not every Mystic has other uses for), it's popular pick for starter decks.
    • The "Four of Cups" Tarot card is a popualr pick for the same reason "Holy Rosary" is: it boost Willpower, which is the main skill mystic use to fight, investigate, evade and whatever else their other cards allow them to. It does cost 1 extra resource compared to "Holy Rosary", but unlike the other asset, it takes its own Tarot slot, rather than the hotly contested Accessory slot, making it easier to slot in most decks.
  • Brick Joke: Olive McBride, originally introduced in The Forgotten Age expansion, has "Would try anything once" as her subtitle. When, years later, she received un upgrade, her text was "Tried everything once".
  • Cast from Hit Points:
    • "Forbidden Knowledge" asset allows investigator to gain some resources, at the cost of accumulating horror.
    • "St. Hubert's Key" asset reduces max Sanity by 2 to give investigator boost to their Intellect and Willpower. Penalty only lasts for as long as this card stays in play, and if you get defeated by horror, you instead discard the Key and heal that missing Sanity, making it less impractical than can be expected.
    • Inverted with "Drain Essence" event, that moves damage from your investigator to the target enemy, if you pass Willpower test; you must actually get damaged first before you can use it, as it shifts your wounds onto other being.
  • Cast from Money:
    • "Arcane Studies" lets you spend resources to boost either your Intellect or your Willpower. Level 4 version gets its own supply which it recharges every turn.
    • "Grounded" lets you spend resources to boost any of your stat, but only while using Spells. Another drawback is that it breaks if it ever takes any horror. The upgraded version gets an extra point of Sanity (but also two points of Health, adding other thing you have to manage), and gives some static boost on top of keeping a paid one.
  • Cast from Sanity: "Arcane Research" Permanent asset allows to spend less experience on upgrading Spells, but requires suffering a lasting mental trauma in order to be purchased. The implication is that some knowledge puts a heavy burden on one's mind. "Much knowledge brings much suffering", indeed.
  • Critical Hit:
    • "Hypnotic Gaze" normally just cancels enemy's attack, but then you draw a chaos token, lets you to reflect the damage back at enemy if right one is drawn.
    • "Armageddon", "Eye of Chaos" and "Shroud of Shadows" all either gets extra effects or lets you to instantly recharge them if you draw at least one cursed token while using them and still succeed.
    • "Shards of the Void" Spell deals extra damage for each "0" token revealed during attack, but seals it afterwards (gaining extra accuracy for future attacks).
    • "Song of the Dead" deals extra damage if you reveal a Skull token.
    • "Banish" event, if you reveal a bad symbol token during evasion, prevents the enemy you just exhausted from reading, essentially doubling the duration of its effect.
  • Discount Card:
  • Double-Edged Buff:
    • "Ethereal Form" event makes enemies unable to engage and/or attack you, but also makes you unable to attack or damage them.
    • One of upgrades for "Living Ink" further increases the boost it provides for chosen skill(s), but also penalises skill(s) you didn't choose.
  • Draw Extra Cards: Mystics are highly limited in options to draw extra cards, and the few options they do have, tend to either have some drawbacks, or be restricted to Spell cards only.
    • "Arcane Initiate" Ally lets you search top 3 cards of your deck to quickly find and draw a Spell card.
    • "Crystal Pendulum" asset lets you name a number, and, if you succeed or fail a skill test by exactly that amount, draw 1 card.
    • Upgraded "Deny Existence" event, if you use it to ignore effect that forces you to discard a card, lets you draw a card instead.
    • "Eldritch Initiation" event lets you draw 1 card per each arcane slot you have (capped at 5), but forces to discard one card from hand per each arcane slot that isn't empty.
    • "Jewel of Aureolus" asset lets you draw 1 card (or get 2 resources) if you (or someone else at your location) reveal specific chaos token during skill test.
    • Upgraded "Parallel Fates" event lets you look (and change the order of cards) not only encounter, but also player deck; if you do so, the deck's owner can draw 1 card.
    • "Quantum Flux" event shuffles your discard pile back into deck, then lets you draw 1 card immediately. It then gets removed from the game, so you only have one shot.
    • "Sacrifice" event forces you to discard a Mystic-lcass event, but gives you 3 cards and/or resources in total in return.
    • "Scroll of Prophecies" asset lets any investigator to draw 3 cards, but forces to discard one from hand.
    • "The Stars Are Right" event (bonded to another event, "Stargazing"), amongst other effects, lets its user draw 1 card, though it's not the prime function, especially since you can only use it twice.
    • "Word of Command" event lets you find any one specific Spell card in your deck, with no limit of how many cards you may look for it.
    • "Speak to the Dead" asset lets you retrieve Spell or Ritual events from discard pile and put them to hand, albeit it has a chance to fail (you must draw tokens, and only "Skull" or cursed ones do the trick).
  • Encounter Repellent:
    • "Ward of Protection" event allows to cancel revelation effect of a (non-weakness) treachery card you draw, albeit at the cost of taking some horror. Level 2 upgrade allows you to also protect other Investigators, while the level 5 upgrade only works on you again, but let's you cancel any encounter cards, enemies included.
    • "Ward of Radiance" event allows to cancel a treachery card drawn at your location, albeit it has a chance to fail.
    • "Foresight" event allows to name a card before drawing (either player card, or encounter card); when drawing an encounter card, if you guess the name of the card right, you can immediately cancel and discard it.
  • Equipment Upgrade:
    • "Living Ink" asset gives you static boost to a skill chosen at purchase, but drains charges every turn, getting discarded once it dries out. It can be upgraded in various ways: to make it boost up to 2 more stats, letting it help the other players, letting you "pause" its draining (at the cost of disabling for one turn), or even give you means to recharge it.
    • "Power Word" event takes a non-Elite enemy under control, letting giving it various orders. As you keep upgrading the card, it expands the list of possible orders, or gives the card itself extra functionality (like an option to quickly reclaim it without killing the enemy).
    • "Summoned Servitor" can't do anything but move at first, but learns to perform actions as you keep upgrading it: like fighting, evading, investigating and so on. It can also be upgraded in other ways: make it easier to summon, make it stop taking a slot of your choice, or make it able to take two actions each turn.
  • Experience Booster: "Delve Too Deep" is an event that gives 1 victory point (1 exp to every investigator) after they draw one encounter card each. Later taboos prohibited for more than 2 "Delve Too Deep" to be played per scenario, to prevent teams with multiple Mystics (or investigators with Mystic cards access) from going over the limit of 2 cards of the same card per deck and amass massive amounts of exp with little effort.
  • Extra Turn:
    • The "Stargazing" event shuffles a special encounter card into the deck, "Stars Are Right", which can give a random Investigator an extra action (as well as 1 card and 1 resource) when drawn. Because it takes an action to play this card to begin with however, its main appeal is more skipping drawing a treachery or an enemy for one turn (And it works only twice per game, as one copy of "Stars Are Right" removes itself from the game after resolving).
    • "Close the Circle" asset allows to take extra actions; it can be used multiple times in a row, but has limited number of charges, and the sole way to increase their number is to collect cards from multiple classes, which seriously limits its potential.
    • "Astral Mirror" Ritual gives you extra action each turn, but you can only use it to play cards that take hand slot(s).
  • Familiar: Mystics can have a magic pet follow them (the card depicts it as a cat), which gives an extra Arcane slot (usable only for Spells). The drawback is that it's very frail, being defeated from just 1 point of damage or horror.
  • Gathering Steam:
    • A lot of Mystic cards scales their effect with amount of Doom on them; you have to balance your desire for more power and desire to actually win, however, as Doom equals to time that has passed in this game.
    • "Dragon Poll" scales its power with amount of filled Arcane slots you have, gaining +1 Combat for every slot, and +1 damage for every two.
    • Played With regarding "Astral Mirror"; it's an asset taking up Body slot, which gives you extra Hand slot for every empty Arcane slot, so it penalises you for filling those up... but Mystics have options how to increase amount of Arcane slots, allowing its effect to grow stronger as you put more cards into play.
    • Played With regarding "Eldritch Initiation" event; it allows do draw 1 card per each Arcan slot you have (up to 5), but also penalises you for every filled Arcane slot, forcing to discard a card from hand.
    • "Meditative Trance" event heals 1 damage and 1 horror per every filled Arcane slot; it starts rather weak for its price, but grows massive power once you put enough cards into play.
    • "Prophecy" skill grows stronger as the number of Doom in play increases by any means.
    • Until you upgrade it to give it more abilities, "Summoned Servitor" can't do anything but move, while taking both arcane and ally slot, and requiring discarding another asset from play. You can upgrade it, giving it new abilities, and countering aforementioned weaknesses.
  • Healing Hands:
    • "Clarity of Mind" and "Healing Words" Spell events lets you heal investigators' horror or damage, respectively.
    • "The Key of Solomon" Tome lets you sacrifice one blessed token to heal up to 2 damage/horror in total from investigators and/or Allies at your location. The catch is that there must be more blessed tokens than cursed in the bag when you use it.
  • Heal Thyself:
    • "Fearless" skill heals horror on you if you pass a test while using it. (or up to 2 with the upgraded version)
    • "Meditative Trance" event heals either 1 damage or 1 horror for each filled arcane slot you have.
  • Herd-Hitting Attack:
    • "Armageddon" Spell lets you deal 1 damage to any enemy at your location when you reveal a cursed token while you attack with it (or refund the charge spent to cast the spell instead).
    • "Storm of Spirits" Spell, instead of normal damage, deals 2 damage to every enemy at your target's location (with any extra damage you would deal still targeting the original target) if it succeeds. But if one of the negative symbol tokens gets drawn, it targets the investigators as well.
  • Hypnotic Eyes: "Hypnotic Gaze" event cancel an attack against an Investigator and makes the attacking enemy deal damage to themselves.
  • Item Amplifier:
    • "Astronomical Atlas" lets you stockpile cards from your deck and later commit them to tests, retuning them to your hand if you pass, instead of discarding them.
    • "Edlritch Inspiration" event synergises with other Mystic cards which have unique effects on revealing a chaos token, allowing to either ignore those effects altogether (negating bad ones), or resolve twice (doubling positive ones).
    • "Empower Self" lets you ignore effects of other cards that makes you use Willpower instead of some other stat, while still enjoy the other benefits of the card, as well as not being locked out of using the non-Willpower skills during tests.
    • "The Hierophant • V" Tarot lets your arcane-slot cards use accessory slot, and vice-versa, making inventory management less tedious process.
    • "Astral Mirror" Ritual gives you extra hand slot per each unused arcane slot, which are always in short supply (though so are arcane slots). It also gives you extra action to use cards that occupy hand slot.
    • Several cards are dedicated to putting charges on cards (which primely helps Spells):
      • "Enraptured" skill lets you recharge your assets with charges and secrets, but you must investigate to use it.
      • "Winds of Power" event lets you quickly put charges on your assets.
      • "Recharge" event lets you quickly add several charges to any card, albeit with chance to backfire.
    • Mystics heavily rely on Spells, and have several cards dedicated to improve their usability:
      • "Foresight" event allows to reduce the price of a card you're about to draw, but only if you guess the name of it.
      • Dayana Esperence is an Ally which allows to play a Spell event attached to her up to three times (before she runs out of "secrets"); she's specifically made for investigators relying on key events, the main drawback of which is them having only one use.
      • Mystics have to frequently rotate their Spells due to running out of charges on assets, or events in their hand. "Robes of Endless Night" exists to mitigate that problem by decreasing the price of playing Spells, on top of also giving them some much-needed extra health to spare. The upgraded version even allows to, once per turn, to play Spells without provoking attacks of opportunity, which is helpful if an enemy spawns next to you while you don't have your offensive Spells ready yet.
      • "Shining Trapezohedron" asset allows to pass as Willpower test to play Spell card "for free", but cancels it completely if you fail and forbids to use the other copies of same card for duration of the round.
      • "Spirit Athame" asset helps to pass skill tests when using Spells, along with being a decent emergency weapon.
      • "True Magick" asset takes up both a Hand an Arcane slots, but allows to mimic any Spell asset from your hand, without actually putting them into play, albeit you only get 1 charge of it per turn.
      • Twila Katherine Price exists primely to keep your Spells charged, by refunding some charges spent.
      • "Word of Command" event exists solely to quickly search your deck for Spells.
      • "Book of Shadows" Tome helps you recharging your Spells (and only Spells). Upgraded version also gives you extra arcane slot, which are often used by Spells.
      • "Prescient" skill lets you return Spells from discard pile... if you correctly guess the type of token you would draw (which is easier to do than what it seems if you make use of certain other Mystic cards).
      • "Sign Magick" gives you extra arcane slot for Spells and Rituals, at the cost of taking a hand slot.
      • "Call the Beyond" event lets you fully replenish charges or secrets on an asset under you control (if they're below starting value), and then lets trigger its action ability without actually spending actions. You pay for it with adding whopping 3 cursed tokens into bag.
      • "Ethereal Weaving" lets you play up to 3 Spell events from hand in one go, not only reducing resource cost, but also significantly boosting your skill value while using them (where it matters).
    • Mystics tend to accumulate doom on their cards. Some cards exists specifically to keep this gimmick under control:
      • "Ghastly Possession" skill's gimmick only triggers when you use it while doing tests on assets; it either gives good skill boost to make you more likely to succeed (at the cost of adding doom), or lets to either remove some doom already presented once you succeed or replenish half the uses of the card (regardless of specific type: charges, secrets, ammo, etc).
      • "Moonlight Ritual" event removes all doom from a card you control; upgraded version becomes fast and lets you target any card in your location, treacheries and enemies included as long as they do not have the "Elite" trait.
      • "Sin Eater" permanent asset sucks doom from other assets, while either recharging or readying them. You can then get rid of all that doom by spending an action.
      • Elle Rubash exists so you can attach to her up to two assets with Doom on them (a common occurrence for Mystics, with their Power at a Price approach), not only disregarding 1 Doom on each attached card, but also boosts your skills when using those cards.
  • It Only Works Once:
    • "Quantum Flux" event fully retrieves your discard pile, shuffling cards from it back into deck, but you can only do so once per scenario.
    • "Seal of the Seventh Sign" temporarily seals an Auto-Failure token, but slowly self-destructs as you keep revealing other negative symbol tokens; if it drains fully or leaves play for other reason, it gets destroyed completely and can't be reused again during same scenario.
    • "Seal of the Elder Sign" skill replaces any token revealed as Elder Sign, but only once per scenario.
    • "De Vermis Mysteriis" Tome can play Insight or Spell events from discard pile at reduced price, but every card used this way gets removed from the game, so you get one shot per card.
    • "Seal of the Elders" event triggers when someone at your location reveals 2 blessed and/or cursed tokens during skill test at your location, each summoning a different minion who help you soak some horror/damage (respectively), on top of providing extra functionality for the blessed/cursed tokens. As event removes itself from the game after use, you can only trigger it twice per game at most (as you can't have more than two copies in your deck).
  • Jack of All Stats: Outside of their high Willpower, Mystics tend to have average stats.
  • Jack of All Trades: Mystics have the cards specifically made to replace or amplify the weaker stats with their Willpower (generally their strongest stat). This allow them to adapt to any role.
  • Laser Blade: "Spectral Razor" event; unlike conventional knives, it's a blade made from pure magic energy, attached to spell-caster's arm. Obvious downside is that, being an event, it only lasts for one attack.
  • Life Drain: "Drain Essence" let's you do a parley test of Willpower to move 2 damage tokens from you to an enemy (or just one in case on an Elite foe).
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic: Any class has cards to interact with chaos tokens, but Mystics have by far the largest selection:
    • "Grotesque Statue" asset allows to draw additional chaos tokens and pick the one which seems more favourable.
    • "Seal of the Elder Sign" allows to disregard any chaos token, replacing it with Elder Sign instead; it only works once per game, however.
    • Olive McBride allows to draw 3 chaos tokens instead of 1, and resolve 2 of them on your choice. Her effects are highly chaotic and unpredictable, but sometimes allows to ignore something truly nasty (like auto-failure) or draw something truly desired (like Elder Sign). The upgraded version ups the number of drawn tokens to 4, making more likely to get a favorable combination of them.
    • "Protective Incantation" allows to seal any chaos token (excluding auto-failure), essentially removing it from play for as long as you can pay for its upkeep. Its usefulness varies from scenario to scenario, as sometimes, symbol tokens may have truly nasty effects.
    • "Seal of the Seventh Seal" asset allows to seal the auto-failure chaos token, temporarily protecting investigators from it by ensuring that they would draw something else instead. However, each time a symbol token is revealed during any skill test, it loses charges and eventually breaks; once it leaves play, it's gone for the rest of scenario.
    • "The Chthonian Stone" allows to seal symbol chaos tokens, temporarily protecting the team from their effects. It breaks if you reveal an auto-failure token later.
    • "Counterspell" event allows to just ignore chaos token drawn during skill test at your location, without drawing extra one — avoiding both the nasty modifier and even nastier additional effects.
    • "Dark Prophecy" event allows to draw 5 chaos tokens, and resolve one of them; however, it always requires to pick a symbol token if possible (which almost always comes with some additional effects), making it a choice between two evils.
    • "Premonition" event allows to seal a random chaos token, and later use it on the next skill test performed, instead of the random token you would draw otherwise. While result is not always beneficial, at least you always know what to expect.
    • "Curse of Aeons" asset allows to turn a second cursed token revealed during skill test as "Skull" token; while modifier may actually be worse, it's beneficial for some Spell cards, which gets stronger if you draw such token. Then you can remove both cursed tokens from the bag after the test's conclusion.
    • "Paradoxical Covenant" asset only works if both blessed and cursed tokens were revealed during one skill test, but if it happens, it's an automatic success.
    • "Rite of Equilibrium" event allows to either add any number of blessed and cursed tokens (in equal proportions) to the chaos bag, or, conversely, remove them on demand (also healing cards at your location).
    • "Tides of Fate" event allows to replace all cursed tokens in the bag with blessed ones; once the round ends, it does the same in reverse, so it's better to capitalise on its effect while it lasts.
    • "Seal of the Elder Sign" Skill allows to ignore drawing a chaos token, assuming that you drew an Elder Sign instead. Each copy only works once per scenario.
    • "Accursed" skill makes any cursed token revealed during a test you used it for count as "0" token (it's "-2" by default). It also lets you add up to 3 of them into bag right away, in case you may want them for one of the other card's effects.
  • Magical Gesture: "Sign Magick" asset allows to sacrifice Hand slot for extra Arcane slots (usable only by Ritual and Spell cards), clearly meaning that investigator is doing magic through special gestures and signs. Upgraded version even allows you to trigger cards Spells and Rituals assets without spending an action once you activate a card with those keywords.
  • Magic Misfire: A lot of Spells have a risk of causing you harm rather than good.
    • Several cards added in Jacqueline's starter pack ("Azure Flame for offence; "Claivoyance" for investigating; "Ineffable Truth" for evading) causes you some negative effects if you reveal "0", "+1" or Elder Sign tokens (normally beneficial to you).
    • Several cards share a gimmick that they help with certain tasks, but backfires if you draw any negative symbol tokens:
      • "Shrivelling", "Mists of R'lyeh" and "Rite of Seeking" all helps you with certain tasks (fighting, evading and investigating, respectively), but backfires at you if you draw a bad token (causing damage, loss of cards from hand or just ending your turn, respectively).
      • "Alchemical Transmutation" gives you "free" resources, but risks to cause damage if you reveal bad token.
      • "Astral Travel" lets you teleport to any revealed location, but then reveals a chaos token, with the risk of discarding Item or Ally (or taking damage if you can't) if you reveal bad token.
      • "Blinding Light" makes you lose an action if you reveal bad symbol token. Upgraded version has obviously a stronger effect but also causes horror.
      • "Recharge" event has a chance to, instead of recharging the card as intended, discard it outright if you draw a wrong token (with chance rather high, as you have to draw 3 tokens). Upgraded version removes this drawback, just getting weaker effect instead.
      • "Storm of Spirits" has a chance to cause damage to every investigator at your location.
  • Manipulating the Opponent's Deck: Mystics are the only class that can not just interact with encounter deck, but actually manipulate it:
    • Alyssa Graham can look the top card of the deck, and then put 1 Doom on herself to put that card at the bottom of the deck, delaying it appearing.
    • "Antediluvian Hymn" event reveals top 5 cards of encounter deck, and lets you return them back in any order — or put them on the bottom instead, if you're willing to add one cursed token per each card you want to move.
    • "Parallel Fates" event lets you look top 4 (top 6 for upgraded version) cards of encounter deck — and then put them back in any order (with basic version having a chance to backfire and shuffle the deck instead).
      • "Scrying" asset lets you look the top 3 cards of the deck, and return them back in any order; it has enough charges to do it up to 3 times.
  • Martial Arts Staff: Mystics have a "Dragon Poll" as low-level Weapon option ("coincidentally", added in the same expansion as Lily Chen, an actual martial artist and resident Kung-Fu Wizard).
  • Mind Control: "Power Word" event allows, to a limited degree, control an enemy and use it to achieve your goals. Most of its upgrades expands the number of things you can order through this card.
  • Money Multiplier: Mystics are highly limited in options to get extra resources, and they always comes with drawbacks:
    • "Alchemical Transmutation" asset gives you random number of resources, depending on how lucky you are with drawing tokens, but may backfire an cause damage.
    • David Renfield gives you resources each turn, but only if you're willing to add some Doom on him.
    • "Forbidden Knowlege" lets you exchange sanity for resources.
    • "Jewel of Aureolus" lets you either draw 1 card or get 2 resources when someone reveals specific chaos token during skill test at your location.
    • "Voice of Ra" event gives you 1 guaranteed resource, and up to 3 more if you're lucky with chaos tokens draw.
    • "Stargazing" event gives access to the "The Stars are Right" encounter card, which gives you 1 resource and 1 card (as well as an extra action), but each copy only works once per scenario.
    • "The Key of Solomon" Tome lets you remove 1 cursed token from the bag and gain 2 resources instead, but for that to work, there must be more cursed than blessed tokens in the bag at the moment you use it.
  • Monster Allies: "Summoned Hound" is a Hound of Tindalos made to fight for investigator. However, sooner or later, it would break free...
  • Necessary Drawback:
    • Mystics generally have very high Sanity (8-9), but are physically frail, with very few of them having above 6 Health.
    • Almost all Mystics have good Willpower stat (4-5), but pay for it with mediocre other stats: very few of them have above 3 in either Intellect, Combat or Agility (albeit they also rarely have particularly terrible stats either), usually prioritising one of them over the others.
  • Nigh-Invulnerability: "Ethereal Form" event allows, on successful evasion, turn ethereal, which makes the enemies unable to engage or attack investigator — but also makes investigator unable to attack or cause damage to them. However, any effects which causes damage/horror directly, would still do so, so this protection is not absolute.
  • No-Sell: Mystics have perhaps the largest number of cards which protects them from some harm in one way or another:
    • "Deny Existence" event allows to ignore one negative effect from encounter card or enemy's attack (on player's choice, out of options listed), sometimes avoiding something truly nasty. Upgraded version allows to perform same thing in reverse (heal when you would have take damage, draw cards when you would have discarded them, etc).
    • "Defiance" skill allows to pick a symbol chaos token (excluding auto-failure and campaign-specific ones), and ignore it altogether, including modifier. Its upgraded version ignores all such tokens, no longer requiring to pick specific ones.
    • Ikiaq allows to put the just drawn basic weaknesses (even those belonging to the other players) below her card, temporarily removing them from the game; but for each card, her owner temporarily loses 1 Willpower and 1 Intellect, and once she leaves the play, all those cards gets freed and must be drawn for real.
    • "Binder's Jar" asset can cancel the enemy's attacks directed at its user; however, the conditions for it to actually work makes it hard to utilise that way.
    • "Edlritch Inspiration" event synergises with other Mystic cards which have unique effects on revealing a Chaos token, allowing to either ignore those effects altogether (negating bad ones), or resolve twice (doubling positive ones).
  • One-Hit Kill: "String of Curses" event lets you instantly defeat a non-Elite enemy with at least 1 doom, gaining resources depending on how much doom was on it. It can also charge enemies with doom (while automatically evading them) so you can kill them later (the drawback is that you can't damage that enemy during same round).
  • Portal Network: "Open Gate" event allows to create up to 3 portals, between which investigators can move freely.
  • Power at a Price: Mystics constantly deals with eldritch powers to achieve their goals. As result, many of their cards have various drawbacks, which comes in various flavours.
    • "Sacrifice" event makes you discard a Mystic-class asset in play, but lets you either draw 3 cards or gain 3 resources as compensation. A card picture shows a sorceress preparing to sacrifice an animal.
    • "Crystalline Elder Sign" boosts all your stats, but makes you seal either "+1" token or Elder Sign, preventing them from showing up during any test (and in the case of Elder Sign, disabling everyone's special abilities related to it), which indirectly makes every skill test harder for the team if you are playing a non-solo game.
    • "Arcane Research" permanent gives discount on upgrading Spells, but makes investigator suffer a mental trauma, making them start each game with some sanity already missing, and going insane if the number of traumas reaches maximum Sanity.
    • Some cards require putting Doom tokens on them (taking away your precious time) for immediate benefits; fortunately, some cards are specifically dedicated to removing Doom from cards.
      • "Abyssal Tome" asset lets you fight through your Intellect or Willpower instead of Combat (the latter isgenerally strongest stat for Mystics), with ability to further boost your accuracy and damage if you're willing to put some Doom on it.
      • Alyssa Graham by default lets you look up the top card of encounter or deck, or deck of any player; but in return for putting doom on her, she lets to dump that card on the bottom of the deck.
      • "Blood Pact", unlike its analogues from other classes, requires adding doom to it instead of spending resources. However, it also gives stronger boosts than its analogues (same as Rogues' version), boosting your Combat and Willpower by +3 at its final upgrade. However, you're only allowed to use it once per test.
      • David Renfield gives you resources, but generates doom when doing so. He also gives you static boost to Willpower, but only if he has at least some doom.
      • Several cards added in The Scarlet Keys expansion ("Ceremonial Sickle" for offence, "Dowsing Rod" for investigating, and "Onyx Pentacle" for evasion, "Hallowed Chalice" for healing) helps you with certain tasks, but stockpiles doom as you do so. All four have built-in button to clear this doom out, making them less awkward to use.
      • "De Vermis Mysteriis" Tome lets you play Spell or Insight events from discard pile at reduced price, but removes them from the game once you do so and it also adds Doom on the book itself.
    • Few cards trigger extra encounter cards as part of their price:
      • "Drawn to the Flame" event allows to discover some "free" clues by drawing encounter cards.
      • "Delve Too Deep" event gives "free" victory points at the cost of drawing extra encounter cards for every investigator. Due to the way it works, each copy can be used only once per scenario (as it gets added to the victory display after being played).
    • Some cards make you add cursed tokens as part of their effects:
      • "Promise of Power" skill gives massive stat boost, but forces to add a cursed token into bag, or take horror if you can't.
      • "Wicked Athame" Weapon asset makes you add 1-3 cursed tokens to the bag when you attack with it, but also gives you huge boost to accuracy for each token, and lets you put 1 charge or even offering on asset under your control (the latter is nearly impossible to do naturally) if you actually kill someone with it. Given it doesn't get boosted damage, it is best used to finish off enemies at with 1 hit point left while preserving charges on deadlier Spells.
  • Power Copying: "True Magick" Tome takes up both a hand an arcane slots, but allows to mimic any Spell asset from your hand, without actually putting them into play, albeit requiring to pay the cost to activate their abilities each and every time (spending actions, charges and so on). It also only comes with 1 charge, that however replenish itself next turn once spent, so you can only benefit from it once a round if you cannot find ways to put more charges on it.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • "Mind Wipe" asset "blanks" the enemy card's text box, essentially depriving it of all its abilities.
    • "Read the Signs" allows to, while investigating, ignoring any effects and keywords of investigated location, which would otherwise target the investigator (and may be very nasty in some cases). It doesn't affect location's shroud, however.
    • "Bind Monster" event allows to disable just-evaded non-Elite enemy for as long as its user keeps passing the Willpower check.
    • "Mesmeric Influence" skill lets to ignore any keywords or location effects that can trigger during skill test it's used for (which primely includes penalties for failures).
  • Seers: Various Mystic-class cards are related to ability to see the future or something hidden, in one way or another, with the name often reflecting it; it's used as justification for them manipulating game mechanics.
    • "Scrying" asset allows see the top 3 cards of player or encounter decks and change their order.
    • Alyssa Graham (beside boosting your Intellect) allows to not only look at the top of either the player or encounter decks, but also put that card on the bottom of the deck if the player wishes so (at the cost of putting Doom on her).
    • "Rite of Seeking" asset allows to investigate while using Willpower instead of Intellect, by discovering the hidden clues via magic. Like many Spells, it has a chance to backfire on user, ending their turn prematurely.
    • "Premonition" event "predicts" which chaos token would be drawn, by sealing a random token from the bag and enforcing its usage on the next skill test.
    • "Sixth Sense" asset allows to not just investigate using Willpower instead of Intellect, but also to investigate connected location instead of your own (without actually going there) if you reveal certain tokens during the test. Upgraded version allows to pick location up to two connections away.
    • "Parallel Fates" event allows to look up to 4 cards in the encounter deck and put them back in any order, but it has a chance to backfire as it forces to reveal a chaos token when you play it, and if you reveal certain ones the cards will get shuffled back instead (randomising the encounter deck once more). Upgraded version gets rid of this clause and lets you return encounter cards in any order or reshuffle them according to player's choice instead, on top of increasing the cards you can look at to 6 and letting you draw a card once this event is played.
    • "Scrying Mirror" asset allows to reveal a chaos token before committing any cards, so the player knows what they must do to pass a test, or, if they know that it's a certain failure, to not invest any cards.
    • "Foresight" event allows to name a card before investigator draws from either their deck or encounter deck; on right guess, investigator may either play the card with reduced price, or immediately discard it without any effects.
    • "Recall the Future" asset allows to guess a chaos token which would be revealed; on right guess, it gives stat boost until the test ends.
  • Random Effect Spell: Level 0 version of "Rod of Carnamagos" asset, when used, makes you draw 5 random tokens; if at least one cursed token was revealed, it attaches 1 random Rot event to the chosen enemy, which applies permanent debuff to it until that enemy leaves play by any means: disables its ability to attack or move (Abyssal and Virescent Rot), lowers its fight and evade values (Putrescent Rot), applies Damage Over Time (Scarlet Rot) or turns that enemy into resources when it dies (Aember Rot). Upgraded version lets you actually choose which Rot to use, as well as lets you use more than one if you drew multiple tokens. As expected however, this cannot be used against Elites.
  • Reduced Mana Cost:
    • "Uncage the Soul" event reduces the cost of playing a Spell or Ritual cards by 3, which is a huge boon, as Mystics are lacking in terms of economy cards.
    • "Robes of Endless Night" asset lets you reduce a cost of playing one Spell card by 1. You can only use it once per turn (as it exhausts after triggering), but otherwise has no limits how many times you can do it.
    • "Ethereal Weaving" event lets you play up to 3 Spell events from hand, each with -1 resource cost, as well as boosts your skill value while using them.
  • Situational Sword:
    • "Close the Circle" lets you use Willpower for any test, but doesn't help with test itself. However, the card itself gets more charges if you control cards of more than one class (counting your investigator), making it more useful if you actively use off-class cards.
    • "Eldritch Initiation" lets you draw 1 card per each empty arcane slot (up to 5)... but makes discard 1 card from hand for each filled one.
    • "Occult Theory" skill, instead of having any consistent bonus, either gives you boost to Intellect equal to your Willpower, or boost to Willpower equal to your Intellect.
    • "Prophecy" skill doubles its skill icons if there's 3 Doom in total on any cards in the game, and triples if it's at least 6. Otherwise, it gives you meager +1 "Wild" icon.
    • "Sixth Sense" and "Wither", by default, merely lets you investigate/fight (respectively) using Willpower instead of a relevant stats, but gains extra gimmicks if you reveal "bad" symbol tokens: "Sixth Sense" lets you find clues from outside your location, and "Wither" nerfs your enemy's stats. When upgraded both give a Willpower boost on usage, but also have an even stronger effect when revealing certain tokens.
    • "Torrent of Power" skill only gives one "Wild" icon by default, but adds extra "wild" and Willpower icons if you're willing to spend some charges on your assets.
  • Smoke Out: Mystics can use "Mists of R'lyeh" Spell to help them evade an enemy and then escape into another location.
  • Spell Book: Several Mystic cards are occult books containing spells or magic rituals for specific purposes.
  • Squishy Wizard:
    • Mystics tend to have great Willpower (around 4-5), which they use to fuel their magic, but bad Health (6 at average) and Combat (around 2-3), meaning they are in a trouble whenever their supply of magic tricks runs out, or isn't suitable for the situation.
    • It's not uncommon for Mystic-class Allies to have strong Sanity, and just 1 point of Health; some instead do it in reverse, having higher Health and worse Sanity. But they greatly boost Mystics' sorcery through their own abilities, making them valuable additions to the deck.
  • Status Buff:
    • "Abyssal Tome" asset lets to fight using either Willpower or Intellect rather than Combat when attacking an enemy, albeit, unlike most offensive cards, it offers no extra damage by default (unless you're willing to put some doom on it).
    • "Ceremonial Sickle", "Dowsing Rod" and "Onyx Pentacle" assets all lets you choose between using Willpower when performing their associated tasks (fighting, investigating or evading, respectively), or doing them with boost to prime stat.
    • "Mind's Eye" asset Spell lets you replace any stat of your choice with Willpower for duration of one test, regardless of the test's type. It can be quickly recharged by discarding extra copies of it from hand, thought it is not easy to use given it is the only Spell that takes two arcane slots (Read: the default number Mystics have to begin with).
    • Majority of Spells replaces Combat, Intellect or Agility with Willpower for duration of skill test you use them for.
  • Sword Cane: Mystics have actual "Sword Cane" as their Weapon choice; besides standard for Mystic cards ability to do stuff through Willpower, its main gimmick is that a sword-disguised-as-a-cane always takes the enemy by surprise, making you able to use it without attacks of opportunity.
  • Teleportation with Drawbacks: "Astral Travel" Spell allows to move into any revealed location, but then makes you draw a chaos token, with any negative symbol token forcing you to discard an Item or Ally (or damaging you if you can't).
  • Time Rewind Mechanic:
    • "Time Warp" event allows to completely undo an action done by investigator, allowing for comeback if something goes not as planned.
    • "Quantum Flux" event allows to, once per game, regain all cards from discard pile; the name suggests that time manipulation is in effect.
  • Useless Useful Spell: "Cat Mask" asset gives you Willpower and Combat boosts, helping with the magic/treacheries and with fighting monsters, respectively. However, it only recharges when Doom gets placed on a card without Doom on it — any card, not just player cards. Unfortunately, managing Doom on your own cards may be very awkward, while with encounter cards and locations, those are generally out of your control.
  • Weakened by the Light: "Blinding Light" event not only aids in evading the enemies (due to, well, blinding them), but can somehow harm them, causing them damage if successful.
  • Weaponized Teleportation: "Banish" event allows to teleport just-evaded enemy somewhere else. If you're lucky with drawing right tokens, just-teleported enemy would also be stunned.

    Survivor class tropes 
Survivors have no combat training, arcane abilities or occult knowledge. Wrong people in the wrong place at the wrong time, they must rely on their savviness and sheer luck to overcome the eldritch horrors surrounding them, and do what they do best—survive.
  • Action Survivor: Unlike their colleagues from the other classes, most Survivors have no specialised training or arcane knowledge, and must rely on their savviness and sheer luck.
  • Ammo-Using Melee Weapon "Chainsaw", despite being Melee card, has limited number of supplies (3 by default), without which it can't attack. On the bright side, failed attack with it allows to either deal damage anyway (albeit much lower), or regain some lost supplies.
  • Anti-Debuff: "Alter Fate" event allows to discard any treachery currently in play for 3 resources, excluding weaknesses and cards attached to Elite enemies. Upgraded version reduces the cost to 1, and makes it fast.
  • Attack Reflector: Aquinnah can reflect the enemy attack's damage back at attacker (or any other enemy at your location, if you upgraded her), at the cost of suffering some horror herself. She can't protect the investigator from horror, however.
  • Backstab: "Waylay" allows to immediately defeat any non-Elite enemy, but requires that enemy being exhausted first.
  • Batter Up!: Survivors can arm themselves with a "Baseball Bat" asset, which provides them with reliable source of damage, but also risks breaking up on every swing.
  • Book Dumb: There are very few Survivors that have more than 2 base Intellect, but they are still very capable of gathering clues as much as other investigators of other classes with higher intelligence through... Unusual investigation methods. The general trickery and improvisation they show performing in many of their event cards fully showcase how shrewd they can be.
  • Boring, but Practical: "Persistence" skill provides you small stat boost for one test. It has only one gimmick: you can commit it to the tests even from your discard pile (from where, it then gets shuffled back into deck), which makes it easily reusable.
  • Breakable Weapons: Recurring trait of Survivor assets. They either risk breaking at random, or can be put beyond their usual surviving capabilities and damaged beyond repair, removing them from the game (or from your deck, via so-called "exile" mechanic, requiring to re-purchase them), in order to achieve certain goals.
    • "Baseball Bat" breaks if you reveal a Skull or Autofailure token, forcing you to discard it. Upgraded version instead lets you choose between returning it into your hand, or discard it anyway to deal extra damage.
    • Upgrading "Cherished Keepsake" and "Leather Coat" doubles their durability (Sanity and Health, respectively) after upgrading, but gets an extra quirk: reaching limit of that durability "exiles" those cards, making you lose them.
    • "Fire Extinguisher" asset can be used offensevely as relatively weak weapon, but you can also use it to shoot some foam, helping greatly with evading enemies... at the cost of rendering extinguisher unusable (making you discard or even "exile" it). Upgraded version can outright discard enemies engaged with you by exiling it.
    • "Gravedigger's Shovel" can be used offensively as relatively weak weapon, but you can just use it for intended purpose and dig with it, finding more clues... but breaking the shovel, discarding it. Upgraded version lets you to find even more clues potentiallly, at the cost of outright removing the card from the game.
    • "Lantern" is normally used for investigating (reducing location's shroud), but can be used offensively, causing instant damage to the enemy at the cost of breaking the lamp (you have to discard it); upgraded version lets you cause even more damage, at the cost of outright removing it from the game.
  • Cap: Only two Dilemma cards are allowed to trigger per round.
  • Cast from Hit Points:
    • "Meat Cleaver" Weapon lets you take 1 horror to deal extra damage while using it (and boosts accuracy if your sanity drains 3 or less). It also lets you heal some sanity back if you actually kill someone with it.
    • "Mysterious Raven" is a generic Ally with a single point of Sanity, but it can be discarded (causing you 1 horror) to immediatley discover a clue at your location.
  • Cast from Money:
    • "Fire Axe" and "Mariner's compass" lets you directly spending resources to make you more likely to succeed while fighting/investigating (respectively), while also giving extra bonus if you do run out of resources.
    • "Plucky" lets you spend resources to boost either your Intellect or Willpower... but as soon as any horror lands on it, it breaks. The upgraded version triples its Sanity value, but also gets 1 point of Health you have to worry about; on the bright side, it also gives some static boosts besides its paid effect.
    • "Dig Deep" lets you spend resources to boost either your Willpower or your Agility. Level 4 version gets its own supply which it recharges every turn.
    • "Scrapper" lets you spend resources to boost either your Combat or your Agility. Compared to the other versions, it costs only 1 resource per boost, but also provides the weakest boost (only +1 to chosen stat, while others usually give +2 or +3).
  • Cats Are Magic: Miss Doyle gives you access to several other Dreamlands cats, each specialising in particular field (evading for Hope, fighting for Zeal and investigating for Augur), with built-in mechanic to quickly rotate them as the situation changes. However, the magic ends as soon as you fail to protect Miss Doyle herself, as if she leaves, so would her followers (until you play her again).
  • The Cavalry: "A Chance Encounter" event allows to put into play an Ally card from discard pile, including the ones that belongs to the other players. Tha base version just costs 1 resource but leads to the Ally getting discarded at the end of the round, but the upgraded version let's you pay the printed price of the Ally you are summoning to play them normally.
  • Chainsaw Good: "Chainsaw" asset takes both hands, but provides good boost to Combat and damage for one attack. Its gimmick is that it has limited "ammo", but whenever your attack with it fails, you can either deal (much lower) damage anyway, or regain one supply for the Chainsaw.
  • Coincidental Broadcast: "Newspaper" boosts your Intellect when you're investigating and have zero clues, implying that investigator found some much-needed hitch while observing local press for mentions of supernatural. Upgraded version also lets you find extra clues.
  • Convenient Decoy Cat: "Stray Cat" Ally can be discarded to automatically avoid non-Elite enemy; idea is, obviously, that said enemy gets distracted to pursuit a cat.
  • Comeback Mechanic: Many survivor cards are designed around reducing the chance of failure, mitigating the consequences of failing a skill test or giving you a benefit when you fail a test, the drawback being of course that these cards are useless if you are doing well, though that is rarely a worry in this kind of game. Many Survivors build around their deck to fail often and reap the benefits from it.
  • Cornered Rattlesnake: Many Survivor-class cards follow the theme of weird and unpredictable solutions to otherwise-hopeless situations:
    • "Cornered" asset boosts any skill of your choice by 2 for duration of one skill test by discarding a card from hand.
    • Where other classes have to just suck it up, Survivors have the best selection of damage control cards, minimising (if not outright shrugging off) failures, or even turning a failure to their benefit:
      • Granny Orne helps with damage control from the failed test, either boosting stat value to reduce the danger, or further reducing it to trigger some special effects of other Survivor cards. The upgraded version let's her stat boost potentially turn a failure into a success instead of just mitigating (or worsening) the consequences of failing.
      • "Grit Your Teeth" event boost all your skills by one for the remaineder of the round, but can only be played after you failed a test.
      • "Look what I found!" event lets you find clues even after failing investigation. The upgraded version has more forgiving "thresholds" to fail by to play it, on top of potentially letting you find clues outside of your location.
      • "Grimm's Fairy Tales" Tome asset lets you heal horror from any investigator who just failed a skill test, often fully or partially negating effect of the failure.
      • "Live and Learn" event allows to retry a just-failed skill test with a stat boost.
      • "Lucky!" event gives skill boost to the just-failed skill test, potentially negating that failure. It's level 2 upgrade also lets you draw a card to replace itself, while it's Level 3 version can be aid other investigators beside yourself (and making them draw a card too).
      • "Oops!" lets you, after failed attempt to attack someone, hit another enemy instead. The upgraded version let's you hit the enemy you just missed anyway and make Investigators take no Collateral Damage from failed attacks.
      • "Try and Try Again" event lets you to reclaim cards you've committed to a failed skill test, which would've been just wasted otherwise. It's level 1 version has a limited amount of "tries" you can benefit from, but the upgraded Level 3 version gets rid of it.
      • Jacob Morrison gives you +2 skill value when you fail a skill test, which either turns failure into success, or reduces penalty for failure. The downside is that you have to exhaust him, and can't ready him automatically during the upkeep phase (like most other cards): you have to draw a blessed token to refresh him.
    • Suvivors have several cards (marked by Improvised trait) symbolising them coming up with solution to some problem using whatever trash they can find (such cards are often only usable from the discard pile, to further nail it, or gets stronger if you do so).
      • "Impromptu Barrier" helps evading evading enemies that are faster than you, by blocking their way with whatever investigator can find, lowering their evade rating.
      • "Improvised Weapon" helps to deal with enemy tougher than you, lowering its combat rating. Card's image shows adventurer trying to protect himself with a torch.
      • "Improvised Shield" gives investigator some surprisingly durable, well, shield, made of whatever scrap investigator can find. The card's image shows a boy protecting himself with trashcan lid.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff: "Long Shot" skill makes successful attack or evasion cause 1 damage to the target enemy, on top of normal effect.
  • Delicious Distraction: The art for "Cunning Distraction" event shows how a group of monsters gets distracted by a chicken; in gameplay terms, it allows to automatically evade all non-Elite enemies in your location, likely due to them being distracted.
  • Determinator: Survivors have cards that allow them to shrug off large amounts of damage, turn failure into success, and keep going when everything else seems lost.
  • Discount Card:
    • "Déjà Vu" asset decreases the price of re-purchasing of up to 3 cards you previously "exiled" during the scenario you just finished.
    • "Pelt Shipment" asset gets stuck in your hand with no way to get rid of it outside of cards-discarding effects, and reduces maximum hand size by 3. But if you finish scenario with it still being in your hand, you would get 1 exp discount on purchasing one new card for the following scenario.
  • Do Not Go Gentle: "Not without a fight!" Skill is only usable while you're engaged with enemies, and provides boosts to all your stats other than Intellect, with extra bonus stacking with number of enemies; the idea is that desperate investigator mobilises their last strength to make it out alive... or at least go out fighting.
  • Double-Edged Buff:
    • "Short Supply" permanent makes you start the game with top-10 cards of your deck being discarded on your first turn; Survivors have the cards that helps to reclaim their discarded cards, often with extra benefits... but it's entirely possible to have them amongst stuff that was discarded, or it may discard something which those cards can't interact with.
    • Most "Dilemma" events creates a situation that offers both advantages and disadvantages; unfortunately, you don't get a choice at when to play them, as they trigger as soon as they gets revealed:
      • "At a Crossroads" makes you choose between giving investigator an extra action at the cost of losing 1 random card from hand, or making them lose 1 action on their next turn, but draw 3 cards.
      • "Fickle Fortune" lets to either heal everyone by 3 health and 3 sanity at the cost of increasing doom on current agenda, or lower current doom, but make everyone take 1 direct damage and 1 direct horror (and also remove the card itself from the game).
      • "Heed the Dream" creates three piles, each composed of the top card of each investigator's. You then pick one pile to retrieve the cards from (and immediately draw), while two others leaves the play permanently (weaknesses instead goes back to deck). This may let to draw some cards earlier, but it also makes each investigator lose up to two cards.
      • "Making Preparations" boosts two stats of your choice for duration of investigation phase, for everyone... while lowering two others.
  • Draw Extra Cards: Survivors are somewhere in between the other classes in terms of how many options they have to draw extra cards; notably, most such cards are events or skills, so such cards themselves gets discarded after use.
    • "At a Crossroads" Dilemma event, as one of two options (other one is to discard 1 card to take extra action), makes everyone (not just the user) to lose 1 action on next turn, but lets them draw 3 cards.
    • "Blood Will Have Blood" event can be used only when you're attacked, preventing you from assigning damage/horror to Allies (but not other assets), but letting you draw 1 card per each damage/horror you take.
    • "Drawing Thin" event can only be played when you initiate a skill test, and lets draw 1 card (or gain 2 resources), at the cost of upping test difficulty by 2.
    • "End of the Road" event, amongst other effects, lets you draw 1 card, but you can only play it once, and only at the final agenda.
    • "Flare" event can be used either to shoot at someone, or to call for help, quickly finding an Ally in your deck. You have only one shot, however, and must repurchase "Flare" afterwards.
    • "Heed the Dream" Dilemma event creates three piles, each with 1 card from each player's deck; you then have to pick a pile, with each player drawing their card from said pile, but losing other two cards till the end of scenario.
    • Katja Eastbank lets you put the card you just drew under her (you draw another card instead), so you can later draw that stashed card at right moment.
    • Upgraded "Lucky!" event lets to draw 1 card, but only when you fail a skill test. Level 2 version's effect is limited to card's user, while level 3 version lets any investigator at your location do that.
    • Madame Labranche lets you draw 1 card at any moment, but only if you have exactly zero.
    • "Nothing Left to Lose" event lets you draw enough cards to reach 5, but only works once per game.
    • "Predator or Prey" Dilemma event lets you draw 1 card if its prime effect can't be triggered (due to lack of enemies in play), so you don't waste your card draw on it.
    • "Rabbit Feet" asset lets you draw 1 card when you fail a skill test. Upgraded version instead lets you look several cards (with exact amount depending on how badly you failed) and pick one to draw.
    • "Shrine of the Moirai" event gets attached to a location, and can be later used by any player to return 2 cards from their discard pile and put into hand.
    • "Take Heart" skill does nothing to help on a test, but makes you draw 2 cards and gain 2 resources if you fail.
    • "Unrelenting" skill lets you seal any 3 chaos tokens of your choice on it before skill test begins (you can't seal Autofailure, though); if you only seal "+1", "0" and/or Elder Sign tokens, you can draw 2 cards.
    • "Wrong Place, Right Time" event lets you dump some damage/horror from your investigator to your assets; for anything that gets defeated this way, you can draw 1 card as compensation. It only works once per game.
  • Encounter Bait: "Nature of the Beast" Dilemma event makes a chosen investigator draw an encounter card (out of 3 picked from the top of the encounter deck, the other two gets discarded), but also makes them discover a clue at any revealed location of their choice.
  • Encounter Repellent:
    • "A Watchful Peace" event lets you skip drawing encounter cards altogether (not just for you, but for entire group), at the cost of removing 5 blessed tokens that are either currently in the bag, or sealed on any cards.
    • "Nine of Rods" Tarot asset lets you cancel and shuffle back an encounter card, albeit you must then draw another one.
  • Equipment Upgrade:
    • "Grizzled" skill makes you record two traits, and then gives stat boost when you do skill tests on, or against, the encounter cards with matching traits (with extra bonus for each matching trait). It can be upgraded to get up to two more traits it can affect, or to give it extra abilities.
    • "Makeshift Trap" event, by default, is a short-lasting trap that lowers fight and evade values of every enemy at its location. However, it can be upgraded to install extra abilities on it, like making it able to damage enemies, or making it only trigger when there's actually someone to target.
    • "Pocket Multi Tool" Tool asset, by default, merely gives you humble +1 to a skill test you perform. It can be upgraded to give stronger boosts during specific tasks, or get extra abilities, like making it easily reusable if you fail a skill test, or letting other players benefit from it.
  • Exactly What I Aimed At" "Oops!" event allows to, after missing an enemy, to damage other enemy at same location. The upgraded version straight up allows you to hit the enemy you've missed anyway, on top of preventing another investigator engaged with the targeted enemy to suffer damage from your missed attack.
  • Extra Turn:
    • "End of the Road" event gives the investigator several boons, including one extra action, but can only be used when the final Agenda is in play, and only once per game.
    • "Lifeline" event gives an investigator whose turn is about to end the number of extra actions equal to how many tests they failed this turn. It allows for some good comeback, but requires repurchasing after every use.
    • "At a Crossroads" gives a choice between making one investigator get an extra action at the cost of discarding random card from hand, or losing one action next turn to draw three extra cards.
  • Flare Gun: "Flare" event can be either fired at enemy, or to call for aid (helping to summon an Ally from any investigator's deck under your control wihtout paying for its cost). Either way, it's one-time card, which gets "exiled" after use and has to be repurchased.
  • Friendly Ghost: "Guiding Spirit" Ally boosts your Intellect and soaks some horror from you, but leaves you (and your deck) once if it gets defeated.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration: Survivors generally have a low Intellect stat; because they were dragged into this mostly by accident, they have near-zero prior experience with occult magic and Mythos research (for the same reason, they also have the least selection of assets taking up arcane slot, or magic-related cards in general). Besides that, they have no established pattern for their skills, which varies greatly from investigator to investigator.
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: "Brute Force" skill's art depicts a man going against much bigger thug with just their bare fists. Mechanics-wise, the skill massively boosts your Combat stat and damage for one basic fight action.
  • Guile Hero: One of the core aspect of the Survivor Investigator archetype is that they are in general woefully unprepared to investigate the nature of the Mythos and face the many trails ahead related to them, but they make up for it through their uncanny ability to adapt to any situation they find themselves in, improvising along the way and finding creative solutions to problems.
  • Healing Factor: What makes Peter Sylvestre a popular Ally choice is that he's not just a horror soak; he's a regenerating horror soak, allowing him to last for longer. That, and his stats boosts.
  • Heal Thyself:
    • Survivors can use the "Bandages" asset to quickly patch up wounds taken by themselves, the other investigators or their Allies. The drawback is that it can only be used on freshly-received damage.
    • "Wrong Place, Right Time" event lets to dump up to 5 damage and/or horror from your investigator to asset(s) at your location (even that of other players), while drawing extra cards for each asset that gets defeated by it. It only works once per game, however.
  • Heroic Second Wind: "Perseverance" event allows to cancel up to 4 of damage/horror which would otherwise defeat an investigator.
  • Heroic Spirit: Survivor class' whole schtick is to keep going against all odds, and overcoming seeminlyg-impossible odds through sheer resolve. It's best demonstrated through one of their events, "Trial by Fire", which temporarily boosts all their basic stats to 5; upgraded version allows to instead boost one stat to 7 (no investigator in the game normally has basic stats above 5).
  • Improvised Armor: "Improvised Shield" asset lets investigator to create a (surprisingly durable) shield from whatever scrap they can find, however it can only be played from the discard pile, cannot be commited as it lacks icons and when it would get destroyed by damage it reshuffles back into your deck instead of getting discarded; making it tricky to play without an in-built way to discard unwanted cards.
  • Improvised Weapon: Many combat-oriented Survivor-class cards represents them using something as improvised self-defence:
    • Almost all Survivor-class weapons are instruments created for different purposes than slashing monsters, like baseball bats, kerosene lamps, meat cleavers, fire axes and others. Because they are not intended to be used that way, there are often some downsides, like possibility of breaking them. Out of two firearms available, one is an old hunting rifle (prone to jam at worst moments), while the other is a small, self-defence pistol with lower punching power than the rifle and even worse ammo capacity.
    • "Improvised Weapon" event is useful as a one-time attack against a monster, especially if you have no better options. The card depicts scared archeologist trying to use a torch for self-defence.
    • "Act of Desperation" event forces you do discard an Item (that takes up at least one Hand slot) card from your hand or play area, but gives you boost for one attack, stacking with Item's cost. The implication is that you just use that object as an improvised melee weapon. The card's image portraits a woman using empty rifle in melee against the monsters that cornered her.
  • Interchangeable Antimatter Keys: "Old Keyring" contains several keys which, somehow, fit every lock (reducing shroud by 2), but you have limited number of keys which can't be easily resupplied unless you find another keyring, but at least you won't lose a key if you failed an investigation.
  • Item Amplifier:
    • "Jury-Rig" event can be attached to any of your Items, boosting your skills while doing any tests on those Items. Unfortunately, it has limited durability, and ceases to provide benefits after three uses.
    • Katja Eastbank lets you stockpile cards to draw them later.
    • "On Your Own" asset gives you discount for playing Survivor-class events; the downside is that it's incompatible with Allies. There are two version of this card: a playable asset that discards itself when you play an Ally and a permanent asset with doubled exp cost that forbids you from including Ally cards in your deckbuilding options (and immidiately banishes all Ally cards in your deck, which you will need to replace)
    • "Resourceful" skill lets you quickly reclaim previously-discarded cards, on condition that you have to pass a skill test first. It's notably banned from working on itself.
    • "Salvage" event lets you to use an Item from discard pile, something normally impossible. Alternatively, you can disassemble it (removing from the game) to get back its resource price.
    • "Scavenging" asset lets you retrieve Items from your discard pile and put back into hand, albeit you have to do some successful investigation first. Upgraded version lets to immediately play it, paying its cost.
    • "Schoffner's Catalogue" Tome asset doesn't do anything on its own, but gives you small supply of resources to spend to play Items (which other players may draw from as well).
    • "Scrounge for Supplies" event lets instantly draw a level-0 card from your discard pile and return to hand.
    • "Short Supply" permanent asset makes you start every scenario with top-10 cards of your deck already discarded; this synergises with the cards and abilities interacting with discard pile — one of the core aspects of Survivors' gameplay.
    • "Shrine of the Moirai" event gets attached to your location, where it can be then used by anyone to retrieve some cards from their discard pile, at the cost of drawing encounter cards.
    • "True Survivor" event lets you quickly regain bunch of Innate skills from your discard pile, which helps using such skills more frequently.
    • "Pushed to the Limit" event lets you use Items or Tools from discard pile, completely for free, and then shuffle back into deck.
    • "Survival Technique" asset gives you easy option to retrieve your cards that you have previously attached to location, which makes them much easier to use.
  • Item Caddy: Many Survivor-class cards are dedicated to (re)obtaining other cards from discard pile, or even playing them from there. Some investigators also have abilities interacting with discard pile in some way.
  • It Only Works Once:
    • "Beloved" skill, once per game, lets to count blessed token as automatic success.
    • "Gravedigger's Shovel" is normally used offensively, but can be used to dig up some clues, which breaks the shovel and prevents from reusing it for duration of scenario. "Lantern" does the same in revers: it's normally a search tool, that can be shattered to break someone's head.
    • "Nothing Left to Lose" event gives you extra resources and cards to you would have exactly 5 of both, but only once per scenario.
    • "End of the Road" event gives you 1 resource, 1 card and 1 extra action, but only once per scenario.
    • "Fickle Fortune" event has two effects: it can either heal everyone at the cost of advancing doom, or damage everyone to reduce doom (at the cost of losing the card itself).
    • "Right Place, Wrong Time" event lets to dump some of your damage/horror onto asset(s) at your location, even those of other players — but only once per scenario.
    • Several Survivor-class cards gets "exiled" from the deck on top of being removed from the game after use, meaning that you have to actually repurchase them later (and it never shows up on level-0 cards, so you never get them for free):
      • "A Test of Will" event lets to ignore revelation effect of a treachery card, but at the cost of dropping it from your deck. Basic version exiles right away, while upgraded gives you a chance to preserve it.
      • "Burn After Reading" event, well, burns itself and other card from your hand to discover some "free" clues". Burning high-level card provides extra reward.
      • "Devil's Luck" event lets to survive massive otherwise-fatal damage/horror, but the card itself gets removed from the deck.
      • "Fire Extinguisher" is normally used to just smash your enemies with it, but you can actually shoot the foam to get massive help with evading your enemies... and render the extinguisher unusable.
      • "Flare" event can be used to either shoot at enemy, or call for aid, but either way, you only have one shot.
      • "Fortune or Fate" cancels 1 doom that is about to be put on scenario card, but then gets removed from the game.
      • "Lifeline" event gives investigator extra actions, scaling effect with amount of failed skill tests they did this turn, but only once per game.
      • "Stroke of Luck" can turn any skill test into automatic success, unless you revealed an auto-failure token — but only once per game.
  • Jack of All Stats: The only class not to favour certain stats by default, and not to have an established role in the party by default. Instead, they prefer a more generalist playing style, having some abilities for anything, yet not exceeding actual specialists. Also, for a long time they lacked cards above level 3 (and those are still uncommon).
  • Jack of All Trades: Survivors don't have any fixed role, and have very diverse card pool. Specific investigators may be better or worse at certain tasks, however, as they have very diverse statlines.
  • Left Stuck After Attack:
    • "Pitchfork" asset gets stuck after successful attack, and has to be picked up.
    • "Hatchet" asset boosts your accuracy for one attack by adding Agility to your Combat, but then either gets discarded (if attack has killed an enemy) or stays stuck (if it does not). If it gets stuck, it can be retrieved by anyone once the enemy gets finished off.
  • Little Useless Gun: Played With regarding the ".18 Derringer"; it provides a decent +2 bonus to Combat and deal the standard +1 damage as most Level 0 weapons, but it has one of the worst ammo capacities in the game; the gimmick is that you can freely recharge it by 1 ammo on each failure. The upgraded version even becomes more accurate with each shot missed (on top of being cheaper to play and having slightly more ammo)!
  • Luck-Based Search Technique:
    • "Look what I found!" event allows you to find some clues... after failing the investigation.
    • "Sharp Vision" skill lets to find extra clues while doing a basic investigation action — not because investigator is an expert at anything, or use some special tools or techniques, but just because they have sharp eye that lets them notice something unusual.
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic: Tied with the Mystics in number of options they have to manipulate the chaos tokens in their favour:
    • "Unrelenting" skill lets you to seal any 3 tokens (other than autofailure) before doing a test, protecting your from drawing something nasty. Alternatively, you can seal some beneficial tokens to draw extra cards. All sealed tokens goes back once you complete the test.
    • "Will to Survive" event allows to flat-out disable drawing chaos tokens, protecting you from random "-8" and "auto-failure" draws. The base level 0 version however works for one skill test, so make it count (or you can get the upgraded version to avoid drawing tokens for the rest of the round).
    • "Stroke of Luck" skill allows to automatically pass a test after revealing a chaos token, unless you draw auto-failure token. However, after one use, this card gets "exiled", meaning that you have to repurchase it.
    • "Against All Odds" event allows to draw extra chaos tokens when performing skill tests with difficulty exceeding basic stat value (with effect scaling with difference), and pick the token which favours you more.
    • "Eucatastrophe" event allows to ignore any chaos token revealed during skill test if that token's modifier would reduce the skill value to 0; this does apply to the dreaded auto-failure token. Instead, you receive an Elder Sign.
    • "Third Time's a Charm" event allows to ignore up to 2 chaos tokens during a skill test, drawing another one instead; what makes it stand out amongst similar cards is that it can affect the other players.
    • "Butterfly Effect" event doesn't directly manipulate the chaos bag; instead, it allows to, after revealing a chaos token, to either commit more cards (to turn failure into success, or further improve your success to get stronger effects), or recall already committed cards from what's clearly a failed cause. Normally, you have to just deal with whatever outcome the skill test receives, be it good or bad.
    • The Innsmouth Conspiracy expansion introduced several cards which interacts with its "blessed" and "cursed" tokens (provides a boost or penalty to skill, respectively), trying to either make the best of blessed tokens, or minimise the harm from cursed ones, as well as a few cards which just adds more blessed tokens:
      • "Ancient Covenant" asset allows to, once a blessed token is revealed, skip revealing any other tokens; by itself, a blessed token gives "+2" bonus, which is higher than whatever you might've drawn otherwise.
      • "Spirit of Humanity" asset allows to either take some damage and horror to add more blessed tokens (which makes things easier for the players), or add some cursed tokens (which makes things harder for the players) to heal yourself.
      • "Harmony Restored" event allows to straight up remove cursed tokens from the bag, but only if there's exactly the same amount of blessed tokens presented.
      • "Beloved" skill allows to automatically succeed after drawing a blessed token; the downside is that it gets removed from the game after use.
      • "Signum Crucis" skill exists to help the investigator whose skill value is way too low to have a chance to pass skill test; the further you're behind, the more blessed tokens it adds before the test even starts, significantly increasing your chances.
      • "Keep Faith" event allows to quickly mix in some blessed tokens into a bag; those tokens boosts your skill value when drawn, instead of detracting from it.
      • "Predestined" skill allows to either add 2 (benevolent) blessed tokens, or remove 2 (harmful) cursed tokens from the bag; it works after you fail the test, so it's only affects subsequent skill tests.
      • "Token of Faith" asset allows, after a skill test, to add some blessed tokens into bag, equal to the number of cursed and auto-failure tokens drawn during the skill test, thus making the next attempt less likely to fail.
  • Lucky Rabbit's Foot: Lucky Rabbits Foot asset allows the user to draw 1 card after failing any skill check, providing some comeback after suffering from bad luck.
  • Magically Inept Fighter: Survivors have the least number of native magic-related events and assets, as most of them have nothing to do with occult at all.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: Inverted by their level 1 Tarot card, "Five of Pentacles", which instead of boosting any skill (like all other four level 1 Tarot card of each other class) improves an Investigator's Health and Sanity by 1 as long as it is in play.
  • Money Multiplier: Most Survivor-class economy cards requires failing some skill test in order to trigger them:
    • "Drawing Thin" makes a skill test you're about to perform harder, but in return lets you either get 2 resources or draw 1 card.
    • "Harmony Restored" event, on top of its main effect — removing cursed tokens from the bag — gives you free resources for every token removed.
    • Madame Labranche lets you get 1 resource or draw 1 card if you have exactly zero of either.
    • "Nothing Left to Lose", once per game, gives you extra resources and cards until you have exactly 5 of both before removing itself from the game.
    • "Take Heart" skill lets you get some resources and a card draw if you failed a skill test you've committed it to. It doesn't help to pass the test in any way (lacking icons); it's intended for comeback from tests you have no chance to pass anyway.
    • "Salvage" event lets you disassemble an Item in your discard pile that you no longer need (removing it from the current scenario), to get its full cost back as resources. Alternatively, it let's you play it.
    • "Hunting Jacket" lets you attach up to 3 cards from your hand (excluding weaknesses) to it, gaining resources for each. If it then runs out of durability and gets "defeated", you'd regain all attached cards.
  • No-Sell:
    • "A Test of Will" event allows to completely ignore a non-weakness treachery card: the level 0 version requires you to pass a Willpower test of 3 to work (fittingly enough); the level 1 upgrade doesn't require a test, but "exiles" itself upon use, requiring to be repurchased and preventing you from reusing it if you have ways to return cards from your discard pile into your hand. The level 2 version is a happy medium of the two previous ones: on top of being free to play instead of costing 1 resource, it immediately cancel the treachery like the level 1 version, but brings back the Willpower test of the level 0 version: pass it and the card gets only discarded, fail it and it gets "exiled".
    • "Devil's Luck" is a level 1 event that allows you to shrug off a large amount of damage and/or horror (up to a total of 10), albeit at the cost of "exiling" that card (so it has to be re-purhased).
    • "Infighting" event cancels all attacks by enemies aimed at you for entire phase.
    • "Fortune or Fate" event can cancel 1 Doom token when it's about to be put on agenda. Unfortunately, this card works only once per scenario, and also has to be repurchased afterwards as it "exiles" itself upon use too.
    • "Nightmare Bauble" accessory asset can cancel auto-failure tokens, at the cost of shuffling additional weakness into your deck. On the bright side, if you would lose that asset, you would lose the weaknesses, too.
    • "Idol of Xanatos" accessory asset allows investigators to shrug off up to 3 damage and/or horror, albeit it requires discarding that same amount of cards from hand for every use.
    • "Nine of Rods" Tarot allows to cancel just-drawn encounter card, and replace it with another.
  • One-Hit Kill:
    • "Waylay" lets an Investigator test their agility skill against an exhausted non-Elite enemy's evade value. If they succeed, that enemy is instantly defeated, with the name and art implying that said Investigator sneaked up on them and brutally beat them to death while they were distracted.
    • "Close Call" event allows to shuffle a non-Elite enemy just evaded at your location into encounter deck, getting rid of it until someone draws it again.
    • "Dumb Luck" event allows to temporarily get rid of an enemy you just failed to evade, by putting them in the encounter deck; level 0 version puts them on top, making it sure that whomever draws from there first, would run into them, while upgraded variant drops them at the very bottom.
    • "Exploit Weakness" event instantly discards a non-Elite enemy from play (and deals massive damage and stuns Elites enemies for one turn as well) during a fight or evade action, but requires you to reduce that enemy's fight or evade value to zero before you test.
    • The upgraded version of the "Fire Extinguisher" asset allows you to mass-evade all enemies engaged with you by discarding it or exiling it outright to discard all non-elite foes instead.
  • Pain & Gain:
    • "Fight or Flight" event gives the bonus to both Combat and Agility for the remainder of the round, which depends on the amount of damage and horror the investigator has while taking the test(s).
    • "Bangle of Jinxes" lets you get a boost to any skill test, but has only one charge, which you normally gain only after being attacked.
    • "Blood Will Have Blood" can only be used when enemy attacks you; it prevents you from appointing damage/horror you received to Ally assets, but lets you draw extra cards (the stronger the attack was, the higher would be bonus).
    • "Sparrow Mask" asset lets you spend offerings on it to get a boost for Willpower or Agility during skill test, but you can only get more offerings by taking damage or horror.
  • Power at a Price: "Burn After Reading" event lets you to instantly discover 2 clues, but at the cost of removing 2 cards from your deck (itself, and one other card on your choice from your hand), so you have to actually repurchase them. "Exiling" cards of level 2 and above, as additional reward, lowers current Doom.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • "Fend Off" event triggers when an enemy spawns in your location; it attacks you, but then it gets exhausted (due to you automatically evading it)... and never readies, as this card gets attached to it and disables it, making that enemy an easy target, or allowing to just leave it where it stands and proceed further. The downside is that you can't retrieve that card while it's still attached.
    • "Snare Trap" gets installed in location, preparing a trap from the approaching enemy: once a non-Elite enemy enters it, it immediately gets stunned for couple of rounds.
  • Powerful, but Inaccurate: Played With in regards of the "Old Hunting Rifle": on top of dealing 3 damage, it has an accuracy modifier of +3 to hit, so it is technically a fairly accurate weapon... But it also has the special property of instantly jamming not just when revealing an Auto-Fail Token, but a Skull Token too: which means when attempting to shoot with it, your chances of instantly missing, depending on the current composition of the chaos bag, triple, if not quadruple!
  • Regenerating Health:
    • Peter Sylvester slowly heals horror, allowing to use him as reliable horror sink.
    • Jessica Hyde enters play with 2 damage (leaving her at just 1 Health), but heals 1 damage once your turn ends. This allows to use her as reliable damage sink.
  • Reliably Unreliable Guns: "Old Hunting Rifle" asset can (depending on the chaos token revealed) potentially jam (automatically failing skill check), requiring spending additional action to fix it, which, in combat situation, makes you vulnerable to attacks of opportunity. It's the only Weapon in the game that can jam.
  • Right Under Their Noses: "Hiding Spot" event gets attached to your location, making any enemies there "Aloof" (so they wouldn't attack you on their own). By the end of enemy phase, if any ready enemy is still at this card's location, that card gets discarded.
  • Shovel Strike: "Gravedigger's Shovel" asset is an actual shovel which can be used either for digging (allows to find a clue, albeit at the cost of breaking the shovel)... or hitting someone on the head, giving Combat bonus.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • "Able Bodied" skill boosts your Combat and Agility by 1, but increases the bonus the less Item assets you control, up to a maximum of 3 Combat/Agility icons.
    • "Dauntless Spirit" skill, instead of having any consistent bonus, either gives you boost to Combat equal to your Willpower, or boost to Willpower equal to your Combat.
    • "Fight or Flight" event gives you bonus to Combat and Agility till the end of the round... which depends on the amount of horror on you. Losing more sanity makes it even stronger, while healing weakens it.
    • When you play the event "Fortuitous Discovery" the first time, it does literally nothing. Each subsequent copy (and you can have up to 3 of them) gives you growing boost to Intellect during investigation, and lets discover one extra clue, but also gets more expensive to play, on condition that you didn't retrieve the other copies from discard pile yet.
    • "Strength in Numbers", unlike other Synergy cards, does have a fixed bonus (one "Wild" icon), but it offers much greater boost if you control cards of multiple classes.
    • Yaotl gives you bonus to your stats for one skill test, based on matching icons on top card in your discard pile; as result, the usefulness of this ability may vary wildly. He also lets you to discard a top card of your deck as a free action, which was likely intended as a way to get a better card for his ability.
    • "Predator or Prey" event gives a choice between two effects, both of which may backfire in team games; it either makes each unengaged enemy move once towards the nearest investigator (who may be the team's Seeker who just barely escaped from ambush), or makes each investigator disengage from every enemy and move into connected location without enemies (which may stop your team's Guardian from chopping on said enemies). If no enemies are present when this card is drawn, it would replace itself by making you draw another card at least.
    • "Providential" skill, if the test it's used on succeeds, adds 1 blessed token into bag per each damage or horror on you — always picking the lesser value.
  • Situational Sword:
    • A lot of Survivor-class cards works only if you fail a skill test, giving you various boosts or handling whatever task you were trying to do. For obvious reasons, they do nothing to protect you from the nasty effects of the chaos tokens you draw, or specific cards' failure penalties.
    • "Last Chance" skill gives you 5 "Wild" icons, but with drawback: it loses 1 icon for each other card in your hand; and no, you can't bypass it, as it also prohibits committing the other cards to same test.
    • "Quick Learner" permanent asset makes all tests taken during (or before) first action more difficult, but also makes all tests taken on third action or beyond easier. Given how often situation changes on the board, it's rather hard to plan around.
    • "Shed a Light" event makes you skip drawing a chaos token when doing an investigation and test and let you succeed automatically on top of giving you a bunch of extra clues... but only if you managed to lower difficulty to 0 before the test begins.
    • Several cards requires you having zero of something before they can do anything:
      • "Newspaper" boosts your Intellect during investigation, but only if you don't have clues.
      • "Fire Axe" deals extra damage if you have no resources; it has built-in mechanism to "burn" excessive resources for extra accuracy.
      • "Mariner's Compass" finds extra clues if you use it while having zero resources, with built-in mechanism to get rid of "excessive" resources.
      • "Dark Horse" boosts all your skills by 1, on condition that you have zero resources. You're allowed to not take a resource during the upkeep phase, as otherwise it would be too unreliable to use.
    • "Rise to the Occasion" skill can only be used for skill tests where difficulty is higher than your basic stat value, with basic version of the card also requiring the difference being at least 2; this makes the card, albeit powerful, rather awkward to use in many situations. as it can only be committed to test you have very little chances to pass on your own.
    • "Moonstone" boost Willpower and Agility, but the catch is that you can't play it from your hand; you have to somehow discard it, and then you can use it (and no, you cannot commit it either, as it lacks icons).
  • The Sneaky Guy: Survivors are tied with Rogues in the sheer number of tools for escaping or avoiding their enemies. They also have noticeable high Agility across the board, with the "slowest" members of the class having 3 at worst.
    • "Expeditious Retreat" skill provides huge Agility boost when doing a basic evade action, and lets to automatically evade another enemy if you succeed with good enough result.
    • "Bait and Switch" event lets to not just evade an enemy, but also kick it out of your location. Upgraded version allows to instead evade an enemy in connection location, and swap position with it.
    • "Cunning Distraction" event costs tons of resources to play, but also automatically evades every enemy at your location, Elites included.
    • "Fire Extinguisher" asset has built-in emergency button to massively boost your chance to evade an enemy (while also evading everyone else in same location). The upgraded version makes you automatically evade every enemy engaged with you by discard it.
    • "Impromptu Barrier" event lowers enemy's evade rating, thus lowering the test's difficulty and allows you to evade another enemy at your location if played from the discard pile if you succeed by enough.
    • "Stray Cat" Ally can be discarded to automatically evade any non-Elite enemy.
    • "Stunning Blow" skill lets to stun an enemy after successful attack, automatically evading it as well.
    • "Survival Instinct" skill lets to automatically disengage from all enemies after evading one, and escape into other location. Upgraded version lets you evade all enemies engaged with you.
    • "Hiding Spot" event temporarily makes every enemy at your location Aloof, preventing them from engaging you automatically when they enter.
    • "Tracking Shoes" boosts your Agility gives a way to move past a pack of enemies without either engaging you — by just running past them.
    • "Elaborate Distraction" event costs you extra action (without attacks of opportunity), but lets you either sneakily deal 1 damage to each enemy at your location, or automatically evade them (you choose separately for each enemy).
    • Several cards encourages Survivors being evasive, by giving their evasions extra effects:
  • Sprint Shoes: "Track Shoes" asset not only provides passive boost to Agility, but also lets you, when you enter a location, even if it is full of enemies, run past it and move to another location.
  • Status Buff:
    • "Gumption" skill temporarily lowers skill test's difficulty by 2, making you much more likely to succeed on it (as well as helping any cards that checks for you surpassing difficulty by exact amount).
    • "Winging It" event reduces your location's shroud by 1 for duration of one investigation, making succeeding at it easier and makes you discover a second clue if you succeed when played from the discard pile.
    • "A Glimmer of Hope" event can't be coventionally played from your hand; instead, you commit it to skill tests like you would skill cards (gaining "wild" icons that are useful for any test), then "play" from discard pile to retrieve all copies of it.
    • "Survival Technique" asset gives you +2 to any stat for duration of one test while you're resolving a test on a location or treachery card attached to location.
    • "Matchbox" temporarily lowers your location's shroud by 1, making it easier to investigate. It doesn't take up any slots, but drains very quickly.
  • Talking the Monster to Death: Downplayed with "Stall for Time" event; it allows to temporarily talk an enemy into peacefulness (by exhausting them), but they remain engaged with you, and you still have to find more permanent solution.
  • Taking You with Me: "Devil" Ally (a black demonic-looking goat) slowly syphons damage from its owner, taking it on itself... until it finally runs out of own health, at which point it gets defeated, and deals 2 damage to everyone at its location, enemies and investigators alike.
  • Tap on the Head: "Stunning Blow" allows to automatically evade an enemy you just attacked, with name and card's art implying that you just stunned the enemy with a heavy blow. It does nothing to affect attack's lethality, somehow.
    Thud.
  • Visual Pun: "Deja Vu" has the same card art as "Stray Cat", only with different colours and background. In french, "deja vu" means "already seen"; this is even Lampshaded by the card's quote:
    "Haven't you seen this before?"
  • Unluckily Lucky: Many of their card effects represent good luck getting them out of the horrible mythos-tinged situations they stumble into, including some cards which only work when failing skill tests, essentially serving to provide comeback from an otherwise hopeless situation.
  • We Need a Distraction: Survivors have several cards which in one way or another distract an enemy, giving some breathing space to the player(s):
    • "Cunning Distraction" event allows to distract all enemies at your location, automatically evading them.
    • "Bait and Switch" event makes an enemy you just evaded move to a connected location.
    • "Lure" event sets a lure at a specific location which makes all roaming enemies move there instead of their intended targets, allowing to either get rid of dangerous enemies, move into previously-protected areas, or set up an ambush. Basic version can only dropped in your location, while upgraded version lets to set a lure in a connected location.
    • "Stray Cat" can be discarded to automatically evade an enemy.
  • Wild Goose Chase: "Bait and Switch" event allows to lure an enemy you just evaded into connecting location. Upgraded version allows to instead "evade" an enemy in a connected location and swap places with them.
  • Wrench Whack: "Not without a fight!" skill shows investigator whacking a snake man with a wrench.

    Neutral, multiclass and weakness cards 
  • Attack Reflector: "Self-Destructive" basic weakness causes you 1 damage whenever you cause some to an enemy; fortunately, it doesn't scale with how much damage you do. Like with most basic weaknesses, it can be discarded by spending actions.
  • Awesome, but Impractical: "Sledgehammer" (a Guardian/Survivor asset) is so huge that it requires using extra actions to strike with it reliably, but if it actually lands a hit, it causes massive damage... and likely leave your investigator unable to do anything else, as you start with only three actions by default.
  • Awesome, but Temporary: The Red-Gloved Man raises the base value of any two of your skills to 6, has a mighty 4/4 Health/Sanity statline, and only costs 2 resources to play and is "fast" so he doesn't even require an action to bring into play. However, he is discarded at the end of the next mythos phase, meaning you only get to keep him around for at most one game round.
  • Badass Longcoat: The "Trench Coat" Neutral asset. It not only can absorb some damage but also boosts Agility when evading an enemy.
  • "Begone" Bribe: One way of dealing with the "Mob Enforcer" basic weakness is by paying him 4 resources to go away for a while.
  • Boring, but Practical:
    • The very popular Neutral skill cards from the core set - they do nothing other than providing decent stat boosts and letting you draw an extra card if you pass the skill test.
    • The "Flashlight" Neutral asset can be used to investigate with -2 to the the location's shroud value, but offers no extra effects or enhancements for the investigation itself.
    • "Emergency Cache" event is a popular pick for free resources influx: unlike many other resources-generating cards, it has no drawbacks, and, being Neutral, is available to every investigator.
  • Bulletproof Vest: "Bulletproof Vest" is a Neutral asset which can protect its wielder from up to 4 points of damage before breaking up.
  • Canine Companion: Sled Dogs are available as Neutral Allies; investigators may take up to four of them, and either put them into fight for scaling bonus to Combat and damage, or instead use them as actual sled dogs and rush across the map.
  • Cap Raiser:
    • "Versatile" Permanent, on top of its main effect (it lets you take any one level 0 card that isn't covered by your deckbuilding rules), boosts your decksize by 5.
    • "Drawing the Sign" basic weakness lowers you hand size by whopping 5, down to the miserable 3 cards.
  • Cast From Hitpoints:
    • "In the Thick of It" allows to get "free" 3 exp at the start of the game, but instantly gives you 2 traumas of your choice, which would make it easier for you to die later in the campaign.
    • "Dendromorphosis" basic weakness makes you unable to use your hands, until you damage it by any means. Fortunately, it comes with a kill-switch: you can take direct damage to damage it as well.
  • The Cavalry: "Calling in Favors" Neutral event allows to return your Ally back to your hand, and replace with fresh Ally from your deck at reduced price; while any class can find some use for this card, it's most welcomed by Guardians and Survivors who heavily rely on their Allies to soak damage/horror, as it allows to rotate their cards instead of letting them perish.
  • Crippling Overspecialisation: Defied by "Versatile" permanent, entire purpose of which is to let investigator take some off-class level 0 card they can't normally take, but which may be crucial for their plan. It also boosts the decksize, which makes it harder to find a card you need in the deck, but lets you take more stuff.
  • Damage-Increasing Debuff:
    • "Hypochondria" makes investigator take 1 direct horror each time they suffer any damage. "Psychosis" works similarly, dealing direct damage each time you suffer horror.
    • "Atychiphobia" makes you take 1 horror each time you fail any skill test, on top of normal penalty for failure.
  • Damage Over Time: "Chronophobia" and "Internal Injury" basic weaknesses makes you suffer 1 direct horror/damage, respectively, at the end of your every turn, until you spend two actions to discard them.
  • Deal with the Devil: "Dark Pact" basic weakness forces you to cause 2 damage at investigator at your location (even yourself, if you fail to find a "volunteer"). Fail to do so before the game ends, and in the next scenario, it would be replaced with "Price of the Failure", which causes massive damage/horror to you and directly places doom on the agenda, potentially making it advance, something which would screw entire team; then you would be forced into other pact...
  • Draw Extra Cards:
    • "Scroll of Secrets", Seeker/Guardian asset, lets to look on the bottom card of any player's deck, and either draw it, discard or place at the top/bottom of the deck. Seeker upgrade lets to look 3 cards, while Mystic upgrade lets to look the top card instead.
    • Neutral skill cards from the core game ("Overpower", "Perception", "Manual Dexterity", "Guts" and "Unexpected Courage") each lets you draw 1 card if you succeed on a skill test you use them for (on top of providing good stat boost); class-specific upgrades to them let you draw 2 cards, if you perform well enough.
    • Anna Kaslow not only gives you 2 extra Tarot slots, but lets you immediately find in the deck and put into play a Tarot card once she enters play.
    • "The Council's Coffer" asset, once fully unlocked, lets every player to search and play (for free) any card of their choice from either deck or discard pile (but not hand). It only works once per entire campaign.
    • Once per game, if you defeat Elite enemy with "Timeworn Brand's" special attack, you can draw 3 cards.
    • "Backpack" asset lets you stash up to 3 Item and Supply cards from your deck to use when you need them. Basic version searches only top 6 cards, while upgrades searches top 12 (nearly half of default-sized deck), making it more likely to actually find something.
    • Level 2 version of "Emergency Cache" event lets you draw 1 card, on top of giving you resources. Strangely, level 3 version loses that ability, replacing it with another.
    • "Lucid Dreaming" event helps you quickly find and draw a copy of a card that you already have in play or your hand.
    • "Moment of Respite" event lets you draw 1 card and heal 3 horror, but only if you have no enemies at your location.
    • "Tempt Fate" event, on top of its main effect (putting 3 blessed and cursed tokens into bag) also lets you draw 1 card.
    • Guardian upgrade for "Enchanted Blade" (Guardian/Mystic asset) lets you draw 1 card (and heal 1 horror) if you defeat someone with it while it's empowered.
    • Seeker upgrade to "Grisly Totem" (Seeker/Survivor asset) lets you draw 1 card if you pass a skill test while committing a card to it. Survivor upgrade instead lets you reclaim the card if you fail.
    • "Protecting the Anirniq", Seeker/Mystic event, triggers once someone's Ally gets defeated, letting Ally's owner to draw 3 cards (or just return that Ally into hand).
  • Elegant Weapon for a More Civilized Age: The Forgotten Age expansion added couple ancient Eztli weapons (both Neutral assets) which are on part, and sometimes better, than advanced weapons of modern age (fittingly, both have Relic trait):
    • "Ornate Bow" Weapon, despite its ancient age, actually outperforms many Firearms cards; it lets investigator rely on their Agility instead of Combat (with a decent boost to it), and can be recharged in the field (albeit it only has one shot — it's a bow, after all) by taking an action to nock an arrow.
    • "Timeworn Brand" is a pretty good one-handed Weapon on its own, but it has another gimmick: once per game, you can do a special attack, boosting it with your Willpower and dealing extra damage, which, if it kills an Elite enemy, also lets you draw 3 cards.
  • Emergency Weapon:
    • "Knife" and "Kukri" Neautral Weapons are relatively cheap (1 and 2 resources, respectively) for assets, and can be taken by any investigator... but you would only resort to using either if you run out of literally any better card, and would rather not waste ammo/events on weak targets. Both provide you meager +1 Combat with no extra damage by default, but have built-in damage booster... which further nails why you wouldn't use them unless you must: Knife has to be thrown, discarding it, and Kukri requires spending extra action (you have only 3 by default).
  • Encounter Bait:
    • "Purifying Corruption" becomes unusable if you accumulate too much "corruption" on it as result of using it, but you can draw encounter card instead to either heal yourself or clear corruption from it.
    • "Overzealous" basic weakness drops encounter card on you, and gives it "surge" keyword (meaning that it gets followed by another one right away). The card depicts a man kicking the door out, entering a house full of monsters with confident look and a shotgun in his hands.
  • Encounter Repellent:
    • "Purifying Corruption" asset lets you cancel a non-weakness treachery card, by causing you 1 damage and 1 horror and accumulaing "corruption"; once it accumulates 3 "corruptions", it gets removed from the game.
    • "Protective Gear" Guardian/Survivor asset allows to cancel any "Hazard" treacherie's revelation effect, albeit it takes some damage and horror in process, which breaks it after three uses at most.
  • Energy Bow: "Enchanted Bow", Survivor/Mystic asset, is a magic bow that shoots not arrows, but bolts of pure energy; as result, it lacks ammo, and instead exhausts to recharge its magic, but also takes arcane slot besides taking both hands. It does have limited charges however, but those are used to instead target enemies in connecting locations with a long-ranged attack (which ignores most keywords to boot). Similarly to the "Ornate Bow", it lets you use either Agility or Willpower during attack, but deals less damage than it.
  • Equipment Upgrade:
    • The Circle Undone expansion introduced first bunch of multiclass cards (all of them assets), with a gimmick: level 0 version belongs to two classes at once, offering rather generic effect, while upgrades becomes exclusive to specific class and improves over specific aspect of the basic card.
      • ".41 Thompson" is a rather generic Firerarms asset aviable to Guardians and Rogues, costing prohibitive 6 resources to play, but coming with 5 ammo to shoot. The Guardian's upgrade doesn't change anything about the gun, but reclaims every spent ammo as a resource (thus paying back for it); while Rogues makes it cheaper and gives it means to hit another target at the cost of extra ammo consumption.
      • "Scroll of Secrets" Tome asset available to Seeker and Mystic lets to look at bottom card of investigator's or encounter deck, and then either discard, put at top/bottom of the deck, or make the owner draw it. Seekers can make it capable of checking 3 cards at once with their upgrade, while Mystics gives it 1 extra "secret" (making it usable one extra time) and lets it also check top of the deck.
      • "Tennessee Sour Mash" Item asset can be drunk by Rogues and Survivors for improving their chances during a Willpower test on a treachery card, or the bottle itself can be used as a weapon, giving user huge boost to accuracy (but not to damage). The Rogue's upgrade makes the card fast, the stat boost more potent, and makes the attack with it cause extra damage; while the Survivor's upgrade makes it cheaper, last longer (giving bottle 1 extra supply), and lets you attack to stun non-Elite enemies, resulting in automatic evasion.
      • "Enchanted Blade", a Weapon asset available to Guardians and Mystics, by default only gives meager +1 Combat, unless you spend some charges to get extra accuracy and damage. Both upgrades double basic bonus, with the Guardian's version only making you spend the charge to deal extra damage once the attack connects and also gaining the ability to draw extra cards and healing horror if they manage to kill someone with empowered attack, while the Mystic's version adds an extra charge, and lets to spend more than one charge at once (giving the weapon even more accuracy and damage burst potential).
      • "Grisly Totem" accesory asset for Seeker and Survivors adds extra skill icons on a card committed to a skill test; the Seeker's upgrade also makes the user draw an extra card if they pass the test, while the Survivor's version lets to reclaim the card if test still fails (on top of making the totem cheaper to play).
    • When Customisable cards were introduced in The Scarlet Keys expansion, along with 15 class-specific ones, was also introduced one Neutral card of that type, "Hyperphysical Shotcaster" asset. It has no abilities by default; you have to purchase upgrades to give it alternate forms it can switch between, gaining various abilities depending on its current form. Two upgrades that don't add extra forms, are dedicated to improving card itself, either giving it more uses, or boosting your stats while using any of its abilities. It's main draw is that it allows you to use any skill of your choice to activate its abilities, letting an Investigator use it to cover the weakpoint of their statline (for example: letting a Guardian evade with Combat, a Seeker fight with Intellect, a Rogue get rid of treacheries through Agility and so on)
  • Experience Booster: Inverted with series of "Unspeakable Oath" basic weaknesses introduced in Return to the Path to Carcosa; they make you earn 2 fewer exp if you get those into your hand and fail to get rid of them before scenario ends (or you get eliminated), by doing card-specific meaningless task: evade already exhausted unengaged enemy, overkill someone by dealing more damage than their current health or investigate location without clues.
  • Extra Turn:
    • "Ace of Rods" Neutral Tarrot asset allows to perform an extra action, with a bonus to all stats... but only once per scenario, as the card then leaves play.
    • "Bide Your Time" Neutral event takes two of your actions (one to play, and one extra) now, but gives you two extra actions on your next turn.
    • "Eon Chart" Seeker/Rogue accessory asset lets you do one (two for upgraded version) extra action, albeit it can only be move, evasion or investigation. It only has 3 charges to do it, however.
    • "Blur" Spell lets you, after successful evasion, do an extra action (or two, for upgraded version).
  • The Gambler: "Hit me!" Rogue/Survivor event, in a typical Rogue style, is gambling-themed; it allows to take a risk of revealing a second token and reverse its modifier (if it's negative) — but if drawn token is "Skull", it fails your test immediately.
  • Gathering Steam: "Old Shotgun" Guardian/Rogue Weapon asset enters play without any ammo (but costs no resources to play either), you have to reload it with events (unless you put it into use through events, then it's immediately loaded). After being reloaded, it gives high boost to Combat, and varying damage that scales with your performance.
  • Genius Bruiser: Michael Leigh belongs to both Guardian and Seeker classes, and is tailor-made for fighter/searcher combo, as he boosts both investigating (by giving extra Intellect) and fighting (by giving extra Combat, and giving extra damage if you previously did some research). On top of it, he's also one of the most durable Allies in the game, having 3 Health and 3 Sanity.
  • Harmful Healing: "Painkillers" Neutral asset heals some damage at the cost of suffering horror. Its twin sister, "Smoking Pipe", does the same in reverse, healing horror and causing damage.
  • Healing Hands: "Earthly Serenity", Mystic/Survivor Spell, makes you pass Willpower test to heal any investigator, with exact power scaling with your performance.
  • Heal Thyself:
    • "Moment of Respite" Neutral event allows to heal up to 3 horror on yourself, on condition that there's no enemies in your location.
    • "Precious Memento" (a Rogue/Survivor accessory asset) has impressive 3/3 Health/Sanity, and has the means to heal itself when you pass or fail tests; it comes in two variants, which only differs in what gets healed on success and what on failure (health or sanity).
  • Heroic Second Wind: "Talisman of Protection" Mystic/Survivor arcane asset lets you cancel up to 2 damage/horror that would otherwise defeat you, thus staying alive. However, Talisman only protects you once, and gets discarded afterwards.
  • Hypochondria: Appropriately-named "Hypochondria" basic weakness makes investigator take direct horror each time they suffer any damage, apparently because investigator imagines their wounds and injuries as way more crippling than they truly are. You can temporarily get rid of it, but it would return.
  • Improvised Weapon: Two dual-class assets (one of two classes is Survivor in both cases) follow the common theme of Survivor class, by using various tools offensively:
    • "Ice Pick" (a Seeker/Survivor asset) is normally used as a research tool, boosting skills while investigating... but can be used offensively, to just stab someone.
    • "Sledgehammer" (a Guardian/Survivor asset) is, well, a sledgehammer, and obviously not optimised for battle: it's too heavy to reliably fight with it. In gemeplay terms, it manifests as it giving you very unimpressive boost when you attack with it (with unupgraded version penalising your accuracy instead of improving it)... unless you spend extra actions, which massively improves it, but also makes you fully exhaust in one single blow.
  • Invincible Boogeymen: Played With regarding "Your Worst Nightmare" basic weakness; it is vulnerable — just not to you; the weakness' bearer can't attack, damage or defeat it, but their teammates can target it just like any other enemy. Thankfully, it is excluded from the pool of random weaknesses in solo games.
  • Item Amplifier:
    • Anna Kaslow gives you extra Tarots slots.
    • "Moon Pendant" asset, besides giving you an extra Tarot slot at expense of Accessory, also gives them skill icons (absent by default), letting you commit them to skill tests.
    • "Lucid Dreaming" event allows to pick a card in your hand, and instantly find a copy of it in your deck. While it can have many uses, the prime idea is to make using "Myriad" cards introduced in the same expansion easier to handle (as they tend to have effects tied to having more than one copy of them).
    • "Refine" Neutral event has sole purpose: upgrading "Customisable" cards mid-game, instead of between scenarios. Every investigator can use it only once per game.
    • "Charisma" and "Relic Hunter" Neutral permanents solves the main issue with Allies and accessory-slot assets: you only having 1 slot to use them; these cards provide more slots.
    • "Rod of Animalism" Neutral accessory asset lets you trade accessory slot for two more ally slots, albeit limited to the Creatures. On top of it, it lets to play such assets cheaper.
    • "Tool Belt" Neutral body asset lets you stockpile your Tools for further use, as well as easily swap them on demand, all without spending actions or extra resources.
    • "Eldritch Tongue" Ritual arcane asset lets to use parley-based events from discard pile, albeit it also removes them from the game after use.
    • "Occult Reliquary" permanent gives you extra slot to hold Blessed or Cursed cards; the slot can be either a hand, accessory or arcane, depending on what you need at the moment.
    • Several assets introduced in the Edge of the Earth expansion are made to boost specific types of cards by making them cheaper and more efficient; they are : "Bruiser" (Armor, Firearm, Melee), "Prophetic" (Fortune, Spell, Spirit), "Sleuth" (Charm, Tactic, Tome), "Antiquary" (Favor, Relic, Ritual) and "Crafty" (Insight, Tool, Trick). All such cards belong to three classes at once, instead of just two like other multiclass cards: Bruiser belongs to Guardians, Rogues and Survivors; Prophetic to Guardians, Mystics and Survivors; Sleuth to Guardians, Seekers and Mystics; Antiquary to Seekers, Rogues and Mystics and Crafty to Seekers, Rogues and Survivors.
    • "Quickdraw Holster" Guardian/Rogue body asset lets you store one-handed Firearms asset without taking slot (albeit the holster itself takes a body slot), and lets, once per turn, use it without spending actions to activate. This makes using all those pistols much easier to use.
    • Professor William Webb, an ally available to Seekers and Survivors, lets you, when investigating, instead of finding a clue, draw an Item card from your discard pile (effect common for Survivors, but way less common for Seekers); alternatively, you may just find a clue in a connected location intsead of yours. His upgraded version let's you get back an Item and discover a clue at the same time.
    • "Protecting the Anirniq" Seeker/Mystic event lets you return just-defeated Ally into owner's hand (so it can be reused), instead of letting it be discarded. Alternatively, it lets the owner of the just-discarded Ally draw 3 other cards to compensate for losing one.
  • It Only Works Once:
    • "Ace of Rods" Tarot does nothing on its own, but once per game can be discarded to perform two extra actions (with an extra stat boost).
    • "The Council's Coffer", Neutral-class asset, allows every investigator to play one card for free (from either their deck or discard pile), but after one successful use, not only it gets removed from the game and your deck, but no other player can use it either for duration of campaign.
  • It's All About Me: "Self-Centered" basic weakness enforces you into a role of egoist, by making you unable to assist your teammates with cards or any effects, unless it's to cause them damage or horror. You can temporarily discard it by spending actions, but it would go back.
  • The Jinx: "The 13th Vision" basic weakness makes you and any other investigator at your location count ties during skill tests as failures (they normally counts as success).
  • Luck Manipulation Mechanic:
    • "Snipe" Guardian/Rogue event allows to treat all negative symbol tokens, including auto-failure, as "0" instead of their actual modifier.
    • "Heavy Furs" Neutral asset allows to cancel a chaos token (other than auto-failure) and reveal another, at the cost of taking some damage (breaking after just two uses).
    • "Tempt Fate" Neutral event adds 3 blessed and 3 cursed tokens into bag, which, unpredictably, can shift the balance either in favour or against the players.
    • The Black Cat Neutral Ally lets you treat modifiers of Tablet and Elder Sign tokens as "-1", albeit he takes direct damage/horror (respectively) when doing so. And if you draw an Elder Sign, you may count it as whooping "+5", fully healing the Black Cat on top of it (it overwrites investigator's default effect, however).
    • "Tempt Fate" event adds 3 cursed and 3 blessed tokens into bag, then lets you draw 1 card.
    • Nkosi Mabati lets you pick a chaos token (any token other than Elder Sign) as your "sigil"; when you or other player at your location draws Cultist, Plate or Elder Thing token, you can ignore it and reveal your "sigil" instead.
    • "Hit me!" Rogue/Survivor event lets you, after revealing a chaos token, reveal another one, turning negative modifier into positive; the drawback is that if you draw a Skull token, you'd fail automatically.
    • "Favour of the Moon" and "Favor of the Sun" Neutral assets seals some cursed/blessed tokens (respectively) and lets you to use them instead of whatever you just revealed, on top of extra benefits. Both can only do so thrice before running out and being discarded.
    • "Broken Diadem" Neutral asset generates offerings whenever someone at your location reveals either blessed or cursed tokens during a test. Once it gains 3, it turns into "Twilight Diadem", that lets you treat either of those tokens as Elder Sign instead (which is not only beneficial, while cursed tokens are nearly always the opposite, but also triggers investigator's special ability), at the cost of spending one offering. It reverts back once offerings run out, restarting the process.
    • Some basic weaknesses alters favours against the players:
      • "Accursed Follower" hides in a remote corner and keeps dumping cursed tokens into chaos bag, increasing the risks of failing skill tests for everyone. Fortunately, you can find it and kill temporarily.
      • "Ectoplasmic Horror", Mystic-only weakness introduced in The Scarlet Keys expansion, has a nasty gimmick: once per test, when attacking or evading it, you have to draw an extra chaos token for each empty Arcane slot you have. This can make killing it nearly impossible for anyone but a Mystic, as non-Mystics generally don't carry tons of magic-oriented cards at their disposal.
      • "Dread Curse" weakness instantly adds 5 cursed tokens into bag, which may later show up randomly and hurt investigators' attempts to pass skill tests.
  • Magic Misfire: Several milticlass Spells introduced in the Edge of the Earth expansion ("Blur", "Brand of Cthugha", "Divination" and "Earthly Serenity") backfires if you succeed exactly by 0 (causing damage, loss of actions, loss of cards, or loss of resources, respectively).
  • Mana Burn:
    • "Offer You Cannot Refuse" and its advanced "variants" syphon the resources you currently have the moment you draw it. Of course, there is a far nastier effect if you are unable to pay...
    • "Reckless" saps 2 resources at the end of the round until you get rid of it.
  • Manipulating the Opponent's Deck: "Scroll of Secrets", Seeker/Guardian asset, lets to look a bottom card of encounter deck, and either discard it, or place at the top/bottom. Seeker upgrade lets to look 3 cards at once, while Mystic one lets to look to look top card instead.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: The Feast of Hemlock Vale introduced four new weaknesses that each lower either maximum Health (Maimed Hand and Back Injury) or maximum Sanity ("The Silver Moth" and "Vow of Drzytelech"), also occupying one of your precious slots (hand, body, accessory and arcane, respectively); you may take them, and later spend two precious actions to discard, or take damage/horror (depending on what stat they lower) to shuffle them back, only to draw them again later.
  • The Medic: "Medical Student" is an Ally for Guardians and Seekers that instantly heals an Investigator or other Ally by 1 health or sanity when it enters play; it's the only ability they have, however.
  • Money Multiplier:
    • Downplayed with Guardian upgrade to ".45 Thompson". Any ammo spent from this card converts into your resources, almost fully refunding this card's price by the time when it runs out, letting you swap it with something else.
    • "Unscrupulous Loan", a Rogue/Survivor asset, gives you 10 resources right away. The downside is that if you end scenario with less than 10 resources (basically, can't pay the loan back), the card gets "exiled", requiring repurchasing it to get another loan.
    • "Supply Cache" Neutral event gives you free resources, with no drawbacks. Upgraded versions gets extra functionality, like drawing cards or providing assets with supplies.
    • Inverted with "Indebted" basic weakness, which makes you start every scenario with 2 fewer resources.
  • Multiplayer-Only Item: Some weaknesses ("Narcolepsy", "Your Worst Nightmare"...) are nearly impossible to deal with on your own and require teamwork to overcome, as such the game forbids you from adding them to your deck if you are playing with only one Investigator.
  • No Item Use for You:
    • "Amnesia" basic weakness makes you lose all but 1 card from your hand. Had a stash of Skills and Events on the ready? Well, too bad.
    • "Paranoia" basic weakness strips you of all your resources, making most of your cards (aside from few that costs zero resources to play) unplayable.
    • "Obsessive" basic weakness keeps discarding cards from your hand at random until you temporarily get rid of it, wasting most of your actions in process.
    • "Through the Gates" removes top-most card of your deck (along of every copy of it, regardless of where it currently is), and removes it from the game (unless it's another weakness, then you would instantly draw it instead).
  • No-Sell:
    • "Talisman of Protection" Mystic/Survivor asset allows to cancel up to 2 damage and/or horror which would otherwise defeat the investigator who uses it.
    • "Purifying Corruption" Neutral card allows to ignore non-weakness treacheries, at the cost of accumulating corruption (with accumulating too much removing the card for the rest of scenario). You can draw extra encounter cards to either heal yourself, or purify this card of corruption to prolong its use.
    • "Dawn Star" Neutral event ignores modifiers of any cursed tokens revealed during skill test, often just neutralising them altogether (unless some other card gives them extra effect). As an added bonus, it deals 1 damage to an enemy at your location, potentially causing massive devastation if enough tokens were drawn.
  • Pain & Gain: "Key of Ys" absorbs 1 horror of what you just received, giving you stacking +1 to all stats for each horror it has. The downside is that it breaks at 4 horror... and forces you to discard top 10 cards of your deck.
  • Power at a Price: "In the Thick of It" permanent gives investigator some starting experience influx at the beginning of campaign (and only then, you can't purchase it once you form your deck), but makes them pay for it with two traumas of their choice.
  • Powerful, but Inaccurate: "Sledgehammer" Guardian/Survivor asset, by default, deals increased damage, but penalises your Combat (so you're more likely to miss), unless you spend extra actions for a stronger attack. Upgraded version gets rid of this weakness.
  • Power Nullifier: Weaknesses often cripple investigators' effectiveness in one way or another:
    • "Stubborn Detective" basic weakness, while close to an investigator, blanks all text on their card (excluding traits), essentially turning off their abilities until he's dealt with.
    • "Reckless" basic weakness is a Skill card that quickly drains your resources unless you commit it at skill test... with the caveat that you can't commit any other cards to same test, and it returning to your hand if unless you manage to pass anyway.
    • "Haunted" basic weakness gives flat -1 to all stats, nerfing stronger sides and outright disabling weaker on. Fortunately, you can temporarily get rid of it by spending actions.
    • Downplayed with "Indebted"; you start scenario with 2 fewer resources, which slows down your start in the game which is all about struggling against time.
    • "Narcolepsy" bans you from taking actions, playing cards or triggering abilities, essentially paralysing your investigator. Only another player can bail you out of it, unless you're willing to wait until something deals your damage or horror. Unsurprisingly, it's restricted to only using when playing in a team.
    • "Haunted" basic weakness drops all your stats by 1, which significantly weakens investigator, and may even shut down their ability to perform certain tasks outright. You can remove it by spending two actions, but it wastes most of your turn.
    • "Day of Reckoning" basic weakness seals an Elder Sign token until the current agenda ends (or potentially for the rest of the scenario if you are already at the last agenda). This disables all effects and special abilities tied to revealing an Elder Sign.
    • Downplayed with "Drawing the Sign" basic weakness; it reduces your maximum hand size by 5 (default maximum is 8), thus leaving you with 3 slots left. Like with many similar cards, you can still get rid of it by spending two actions.
    • The Circle Undone and Return to the Circle Undone have introduced two Tarot-themed basic weaknesses that imposes harsh restriction on the player:
      • "The Tower XVI" makes you unable to commit cards to skill tests until you put it into play (where it just occupies your Tarot slot until replaced with something).
      • "The Devil XV" prohibits you from playing any other assets while it stays in your hand.
    • Edge of the Earth expansion introduced several basic weaknesses which exists to disable certain types of action if you trigger at least one of them, till the end of the round. However, they can be "healed", as if they're a single point of damage (physical ones) or horror (mental ones), which discards them.
    • The Scarlet Keys expansion introduced several basic weaknesses tailor-made to screw over the investigators of particular classes; most of those are built around negating class' strengths:
      • Guardians have "Lurker in the Dark", a "Hunter" Shoggoth that has weak stats, but takes reduced damage from any source, and can only be attacked through Weapon or Tactic cards. Not only it's a pain in the ass to kill, it can attack other players as well, as it's not limited to only hunting its owner, with some of them being straight up unable to kill it if they lack specific cards in their decks.
      • Seekers have "Quantum Paradox" event, which forces them to discard 4 other cards from hand in order to play it, and drains their sanity if they don't. It reduces effectiveness of the Seekers' favourite tactic of stockpiling cards in hand for further use.
      • Rogues have "Pay Your Dues" event, which costs 10 resources to play (with ability to reduce the price by spending actions), with you suffering damage if you don't. It negates Rogues' strongest sides: economy, and access to extra actions.
      • Survivors have "Underprepared", which makes every cards they commit to skill tests have 1 fewer matching skill icons than they should, making many cards outright unusable. You can only get rid of it if it's the only card you have left, and you have exactly 1 resource, so it's likely that it would stay with you for a while.
  • Protective Charm: "Elder Sign" is a Neutral asset which can protect its wielder from up to 4 points of horror before breaking up.
  • Punched Across the Room: "Cyclopean Hammer", a Guardian/Mystic asset, is a hammer so massive, it can actually kick the attacked enemy out of your location.
  • Random Effect Spell: "Manipulate Destiny" Neutral Spell event randomly triggers one of the two effects, depending on what token you draw when playing it, and either damages an enemy, or heals yourself, your teammate or an Ally card.
  • Reduced Mana Cost: "The Fool • 0" Neutral Tarot assets lets you play a card of your choice with reduced price once per round.
  • Self-Harm: "Psychosis" basic weakness makes you suffer direct damage each time you suffer horror. Fortunately, you or other investigator can help to temporarily get rid of it.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • "Call for Backup" Neutral event gives you different effect for each class represented amongst cards you control, meaning that two investigator can get entirely different effect out of it.
    • "Thermos" Neutral asset heals investigator from damage or horror; it's rather weak for its 4 resources cost, except it doubles its power when your investigator has accumulated 2 or more traumas of corresponding type, which makes it more practical for investigators likely to take lots of traumas (like Calvin), or in the campaigns which gives traumas like candies (like The Forgotten Age, which is where Thermos was introduced).
  • Situational Sword:
    • "Hemispheric Map" Neutral accessory asset gives you +1 to Willpower and Intellect if your current location is connected to at least 2 other locations, and double that amount if it's connected to at least 4. It's only connected to one location? Too bad, you would get nothing.
    • "Fine Clothes" Neutral asset reduces the difficulty of any parley tests by 2, helping immensely in some otherwise-hard situations. The problem is, not every scenario involves parleys at all, nor they always involve them consistently; and when you don't have to use this card for its intended purpose, it's one-hit-and-it-breaks "armour" which isn't even very helpful if committed to a skill test.
    • "Well-Dressed" skill gives massive stat boost... but only when used for parley tests; otherwise, it gives meager 1 "wild" icon.
    • The Path to Carcosa expansion introduced a series of Neutral skills (grouped by "Desperate" trait), that provide huge stat boost... but can't be used unless your sanity drops below 4. One card per each stat exists: "Desperate Search" for Intellect, "Reckless Assault" for Combat, "Run for your Life" for Agility, and "Say Your Prayers" for Willpower.
    • "Nihilism" basic weakness deals you 1 damage and 1 horror, but only when you reveal, ignore or cancel an auto-failure token. It may be either triggered once in a full moon, or quickly drive you to the grave, depending on what you do and what scenario and your own luck throws at you; notably, it isn't restricted to tokens drawn during skill tests only.
  • The Sneaky Guy:
    • Gené Beauregard belongs to both Seeker and Rogue classes, and is tailor-made for sneaky researcher combo, as she boosts both investigating (by giving extra Intellect) and evading (by giving extra Agility) and can move a clue or non-Elite enemy into or out of her location after moving, which allows for some creative combinations for either class.
    • "Pocket Telescope" asset belongs to both Seeker and Rogue classes, and takes best from both classes, creating a tool to make a sneak peak on unrevealed location, or investigate some remote area without going there yourself (reducing the risks).
  • Stalker without a Crush: Some of the basic weaknesses are enemies; most of them are Hunters, meaning that they would actively pursue investigators, usually preferring weakness' bearer over anyone else:
    • "Mob Enforcer" is noticeably tougher than similar enemies, but has built-in option to just bribe him into peacefulness... until you run into him again.
    • "Stubborn Detective" pursues investigator, and, once catches up, disables their and their teammates abilities until dealt with, one way or another.
    • "Silver Twilight Acolyte" is amongst nasties pursuers, as each attack he does permanently takes aways your precious time, by adding Doom to current agenda.
    • "The Thing That Follows" isn't very strong; issue isn't with defeating it, but with it refuses to stay dead, being shuffled into your deck instead of discarded after you or someone else has dealt with it.
    • "Your Worst Nightmare" is relatively generic always-pursuing enemy, if not for the fact that it's completely invincible for the person bearing it (but not their teammates). It's banned from being randomly picked in single-player.
  • Status Buff:
    • "Flashlight" asset temporarily lowers your location's shroud by 2, making it easier to investigate. However, its battery runs out after three uses.
    • "Soul Sanctification" Neutral permanent asset accumulates "offerings" each time you heal someone, which you can then spend to get stat boosts during skill tests.
    • "Tennessee Sour Mash" Rogue/Survivor asset boosts Willpower during tests imposed by treacheries. Rogue upgrade improves the bonus, while Survivor upgrade gives it one more supply to spend.
    • Edge of the Earth expansion introduced several multiclass Spells, each shared by Mystics and one other class, that share a gimmick of optionally replacing a relevant skill for duration of effect (boosting whatever stat you choose to test), as well as making you spend charges after you succeed:
      • "Brand of Cthugha" (Mystic/Guardian) lets to fight using Willpower, and, rather than cause normal damage, lets you spend desired number of charges to determine it.
      • "Divination" (Mystic/Seeker) lets to investigating using Willpower, and, rather than normal number of clues, lets you spend desired number of charges to find as many.
      • "Blur" (Mystic/Rogue) lets to evade using Willpower, and then do an extra action (or two) if you spend charges.
  • Swap Teleportation: "Ethereal Slip" is a Mystic/Rogue event that lets you swap location with a non-Elite enemy. Basic version has limited range, while upgraded lets you pick your target at any revealed location.
  • They Have the Scent!: "On the Trail" event's image shows a hunt going on, with a hunter sending his dogs forward. The card itself is hunt-themed, too, letting to track down an enemy (quickly catching up with it), or find some clues while following the trace. Fittingly, it can be used by both Seekers and Guardians. The upgraded version mkaes you run trhough various location to catch up with an enemy, discovering automatically clues on the way.
    The game is afoot!
  • Video Game Stealing: "Kleptomania" basic weakness makes you spend action to steal an Item or 2 resources from another player to temporarily get rid of it (unless you want to suffer 1 horror every turn).
  • Weakened by the Light: Upgraded "Flashlight", on top of its prime function (lowering location's shroud), gets another one: blinding the enemy, making it easier to evade them as it lowers test's difficulty.
  • You Are Already Dead: "Doomed" basic weakness from The Forgotten Age expansion is a delayed death sentence: you would die, sooner or later, with little you can do to avoid it. Draw that card twice (suffering some horror in process), and it gets upgraded to stronger version, "Accursed Fate". Draw it two times, and it gets upgraded to "To Bell Tolls", which kills you outright as soon as you draw it. Return to the Forgotten Age added its counterpart, "Offer You Cannot Refuse", which drains insane amount of resources each time you draw it, and upgrades into stronger variants each time you can't, until final version just drives you insane if you ever fail to have 10 resources to spare.

Campaign-specific Tropes (Warning: unmarked spoilers)

     Night of the Zealot tropes 
  • Antagonist Title: The third scenario's title, "The Devourer Below", refers to Umôrdhoth, an evil deity the local cultists and ghouls worship.
  • Badass and Child Duo: The official tutorial for a 2 players game recommends to pick Roland and Wendy.
  • Batter Up!: One of the achievements in the Return to the Night of the Zealot campaign is called "Pinch Hitter"; to achieve it, a player must defeat three Ghoul enemies with a Baseball Bat without it breaking.
  • Draconic Abomination: Umôrdhoth would randomly receive support from either Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Cthulhu or Shub-Niggurath. If Hastur is chosen, he would send byakhees, who vaguely resemble some weird dragon/insect hybrid.
  • Early Instalment Weirdness: As expected, being the very first campaign of the LCG line-up, Night of the Zealot differs greatly from later expansions:
    • The campaign is made of only 3 scenarios, while later campaigns have 8 or more scenarios each. Justified In-Universe by the story of the campaign lasting only one night, and out-of-universe by it being a tutorial campaign for the players.
    • In the very first scenario of the campaign, The Gathering, none of the locations have traits. In every future scenario, including the other two in the same campaign, all locations DO have traits.
    • There are no story weaknesses. Most future campaigns add campaign-specific weaknesses to players' decks as part of the story or as a result of failing a scenario.
    • The first campaign is relatively conservative with the the "Elite" trait: the Ghoul Priest, Masked Hunter and Umôrdhoth are the only enemies in the core game that are "Elites". Notably, important story character in the form of named cultists you need to capture and interrogate in the second scenario, all lack the "Elite" trait, which also means they have no Contractual Boss Immunity and you can easily deal with them with effects that instantly defeat enemies or with another Outside-the-Box Tactic. Later expansions had no issue throwing multiples "Elite" enemies in the scenario if it could prevent Investigators from Sequence Breaking their way to victory.
    • Both the final scenario of the core campaign and The Dunwich Legacy technically give you infinite time to win (although things will get much harder if the agenda deck advances too further or if there is no agenda left to advance to at all). In every future campaign, dooming out means you lose the campaign.
    • The game gives you the chance of resigning during the final scenario from the very start, which is a massive Schmuck Bait as it will cause you to lose the campaign on the spot. Almost every final scenario of every other campaign either doesn't allow you to resign at all, or only lets you do so as part of an Escape Sequence, where resigning is necessary to win.
    • When the campaign ends, the guide announces "The Investigators win/lose!". Every other campaign adds "...the campaign!" at the end of the sentence. Justified given the short lenght of Night of the Zealot.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Umôrdhoth would randomly receive support from either Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Cthulhu or Shub-Niggurath. If Shub-Niggurath is chosen, she would send Dark Young — enormous mass of formless flesh with strong Healing Factor.
  • Extremely Short Timespan: As the title hints, Night of the Zealot takes place during a single night
  • Fish People: Umôrdhoth would randomly receive support from either Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Cthulhu or Shub-Niggurath. If Cthulhu is chosen, he would send Deep Ones, which resemble some ugly human/fish hybrid.
  • The Goomba: None of the enemies showing up in the first scenario have any special abilities (at most having keywords like "Hunter"), though scenario-specific ghouls at least have reasonably large stats. Even the main boss of this scenario, the Ghoul Priest, only differs by being just stronger stats-wise and having "Elite" trait to protect him from some cards effects. In a way, in applies to locations, too, as none of locations has nasty effects which would be common in later expansions, and some even lacks effects whatsoever.
  • Humanoid Abomination: Umôrdhoth would randomly receive support from either Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Cthulhu or Shub-Niggurath. If Shub-Niggurath is chosen, she would send Goat Spawns, which resemble some ugly human/goat hybrid.
  • Implacable Man: Once the Masked Horror spawns, it keeps pursuing whatever investigator currently having the most number of clues; he's very tough and hard to kill, and while he's engaged with you, you can't neither discover nor spend clues, which may stall your progress while he's alive.
  • Let the Past Burn: If you "win" the first scenario, Lita would insist on you burning down the house with ghouls inside. Agreeing lets you keep her as a story Ally, but experience is so traumatic, the lead investigator (whose house it was) suffers 1 mental trauma. The house wouldn't return as location in the following scenario if that happens.
  • Mini-Boss: Both Ghoul Priest and Masked Hunter have their health scaling with number of players (capping at 20 and 12, respectively), and have above-average stats. Ghoul Priest serves as the final objective of the first scenario (and may randomly return later unless killed at any point), while Masked Hunter is your main obstacle during second scenario, pursuing you and not only attacking, but also stalling your progress.
  • Multiple Endings: Campaign has three endings (outside of investigators losing), depending on whether Umôrdhoth was successfully summoned or not, and if yes, whether it was defeated by investigators, or sated by feeding Lita to it.
  • Noob Cave: Shortest and easiest of campaigns, mainly used to introduce new players to the game (particularly the first scenario, The Gathering); campaign guide also provides some tips for them. This does not apply to Return to the Night of the Zealot, however, which increases difficulty of the game.
  • Our Ghouls Are Creepier: This campaign features the ghouls twice, with first scenario focusing exclusively on them (the only non-ghoul enemies are rat swarms). These particular ghouls aren't just some mere corpse-eaters; they serve and worship Umôrdhoth, the deity that promises to turn entire Arkham into one big feast if summoned.
  • One-Hit Kill: "Umôrdhoth Hunger" treachery (from Return to the Night of the Zealot) forces all investigators to discard a random card from hand... and kills whomever can't do that.
  • Permanently Missable Content: Lita Chanter can only be recruited right after the first scenario; if investigators fails to make it out alive, she would join the next team which would follow their steps, otherwise, she would only agree to tag along if investigators agree to burn the house down. Not taking her with the team, in turn, cuts off one of the endings (albeit the worst one, outside of outright failure).
  • Press X to Die: You can resign right at the start of "The Devourer Below", but if every Investigator does that, you lose the campaign on the spot.
  • Pushed at the Monster: In the final scenario, "The Devourer Below", Lita Chantler can be thrown at Umôrdhoth in order to appease its hunger, should it rise. This awards players with instant victory, but with great penalties.
  • Rat Stomp: Rats are used to introduce new players to the "Hunter" mechanic (the enemies which keep pursuing players each turn) which would be widely used in other campaigns, without actually putting them at any risk. The rats' stats (abysmal combat rating and health, good evade rating) force the players to learn that sometimes, it's better to stand up and fight rather than keep running.
  • Skippable Boss:
    • It's possible to finish first scenario without killing the Ghoul Priest. However, he would keep showing up in subsequent scenarios, and you miss on precious experience.
    • None of cultists in the second scenario are mandatory to neutralise (and you may simply run out of time if the process goes too slowly); however, any cultist still active would return in the final scenario.
  • Stalker without a Crush: The first agenda card in "Midnight Masks" mentions that even as you hunt the cult through Arkham, you feel hunted in return. Proven true once that card flips, and reveals the Masked Hunter, who immediately pounces on whoever has the most progress in revealing more members.
  • Trapped-with-Monster Plot: In "The Gathering" scenario, you are trapped with ghouls inside your house, and must find a way to escape before they defeat you with shear numbers.
  • Starfish Aliens: Umôrdhoth would randomly receive support from either Yog-Sothoth, Hastur, Cthulhu or Shub-Niggurath. If Yog-Sothoth is chosen, he would send Yithians, who are so outlandish, they resemble no any Earth-born creature.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: While you can sacrifice Lita to Umôrdhoth in order to quickly win the last scenario, whole party would be punished by acquiring new weaknesses (and you still get the same amount of traumas as if you fought Umôrdhoth); this is also the only ending in which investigators wouldn't be awarded with bonus experience (if not counting outright failure), with disrupting the ritual or defeating Umôrdhoth in battle awarding 5 or 10 points, respectively.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: The opening narration is from a person who describes themselves as an old soothsayer. After setting the scene they never appear again, including in the closing narration.
  • To Win Without Fighting: Every unique cultist of Umôrdhoth (with exception of Wolf-Man Drew, who's too insane to reason with, and Masked Hunter, who's dead-set to murder you) has some way to apprehend them without resorting to violence, so even non-fighters can neutralise them.
  • You Dirty Rat!: Investigators' house in "The Gathering" is heavily infested by rodents; they are even aggressive enough to attack investigators themselves. Though ultimately rats are not the main problem here...

     The Dunwich Legacy tropes 
  • Advancing Boss of Doom: In "Lost in Time and Space", Yog-Sothoth, once awakened, pursues investigators until they escape or die. Actually fighting and defeating him ends the game in your victory, but wipes out the entire party; instead, you're supposed to finish your task, and run.
  • Advancing Wall of Doom: In "The Essex County Express", the train is gradually consumed by a transdimensional portal; your task is to reach the train engine and restart the train before it consumes you as well.
  • Armor-Piercing Attack: The "Light of Aforgomon" treachery makes all damage and horror direct, meaning that it's not possible to soak it with assets.
  • Broke Your Arm Punching Out Cthulhu: Yes, you can beat Yog-Sothoth. No, you wouldn't be alive to celebrate it.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Enemies which award victory points are generally tougher than common enemies, but the Crazed Shoggoth stands out due to combining high health, damage/horror and the ability to outright kill any investigator it defeats.
  • Boss-Only Level: "The Miskatonic Museum" has only one enemy — the Hunting Horror, which keeps pursuing investigators and never stays "dead" for long. There are no enemies in the entire encounter deck, and many of the treacheries in it are related to supporting Hunting Horror in killing you.
  • Call-Back: During "Lost in Time and Space", as the agenda deck keeps progressing, some past events are mentioned:
    • If investigators didn't save the students in the university, they would see exactly how the monster attacked them, suffering horror.
    • If investigators let anyone be sacrificed to Yog-Sothoth, they would see the dead looking at them, silently judging them. Those who lack sufficient willpower take damage from it.
  • Cat-and-Mouse Boss: "Undimensioned and Unseen" scenario is divided in two acts. During the first, the objective of the Investigators is to gather enough clues and reach Whateley Ruins to find an incantation that can destroy the Broods of Yog-Sothoth, (supposedly) invincible monsters that hit extremely hard and cannot be defeated by conventional means (at least without abusing them not being Elite). If the investigators survive long enough to reach the destroyed barn and gathered enough clues, they will gain the Esoteric Formula, allowing them to attack, deal damage and defeat the Broods using their Willpower stat in place of Combat. Afterwards, the second act's mission is to eliminate all Broods, which may or may not attempt to run away from the investigators at the end of every Enemy Phase.
  • Choice-and-Consequence System: Some of your decisions have long-terms consequences:
    • If you make a questionable decision, the campaign will mark it by adding extra tokens to the bag, raising the risks of failing any given task. Such choices include keeping Tome of Eldritch Lore instead of destroying it, letting innocents die when you could prevent it, and cheating at cards in a speakeasy.
    • In the beginning of campaign, you have to choose between two locations to visit first; the one you didn't choose would be played second, but you would be too late to prevent the abduction of the person you're after, and would arrive right when the action is about to start. Doing the casino as second has an extra consequence: you'd get a chance to rescue fiance of mafia boss' daughter's, which is only way to make the gangsters leave you alone later, and would later result in said daughter backing you up (either by giving extra bonuses, or, in Rerturn to... version, joining you physically).
    • In "Extracurricular Activity", you have to pick between saving the person you're after from being abducted (with him potentially dying if you don't do that), and preventing the monster from massacring the students (permanently adding "tablet" chaos token into bag, on top of other risks later on). You aren't given the choice if you come there as second location, as Professor Rice would be already abducted, leaving saving the students as the only objective.
    • During "The House Always Wins", you may choose to "cheat" to get some instant benefit. In the scenario's resolution, if any player "cheated," an "elder thing" chaos token is added to the chaos bag for the rest of the campaign, which universally has extremely nasty effects on top of a harder skill modifier.
    • After completing "The Miskatonic Museum", you're given a choice between taking the Necronomicon for yourself ("earning" an extra "elder thing" token along with it and risking the book getting into hands of your enemies if you ever lose it, but also opening some extra opportunities), or just destroy it to deprive your enemy of such opportunity.
  • Choose a Handicap: Early in the campaign, the players have to choose which scenario — "Extracurricular Activity" or "The House Always Wins" — to do first; the scenario they choose to do second will be harder, due to the investigators arriving just in time for the monsters to go on rampage; and whatever character they're here for in the fist place would be already abducted.
  • Early Instalment Weirdness: This campaign was designed at the same time as the Night of the Zealot core set campaign (or possibly even before it!), so it's only natural that it would have a few quirks:
    • Most scenarios in this campaign only reward the players with 2-3 experience per scenario. In the Night of the Zealot campaign, it's not hard to get 6 or more experience per scenario. Likely the idea was that because The Dunwich Legacy campaign was longer (8 scenarios versus 3 scenarios), it should have lower experience rewards, so that the total experience payout over the course of the campaign would be the same. However, starting with The Path to Carcosa (the next campaign), the experience rewards were increased to about 4-6 or more per scenario. This change makes sense because more experience means players can play with more powerful high-level cards and can have a greater variety in deckbuilding options.
    • In "The House Always Wins" scenario, the "Back Alley" location has 1 clue per player and Victory 1, and also has a "Resign" ability which is the goal of the scenario. In order to get the victory points from a location, the location has to have no clues on it by the end of the game; but when an investigator resigns, they drop all their clues on the location they are at. This means it's impossible to get the victory points from this location, as even if you discover all the clues from it before resigning, you'll just have to drop them back onto the location. This location was likely made before the designers came up with the rule that an investigator drops all their clues on their location when they resign.
    • A few of the scenarios include randomized locations that have identical backs but different fronts and are set up without the players knowing which is which (for example, museum exhibits or train cars where the investigators don't know what's inside until they enter them). In early printings of the mythos packs for these scenarios, each of these location cards has a blank circle with no icon in it in its upper-left corner, and in later printings these cards have no circle at all. This is likely because the designers hadn't yet decided on how to show that a location has no connection icon in its upper-left corner. Later printings of these mythos packs reprint these locations with no circle at all, making it clear what the designers chose to go with; but this does make it difficult for players who have the original printings to add in the new randomized locations from "Return to the Dunwich Legacy" (which have no circle at all) without giving away which ones are which.
  • Eldritch Location: The setting of "Lost in Time and Space" is an extradimensional void with locations that defy understanding. The locations and connections are constantly in flux, and echoes of the investigators' past failures continuously come back to haunt them.
  • Enemy Mine: Doing "The House Always Wins" scenario as second one allows to save Peter Clover (casino owner), which makes his fiance, Naomi O'Bannion, grateful to the investigators and assist them in their mission (in Return to the Dunwich Legacy, she even physically joins the players, as a story Ally). Otherwise, the gangsters would remain hostile and even attack investigators at one point right in Dunwich.
  • Escort Mission: in "The Miskatonic Museum", depending on how you choose to enter, you will be accompanied by either a Night Guard or a Curator of the Museum as you search for the Necronomicon. Their defeat does not cause you to lose the scenario immediately, but it will permanently add a tablet chaos token to the chaos bag (making the rest of campaign harder) and defending them from harm is easier said than done when they both have one health and one sanity. The one that didn't accompany you will be later found dead in the room containing the Necronomicon, killed by the Hunting Horror.
  • Fate Worse than Death: If you show Seth Bishop the pendant (the only thing remaining from Silas Bishop after you perform a ritual on him) and ask whether it's the future he wants for us all, he will be shocked, and stumble, falling onto altar and getting suck into the rift. Unless you play with Return to the Dunwich Legacy, it's the last time you would see Seth, otherwise you would later find him on the other side, in... not exactly pleasant state: his flesh got twisted into something truly monstrous, and he became completely insane, mindlessly attacking investigators on sight. If he comes into contact with Yog-Sothoth, he would be consumed, healing Yog-Sothoth if he was hurt. The players can put him out of his misery, earning some extra experience in process.
  • Foregone Victory: Once you seal the rift in "Lost and Time and Space," you can no longer lose, even if entire team gets wiped out; you would be declared victorious regardless of what happens to the team, but you will get a better ending if you actually manage to escape.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: It's implied that whoever witnessed the Dunwich Horror and still stayed in Dunwich, was driven insane by it in one way or another. One version of the epilogue shows Curtis Whateley obsessing over the old Whateley farm, hoping to find something inside that would let him rationalise what he'd seen, which hints at how Seth Bishop became the Evil Sorcerer we know.
  • The Goomba: Thralls have low stats, and no special abilities (beyond "Retaliate" keyword, which doesn't do much due to aforementioned low stats). Essentially, they're this campaign's replacement for ghouls as generic recurring enemies.
  • Here We Go Again!:
    • In "Blood on the Altar", you find that someone has tried to recreate the Dunwich Horror. By the next scenario, you know that they succeeded, and there's more than one of them out there.
    • Either version of the epilogue. In one, Curtis Whateley starts obsessing over the family legacy. In the other, some new investigators from the university checking out an abandoned Dunwich finds evidence that the cult is still around.
  • Locomotive Level: Naturally enough on "The Essex County Express", the train you're travelling on comes under attack by a tear in the sky trying to swallow the whole thing. While you certainly can be taken out, the evil's intent is to recover anyone or anything you rescued earlier in the campaign. In order to survive, the investigators must rush through the train as it's being torn apart car by car, and reach the locomotive in order to restart the train before it's too late.
  • Lord British Postulate: Broods of Yog-Sothoth can't be attacked or damaged without using Esoteric Formula. It's still possible to get rid of them with player cards that can defeat or otherwise remove them from play without damaging them, as the Broods aren't Elite and thus lack the game's usual Contractual Boss Immunity.
  • Multiple Endings:
    • The last scenario, "Lost in Time and Space", has different outcomes depending on whether the investigators have managed to escape with their lives after preventing Yog-Sothoth from merging with our reality, or perished. There's also a separate ending for fighting Yog-Sothoth, which results in the investigators dying after their victory.
    • There are two versions of the epilogue, depending on whether the citizens of Dunwich were warned, or told to evacuate. Both are implying that someone else would restart the cult soon enough.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: You spend much of "Blood on the Altar" trying to find your kidnapped allies before they are sacrificed. Turns out the sacrifices were meant to appease the Brood or its master, and by rescuing all or most of the prisoners, you now have up to five expies of the Dunwich Horror pissed off and rampaging nearby.
  • Nonstandard Game Over: During "Where Doom Awaits", if Seth Bishop completes the summoning ritual, Yog-Sothoth would merge with reality, abruptly ending the campaign.
  • No-Sell: It's not possible to damage Broods of Yog-Sothoth by anything other than Esoteric Formula. However, them lacking "Elite" trait makes them vulnerable to some other means of dealing with them...
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Earning Naomi's support requires to save Peter Clover from the casino. Failing to save Peter (or doing "The House Always Wins" as the first scenario, resulting in him never showing up) would result in Peter going missing, and O'Bannion gang going after investigators, permanently cutting the option for alliance.
    • Subverted with Armitage and his colleagues; if they would be abducted, the investigators would still get a chance to save them at later point. At least one of them would be abducted no matter what.
    • If the Necronomicon wouldn't be retrieved from the museum, or its bearer would be defeated at any point before the confrontation with Seth Bishop, the book would be stolen by cultists.
    • Any unique Allies sacrificed to Yog-Sothoth are gone until the end of campaign. You can't get them back. This includes not just people abducted by cultists in the previous scenario and two victims already put there, but also whatever Allies abducted during scenario itself, including normal player cards and even investigators' signatures.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • O'Bannion's Thug, while engaged with investigator, makes that investigator unable to gain resources, which may outright shut down some investigators' progress if they can't deal with him quickly.
    • "Unhallowed Country" treachery prevents the investigators from playing Allies, and disables all abilities on those who're already in play.
  • Psychopomp: The soul-catching birds, whippoorwills, from the story return, both as encounter cards trying to trip you up, and lining the rooftops of Dunwich, eager to feast on the doomed village.
  • Puzzle Boss: In "Undimensioned and Unseen", the many Brood of Yog-Sothoth are all immune to all damage except for a specific spell you recover early in the scenario. Even that spell won't land much, unless you find a way to trap the creatures, slow them down, or otherwise cut through their invisibility.
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies: In "Where Doom Awaits", if Seth Bishop successfully summons Yog-Sothoth, it's over — not just for you, but for all humanity.
  • Run or Die: In 'Lost in Time and Space", after enough time progresses, Yog-Sothoth will start pursuing the investigators. While defeating him ends the scenario in victory immediately, it also ends your life; if you want to not just win, but live to tell the story, you must finish your task (seal the rift) and successfully escape — which won't be easy, as Yog-Sothoth hits like a truck.
  • Sadistic Choice:
    • The campaign opens with one right away. The faculty you choose to look for first will be the only one you can potentially save. By the time you get to the second scenario, the kidnappers have come and gone. And if you take too long in the second scenario, the cult will have the time to nab Armitage as well.
    • "Extracurricular Activity" ends with a cruel choice: save the students from The Experiment, or stick to your original mission — find Professor Rice. No third option available.
  • Sequel Episode: This campaign directly continues the story of original The Dunwich Horror story, taking place several months after its ending; apparently, the Whately family perishing wasn't enough, and some other sorcerer is now trying to achieve the same goals as them — as well as targeting the ones who helped to defeat the original Dunwich Horror.
  • Slipping a Mickey: During "The House Always Wins" scenario, one location gives you an easy option to collect clues but requires you to remember that your investigator has "had a drink." One of the treacheries, "Something in the Drinks", forces each investigator who has "had a drink" to lose an action on their next turn — in a scenario with already highly limited time.
  • Starfish Aliens: Yithians are recurring enemies in this campaign, particularly during "Lost in Time and Space".
  • Starts Stealthily, Ends Loudly: "The House Always Wins" starts with infiltration, with thugs not attacking unless provoked. Then the casino gets attacked by monsters sent by Seth Bishop, and everything goes to hell.
  • Sudden Sequel Death Syndrome: Depending on the players' performance, some or all heroes of The Dunwich Horror may be sacrificed to Yog-Sothoth.
  • That's No Moon: In "Lost in Time and Space", when Yog-Sothoth actually appears, investigators at first mistook him for the actual moon. Then he started becoming larger, and larger...
  • Theme Naming: All of the Act cards in "The House Always Wins" scenario have card-themed names — fittingly, as the scenario is set in a casino.
  • Time-Limit Boss: In "Extracurricular Activity", The Experiment, once unleashed, moves each time the last agenda reaches its doom threshold. Its destination? Dormitories. In order to stop it, investigators must either save the students, or find a way to defeat The Experiment before it reaches the dormitories, otherwise it ends in a bloodbath. Investigators may also win by finding Warren Rice (which is why they're here in the first place), but this would mean dooming the students to die.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: If investigators just slaughter Silas Bishop, instead of trying (unsuccessfully) to cure him, they would face more enemies later in game, due to remains of his body dissolving into smaller monsters.
  • Weaksauce Weakness: The Brood of Yog-Sothoth in "Undimensioned and Unseen" are not Elite, and are vulnerable to card effects which similarly threatening enemies are immune to—being blanked, insta-killed, and so on. This can be used to bypass their Puzzle Boss nature. Return to the Dunwich Legacy, however, took this into account, by introducing "Imperceptible Creature" treachery, which takes away this vulnerability.
  • You Are Already Dead: "Beyond the Veil" treachery, when it gets revealed, goes into investigator's threat area, and stays here until the right moment. It does nothing... until that investigator runs out of cards in their deck, after which it deals them whopping ten points of damage, which is enough to put down even most tough Guardians without assets to soak up damage. And then there're other treacheries and effects which force you to discard cards from your deck. If you are low on cards and have no means to cancel or discard that treachery, your only chance of survival is to live until the end of scenario, or resign.
  • You Can't Thwart Stage One: In "Where Doom Awaits", Seth will always be able to open the rift to summon Yog-Sothoth. Your choices before that point will determine how much time you have until he actually summons his master, and whether Seth will still be around to stop you.
  • You Dirty Rat!: Club Clever is heavily infested with rats, who are unusually aggressive.
  • You Will Not Evade Me: The Grappling Horror from "The Essex County Express" scenario, true to its name, grapples investigators, making them unable to move while they're still engaged with it. Managed to evade it, and move away? But it's a "Hunter", so it would just crawl after you.

     The Path to Carcosa tropes 
  • Ax-Crazy: While no cultists of any Eldritch Abomination out there are exactly sane, Hastur's servants are often outright lunatics and maniacs, down to and including knife-wielding psychos and pyromaniacs.
  • Bait-and-Switch: If more Convictions were accumulated than Doubts, during the ending the Investigators hears ominous "I've been looking all over for you"... which turns out to be just the ship captain who was hired by investigators themselves to reach the abbey.
  • Bedlam House: "The Unspeakable Oath" is set in Arkham Asylum, with plenty of hostile patients (and several monsters mixed in). While infiltrating it is relatively easy, escape is much harder. Any investigators who fails to escape would become irrevocably insane.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Asylum Gorger has boss-grade damage and horror values, and has high health, combat and evade stats; and it doesn't give victory points, meaning that it can come back if killed. Fortunately, it has a fixed spawning point, and is prohibited from attacking on the same turn it moved, or making attacks of opportunity, allowing investigators to just outrun it.
  • Breaking the Fourth Wall: During dream sequence in the "Phantom of Truth" scenario, parts of that sequence are mixed rather chaotically. "Dream 5" is the first one on the page, but not only it's not the one you start with, but it's never used at all. If you read it anyway, your character would tell that it's not the entry they need.
    "Wait a second, this isn’t Dream 1," you say.
  • Choice-and-Consequence System:
    • Game keeps track of "doubts and "conviction", essentially you either outright rejecting anything supernatural going around, or believing in all that and trying to "follow the rules". Pretty much any major decision awards one of them, with occasional chances to avoid either. How many marks you accumulate would alter setup for "Phantom of Truth" scenario (changing encounter deck, scenario boss and even your objective), as well as determine which final boss you would face and ending you would receive (including game over if you fail your last battle).
    • Some of the choices have long-terms consequences on their own, besides affecting Doubts/Conviction system. But, following the insanity theme, it's often not apparent which are actually "best", if any:
      • Both non-neutral choices during "The Last King" scenario would backfire on you during "The Phantom of Truth", causing you extra mental trauma either during intro dream sequence (if you burned the house) or during resolution (if you intruded at secret meeting)... but both also reward you (by getting rid of several dangerous foes you would otherwise face, and with extra exp, respectively). Neutral option — just get it out of there — is risk-free, but also reward-free.
      • "Echoes of the Past" scenario, unless you go for the "neutral" option, gives you the choice between taking the clasp, or throw it away. Taking it gives you extra weakness for the rest of campaign, but alters the story of the following scenario.
  • Choose a Handicap: The chaos bagalters each scenario depending on the outcome of the previous one, changing the dangers the players would deal with.
  • Creepy Cockroach: Swarms of cockroaches are recurring enemies in Hastur's areas of influence.
  • Do Well, But Not Perfect: If you aim for the neutral ending (something you're likely to do on repeat playthroughs, as you only learn what does or doesn't count as "neutral" post-factum), you would go over the threshold for the neutral ending (5 or less total Doubt and Conviction; you would accumulate 7 even with every neutral options picked) if you complete every scenario successfully, unless you purposely botch either "The Unspeakable Truth" (not recommended, as it kills the entire party) or "The Pallid Mask" to skip getting those excessive 2 points and stay on just 5. Return to the Path to Carcosa takes it a step further by challenging you to finish with just one point (the one unavoidable that you get on the penultimate level), forcing you to fail "The Unspeakable Truth" too, as well as "The Curtain Call" (which awards 1 point at the end)
  • Draconic Abomination: Byakhees are widespread in this campaign, particularly during "A Phantom of Truth" scenario.
  • Early Instalment Weirdness: The Specter of Death Mini-Boss in The Pallid Mask has a "Forced" effect that causes it to attack you if you fail a test to evade it: this would later become the "Alert" keyword introduced in the next campaign, The Forgotten Age.
  • Eldritch Location: Carcosa, the city of King in Yellow, doesn't abide normal rules of our world, and makes devastating effect on sanity of anyone witnessing it.
  • The End... Or Is It?: If more Doubts were accumulated than Convictions, Hastur tricks investigators into believing that All Just a Dream... and then they sees the Stranger on they way back.
  • Gimmick Level:
    • "The Pallid Mask", instead of normal map, has catacombs which generates in unpredictable way on the go.
    • "The Black Star Rise" starts with no Act deck — and two Agenda decks. But one of the two decks are genuine, and other hides the way players may achieve their goal. But only final card in every deck reveals whether it's the right one or not.
    • "Dim Carcosa" wouldn't cause instant defeat on losing all Sanity (which is good, considering extreme amount of horror-based effects it has), allowing to accumulate horror well past the point when investigator would be already dead. However, several scenario-specific threats becomes more lethal if investigator stockpile horror, including some outright lethal.
  • Glamour Failure: In "The Last King", if investigators take too long or bother them too much, certain party-goers would mutate into monsters and become hostile.
  • Golden Ending: Played With regarding the "neutral" ending. By refusing to play by Hastur's rules and accumulating less than 5 Doubts and Convictions in total, the investigators unlocks a special, otherwise inaccessible version of the final boss and the third ending associated with it. In it, rather than Hastur making the last laugh at investigators, they defiantly tosses the Pallid Mask into the ocean. But it's also the only ending where investigators receives both 2 physical traumas and 2 mental ones, instead of just one or another.
  • Go Among Mad People: Your main mission during "The Unspeakable Oath" scenario is to infiltrate Arkham Asylum by pretending to be new patients, in order to find one of the last persons who knows what's going on.
  • Guide Dang It!: While getting either the Conviction or Doubt ending is clear and simple enough, as the choices giving you points in either direction are very well telegraphed (for the most parts), that is not the case for the Neutral ending, as the only way to obtain it is by failing scenarios.
  • Here We Go Again!: Campaign epilogue, which can only be accessed if at least one investigator was still possessed by the end of "Dim Carcosa", implies that those investigators would attempt to perform "King in Yellow" again.
  • Immune to Bullets: Poltergeist can't be damaged by any means, excluding through "Spell" or "Relic" cards, or through encounter cards.
  • Know When to Fold 'Em: Your goal in "The Last King" scenario is not to "win" (in fact, this scenario lacks any win condition), or kill all monsters, but to gather as much info as possible, and retreat with it while you still can. At least one investigator must retreat before it's too late, otherwise it would be All for Nothing: you would simply forget everything you gathered.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: In Return to the Path to Carcosa, Dianne Divine can turn into monster as well. The story text which describes transformation makes her say that she's glad to see investigators "again", which they don't get. It's because you normally use Return to... expansions on repeat playthroughs.
  • Maximum HP Reduction:
    • "The Tattered Cloak" boosts all stats by 1 while investigator has less than 4 remaining Sanity, but also decreases maximum Sanity by 1.
    • If you carefully navigate your way through campaign avoiding gathering enough doubts or conviction to be forced into one of two "main" branches, you would "inherit" the Pallid Mask after dealing with the Stranger. All it does is to give its wielder -2 max Sanity.
  • Multiple Endings: Three possible endings, depending on which path was taken ("doubts", "conviction", or neither) and thus which of the three versions of Hastur was defeated. First two makes Hastur have the final laugh at the investigators, but the third one allows them to defiantly throw the Pallid Mask into the ocean, showing that they've emerged truly victorious... but also much more scared.
  • Nasty Party: Setting of "The Last King" scenario; to learn more about ill-fated play which they just survived, investigators infiltrated the party set by people related to it. This is because they are not even humans any more. Not that human guests, being violently insane, are any better.
  • Non-Indicative Difficulty: When playing on easier difficulty, final battle against Hastur (except when on the "doubts" path) can end up being much harder than on harder difficulties, as he (when attacked or evaded by investigators with no sanity left) turns all "+1", "0" and "-1", as well as Elder Sign tokens into auto-failure; the difficulty levels affects the chaos bag composition, meaning that there would be fewer such tokens in the bag. The players only learns about it once they reach the Final Boss...
  • Nonstandard Game Over: During "Black Star Rise", Hastur would begin the process of opening the portal that would let him merge the Earth and Carcosa. Letting him succeed (before you enter Carcosa yourself through another portal) ends the entire campaign in failure just two steps away from the final.
  • No Points for Neutrality: Played With. Attempt to avoid accumulating either doubts or convictions would only result in harder version of Hastur as final boss, and you receiving both physical and mental traumas (other endings have only one kind, depending on which boss you faced). But, if you survive this, you receive only ending where you are shown to be truly triumphant over Hastur, due to refusing to play by his rules (assuming you weren't possessed, that is), while others still lets him make the last laugh.
  • Obvious Rule Patch:
    • As some cards introduced in later expansions let investigators survive otherwise-fatal damage/horror, it was clarified that "take 100 horror" should indeed be interpreted as "everyone is defeated, take 1 mental trauma" instead (as it was meant to be).
    • Return to the Path to Carcosa fixes the potential softlock by making Corpse Dweller unable to target The Stranger (as removing it would break the victory conditions for either path).
  • Paranoia Fuel: invoked This campaign aims to achieve this effect, as part of the madness theme. Just as Hastur screws with his victims, the campaign screws with its players, forcing them to doubt if they do the right things at certain points by implying some possible dire consequences, which may or may not really occur later (on the first play, you can never be sure), or outright screws with their mind.
    • Any outcome of any scenario save for the very last one alters chaos bag for the next scenario, but on the blind run you have no way to check whether it would be for the best or for the worst.
    • This campaign makes heavy use of "hidden" cards, which are supposed to be, well, hidden from your teammates, secretly waiting in your hand until the right time comes; they always result in nasty surprise for everyone involved when they finally set off, so if your friends started acting weirdly, they may hiding something — or suspecting you of doing the same.
    • Several scenarios have their own quirks:
      • If you look at the reverse side of Act 1 in "The Last King" (there is no in-game reason to do so, so it was done either by mistake or out of curiosity), the game directly questions your sanity.
      • "Echoes of the Past" constantly adds up tension, by implying that something horrible would happen if Hastur's followers would find information they seek first, and then... nothing special happens, with the rest of campaign going pretty much unaltered; well, you missed opportunity to earn some (double-edged) story assets, and any outcome of any scenario affects chaos bag for the next one, but that's it.
      • "The Black Star Rise" has two agenda decks, one of which is a genuine threat, and other is your actual goal, but you have no way to check which one is correct one until you finish the Agenda 2 of either one, leaving you one agenda away from winning... or losing.
  • Power Nullifier: All "Whisper in Your Head" cards puts some restrictions on the player, while not allowing to tell the other players about them (as those cards are "hidden").
  • Reality Bleed: Hastur's plot involves gradually merging Earth and Carcosa.
    • In areas plagued by Hastur's influence, weird things starts to occur, like bleeding walls or hostile ghosts' attacks.
    • In "Black Stars Rise", this plan comes to its final stage when Hastur's followers managed to open the portal to Carcosa. The only way to stop it is to find a way to infiltrate Carcosa and confront Hastur himself.
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies:
    • In The Unspeakable Oath, investigators must accomplish their task and escape before final agenda advances, or all involved investigators would be driven insane by Hastur's visions, permanently becoming asylum's inhabitants themselves. If this happens, investigations would be continued by the new team, who would learn of their demise from newspapers.
    • Hastur's plan involves merging our world with Carcosa. If he ever succeeds, humanity becomes his slaves. By the end of campaign, he comes dangerously close to actually accomplish this plan, so allowing final agenda in any of the two final scenarios to advance means instant defeat and insanity.
  • Speak of the Devil: If you heed Daniel's warning, each time an investigators says Hastur's name, they suffer 1 horror. Including during the scenario's setup. One of achievements in Return to the Path to Carcosa requires doing this seven or more times during single scenario and/or its setup.
  • Take a Third Option: Most scenarios (save for penultimate one, which doesn't give you neutral option at all) give you the way to avoid receiving either Doubts or Convictions; but it's not always in your interest to do so. Picking some of those is actually mandatory to get the Golden Ending, which is the neutral one.
    • "Curtain Call" and "The Pallid Mask" both have only two endings, making picking side unavoidable... unless you just fail on purpose (that would cost you traumas, though), which would skip awarding you either points. "The Unspeakable Truth" has similar situation (the only difference is that you pick sides during interlude after scenario), but anyone who fails to escape goes outright insane, forcing you to start fresh in the middle of campaign. It's actually mandatory to fail either "The Unspeakable Truth" or "The Pallid Mask" scenarios to get a Golden Ending, as it's the only way to avoid getting 2 points in excess and stay within the "5 or less" limit.
    • "The Last King" gives you choice to try and return to the party (assuming that nothing actually happened, and you're just seeing things, which earns you 1 Doubt); burn down the house, as the horrors you saw there can't be let to live (earning 1 Conviction, as you do believe in it being real)... or just run with your life, staying "neutral".
    • "Echoes of the Past" ends with you making decision whether to take the claps, or not. But, you may instead fulfil completely unrelated optional objective that ends scenario immediately on "neutral" resolution, or just let cultists win (which wouldn't alter the story in any way, or further penalise you).
  • There Is No Kill Like Overkill: In "Curtain Call", the first scenario of the campaign, if the final agenda advances, all investigators will suffer 100 horror.
  • Unintentionally Unwinnable: "The Pallid Mask" has an enemy, "Corpse Dweller", which spawns by discarding "Humanoid" enemies in play and taking their place. The problem is, nothing in the rules prevents it from discarding The Man in the Pallid Mask (also known as the Stranger); this doesn't count as him being defeated, and since there's no way to respawn him, this strips investigators of their only way to win scenario. This gets addressed in Return to the Path to Carcosa, where additional rulings specifically forbids Corpse Dweller from targeting the Stranger.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: You can kill all party guests at the end of The Last King. While this guarantees that they never appear again in subsequent scenarios, Hastur later uses the investigators' hidden sense of guilt against them, giving all investigators mental trauma.
  • World Gone Mad: As the campaign's theme is insanity, it tries to look insane itself, to make experience more authentic:
    • Rather than outright say "okay, you're defeated, here's your mental trauma", "Curtain Call" scenario dumps 100 uncancellable horror on every investigator — something you have no means to soak with all assets in the world.
    • You're never supposed to look up the reverse side of Act card in "The Last King" scenario; if you look it up anyway, you would see... a definition of insanity, and reminder that you weren't told to look there, so you should turn the card back.
    • Dream sequence for "A Phantom of Truth" scenario has its parts spread chaotically, making following it rather confusing — so you and your friends would be just as confused as the investigators you're playing as. "Dream 5" sequence, in particular, is the first on the page; if you read it, it tells you that it's not the entry you need, and instructs you to look for "Dream 1" elsewhere, in a fourth wall-breaking manner.
    • If you fail the "Black Star Rise", you would be met with a mocking message "You’ve met with a terrible fate, haven’t you?", before revealing actual outcome. This message would be out of place in any other campaign... but here, it adds to overall surreal feeling. Following scenario, "Dim Carcosa", gives you same message if you fail while on "Conviction" path (or on a tie), and "You didn’t really think you could escape, did you?" message otherwise.
  • You Are Already Dead: "Dim Carcosa" has unique set of cards, "Possession". They all can be discarded (requiring to pay some not exactly small price, unique for each card), but what makes them dangerous is that they would instantly kill any investigator the moment their total amount of horror exceeds threshold of their doubled max Sanity (which can happen very easily, due to scenario being extremely horror-heavy). Including on drawing them. And then Return to the Path to Carcosa added High Priests of Hastur, who, instead of normal attack, immediately drives insane anyone who's possessed (but is otherwise harmless).
  • You Dirty Rat!: The Miskatonic Playhouse in "Curtain Call" is infested with rats, who attack any nearby investigator on sight. It's unclear whether it was always like this, or this is Hastur's influence.

     The Forgotten Age tropes 
  • All of Time at Once: In "Shattered Aeons", you can travel to different location in different times, including Atlantis right before its demise, the ancient world and a devastated city in distant future long after humanity's extinction.
  • Bad Future: During "The Boundaries Beyond", investigators gets a brief glimpse of the distant future where human cities are in ruins, and only creepy polyp-like creatures are inhabiting Earth. According to Ichtaca, so would be our future unless she and her allies prevents it.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Investigators must fight with Snake People of Valusia and Brotherhood, who're both hunting for the Relic of Ages. Although ultimately they are the lesser of your problems.
  • Cap Raiser: Inverted during "The City of Archives" scenario: second agenda reduces hand size by 2, and third by 4. Some of scenario-specific locations lowers it further while you're there.
  • Choice-and-Consequence System:
    • Taking pro-Ichtaca or pro-Alejandro choices permanently alters chaos bag for the worst (by adding initially-absent chaos tokens), but eventually leads to them choosing humanity over Yithians (Alejandro) and Yig (Ichtaca). However, you can only recruit one, as in very first scenario, you have to pick side.
  • Choose a Handicap:
    • Each time the investigators sides with either Alejandro or Ichtaca, the "Cultist" or "Tablet" chaos tokens gets added into the chaos bag, respectively, both of which have their own negative effects.
    • Choosing to side with neither Alejandro nor Ichtaca permanently removes their respective tokens from the bag, but also adds the "Elder Things" tokens, which tend to be even worse; however, doing so is the first step on the path to the Golden Ending.
    • Third scenario, "Threads of Fate", has three separate act decks, each having two variants of setup depending on your previous choices. But some of decisions have long-terms consequences: putting the Relic into museum (as Alejandro wanted) counts as pro-Alejandro choice and can help regain his trust later, while working with Itchtaka obviously counts as pro-Ichtaca choice. And if you picked both "neutral" options, it's where the path to Golden Ending begins, when investigators realise that they can't trust neither Alejandro nor Ichtaca.
  • Collapsing Lair: Once the Relic gets removed from the temple, the temple collapses. It gets assumed that perhaps the Relic was the only thing keeping it intact in some way.
  • Cosmic Keystone: Unsurprisingly, the Relic of Ages gets revealed to be a key component to stabilise space/time continuum, and in "Shattered Aeons" scenario, it becomes humanity's last and only chance for survival. And to get the best ending, you must not only to keep it intact, but also do some specific choices in order for it to reach its full potential.
  • Demonic Possession: Halfway through campaign, investigators would learn that Alejandro is controlled by the Yithian. Depending on how you play the campaign, he can either shrug it and remember everything, or remain hostile to you. Unfortunately, it is not possible to save him on the path to the epilogue.
  • Do Not Taunt Cthulhu: The Vengeance points mechanic. Some actions (like killing certain snakes or his followers, or desecrating his temples) enrage Yig, "awarding" you with vengeance points. Certain game elements become more dangerous if you accumulate too many points, notably:
    • "The Doom of Eztli" has different outcome for defeated investigators depending on the vengeance points accumulated. If there're four or more points, each defeated investigator gets killed by angry snakes. If there're less than four, investigator survives unscarred (if not counting normal defeat-caused effects, like new traumas), but due to it by itself adding three points, it would work only for one investigator (two, if certain precautions, counter-intuitive on the first playthrough, are made).
    • "Depths of Yoth" provide you with progressively less time and more enemies if you test Yig's patience too much. It's entirely possible to skip all but the last two (out of seven) agendas this way.
    • "Shattered Aeons" takes away some cards from your deck, depending on the amount of vengeance accumulated so far, encouraging being very careful up until this point.
  • Endless Game: "The Depths of Yoth" in standalone mode has no victory condition, as the game doesn't end once the 5th floor is reached. Instead, the game continues further and further until all investigator are defeated, with final agenda's effects becoming progressively more dangerous with each new floor. The whole point is not to "win", but to set a new survival record.
  • Enemy Mine: In "Shattered Aeons", two (out of five available) endings allow you to side with either Valusians or the Yithians, preventing the apocalypse and saving their civilisation, while dooming our own due to overwriting timeline.
  • Foreshadowing: There are some subtle hints at Ichtaca and/or Alejandro turning on you at later points:
    • Any time you side with either of them, you permanently add new Chaos tokens into the bag, for angering the other side: "cultist" for Ichtaca, and "tablet" for Alejandro; "cultists" symbolises the Brotherhood (who're later revealed to be Yithians), and "tablets" symbolise Valusians (Yig-aligned Snake People). Both ultimately turn on you, unless your bond with them is strong enough.
    • Losing first scenario, which makes the team wait for supplies before proceeding further, makes the narrator point that Alejandro has surprisingly strong connections for a humble historian, being able to easily find guns and ammo in foreign land. We later learn that he's backed by the Brotherhood, which has its own interest in this expedition.
    • As time goes on, it gets more and more clear that Ichtaca is hiding some very important information about what's going on, and she has some special role in these events, with her strange interactions with Padma Amrita (Yig's "chosen one") being the major red flag. Guess who would turn up a Valusian descendant herself and turn on you later (unless you worked hard to earn her trust).
  • Giant Space Flea from Nowhere: In Shattered Aeons, the Formless Spawn; it's a... formless blob of... something, it's not related to either Valusians or Brotherhood, and there's almost no explanation in-story just what it is. Most likely, it was added to give players a Final Boss even if they miss the Golden Ending.
  • Gimmick Level:
    • "Threads of Fate" has three (four with Return to the Forgotten Age) act decks — and very limited time to complete them all. However, doing so rewards the players with various benefits for subsequent scenarios.
    • The City of Archives forces you to play as Yithians instead of your normal investigators, and is completely built upon trying to play around hand size limitations it forces on you.
    • The Depths of Yoth has investigators constantly running away from ever growing horde of Snake People through several randomly-generated levels.
  • Golden Ending: If you do everything just right throughout whole campaign, you can go back in time and prevent the whole plot from happening.
  • Identity Amnesia: The main threat of The City of Archives. The investigators have been kidnapped by Yithians, and their minds are placed in Yithian bodies. As the agenda progresses, they gradually forget more and more, until they lose their memory completely. This is also what happened to Alejandro, who potentially may be saved at the end of this scenario, depending on the path players took previously.
  • Increasingly Lethal Enemy:
    • The "Agents of Yig" encounter set exists to punish the investigators if they get too many vengeance points, with the enemies getting stronger the more vengeance points the players have. Brood of Yig gains potentially unlimited boost to Fight, eventually becoming borderline unkillable, while Serpent from Yoth gains new abilities, maxing out at 3 vengeance.
    • Brotherhood Cultist gains 1 Doom token each time you try to attack it, and each time he gains a Doom token, he gains +1 to Fight and Evade ratings, making it even harder to deal with him if you fail to dispatch him quickly enough (not to mention, all that Doom brings you closer to running out of time).
    • "The Secret Must Be Kept" treachery from the "Threads of Fate" scenario starts with average test difficulty to avoid its effects and only deals 1 point of damage and horror, but gets +1 to all of those for every completed act deck, potentially making it very lethal if the game lasts for long enough. On top of that, it has "peril", meaning that the other players can't bail you out.
    • "Lightless Shadow" and "Bathophobia" treacheries from "The Depths of Yoth" scenario forces investigators to pass skill tests (which grows harder with each depth level), and on a failure, deals damage and horror, respectively. In the standalone mode, where there's no upper limit of the depth level, they can stuck up infinitely.
    • The Formless Spawn starts with relatively tame Fight and Evade ratings, but keeps accumulating them the more Doom is in play; there's no upper limit other than agendas' Doom threshold.
    • Return to the Forgotten Age introduces Stolen Mind enemy (which replaces Wizard of the Order from "Dark Cult" set), which starts with low Fight stat, but progressively increases it as it keeps accumulating Doom (which it does automatically every turn).
  • Know When to Fold 'Em:"Threads of Fate" has three separate act decks (with Return to the Forgotten Age adding fourth one). None of them are mandatory to finish the campaign (though Relic of Ages must be secured if you plan to reach the Golden Ending), but completion of at least act 1 of each deck rewards investigators with bonus experience, and each deck on completion rewards you with some bonuses. While tempting, being too greedy may result not only in failure to reach these goals, but also mental trauma for each not-resigned investigator once the agenda deck is finished. Instead, investigators must effectively use their limited time and resources to achieve as much as they can and retreat when there is no more time left to take further risks, while prioritising those goals which are most desired for subsequent scenarios.
  • Lured into a Trap: When the Eztli guardians offers to talk with Ichtaca, who would explain what's going on, Alejandro right away states that he's not going, as it just has to be a trap to slaughter them all when they lower their guard down, and he would not take part in this. Except, the offer is genuine, and Ichtaca would give you direction to the temple even if you attack her (albeit she would be understandably angry if that's the case), and would personally lead you there if you listened to her, intrigued by you being more reasonable than most outsiders.
  • Maximum HP Reduction: "Curse of Yig" treachery decreases maximum Health by 1 until it gets dealt with by passing a Willpower test.
  • Mental Time Travel: In the beginning of "The City of Archives", investigators gets kidnapped by Yithians, and their minds placed in Yithian bodies in the city of Pnakotus, which seemingly exists outside of time. Now they must find a way to escape, and return to their time and their true bodies. The problem is, they suffer from Identity Amnesia and must firstly remember who they really are. This wouldn't be easy, since as time goes on, it becomes progressively harder to resist mind-altering, until it becomes irreversible and you fail the scenario (and campaign with it).
  • Multiple Endings: The "Shattered Aeons" scenario has several outcomes (other than let the time break and destroy the world), which determines the fate of the world. Investigators have an option to side with either Alejandro or Ichtaca (assuming they were not recruited before), and help them to save Pnakotus or Valusia, respectively, dooming humanity in the process; this counts as a "victory", but blocks the possibility to transfer surviving investigators into a different campaign, for obvious reasons. Alternatively, if investigators sticks with their mission, they gain one of the two endings depending on whether they fulfilled certain requirements. If they didn't, campaign ends with them just stabilising the time; otherwise, they use the Relic of Times to turn back time and prevent the collapse in the first place (through fighting the True Final Boss), reaching the campaign's Golden Ending.
  • Mutually Exclusive Party Members: While it's possible to temporarily get both Alejandro and Ichtaca after the "Threads of Fate" scenario, you would lose them at certain points in the story, unless you did the things exactly right; both have the checklist of things you should do to keep them loyal (which includes siding with one over the other in the very first scenario); missing even one makes keeping them on your side till the end impossible. Alternatively, you can deliberately refuse to trust either and make them both turn on you, which is one of the requirements for the campaign's Golden Ending.
  • No-Gear Level: "The City of Archives" comes as close to it as possible. Players have reduced hand size, are restricted from putting Item assets in play by default, and can't use any unique Items whatsoever (they are outright removed from the game). In combination with Yithian body having overall poor stats, relatively easy monsters and treacheries suddenly becomes much more problematic.
  • No Points for Neutrality: Played With. Due to their recruitment requirements, you must decide who you want in your team (Ichtaca or Alejandro), and stick with them to the very end, or you would recruit neither one. However, deliberately choosing to ally with none of them and "forging your own path", which makes the campaign even harder, is actually one of requirements for the Golden Ending.
  • Nonstandard Game Over:
    • Failing "The City of Archives" leads to Yithians succeeding at erasing investigators' memories, ending entire campaign in failure even if there are still unused investigators left.
    • In the "Depths of Yoth", if the investigators are defeated, they fall to the Depths of Yoth, and their survival depends on how long (from each "level" they fell) this fall was. If they fell from the first level, they die and campaign ends, even if you still have unused investigators left. Levels two and three instead causes some physical traumas, which still results in same game over if it causes all currently-played investigators to die.
    • "Shattered Aeons" has two:
      • If investigator with the Relic of Ages gets eliminated, or otherwise permanently loses it, the whole party loses, because it is the key to stabilise the space/time continuum.
      • While formally it's still treated as "win", if you side with Ichtaca or Alejandro and help them to save Valusia/Pnakotus respectively, humanity is no more, and you can't transfer your investigators to a new campaign, so it may as well be a Game Over.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
  • Power Nullifier: "Snakescourge" treachery disables all abilities on Items you have in play for entire turn.
  • Red Shirt: There are several other members of the expedition — Jose, Andrea and Maria — who only gets brief mention here and there in the narration, but don't play major role in the plot and don't appear in scenarios proper. If you fail the second scenario and choose to blow up the temple rather than make another attempt to retrieve the Relic, Andrea would have her throat pierced with a spear, and Jose strangled by a boa, with only Maria making it out alive. Regardless of outcome, you would never see either of them again. You may also get a mention of Lorenzo — posthumously.
  • The Remnant: Eztli warriors are explicitly descendants of what's left of Aztec people and their military, still fighting to protect their territory from outsiders.
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies: In "Shattered Aeons", if investigators take too long or fail to protect the Relic of Ages, time itself dissolves, and people's minds are too weak to survive this. Same result is achieved if the investigators take too long to defeat Yig during the Epilogue scenario.
  • Skippable Boss:
    • Throughout many campaign scenarios, you are pursued by the Harbinger of Valusia. It is a particularly tough enemy, but it can't heal its wounds between scenarios, so if you keep fighting it, eventually it dies. However, fighting it does not worth it: while you do save yourself some trouble by eliminating it, not only it does not award any experience, it also "awards" you with whopping 5 vengeance points, which can make your life much harder than if you simply avoid it, which isn't even that hard.
    • In "Depths of Yoth", if you manage to avoid accumulating even single vengeance point during the campaign, Yig does not appear at all. Even if he appears, he may be avoided — which may actually be preferable, despite him awarding a lot of bonus experience, since your actual goal has nothing to do with fighting giant snakes, and you have little time to waste.
  • Snake People: Majority of your enemies consists of serpent people, ranging in size from human-like to really enormous ones. Surprisingly (or not), Ichtaca turns out to be one as well, though depending on your previous actions, she may or may not reject her snake heritage.
  • Snakes Are Sinister: Besides Snake People, several scenarios contain actual snakes, from "normal" ones to enormous man-eating ones called "Basilisks". All of them are hostile to investigators and can cause serious troubles, even posthumously (as they give you Vengeance points). And no snake is more sinister than Yig himself.
  • Stable Time Loop: Entire point of Turn Back Time is to try and prevent the Relic of Ages from ever being disturbed. However, if investigators fail on this mission, this would lead to the Relic being found again, ensuring that time would be locked in eternal repetition of the same cycle, with no foreseeable future, which would lead to it eventually breaking up.
  • Starfish Aliens: Halfway through campaign it turns out that The Brotherhood cultists are not even humans, but rather Yithians.
  • Take a Third Option: You may choose to forge your own path, instead of siding with Ichtaca or Alejandro, despite it seemingly providing nothing but troubles. It's actually mandatory to achieve the Golden Ending.
  • Time Crash: Removing the Relic of Ages from the temple destabilised the time itself. By the time of "Shattered Aeons", it goes on the verge of a total collapse, and now it's up to the investigators to save it before it's too late.
  • We Cannot Go On Without You: In "Shattered Aeons", if an investigator with the Relic of Ages gets eliminated (or it gets removed from the game for any other reason), the whole party loses. As the Relic is also instrumental to completing the main objective, other players must ensure the Relic bearer's survival.

     The Circle Undone tropes 
  • Big Bad Ensemble: Most of the campaign revolves around conflict between Coven (lead by witch Anette Mason), and Silver Twilight Lodge (lead by wizard Carl Sanford), until the end of In the Clutches of Chaos, where their whole conflict becomes insignificant in the face of Azathoth's possible awakening.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing:
    • Piper of Azathoth has huge health not far away from actual boss, and can make a short work on everyone in its position unless dispatched quickly. It also has "Elite" trait, making it immune to many abilities normally able to one-shot regular monsters, and even if it gets killed off, it can easily return to the game through "Daemonic Piping" treachery (which is part of the regular encounter deck). Despite never being actual goal of any scenario, it keeps reappearing in many scenarios to make investigators suffer.
    • Mindless Dancer from the final scenario has only slightly less health than the Piper of Azathoth, has even higher Fight than it, and is extremely mobile, meaning that you have no chance to reliably outrun it. It's not Elite, but there are three of these fellas in the deck.
  • Dark World: Spectral Realm (at least, those parts you may visit) copies the "real" world, but is much more dangerous and inhabited by hostile ghosts and other spectral monsters.
  • Dead All Along: If investigators fails "The Wages of Sin" scenario, the Spectral Watcher, who was ready to kill them all, for whatever reason leaves them alone. Epilogue, however, reveals that Spectral Watcher actually did kill them... and now, when they saved the world, it's time to go... or start another adventure.
  • Deal with the Devil: In the end of "Before the Black Throne", If you can't complete the ritual and lead investigator is unfit to join the Pipers to pacify Azathoth (or you refuse to do either of this), only remaining option (besides dooming whole Universe is to make a deal with Nyarlathotep. Return to the Circle Undone added an extra option, but it's even easier to fail than other two.
  • Decoy Protagonist: In the prologue scenario, you get introduced to four new characters, who would be your Player Characters for this scenario. Then they all gets kidnapped and/or killed, after which the actual team of investigators arrives, to investigate what happened to them.
  • Demonic Possession: Witches' plan involved summoning Keziah Mason's spirit back into our world, and let her possess her descendant, Anette, so they would have great ally in their struggle against old enemies. The plan goes bad very fast, since Keziah has entirely different plans in mind.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: While Carl Sanford and Anette Mason are main threat for the most of campaign, no matter with whom you side and who wins in their conflict, they gets dealt with just before the final scenario, "Before the Black Throne", and the final threat to our world is Azathoth, The Daemon Sultan.
  • Do Not Go Gentle: When the ritual backfires horribly and threatens to awaken Azathoth, meaning the soon-to-happen apocalypse, investigators are well-aware that they would likely perish — but it doesn't mean that they would die sitting and humbly waiting for their doom; they would die fighting to the last drop of blood.
    There is a bitter taste in your mouth. Tears well in your eyes. You close your fist so hard your nails dig into your flesh. If you have to die, then die you will. But you’re not going to die sitting down.
  • Earn Your Bad Ending: Make the "right" decisions at several plot points, and you can not just lead one of the sides to utter triumph, but actually join them in their goal. This ends the campaign prematurely, however, just before the crucial moment which normally leads to Azathoth being disturbed, which may or may not still happen without investigators being ready to stop it.
    • If they remain devoid to the Lodge throughout the entire campaign, protect their key members (particularly Josef Meiger), aid them everywhere and refuse to betray them even when directly questioning whether Carl Sanford can be trusted, the investigators may become the most trusted members of Sanford's Inner Circle. However, it still leaves power-mongering and merciless Sanford unaccounted for.
    • Return to the Circle Undone adds a new ending for Coven-aligned players. If they accumulate enough knowledge of the Coven's cause and methods, earn Erynn's trust and lead them to triumph over the Lodge, the investigators may join the witches in building a "better future". Given that the person in charge is no one else but Keziah Mason, this future actually being good for anyone is highly questionable.
  • Eldritch Location:
    • Spectral Realm, shadow version of our world, inhabited by hostile ghosts and spectral monsters.
    • Last battle would occur not on Earth, but in the centre of Universe, before the Black Throne of Azathoth.
  • The End of the World as We Know It: If Azathoth ever awakens, it would be the end not just for our world, but for all Universe.
  • The End... Or Is It?: If investigators are ineligible for any of the better endings, or deliberately reject them when given a choice, the one option how to solve the crisis and put Azathoth back to rest is always available: make a deal with Nyarlathothep, and sign the Black Book — something what Keziah Mason herself did many years ago. Even the announcement that you've won the campaign is written with a question mark: you may averted the current crisis, only to plant the seed of another one in the future.
  • Enemy Mine:
    • In Union and Disillusion, you would side with Anette Mason against Silver Twilight Lodge, or vice versa, and bring them to triumph over the other side and help them to achieve their goal. No matter whom you choose, they would backstab you afterwards, with exact reason varying depending on the side you favoured. Events of the subsequent scenarios would be largely the same, with only major change being which boss you would face, and few encounter cards being altered.
    • In "In the Clutches of Chaos", if Anette/Sanford survives the mayhem they've caused (which happens if investigators managed to stop them before they go too far with their plans), they would offer help in saving the world. You can accept it, refuse or try to arrest them (in Sanford's case, you can also replace him as new master of the Lodge).
  • Evil Is Not a Toy: Both sides of the Coven/Lodge conflict learns the hard way why playing with such powers is a bad idea if they actually prevails over their opponent:
    • Carl Sanford wished to Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence, but vastly overestimated his ability to control the forces he used for this. Ultimately this may result in him bringing humanity and the whole Universe at the edge of destruction, and quite possibly causing his own death before the story would even conclude.
    • Anette Mason wishes to utilise Keziah's Azathoth-granted powers for the greater good of her people, naively thinking that this would work. It doesn't, as Keziah turns on her and takes over her body, and the end result is pretty much the same as with Sanford's ambitions — near apocalyptical.
  • Evil vs. Evil: Both sides of conflict are dark sorcerers, willing to let many people die to achieve their goals. Still, to deal with Spectral Watcher, investigators must decide who is lesser evil, and side with them.
  • Face–Heel Turn:
    • If Anette Mason teaches investigators the old magic, she promises that she and her Coven would from now on stand as protectors of Arkham from any evil force which would try to harm it again.
    • If investigators took over the Silver Twilight Lodge, kicking Carl Sanford over from his position of leadership, the now-redeemed Lodge gets tasked with protecting the people from eldritch powers, not abusing them for questionable gains.
  • Failure Is the Only Option: The prologue flat-out tells you at the beginning that it's only going to end once all four of its investigators are defeated; you just need to get as many clues as possible to influence the main campaign itself. How those investigators get defeated determines if, in "Union and Disillusion", they're still alive, dead, or neither.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • Any time investigators sides with Lodge in any way (starting from accepting offer to join the Lodge), chaos bag receives new "Cultist" tokens (absent by default); this isn't the first time when questionable decisions "awards" new chaos tokens, and indeed, Lodge soon shows its dark side.
    • Carl Sanford's weird reaction to investigators (who were just accepted into the Inner Circle) surviving the Spectral Watcher's embracenote  foreshadows reveal of the epilogue — that investigators actually didn't make it; they just refused to die, continuing fighting till the end.
  • Four-Man Band: Investigators in the prologue scenario must operate as a team and cover each other's weak points to... well, not survive, but to achieve the best result before inevitable defeat.
  • Gimmick Level:
    • "In the Clutches of Chaos" has no usual once-per-turn doom increasing. Instead, scenario uses unique breaches/incursions mechanic, which represents growing chaos. Breaches are placed at random each turn (and some scenario-specific effects may add even more), and once any location accumulates four or more, incursion occurs, which not only increases the doom on agenda, but also spreads additional breaches on other locations — and yes, this may cause a chain reaction.
    • "Before the Black Throne" is essentially set up in space. Not only level generates at random (thrice, once for each act), but there may be some "empty spaces" between locations, which normally can't be entered by anyone (though there's specific "Hunter" enemy which can visit them during their hunt), but counts for determining distances between locations. "Empty spaces" are marked by the cards taken from the players' decks (they would be shuffled back when empty spaces leave play by any means).
  • Gone Horribly Wrong: Karl Sanford wants to steal Keziah's powers. Anette wants to resurrect her as a powerful ally. No matter who of them succeeds, this results in them disturbing Azathoth, majority of their followers dying, and potentially their own deaths as well.
  • The Goomba: Coven Initiate enemy does have an ability, but it only triggers on their spawning (and even then, very rarely), and certainly does nothing to prevent them from being slaughtered. In fact, sometimes, they're more dangerous when dead, and even then, not by themselves, but through other enemy's effects.
  • Heads I Win, Tails You Lose:
    • In "Union and Disillusion", no matter which side actually wins (and whether you supported victors or losers), they would betray you (loser would abandon you while Coven/Lodge battle itself would cause massive destruction and injure any investigator present there; winner would simply turn on you once you cease to become useful, albeit you at least leave unharmed), and whoever prevails in Coven/Lodge conflict, escalates the previous problems to near-apocalyptic level, either trough Mason's rituals, or through Sanford's incompetence, leading to the events of "In The Clutches of Chaos" scenario, only differing in which enemies you would face there.
    • In "In the Clutches of Chaos", whether you stop Anette/Sanford or not, their ritual would disturb Azathoth's sleep, bringing Universe on the edge of destruction. Only thing which actually changes is whether they would survive this.
  • Here We Go Again!: Epilogue consists of several entries, which may (or may not) happen depending on certain events during campaign. All but one of them suggests that this isn't the end.
    • If Anette gets arrested, she uses unknown magic to escape. This highly reminds about how Keziah's story once started...
    • If investigators replaced Carl Sanford as a leader of the Lodge, they would become confident that they may protect humanity from otherworldly dangers. Considering all Sanford's talks about "greater good of mankind", this may be early signs of investigators going the same route as he did.
    • If investigators made a deal with Nyarlathothep, he would visit them eventually to force them to pay up their "debt".
  • Heroic Sacrifice: In on of the three possible (non-failure) endings the lead investigator sacrifices themselves and joins demonic pipers to put Azathoth to rest once again.
  • Increasingly Lethal Enemy: In "The Secret Name", all enemies gain +1 health per current agenda, including very first one. While with bosses, this wouldn't change much due to them being tough already, this also applies to constantly spawning swarms of rats, upping them to impressive 5 health at fourth agenda. This, in combination with them having massive Fight boost from Brown Jenkin, makes them into a actual force to be reckoned with.
  • Kaizo Trap: When Vengeful Witch gets defeated, she deals her damage and horror to each investigator in her location. What makes this attack dangerous is that those are treated as direct damage and horror, meaning that you can't soak them with assets.
  • King Mook: Rats in "The Secret Name" can be accompanied by Brown Jenkin (a rat-like creature with human head), who triples their Fight value just by being presented.
  • Locked Door: Major part of "For the Greater Good" scenario involves obtaining different keys to enter restricted section of Silver Twilight Lodge's headquarters.
  • The Mole: Depending on your standing with the Lodge, you can exploit their trust to infiltrate their headquarters and learn more. If you perform well enough, they may even allow you into their Inner Circle.
  • Multiple Endings: Investigators have several ways to pacify Azathoth, depending on which "mementos" they gather and whether they accepted their fate or not (with possible "neutral" option being just barely better than armageddon, as it requires making a deal with Nyarlathothep yourself). Alternatively, they can side with the Lodge and lead it to victory, ending campaign prematurely. Return to the Circle Undone added options to join Coven instead of Lodge (with similar outcome), and alternative method of pacifying Azathoth through reversing Anette's original incantation.
  • Never My Fault: If Josef Meiger gets killed during "On the Death's Doorstep", Carl Sanford would blame investigators for the deaths in the Silver Twilight Estate, no matter whether it was their fault, or not. Right after admitting that he purposefully provoked the Spectral Watcher into attacking the Estate and didn't warn anyone about it.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero: Conflict between Anette Mason and Carl Sanford ultimately disturbs Azathoth in his dream. If he awakens, it would mean The End of the World as We Know It.
  • Nonstandard Game Over: In Before the Black Throne, if, at any point, there are ten or more doom tokens on Azathoth, he immediately awakes and devours the Universe. It's possible to happen even before agenda deck finishes, mainly during agenda advancement, since Azathoth "consumes" all doom on cultists in play.
  • Nothing Is Scarier: We're spared the details of Sanford's demise if he "succeeds" at his ritual, only getting a mentioned of the signature demonic flutes. It's the last time you'd hear of any of the Lodge members, indicating that they suffered some horrible fate.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Many mementos can be missed by failing the scenario; alternatively, it may provide different mementos depending on the resolution. Missing some mementos, in turn, can cut off some of the endings.
    • You have only one shot to track down missing people during your visit to the Twilight Estate. Fail to do it, and you wouldn't be able to recover them later.
    • The endings where you side with either the Lodge or the Coven requires to fulfil certain conditions, each of which can be failed.
    • Unless the investigators have passed the "Witching Hour" scenario in a specific way, they wouldn't be able to meet Erynn in "The Wages of Sin", and even if they do, they still need to complete it in specific way to gain her support.
  • Promoted to Playable: When campaign was originally released as a Mythos Cycle, Anna Kaslow (a soothsayer who shows up several times over the course of campaign, including intro for the first post-prologue scenario) was introduced as a Neutral-class Ally in penultimate pack.
  • Psychopomp: The island in "The Union and Disillusion" is inhabited by the soul-catching birds, whippoorwills.
  • Sequel Hook:
    • If Anette Mason was arrested, she would escape her custody in the epilogue, meaning that vengeful witch is on the loose. What's more, the way she achieves that suggests that suspiciously resembles Keziah Mason's own escape — which she achieved with the help from Nyarlathothep.
    • If Carl Sanford was arrested, his arrest doesn't stick and he soon gets freed as investigators fails to properly charge him. He's free once again, and he knows who his enemies are.
  • Stalked by the Bell: In "Before the Black Throne", investigators must find a way to pacify Azathoth before he awakes, otherwise it would mean The End of the World as We Know It. This threat is measured by Doom tokens on Azathoth; each time agenda advances, Azathoth receives all Doom tokens from cultists currently in play, and when agenda deck ends, instead of immediate failure, game continues, but any further Doom would be put directly on Azathoth. Once there are at least ten doom tokens of Azathoth, it's an immediate apocalypse and game over.
  • Story Branching: While decisions, and consequences of them, were always presented in the game, it's the first campaign which makes it the central part, frequently forcing you to pick sides between two warring factions. Siding with either the Lodge or the Coven alters the campaign at several points, giving you different playthroughs:
    • Depending on the outcome of "At Death’s Doorstep" and what you tell to Sanford afterwards, you would either be accepted into the Lodge, or become its enemy. When the time comes to infiltrate the Lodge's HQ in "For the Greater Good" scenario, it would affect both how you would come in, and what you would face inside.
    • At the start of the "Union and Disillusion" scenario, you have to pick your allegiance, siding with either the Lodge or the Coven, which would alter not just the encounter deck, but also how you progress through this scenario and your final goal. And outcome of this scenario determines whom you would face in "In the Clutches of Chaos" scenario, giving you two unique encounter deck compositions and different bosses.
  • Tarot Motifs: The first agenda in any scenario's agenda deck is named after different Tarot cards. Also, every agenda deck uses Tarot cards as card image.
  • Void Between the Worlds: "Before the Black Throne" happens at the centre of the Universe. Void is both common obstacle and lethal threat; any investigator who gets defeated here, would fall into endless space void, alive, leading to them being driven insane.
    Your steed does not catch you when you fall. Down and down and down, through endless voids of sentient blackness, you fall. And fall. And fall. And fall. You beg and scream and plead and pray for an end, even for a floor upon which to crash upon, but it never comes. You will still be falling when the universe ends.
  • Wicked Witch: Besides Anette Mason and her Coven, there are ghosts of victims of Salem Trials, and Keziah Mason herself, who are very hostile to the descendants of their prosecutors.
  • You Dirty Rat!: Witch House in "The Secret Name" is full of flesh-hungry rats, including Brown Jenkin himself. In fact, they are your only non-boss enemies for this scenario. Unlike most scenarios including them, this time they may become an actual threat, due to massive bonus to Fight provided by aforementioned Brown Jenkin, and health value which grows with every Agenda.

     The Dream Eaters tropes 
  • Abandoned Hospital: "Waking Nightmare" scenario is set in (almost) abandoned St. Mary's hospital... heavily infested with otherworldly spiders.
  • Absurdly Long Stairway:
    • In "Beyond the Gates of Sleep", investigators have to ascend through the Seventy Steps... only to immediately run into the Seven Hundred Steps.
    • In "A Thousand Shapes of Horror", there is a very long staircase which leads to the Underworld (which is a part of the Dream Land, being its lower plane). Thanks to The Unnameable's influence, it may become much longer than it seemed at first.
    • In the ending where team B returns back home, they use the same staircase Virgil described in his writings to descend back into Waking World. However, finding that staircase requires taking some extra steps in previous scenario.
  • Actually Four Mooks: The "Swarm" mechanic allows one monster to impersonate several copies of itself, but they can't separate from each other.
  • Advancing Boss of Doom: In "A Thousand Shapes of Horror, The Unnameable can't be defeated; you must run from it (at first, it can only harm you directly in very limited area). But you still can (and must, in order to progress) damage'' it.
  • And the Adventure Continues:
    • In Weaver of the Cosmos, if investigators survived, but didn't secure the short way into the Enhanced Woods, the only escape route remains — to brute-force their way through first the Underworld, and then through the Dreamlands. If the campaign is played as standalone, endings just cuts off, leaving investigators' fate up to interpretation (they can be imported into other game regardless). We get more info on their exact fate in the combined campaign mode.
    • In the Epilogue 15, the team A travels beneath the Leng monastery on order to find their friends, who are still trapped in the Underworld. It cuts off before we learn how they do this, though the brief summation states that two teams did eventually reunite. The investigators are still considered "driven insane", and thus ineligible for importing into other campaigns.
  • All Webbed Up: No spider-themed horror would be complete without people being put in spider-silk cocoons:
    • In the "Waking Nightmare", if you fail to defend St. Mary's from Dream-Lands spiders, all its inhabitants would be massacred and put into cocoons.
    • In the "Weaver of the Cosmos", some of possible locations actually represent cocoons with spiders' past victims. They only add to whole horror of Atlach-Nacha's domain.
    • If investigators fails in their mission, in one of possible endings, the bridge between worlds gets completed,and whole Earth becomes spiders' hunting grounds, with people who aren't consumed outright being put into cocoons. Countless cocoons. Investigators actually tries to break them, to no avail.
  • Antagonist Title: In the "Weaver of the Cosmos", titular Weaver is no one else but Atlach-Nacha herself.
  • Big Bad Ensemble: While simultaneous, each story has different antagonists, who don't interact with each other directly and have separate agendas and minions. Their goals are also mutually exclusive, which means that even if they both succeed, they have to fight each other for control; humanity, obviously, can't survive even one of them, let alone both at once, fighting each other.
  • Book Ends: Scenario 1A ("Beyond the Gates of Sleep") starts with the investigators ascending through two Absurdly Long Stairways. The Golden Ending for scenario 4B ("Weaver of the Cosmos") results in the second team of investigators using these same stairways to escape back to the Waking World.
  • Cap Raiser: Inverted with "Deep Slumber" treachery, which reduces hand size by 3, and forces investigator to discard excessive cards every time they draw anything, instead of only during upkeep phase. Fortunately, it's possible to get rid of it.
  • Choose a Handicap: When playing in the combined campaign mode, but not being on the path to the Golden Ending, it's possible to send the Black Cat to aid one of the teams, at the cost of making the other team's task harder.
  • Cobweb Jungle:
    • One of the "treachery" cards in spider-infested places is a cobweb huge enough you can actually stuck in it.
    • In the "Waking Nightmare", if infestation spreads out of control, cobwebs eventually would cover the entire building.
  • Damage Reduction:
    • Corrupted Orderly cancels 1 damage from any source when attacked at infested location.
    • Inconspicuous Zoog can't be defeated in one attack if it still has "swarm" cards; all excessive damage gets cancelled and it moves to a connected location.
  • Demonic Possession: Fate of everyone whose dreams Nyarlathotep consumed; it allows him to possess their minds, so he would "awake" alongside them in Waking World, beginning his invasion.
  • Despair Event Horizon: In the "Weaver of the Cosmos", if investigators becomes trapped in Atlach-Nacha's domain, story ends with them realising that they have next to zero chances to escape from the Underworld on their own, without any sort of direction. They goes insane.
  • Draconic Abomination: The Moonbound Byakhee in the "Dark Side of the Moon" scenario is a particularly big and dangerous byakhee (dragon/insect being), quite capable of tearing apart careless investigators. With high "alert", it hunts them.
  • Dream Land:
    • The Dream Quest story is set in the Dreamlands, and involves people getting stuck here against their will. Whatever caused this, and whatever may end this, it is certain that the only place where the investigators can receive their answers is Unknown Kadath.
    • The Web of Dreams story involves the Dreamlands and "Waking World" (Earth) gradually merging together, which, if not prevented, destroys both worlds. To stop this from happening, investigators must find another way into the Dreamlands and through it, into the realm of the Eldritch Abomination that causes all of this.
  • Early Instalment Weirdness: The "Incospicous Zoog" enemy runs away every time a swarm card of his is defeated, moving to a connecting location and exhausting, in a manner eerily similiar to enemies with the "Elusive" keyword from the The Feast of Hemlock Vale campaign.
  • Eldritch Location: The Dreamlands is a strange place, which does not abide the rules of the Waking World, and is inhabited by all sorts of weird (and often dangerous) creatures.
  • Enemy Summoner: Ancient Zoog can continuously add more "swarm" cards to the other zoog enemies, and thus should be dispatched quickly... which can be problematic, due to it being considered "Elite", and thus immune to many card effects.
  • Everybody's Dead, Dave:
    • In the Epilogue 7, the Black Cat tries to warn team A about team B's demise, so they won't try to return for them, only to realise that they can't hear it anyway.
    • In the Epilogue 11, the Black Cat warns team A about team B's demise, and pleads them to not try to search for them, since they are doomed. They heed it.
  • "Everybody Dies" Ending: In the Epilogue 1, after both teams fail on their tasks, Earth becomes the battlefield for two antagonistic Ancient Ones''. This is the only epilogue to explicitly state that the campaign is failed.
    There are no survivors.
  • Fed to the Beast: In "Dark Side of the Moon", if the investigators fail to escape from the Moon and get captured by the Moon Beasts, they recognise Randolph Carter and feed him to the Moon Lizard. The last that can be heard of him is his scream.
  • Forced Sleep: The group that enters the Dreamlands was supposed to just prove that it's real and go back, but for some reason got stuck there. According to Randolph Carter, this is not normal, because Dreamers are capable to waking up just by willing it. Something forces them to stay, and this "something" gradually kills them.
  • Genius Loci: In "A Thousand Shapes of Horror", The House With No Name and The Unnameable are one and the same... and are not happy to see unwelcome guests. And the longer scenario goes, the more dangerous The Unnameable becomes.
  • Giant Spider: Stronger minions of Atlach-Nacha are represented by huge spiders, ranging from Leng Spiders (dog-sized) to really huge ones.
  • Gimmick Level:
    • "Dark Side of the Moon" has the "Alert" mechanic, which gradually accumulates, separately for each investigator, and alters the way things goes for them for the worse. In order to win, investigators not only have to do what they came here for, but also find a way to reduce "Alert" before it overwhelms them.
    • "Where the Gods Dwell", instead of the usual boss battle, has (several versions of) Nyarlathothep secretly attacking the investigators from the encounter deck, after which they must find a way to get rid of it.
    • "Weaver of the Cosmos" makes heavy use of Doom on locations (which, unlike most scenarios, is permanent here), but main gimmick is the final boss herself. Atlach-Nacha is a giant spider sitting in a centre of enormous cobweb (that locations players travel through serve as the corners of that cobweb), with players traveling between them and trying to firstly cut off some legs (every one of them counts as separate enemy), which would move between locations when whole monstrosity rotates. After doing so, you would face the Weaver herself. In both cases, Atlach-Nacha actively changes locations at random.
  • Golden Ending:
    • Each campaign, by itself, has four possible endings; in only one of them, the team actually safely returns back home; team A doesn't need to do any extra steps, but team B only gets the best outcome if they discover shortcut into the Enhanced Woods (by exploring side area that is far away from your actual goal). When played in combined campaigns mode, one of the 16 possible versions of the epilogue can be achieved if both teams survive and reunite in the Waking World (specifically, Epilogue 6).
    • It requires taking the right decision at certain interludes and achieving specific tasks, in both campaigns, but it's possible to not only survive, but utterly defeat Nyarlathotep, completely ruining his plans and banishing him from the Dreamlands. If you also combine it with the epilogue where both teams survive and reunite, this gives you one of the (very rare in Arkham Horror) actual happy endings.
  • Go Mad from the Revelation: In the Epilogue 13, right after defeating Nyarlathotep, team A uses a secret passage to reach the Underworld in hopes of finding their lost friends... only to find out what has happened to them, the Underworld and the Earth. This realisation shatters their minds, driving them insane.
  • Happy Ending Override: Epilogue 5; a seemingly triumphant team A returns from the Dream Lands... only to instantly get killed by the giant spiders, whom team B failed to stop.
    The Black Cat: Oh, you’re awake. Interesting. I did not expect you to return. You probably should not have. There is something you need to know. Your companions…well, long story short, things did not go as planned. Your world is no longer yours. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news. Anyway, since I have no desire to be a meal, I’ll be off now. Whatever you do, don’t leave this room.
  • Hope Spot:
    • In "Dark Side of the Moon", if you fail to escape the Moon, the lead investigator wakes up at the last moment, seemingly escaping both Moon-Beasts' trap and the Dream Lands, only to realise that this is another nightmare. Then they wake up from that, still in captivity, and things only go downhill from here.
    • In the Epilogue 2, investigators from team B actually returns home triumphant... only to see that their friends from team A became possessed by Nyarlathotep and went completely insane. This is the fate which awaits all of humanity, very soon.
      The Black Cat: So you’ve made it back to your world. I hope you had a pleasant trip. Yes, your erstwhile companions are awake once more. But they’re not the same, are they? Of course they’re not. They might not remember their dreams, but that does not mean they did not happen. Do you not see the glimmer in their eyes? Have you not noticed them whispering to some other entity when you are not around? Yes, that one. You know of whom I speak. Don’t worry, you at least have some time before the end. Just remember: I did warn you.
  • I Choose to Stay: One of the endings for "The Dream Quest" campaign involves investigators from team A voluntarily staying in the Dreamlands forever instead of returning back home. Four (out of possible 16) epilogues deal with the consequences of this decision:
    • In the Epilogue 9, after team B failed their mission, the Dreamlands remain the last and only "safe" place after the "Waking World's" demise. The Black Cat, realising that they can't understand its warnings, decides that it's better if they simply forget about their past lives altogether; "they would prefer this to the alternative".
    • In the Epilogue 10, team B returns home, hoping to find their friends already awake, not knowing that they simply decided to stay. The Black Cat actually calls that a dick move, though immediately admits that it would've done the same in their situation: the temptation is just that strong.
    • In the Epilogue 11, the investigators from team A learn about their Team B friends' demise, and are only stopped from rushing on their search by the Black Cat who warns them that there's no chance to save them now.
    • In the Epilogue 12, the two teams reunite in the Dream Lands. The Black Cat tries to convince them to return home, but in rather lazy manner; whether team B actually stay after this remains ambiguous.
  • Increasingly Lethal Enemy:
    • In the "Dark Side of the Moon", certain monsters, hazards and tasks becomes progressively harder the more "Alert" investigators accumulate, which, in turn, accumulates when certain negative events occur, like agenda advancement or failing certain Random Encounters. High "Alert" can and will slow down your progress, which, in turn, would help to accumulate even more "Alert". Having low "Alert" is mandatory to enter the White Ship and convince its Captain to smuggle you from the Moon (it's possible to argue with him with high "Alert" once you actually enter, but good luck passing a test with difficulty of 5 or higher) and finish the scenario, but there are only limited opportunities to decrease it, with only one stable option towards the very end. Also, high "Alert" greatly increases the team's chances of being caught when attempting to escape from the Moon once the final agenda advances.
    • Pitch Spiders in "The Point of No Return" have their "swarm" value increasing depending on amount of damage tokens on scenario reference card, which can go pretty high if enough time progresses.
  • King Mook:
    • Spider of Leng gradually empowers the Spider Swarms by adding more and more "swarm" cards to them. No spiders around? Then it just spawns one in its location.
    • Ancient Zoog hides in some safe locations, where it keeps generating more and more "swarm" cards for the other zoogs (who're often already annoying to dispatch). It's also Elite, which makes it much harder to kill.
  • Life Imitates Art: In-Universe; this is what kickstarts the whole plot. When things described by Virgil starts occurring to other people, the team of investigators decides that there might be some truth behind this after all. One group enters the Dreamlands to investigate this, while the other stays in the "Waking World" to guard them and control the experiment.
  • Missed Him by That Much: Several epilogues involve two teams surviving... but failing to reunite afterwards:
    • In the Epilogue 8, team A actually awakes... while team B remains trapped in the Dream Lands, eventually deciding to just settle there.
    • In the Epilogue 14, team A travels into the Underworld to save their friends... just as team B found a way into the Enchanted Forest, through which they then escape back into the Waking World. It seems very unlikely for them to ever reunite now.
    • In the Epilogue 16, team A travels into the Underworld, but, unfortunately, team B is currently in the Dream Lands — and they can't even safely travel back the same way. Their chances to meet each other after that are slim, at best.
      The Black Cat: Oh, what a tragedy of errors this has become. You just passed each other! Oh well. You’re on your own now. Yes, there are ways out of the underworld, but they’re not exactly easy to find. There’s gugs, and ghasts, and ghouls, and…well, you’ll see. Honestly, why would you come down here? I guess I hope you make it back out some day. As for me? I have my own home to return to. Don’t worry. I’m sure you haven’t seen the last of me.
  • Multiple Endings:
    • Both mini-campaigns have their own sets of possible endings (if not counting failure to stop the Big Bad):
      • In The Dream Quest, once Nyarlathothep gets defeated, the investigators may choose to either awake and return home, or stay here forever.
      • In The Web of Dreams, there are three (non-apocalyptic) endings. If investigators secured their way out of the Underworld, they would escape back to the Wake World. Otherwise, their fate depends on whether "Randolph Carter" was around to sabotage their escape route into the Underworld or not; if he was, they would be trapped in Atlach-Nacha's domain and go insane, otherwise they would stuck in the Dream Lands for unknown time, though the resolution leaves their success (or lack of thereof) to the players' interpretation. The endings becomes much more complex when playing in combined mode.
    • When playing in the combined campaign mode, there're several possible versions of (rather short) epilogue; which one you receive depends on how both campaigns ends; each campaign by itself has four endings: failure and demise, triumph and return home, the ending where investigators never returns home, and (unique to this mode) one ending where investigators chose to travel to find their lost friends first. There are 16 possible combos in total. All epilogues are narrated by the Black Cat, whether you trusted it at the start or not. The epilogues don't take into account whether the Golden Ending of The Dream Quest was achieved or not.
  • Never My Fault: Not that it owns its mistakes at any other point, but in the Epilogue 1, the Black Cat blatantly blames investigators for armageddon, despite barely bothering to assist either of teams at any point.
  • Only the Worthy May Pass: In "Beyond the Gates of Sleep", in order to enter the Dreamlands, investigators must pass Nasht and Kaman-Tah's trials.
  • Or Was It a Dream?: By the end of "Waking Nightmare", whole hospital seems to return to its normal state... with exactly one exception: if doctor Maheswaran is dead, she wouldn't return, with no explanation.
  • Our Ghouls Are Creepier: "Thousand Shapes of Horror" and "The Point of No Return" both feature not only the already-familiar ghouls, but also another species of flesh-eating humanoids, named ghasts, who're slightly more agile, and more active in pursuing their prey, specifically picking the most vulnerable targets.
  • Our Giants Are Bigger: Gugs appear in certain scenarios in both campaigns. They are big, four-armed beasts with vertical slit-like mouth. They kill and eat anything too weak to fight back and too slow to run, up to and including humans.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Telling the Black Cat to go away would permanently disable the interaction between two groups, and by proxy cut off the Golden Ending.
    • Several epilogue variants depends on asking the Black Cat for specific information at specific time. If the Cat was told to go away, or it started its investigation (setting you on the path to Golden Ending), those interactions becomes inaccessible.
    • The Black Cat's investigation starts if it notices that there are two versions of Randolph Carter existing simultaneously, which requires the team A to send it with information for the team B. It cuts off prematurely if any of scenarios gets failed, as the Cat either misses the crucial clues, or loses interest.
    • It's not possible to access the True Final Boss (and thus, the Golden Ending) if the team B failed to obtain and preserve the Silver Key.
  • Power Nullifier:
    • "Threads of Reality" treachery targets your asset with highest printed cost (excluding permanents and weaknesses), and blanks all its printed text, excluding forced abilities and traits. The only way to turn this effect off is to discard an asset under your control.
    • Suspicious Orderlies can't hurt you, nor you can hurt them, but their mere presence disables your ability to investigate for as long you keep them engaged with you, stalling your progress.
  • Press X to Die:
    • In "Beyond the Gates of Sleep", refusing the Black Cat's aid provides absolutely no benefits; conversely, it cuts off many alternate endings, and the campaign's Golden Ending.
    • In the "Search for Kadath", if you antagonised the cats by forcing your way into the temple (an already questionable idea by itself), do not return to Ulthar; it spawns hordes of hostile cats to hunt you, and there's no benefit from defeating them: they worth zero victory points, and cause lethal consequences later on. Even if you don't antagonise them, Ulthar provides only a small amount of clues, and nothing else. When playing in combined campaign mode, actually killing those cats when spawned would result in your investigator being unceremoniously killed off right after campaign's ending.
  • Puppeteer Parasite: In the "Waking Nightmare", orderlies are controlled by spiders inside their bodies. They reveal themselves once infestation starts.
  • The Quest: Once Virgil gets found at the end of "Beyond the Gates of Sleep", the main goal of the campaign changes to find Unknown Kadath, where investigators can find answers to their questions about the Dreamlands, and find real evidences of Dreamlands existence.
    • The main point of "The Search for Kadath" is to identify Kadath's coordinates, by investigating several crucial locations of the Dreamlands. This eventually attracts Nyarlathotep's minions' attention and leads to Virgil's – and, depending on their performance, investigators' as well – capture, leading to "Dark Side of the Moon" scenario where Virgil gets saved, before adventure continues.
    • In "Where the Gods Dwell", the investigators finally reaches Kadath, one way or another, only to find it abandoned; the whole expedition turns out to be a trap set by Nyarlathotep.
  • Reality Bleed: Dream Land gradually merges with the "Waking world". If process would not be stopped, consequences would be catastrophic, for both of worlds. Just to get an idea, how bad it would be, take setup of "Waking Nightmare", and apply this to the whole world: this what would awaits us all if the Great Bridge ever gets completed.
  • Red Herring: The campaign log tracks whether the investigators "strayed from the path" in "'Beyond the Gates of Sleep", and never uses this in any way. There are no benefits from not straying, either; conversely, players miss most of the experience points this scenario provides if they abide the laws.
  • Rescue Arc: The whole point of "Dark Side of the Moon" is to rescue Virgil (and Randolph Carter, if he was abducted too), who was abducted by the Corsairs in the previous scenario's resolution, from imprisonment in the city of Moon-Beasts.
  • Senseless Sacrifice: In the Epilogue 3, team B fights Atlach-Nacha, knowing that by cutting her off from the Waking World, they'd cut off their only way to escape, as well. Unfortunately, due to the team A's failure, the other Eldritch Abomination reaches the Earth, meaning that their sacrifice was for nothing. Even The Black Cat only partially succeeds at trying to assure itself that it doesn't care.
  • "Shaggy Dog" Story: In the Epilogue 4, team B succeeds at their mission and escapes Atlach-Nacha's domain, but fails to reach the only escape way to the Waking World. The Black Cat assures them to not even bother, stating that the Earth will soon become a living hell, because their friends failed to stop Nyarlathotep, who already started his invasion of Earth.
  • Shoot the Shaggy Dog: In "Where the Gods Dwell", after surviving so many ordeals and finally arriving to Kadath, Virgil realises that all of this was for nothing (with Kadath being long since abandoned, meaning he has no meaning to acquire any proof of his journeys), and suddenly gets confronted by Nyarlathotep, who kills him by stabbing him through his chest.
  • So Proud of You: In the Epilogue 15, after team A travels into the Underworld to save their friends, who are still trapped there, the Black Cat breaks its usual cold demeanour and states that their bravery shows that not all is lost for humanity, and instead of the usual mean "so long, humans", asks the investigators to keep protecting the two worlds.
  • Spider People: Some of the most dangerous Atlach-Nacha's minions looks like weird hybrid of human and spider. This is also how Atlach-Nacha herself is pictured.
  • Spider Swarm: One of the weakest, but most numerous minions of Atlach-Nacha are actual swarms of small spiders; they are pathetically weak, but are very hard to run away from once they gather in massive numbers (which they do).
  • Story Overwrite: Even though you only give away the Silver Key in combined campaign mode, the game still assumes that it was lost when playing "The Web of Dreams" campaign as standalone, so investigators can't use it to escape if they get trapped in Atlach-Nacha's domain due to actions of Nyarlathotep. Even if it's still a part of someone's deck.
  • Suicide Mission: In the "Weaver of the Cosmos", if investigators become trapped in Atlach-Nacha's domain without any escape route due to Nyarlathothep's actions (which would happen before scenario even starts, if at all), their mission becomes one-way trip: they still can protect Humanity, but the only meaning to do so would also seal their escape route. There is a way to escape past that, but it requires preparing in advance.
  • Survivor Guilt: In Waking Nightmare, if Doctor Maheswaran dies (which happens only if you either takes her with you and then fails to protect her, or if the hospital gets overrun), lead investigator suffers mental trauma.
  • Temple of Doom: "The Temple of Unattainable Desires". King Kuranes specifically warns investigators that once they enter, they risk never leaving; while temple itself bears no particular danger, (at least in gameplay terms); it's home for some of more dangerous enemies in this scenario.
  • Title Drop:
    • The expansion's name, Dream Eaters, is also the name of the fifth act of "Where the Gods Dwell scenario (from The Dream Quest'' campaign), which involves stopping Nyarlathotep from devouring the investigators' own dreams, enslaving them in the process.
    • The Web of Dreams campaign's final scenario's name, "Weaver of the Cosmos", is also the name of penultimate act.
  • Two Lines, No Waiting: The expansion was designed in a way which allows you to either play the two stories separately, or combine them together into one big campaign (plus epilogues) which alternates between two storylines, occasionally allowing investigators to interact with each other. If you play the campaigns together, each part has their own separate campaign log, chaos bag and pool of available investigators; the game refers to two teams by marking them with letters "A" (The Dream Quest campaign) and "B" (The Web of Dreams campaign). Despite being "separated", during interludes, the two teams contact each other through the messenger and their interactions can alter the chaos bag for both campaigns; certain events, once they occur in one campaign, affect both, and the only way to achieve the Golden Ending is to fulfil certain conditions in both campaigns.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: Thought that the "law of Ulthar" (no one may kill a cat and live) was merely flavour text? Wrong. Force your way into the temple in "The Search for Kadath", and cats (giant, angry, sapient and really dangerous cats, not your common stray cats) will be very angry at you. Make a mistake of returning to Ulthar afterwards to collect lost clues there, and they start hunting for you, and would refuse to aid you in subsequent scenarios. It becomes even worse in combined campaign mode, where it can have outright lethal consequences.
  • Void Between the Worlds: Atlach-Nacha's domain is the enormous abyss of emptiness between worlds; she use her mysterious cobweb to link worlds by creating "bridges".
  • Violation of Common Sense: You are warned to not stray from the path, but besides the lone gug (whom you may or may not encounter) and one of the treacheries which only targets those in the woods, there are no punishments for doing so; in fact, breaking the rules and going adventuring is your main source of experience in this scenario. This is likely the entire point: only those who dare can reach Unknown Kadath.
  • That Was Not a Dream: In the end of "Waking Nightmare", the last doubts that this night's events really happened gets shattered by strange patient you met in St. Mary's Hospital that night... Randolph Carter.
  • While Rome Burns: In the Epilogue 9, after successfully escaping Nyarlathotep's grasp, the investigators decides to, instead of returning home, stay in the Dreamlands to live a wondrous new life. The Black Cat calls them out on their naivety, reminding them that their bodies are still alive in the Waking World... and that other predators are already close.
  • You Are Already Dead:
    • In the "Weaver of the Cosmos", even in the endings where Atlach-Nacha is stopped, investigators themselves may still die, depending on whether they have an escape route or not. There're several ways to secure it, but all of them require special preparations, which you may easily miss on the first try.
    • If you antagonise the cats of Ulthar and then kill any (spectacularly bad idea), then, once campaign ends, just after the relevant epilogue has been read, your investigator gets swarmed by vengeful cats and killed. The end.
  • You Can't Thwart Stage One: In "The Search for Kadath", no matter the outcome, Virgil will get captured, either together with the other investigators, or when he briefly separates from them, forcing investigators to go to rescue him on the Moon.
  • You Dirty Rat!: In "A Thousand Shapes of Horror", the swarms of flesh-hungry rats return, this time combined with "Swarm" mechanic, meaning that there are even more of them. This still makes little to address their low combat stats, though; if anything, they're more of a nuisance.
  • You Have Outlived Your Usefulness:
  • Your Soul Is Mine!: Nyarlathotep consuming his victims' dreams is heavily implied to have effects similar to actually consuming their souls, at least partially. If investigators fail to stop him, this happens to them, too.
  • Zerg Rush: The new "Swarm" mechanic. Each "swarm card" on a "swarm" enemy means an individual copy of this enemy, allowing them to amass more monsters than usual; fortunately, they can't separate from each other, and can be fought all at once, since any excessive damage transfers to another copy. Most "swarm" enemies are weak, with such cards being their only protection. Most.

     The Innsmouth Conspiracy tropes 
  • Adaptational Backstory Change: Backstory behind the hybrids was changed to remove the infamous crossbreeding between the humans and the Deep Ones. The new explanation? The cursed artifacts.
  • Amnesiac Hero: Investigators have no memories of how they got there, and what happened before. Alongside their main goal, investigators are also trying to restore these memories, which, besides narrative purpose, also rewards players with various benefits.
  • Berserk Button: Killing the young Deep Ones in "A Light in the Fog" would alert the other Deep Ones to your position, and make them drop whatever they're doing and rush to kill you.
  • Boss in Mook Clothing: Aquatic Abomination has more health than some investigators (and backs it up with high Fight stat), hits only slightly weaker than most bosses, and can quickly catch up with running investigators by going through fully flooded locations. Despite all this, it's a part of normal encounter deck, and lacks Elite trait and doesn't award victory points.
  • The Cavalry: If investigators fail to escape "The Pit of Despair" in time, Elina Harper shows up just in time to save them before they drown completely.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience: Campaign guide marks all flashback scenarios with distinct green colour, making it easier to distinguish them from the events happening in the present.
  • Double-Meaning Title: Campaign's title refers to both the Order's plot to flood the planet, and Agent Harper and Agent Dawson's mission to steal the Order's riches, with investigators as disposable pawns.
  • Drowning Pit:
    • "The Pit of Despair" happens entirely within various caves, often partially or entirely flooded. As the scenario goes, more and more caves gets flooded, with investigators having the less and less place to catch for air. The goal is to find a way to escape from the caves before they get filled completely. Failure to escape in time would take a heavy toll on their health, causing some physical trauma to everyone, but before they could actually drown, the investigators would be rescued by Elina Harper in the last moment.
    • The later part of "A Light in the Fog" takes place in the deep caves under the Falcon Point lighthouse, which slowly gets filled with water. This time, there's no one to save the investigators if they fail; they would drown.
  • Everyone Is a Suspect: "The Vanishing of Elina Harper" has the investigators trying to find out who has abducted agent Elina Harper, and where she's kept, with six possible variants for both the abductor (basically, every named character amongst the locals save for a bus driver) and for the hideout. Since there's only one true abductor and only one true hideout, and scenario ends on a failure immediately if investigators fail to identify at least one of the two, they must investigate and reduce the amount of suspects as much as possible before making an accusation. It helps that the true suspect/hideout would never be in the leads deck, meaning that the faster the players may run through that deck, the faster they would run out of Red Herrings.
  • Fish People: The Deep Ones, human/fish humanoids from the depths, returns, this time as the main focus of campaign. They comes in all forms, sizes and colours, and all of them are universally hostile to the investigators.
  • Forced into Evil: If you manage to rescue Agent Harper and identify her abductor, you would hear out their motivation for doing so. Some are shameless villains (Barnabas Marsh and Joyce Little), and some are ambiguous (Zadok Allen and Robert Friendly), but Brian Burnham and Othera Gilman are motivated by the Order of Dagon forcing them to do their bidding at gun point.
  • Gimmick Level:
    • "In Too Deep" has investigators dealing with barricades placed on the streets of Innsmouth, blocking their way through. There're the ways to break them, but as scenario goes on, new ones may emerge.
    • Two scenarios in a row are built entirely around using vehicles:
      • "Devil Reef" is entirely built around traveling between various sea locations on your boat, only going out to dive into the underwater tunnels to search for clues and keys. While it's possible to just swim between them on your own, it would consume an entire turn, so it's not efficient.
      • "Horror in High Gear" is built around investigators traveling on their cars, while trying to run away from pursuing Order's hitmen. Instead of the normal map, it has the road which randomly builds on the go, with investigators needing to actually scouting their way ahead or risk running into something nasty — or even off the cliff.
  • Go Back to the Source: Flashback scenarios starts in Innsmouth, and later visits the Devil Reef, then, after a failed attempt to investigate the Esoteric Order's HQ, ends with investigators being captured and sent to the guy named Oceiros Marsh, the lighthouse keeper. The actual investigation starts with revisiting Innsmouth, and ends with going to the Devil Reef, or, rather, under it, with Oceiros' lighthouse being the middle point.
  • He Knows Too Much: Regardless of what you say to Oceiros (or if you chose to stay silent), he would think that investigators have seen too much, and throw them into same hole where he previously threw Agent Dawson, as it's how investigators ended up where the campaign started. The only thing that changes is which chaos token gets added into bag.
  • Here We Go Again!: If investigators collects all fourteen flashbacks, after finishing the campaign they would see the last, fifteenth one — which would reveal that there are much, much more underwater cities than just this one, and that the Deep Ones would return one day.
  • How We Got Here: While the campaign mostly follows a linear story, several scenarios occurs in the past, and tells the story how investigators even got in the troubles with the Order, and lost their memories.
    • "The Pit of Despair" ends with investigators being saved by a mysterious woman who introduces herself as Elina Harper. Since the investigators can't remember who she is, she tells them that their involvement in the whole plot started when her boss, agent Thomas Dawson, hired them to find her after she disappeared on a mission at Innsmouth. "The Vanishing of Elina Harper" is essentially retelling on how this mission went, and what got the Order on investigators' tail. Elina, of course, would survive the mission regardless of outcome, though she wouldn't join the team unless saved there (and would be seriously injured without their help).
    • "Devil's Reef" tells how investigators even came up with the idea to investigate the Order further.
    • "The Lair o Dagon" ends with investigators being captured and thrown into the pit (losing their memories due to head trauma), while Thomas Dawson gets killed.
  • The Juggernaut: In "In Too Deep", the Innsmouth Shoggoth ignores the barriers between locations, breaking right through them.
  • Lock and Key Puzzle: This campaign (re)introduces the keys, previously used in one of The Circle Undone scenarios, only this time using the special tokens instead of reusing the Chaos tokens. Depending on the scenario, exact function (and even the look, which scenario's intro always describes) may vary greatly; some are crucial for the main goal's advancement, others unlock flashbacks or provide other benefits.
  • The Mob Boss Is Scarier: If Brian Burnham is the abductor, Agent Harper states that him being afraid of the Order to the point that he would rather risk to abduct a federal agent than disobey its orders, indicates that he's not lying.
  • Multiple Endings: In the final scenario, "Into the Maelstrom", the main goal is to stop the ritual which floods the Earth. Additionally, if the investigators triggers a flashback about the agents' true mission (steal the treasures of the Deep Ones), they may agree to help Elina Harper in doing so — or decide to just collapse the lair along with all its treasures, with agent Harper likely perishing, as she refuses to evacuate without completing her mission; either option, if fulfilled, would be reflected in the ending. Both the main objective and the additional tasks are treated as separate act cards, and it's only mandatory to finish either one of them before leaving, however if the ritual was not stopped (the original task), this would result in a massive damage to the planet (albeit the Deep Ones seemingly wouldn't be able to escalate it to apocalypse), and "reward" the investigators with (otherwise avoidable) two points of mental trauma. The narrative directly questions whether it has worth it.
  • Mystery Episode: Entire point of "The Vanishing of Elina Harper" is to identify who abducted the titular agent Elina Harper, and where she's kept captive, then rescue her.
  • Nonstandard Game Over:
    • In "The Vanishing of Elina Harper", investigators must find the true culprit behind agent Harper's disappearance, and where she's held captive. Guessing both the true abductor and the true hideout allows them to proceed further unthreatened, while mistaking either of them causes massive angry mob going after their blood. If they mistake both, however, scenario ends immediately, and investigators are forced to resign before even going to the final part. Allowing the second agenda to advance before investigators have info they need leads to the same outcome.
    • In "A Light in the Fog", at some point, the investigators gest sealed in the caves beneath lighthouse with no way to go back to the surface. The caves then starts filling with water. Failing to escape leads to all investigators either drowning or being killed by the Deep Ones, and campaign ending prematurely.
  • No-Sell: Priest of Dagon can't be defeated if he has no Doom, he would just fully heal instead. He starts with no Doom by default, but gets one point if he has none, so this invulnerability doesn't last for long.
  • Oxygen Meter: Most scenarios(namely "The Pit of Despair", "Devil Reef", "The Lair of Dagon" and "Into the Maelstrom") have the drowning mechanic; if investigator ends their turn in the fully-drowned location, they start grasping for air, and have until the end of the next turn to reach less drowned location, or suffer massive direct damage due to asphyxia (enough to kill less durable investigator in one hit, and finish off anyone else if it repeats).
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Every flashback can be obtained only during specific scenario and only if specific conditions are met. The very last one unlocks in the epilogue, if the fourteen other flashbacks were unlocked before.
    • Some flashbacks, if not obtained, would cut off certain events and opportunities:
      • If the investigators don't remember killing off the Horror of the Devil Reef, once the "Devil Reef" scenario comes, they wouldn't be able to permanently kill it, as it's a prequel scenario.
      • If investigators don't retrieve the relics from the Devil Reef, they wouldn't be able to later take them from the lighthouse, as the reason why they ended up on the lighthouse is because investigators were caught with them.
      • If investigators have no memories of Agent Harper's abductor escaping the prison, said abductor wouldn't show up later.
  • Punch-Clock Hero: Joe Sargeant in "In Too Deep" is the sole local to be on investigators' side... because they promised him money.
  • Religion of Evil: Cultists from the Esoteric Order of Dagon are recurring antagonists in this campaign. Penultimate scenario, "The Lair of Dagon", even involves visiting their headquarters.
  • Rising Water, Rising Tension: All but two campaign scenario uses new flood mechanic, which allows to fully or partially flood specific locations, which often causes serious troubles for investigators. In the setting where your enemies are the Deep Ones and other monsters from the deep, the depth equals death...
    • "The Pit of Despair" is all about finding a way out of the titular pit before everyone drowns in the rising tide. As flood level increases, the investigators have less and less place to grasp for fresh air...
    • In "In Too Deep", Innsmouth gradually gets consumed by the sea. With each completed agenda, the flood level constantly goes up, with more and more locations becoming consumed, penalties for staying in flooded locations grows harsher and harsher, and even the Doom threshold becomes smaller and smaller (it starts at 6 for the first one, and is merely 3 for the fourth one), as if it tries to make the players feel the same panic as their characters.
    • In "A Light in the Fog", the later part of scenario takes place in the caves under the lighthouse, which slowly, but surely gets consumed by the rising tide. Investigators must find a way to escape before the tide consumes them all. Unlike the previous scenarios with such gimmick, this time around it's "do or die" situation: failure to escape in time would result in them all being drowned to death or killed by the Deep Ones.
  • Timed Mission:
    • "The Vanishing of Elina Harper" has investigators on a time limit (until the end of the second agenda) to find the true abductor and where Elina Harper is kept captive. If they succeeds in at least one of the goals, scenario continues with them going on the rescue, otherwise, it ends prematurely.
    • "A Light in the Fog" has several combinations of paired agenda/act cards, where the plot would progress further regardless of whether the investigators succeed or not, but failing to achieve the current goal in time results in investigators being at disadvantage during the next stage. The Doom tokens persists throughout the agendas (they just gain higher Doom threshold), so the total time limit for a scenario is the same regardless of how the mission goes.
  • Uncertain Doom: If investigators choses not to side with Elina Harper in "Into the Maelstrom", she would try to finish her mission by herself. In the end, after successfully escaping the underwater city, investigators would wonder whether she did this after all or not, since she never came out.
  • Underwater Ruins: The ancient ruins of the unknown civilisation are presented in the "Devil Reef" scenario, being the source of some ancient relics investigators are after.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: Normally, in "The Vanishing of Elina Harper", investigators are supposed to "parley" with the citizens of Innsmouth in order to obtain some clues from them (the true culprit would never be amongst those in the deck, so other five suspects would always be innocent, as much as it applies to Innsmouth). If the players attacks them anyway, they would later show up in "In Too Deep" as your enemies, slowing down your progress in the already time-restrained scenario even further.
  • You Dirty Rat!: Caves in "The Pit of Despair" are heavily infested with rats, who attacks anything resembling food on sight.
  • You Wake Up in a Room: "The Pit of Despair" starts with investigators awakening in some unknown cave which slowly fills up with water, with no memories how they got there. Entire goal of scenario is to find a way to escape.

     Edge of the Earth tropes 
  • Animalistic Abomination: The creepy giant albino penguins returns. They aren't aggressive by default, but slows down the investigators as long as they stay alive, by making entering or leaving their location cost extra action.
  • Anyone Can Die: None of the Companions are safe. One of them dies at random at the start of campaign, and the rest may die either if the investigator whom they follow or themselves gets defeated, or during certain story events. In general, it's nearly impossible to prevent at least two more deaths.
  • Arbitrary Headcount Limit: One investigator may be followed by one Partner; no exceptions. The rests stays offscreen, but out of danger... most of the time.
  • Black Comedy Animal Cruelty: There's an achievement for killing two Giant Albino Penguins simultaneously with a single use of Dynamite asset. The name of it? "Wuk Wuk Boom".
  • Blob Monster:
    • Majority or your enemies look like the formless mass of luminescent hungry goo, often with mind-breaking psychic powers, including Big Bad.
    • The later scenarios have the infamous shoggoths amongst the enemies, which comes in several variations. They may or may not be related to the Big Bad, given the similarities and plot revelations.
  • The Cavalry: If the investigators successfully escapes the facility, they would get rescued as the help arrives on the third (and final) plane.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: Excluding Eliyah Ashevak (who's the loner by nature), the rest of the Partners, assuming they make it that far, would spread into couples, with special scenes for each couple in which both Partners survives:
    • If Amy Kensler and Mala Sinha both survives, Kensler finally gathers enough courage to invite Sinha on a date, with Sinha agreeing and revealing that she was aware all along.
    • If Avery Claypool and Roald Ellsworth both survives, they plan a vacation in some remote warm place for just two of them. Long vacation.
    • If Professor Dyer and Danforth both survives, they decides to continue their researches together, with Danforth seemingly finally recovering from the traumas caused by the first expedition.
    • If James "Cookie" Fredericks and Takada Hiroko both survives, they becomes friends and starts preparing for the mission to find Takada's missing father and save him if he's still alive.
  • Death Glare:
    • If Eliyah dies in the crash, when Anyu insists on staying with the corpse of her owner, Cookie suggests to just leave "the damn dog" behind. The rests looks at him so angrily, he shuts up immediately.
    • If Mala dies in the crash, Cookie says that she "knew the risks", to which Dr Kensler (who was in love with her, but unable to propose) would give him a glare that "can freeze tears". This shuts up not just him, but the rest of the team too.
  • Dwindling Party: There are nine Expedition members at first, but one dies in the crash at the very start, at random. More of them may die at later points in the campaign: there are three specific points when one of them dies at random unless specific conditions are met (first first two deaths being nearly unavoidable); also, whenever an investigator gets defeated, the Partner who's following them dies.
  • The End... Or Is It?: All three endings, outside of failing outright, have implications that Nameless Madness was stopped only temporarily:
    • If Dr Kensler succeeds at her plan, she seals the Nameless Madness within herself, realising that it can't be permanently killed as it's not alive to begin with. However, to do so, she's forced to "make a deal with it" (as much as it applies to a quasi-sentient being), and now it uses her as a host — and it knows all our desires, hopes and fears... For now, it's contained, but who knows for how long it would last?
    • If the Myst Pylons gets collapsed, but Dr Kensler, for any reason, doesn't seal the Nameless Madness inside herself (due to either not finishing research, or not surviving until then), investigators and their followers escapes with their lives, but wonders whether it was enough to contain the beast; also, there's an issue with the Elder Things still being alive...
    • If investigators fails to collapse the Myst Pylons in time, the facility wouldn't be properly destroyed, leaving a great chance that the entity would escape. And who knows whether the entity is limited to Antarctica, or one day it would return to claim the world? Even the campaign guide itself is unsure whether it's even the "victory", and writes the usual "the investigators win the campaign" with a question mark.
  • Escape Sequence: Once you deal with the Myst Pylons (or run out of time to do so), the last objective remains — run away from the pursuing Nameless Madness before it overwhelms investigators. Unlike the similar situation in The Dunwich Legacy campaign, dying here still counts as game over.
  • Evil Is Not a Toy: The Elder Things have discovered that in this part of the world, it's possible to contact another dimension, which they tried to exploit to fuel their civilisation. They have learned the hard way that it was a very bad idea, as the force living there has a mind of its own, and has its own motives. Now they are all but extinct.
  • Fire-Forged Friends:
    • Claypool and Ellsworth used to be friends (or perhaps closer than just friends, it's unclear), but their friendship took a heavy hit sometime prior to the expedition, to the point that they barely can stand each other now. If they both survives to the epilogue, they mends their friendship.
    • Cookie and Takada are almost openly hostile to each other at first. If they both survives to the epilogue, they develops into Vitriolic Best Buds who're now planning a mission on their own to find Takada's Missing Dad.
  • Golden Ending: Allowing Amy Kensler to finish her research, and then successfully collapsing the Myst Pylons, leads to her staying behind to contain the Nameless Madness within herself. It's a Bittersweet Ending at best, but it's the only ending where it's certain that humanity would have at least some time before the entity returns. From the purely gameplay terms, it's the only ending where investigators don't earn traumas.
  • Hearing Voices: If Dyer is alive by the start of the "City of the Elder Things", he would warn about the voices one may hear within the City, and tell not to listen to them. If he's not, then investigators would start suffering from them, and slowly falling for their influence, gaining the special weakness, "Possessed".
  • Hero Killer: The Terror from the Stars directly or indirectly causes at least one death amongst the Expedition members:
    • Terror from the Stars is the monster which caused the crash, and thus the first death. It would attack the investigators directly later in the first scenario.
    • It shows up during the mountain climb in "To the Forbidden Peaks", and, unless specific conditions are met, kills another random Partner, even if they don't follow an investigator.
  • It's All My Fault:
    • If Dyer dies in the crash, Danforth says that it's his fault that this expedition even started. Dr Kensler insists that it's her fault instead, as she was the one who dismissed Dyer's concerns about the shape in the sky, indirectly causing the crash. Dyer reacts in the same way if it's Danforth who dies in the crash instead (as he brought him along), with Kensler again comforting him.
    • Inverted with Claypool's death; Cookie, in his blind frustration, tries to blame Takada (the plane creator) for his death, even though the reason of crash was some hostile creature's attack that they had no way to avoid.
  • Kick the Dog:
    • If Eliyah dies in the crash, Cookie suggests to just abandon his dog to her death when she refuses to leave her master's corpse behind (they have until dawn to find the shelter, or they're screwed). The rest looks at him so angrily, he shuts up immediately.
    • If Claypool dies in the crash, Cookie blames Takada (the plane's creator) for it, claiming that had she did the better job, he would've stayed alive. No one agrees with him, especially since it's pretty clear that the crash was unavoidable regardless of Takada's skills.
  • Loyalty Mission: "Fatal Mirage" allows to help surviving Partners to face and defeat their horrors. If they succeed, they become "Resolute", which improves their survivability and their abilities, as well as prevents their possible Plotline Deaths. It may be played after every scenario, but only gets unlocked if at least three Partners have died prior to this point (including the one who dies in the crash), and may be played more than once (giving slightly less time on each repeat).
  • Master of Illusion: Miasma (the quasi-alive black mass which forms all Eidolons and, of course, the Nameless Madness) may cause people's minds to be trapped in the illusions, to either brainwash them — or to torture them with their worst memories.
    • Entire point of "Fatal Mirage" is to help the Partners to deal with their horrors, which would manifest as material and quite dangerous thanks to miasma.
    • The Partner who suffers from miasma in the "City of the Elder Things" falls into irreversible coma, still alive, but trapped within their mind. There's a special scene if it happens to Danforth.
    • The Nameless Madness makes the last ditch attempt to hurt at least some of he Partners halfway into the first part of "The Heart of Madness" (assuming it wasn't skipped), using their memories against them (those who already defeated their "demons" are immune, and and don't get targeted). If there's a friend ready to save them (different one for each Partner), they would survive, otherwise they would perish. Unlike the previous times, when the Nameless Madness tried to torture them, this time it would trick them by showing some (fake) happy end to their story.
  • Multiple Endings: Barring outright Game Over, the campaign has three endings, each one going progressively worse (and earning more traumas for the investigators). If the players fail to collapse the Myst Pylons, they would be forced to flee and leave the facility as is, with no ways to ensure that the Nameless Madness wouldn't escape later. If they do collapse the Pylons, ending is determined by Dr Kensler being alive and finishing her research: if both are fulfilled, the Golden Ending plays, where she stays to seal the entity inside herself, otherwise, the "normal" ending plays.
  • Nonstandard Game Over: In the first part of "The Heard of Madness", letting two or more activated seals (controlled by investigators) ever end up in the same location causes global catastrophe and wipes out all life on the Earth, including investigators, ending the campaign in a failure.
  • Optional Character Scene: There are lots of scenes that only triggers if specific Partners are dead/alive/missing at specific moments of the story:
    • Campaign always opens with randomly-chosen Partner dying. Most such scenes follow this pattern: someone mourns the fallen character, another character tries to comfort them, and yet another says that they're gotta go, as they only have until night to find the shelter if they want to stay alive.
    • Once the expedition finally finds the shelter, Kensler, Dyer, Claypool and Cookie each says something if they've made it to the shelter, with extra line if the other Partner, associated with them (Sinha, Danforth, Ellsworth and Takada, respectively) is alive, but missing; if the latter triggers, you're forced to take them along on the rescue mission.
    • Between scenarios (multipart scenarios count as one), the expedition makes a stay for rest; during those stays, the players have opportunity to talk with three different Partners, and/or check belongings of deceased ones; you get different scenes in each case, as well as different rewards.
    • If you keep both Claypool and Ellsworth alive, you may gradually observe them mending their friendship if you talk to Ellsworth (who's the one who originally invited Claypool to the team); if you don't, they would just do that offscreen.
    • "Fatal Mirage" scenario gives a short scene, depending on who died in the crash, when you play it the first time.
    • The epilogue shows extra scenes if specific duos (Dyer and Danforth; Takada and Cookie; Kensler and Sinha) lives till the end. Eliyah, the one without a pair (if you don't count his dog), has his segment trigger only if he's the Sole Survivor.
  • Permadeath: If a Partner gets killed, either by a story effect defeated by in-game effects or eliminated because the investigator they follow is defeated, they are gone for the rest of campaign; there's no way to bring them back.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Any Partners not recovered during the second part of "Ice and Death" are gone.
    • Supplies assets must be recovered in any of the three parts of the "Ice and Death", and then carried to the summit during "To the Forbidden Peaks" scenario. If investigators lose them in the mountains or never recover, they are lost forever.
    • Any seals not recovered in the first part of "The Heart of Madness", or lost due to investigator carrying them being defeated, are gone, and may not be recovered.
  • Plotline Death: Normally, Partners die if they run out of Stamina or Sanity, or if the investigator they're following gets defeated, but at several points in the campaign, they may die during interludes:
    • One Partner always dies in the plane crash at the start of campaign; which one would perish is randomised. There's no way to save them.
    • Halfway through "To The Forbidden Peaks" and "The City of Elder Things", one random non-Resolute Partner would die (killed by a monster or put into coma by miasma, respectively).
    • Halfway through the first part of "The Heart of Madness", one random non-Resolute Partner would be picked as the target by the Nameless Madness. This time, they can be saved if another specific Partner is still alive (different one in every case).
  • The Power of Friendship: When the Nameless Madness tries to use its illusion to kill one of the Partners, their friend (if they are still alive) intervenes and stops them at the last moment before they can step into the miasma cloud and perish:
    • Dr Amy Kensler gets tricked by the illusion of the world where she did propose to Mala, and she reciprocated. If Mala Sinha is present, stops her friend at the last moment and averts her gaze, allowing Kensler to calm down.
    • Danforth sees the horror which nearly drew him insane before, but now it looks beautiful, and gently invites him, as if it waited for him all this time... Professor Dyer, if alive, warns him that this is just an illusion, and Danforth uses his last powers to avert his gaze, only to fall into his mentor's arms and faint.
    • Professor William Dyer gets trapped in the illusion where Lake actually convinced him to stop the first expedition, averting all the horrors... but Dr Kensler, if she's here, reminds him that Lake is dead — they attended his funeral together. Dyer remembers it, in details, and snaps out of illusion.
    • Avery Claypool gets tricked by the promise of the treasure he may discover, but he doesn't fall for it if Ellsworth is alive to tell him that he has something much more valuable here, in real world.
    • Takada Hiroko gets shown the illusion of her father still alive. If Eliyah Asherak is still alive, he sends Anyu to just jump on Takada, forcing her to break the visual contact with the entity.
    • Eliyah Ashevak gets convinced that the rest of the people who perished on that faithful hunt are still alive and waiting for him, ignoring Anyu's attempt to stop him. However, if Claypool is here, he reminds him that they're gone, and Anyu — the only survivor besides him — is here, and needs him. This brings him back to reason.
    • If Roald Ellsworth falls for the illusion — the opportunity to make the discovery of his life — Cookie, if he's here, just slaps him hard enough to break him away from the deception.
    • Dr Mala Sinha gets deceived the image of the world without death and suffering. Danforth may bring her back to senses by quoting Poe, which distracts her and breaks the illusion.
    • James "Cookie" Fredericks goes back to the day of that battle on the Ottoman front, only this time, lieutenant and the rest of their platoon are still alive. Takada fires Cookie's own gun under his ear to distract him — and makes him realise that it was an illusion.
  • Recurring Boss: Terror of the Stars shows up as a Mini-Boss in the "Ice and Death" (first part only), "To the Forbidden Peaks" and one of the variants of "City of the Elder Things" scenarios, causing troubles for the investigators and spreading death and horror.
  • Rest-and-Resupply Stop:
    • "Ice and Death" has three parts, with "checkpoints" between them; those checkpoints are explicitly the investigators stopping at the camp to rest and resupply.
    • Scenarios are separated by interludes which involves the team stopping at the camp to rest, patch themselves up and prepare to continue the journey.
  • Required Party Member:
    • If certain Partner goes missing during the second part of "Ice and Death", another Partner would insist on participating in the rescue party, if they're present. Danforth would always insist on going for Dyer, Kensler would go for Sinha, Claypool would go for Ellsworth, and Cookie would go for Takada. The players must take them along, unless there are more candidates than players.
    • Inverted with Amy Kensler; on the path to the Golden Ending, she becomes unavailable as the Partner option in "The Heart of Madness". This doesn't mean that she's immune to being picked as the Nameless Madness' last ditch attempt to harm the expedition.
  • Rousing Speech: If Amy Kensler survives up to the start of "The Heart of Madness", she would give the team the speech which would give them resolve to continue fighting. Otherwise, they would proceed further, nearly desperate and exhausted, and investigators would suffer from mental trauma.
  • Run or Die: Once the Nameless Madness starts pursuing you, your only option (and the main objective) is to run. You can attack it to slow it down, but you can never fully stop it. If all investigators dies there, the campaign still ends in failure.
  • Sanity Slippage: This expedition takes the heavy toll on all Partners, who clearly becomes more nervous as the campaign goes on (which may be traced if the players keep conversing with them between scenarios), but the one who takes it worst is Danforth, who spent some time in the clinic recovering from the previous expedition, and now is on the brink of insanity again. By the time of "The Heart of Madness", he keeps mumbling that "it awaits [him]".
  • The Scapegoat: If Claypool dies in the crash, Cookie blames his death on Takada (who's built the plane), who "built this damned plane as a deathtrap". The others are forced to calm him down.
  • Sequel Episode: At the Mountains of Madness has ended with another expedition to Antarctica being prepared. This campaign deals with its consequences.
  • Sidequest:
    • Second part of "Ice and Death" is entirely built around attempts to retrieve the Expedition members who went missing during the night and went insane. It's up to the players to either risk and go rescue them, or let them perish. The better location for a camp was picked in the previous scenario (measured by the "shelter" value), the less people would go missing, down to and including none, which skips the scenario automatically. If scenario gets skipped manually (or the time runs out), all non-rescued Partners dies.
    • Second part of "Ice and Death" involves the monsters catching up with the camp and trying to attack the investigators. Fighting them isn't necessary, but gives some more time to retrieve the missing story assets (which would be useful later), and allows to earn additional experience.
    • The first part of "The Heart of Madness" isn't mandatory to finish the campaign, the players may skip directly to the second part, but it allows to obtain the Seals, which would significantly increase the chances of successfully destroying Myst tokens.
  • Shout-Out: The achievement for collapsing all five Myst Pylons is called "Construct Additional Pylons".
  • Slave Race: It seems that most surviving Elder Things are now serving the Nameless Madness, as its puppets.
  • Sole Survivor:
    • Two Partners — namely, Eliyah and Claypool — in their backstory, have survived some horrible events that killed everyone else. In one case, Claypool's story is just for flavour, but Eliya's backstory actually plays crucial role in events involving him.
    • If Eliyah Ashevak is the only Partner to make it back from the expedition, he has the special scene in the epilogue, where he comments on him and Anyu being the only ones to live yet again, as if they are cursed.
  • Starfish Aliens: The Elder Things (the alien creatures resembling the actual starfishes with wings, tentacles and eyestalks) returns — and they aren't friendly.
  • Talking to the Dead: Amy Kensler was never able to propose her feelings to Mala Sinha, being too shy. If Mala dies in the crash, she finally says it to her corpse, but gets interrupted by Claypool who says that crying on such cold is dangerous.
  • Time Abyss: The Elder Things came to Earth a billion years ago, yet this place is even older than them, and is the reason why the City was built there.
  • Timed Mission: In the second part of "The Heart of Madness", investigators have limited time to collapse all the Pylons, which is measured by amount of parts of the Nameless Madness which manifests as the Doom increases. When all fifteen spawns, the entity starts pursuing them, leaving no other choice than to Run or Die. If this happens, the players would only gain the worst out of three possible endings, assuming they even survive.
  • Unfortunate Name: According to Cookie, it was a bad idea to name the expedition's ship "Theodosia", as naming a ship after someone who's died at sea brings bad luck.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: If both Cookie and Takada survives to the epilogue, they starts planning another expedition — for just two of them — to either find Takada's father, or confirm that he's indeed dead... all while never ending arguing over some minor things. But the investigators who busts them doing so notices that they always stick together, and comments that as long as they stick together, there's nothing impossible for them.
  • We Hardly Knew Ye: One of the nine Partners dies in the plane crash, before any meaningful character development may be made. The only way to learn something about them after that is by doing the "Fatal Mirage" scenario, which allows to see their memories.
  • Your Worst Memory: Each Partner's has one old, horrible memory which taunts them. In the "Fatal Mirage", they gains the chance to fight and overcome them, becoming stronger in process, as well as increasing their chance to survive later. Those memories are also what the Nameless Madness would use to kill them in "The Heart of Madness" (reversing them to create a happy illusion to lure them), unless they fought it before and thus became immune, or there's a specific friend who may protect them.
    • For Takada Hiroko, it's the memory of the last time she saw her father alive.
    • For James "Cookie" Fredericks, it's the memory of his time during World War I, when he fought on the Ottoman Front, and was forced to take command after his commander's death; he blames himself for the messy outcome of that battle.
    • For Eliyah Ashirak, it's the memory of the hunt gone awry, resulting in him and the dog Anyu becoming the only survivors.
    • For Amy Kensler, it's the memory of her being unable to propose her feelings, and the stress caused by it.
    • For Mala Sinha, it's the memory of her first lost patient, which still haunts her.
    • For Roald Ellsworth, it's the memory of his first major discovery — the first on the long path of uncovered secrets which better be kept buried.
    • For Avery Claypool, it's the memory of one of his discoveries, which costed his entire expedition their lives... while he still failed to understand what it was.
    • For William Dyer, it's the memory of him being one of the persons behind the first Antarctic expedition, and thus, indirectly responsible for its death.
    • For Paul Danforth, it's the memory of something he saw in the City of the Elder Things, which nearly drew him insane before, and still can't leave him alone.

     The Scarlet Keys tropes 
  • Absurdly High-Stakes Game: Most Coterie members, if they're the ones who stole your Key, requires stealing it to reclaim. Desi... bets it in the card game, and loses. Justified, as he's shown valuing the Keys remarkably low, in contrast to literally anyone else.
  • Back from the Dead: In Marrakesh, Amaranth is trying to find Razin Farhi (believed to be the co-founder of Coterie, who's died centuries ago). If she slays enough people to finish the ritual, she succeeds, albeit he can still be put down for good after that.
  • The Bermuda Triangle: The reason behind Bermuda Triangle's weirdness and people disappearing there is because it's where the portal to Outsiders' homeworld is.
  • Bonus Dungeon: While investigators may play the other side stories too, one scenario — Fortune and Folly — has close ties with the campaign, as its antagonist is a member of Coterie; it provides the option to obtain an extra Key, but also would result in another vote to kill investigators on the trial (the casino owner abstains otherwise, seeing investigators as potential asset for some nefarious purposes).
  • Cast From Hitpoints:
    • If you defeat Tzu San Niang and thwart her plans, you can either let her go — or use her magic parasol against her, putting a compulsion on her; this costs everyone a physical trauma, but later makes her quit the Coterie (not showing up even at Congress, giving you one less headache to worry about).
    • Accepting Aliki's proposal costs each investigator a trauma of their choice.
  • Central Theme: Trust (and lack of thereof):
    • You frequently get the choice between trusting some people or not, with your choices changing the chaos bag: "Tablet" tokens for trusting people, and "Elder Thing" tokens for being secretive; in some cases, you have "neutral" options available, but it's not possible to achieve 0/0 balance. Once you reach the maximum of certain kind, the game starts rewarding sticking to your choices with bonus experience.
    • You frequently end up in the situation where you can trust certain Coterie members or work against them. Your choices would have long-terms consequences. Also, unless you make peace between Coterie and the Foundation, the ending you get is based on how often you've deceived the Foundation in any way.
  • Choice-and-Consequence System: This campaign heavily relies on making choices that have long-terms consequences. You frequently have to decide whether to trust someone, or not. Besides the generic effect of changing your chaos bag, they have more long-terms consequences:
    • Your initial approach to Taylor would affect your chances to recruit some story Allies. Quinn is a Foundation loyalist, so if you lied to Taylor, she would be unwilling to trust you herself unless you spit it out. Conversely, Flint doesn't like Taylor at all, and disapproves you sharing intel with her, so he would insist on doing his mission alone, stating you being "chatty" as a reason; you can still recruit him later (assuming you arrive before he gets killed), but if he's trusting, you can cancel his mission or help him speed it up, and get him earlier.
    • Majority of Coterie members you interact with offer you some sort of alliance against either rogue Coterie member(s), or the Outsiders. Trusting them unlocks extra opportunities later on, up to and including extra endings, but also makes you less likely to stay on good side with the Foundation, which disapproves any cooperation with Coterie.
  • Color-Coded for Your Convenience: The colours which dossiers assigns to Coterie members corresponds to their behaviour. Red ones are violent (Amaranth and the Beast), Green are peaceful (Ece and Tuwile), and the rest (all yellow) are somewhat unpredictable. The only one out of classification is Aliki, as not even the Foundation can understand her. Red-Gloved Man is is unknown to everyone, even within Coterie, so he has no dossier, while Claret Knight and Sanguine Watcher don't get dossier available for reading because encountering them wasn't a part of the plan.
  • Conveniently Interrupted Document: The dossiers omits many important details, including those which may actually be required for the missions you get send on. However, the text is actually still there: copying it and pasting elsewhere would reveal it; like a true spy, you can discover a workaround.
  • Cooperation Gambit: Thorne is almost obsessed with deals, which manifests in actual gameplay:
    • All it takes to get them on your side is to strike a deal with them. It may actually backfire on Thorne if you do poor job at protecting them.
    • If it's Thorne who's stolen your Key, you don't steal it back, like with others — instead, you strike a deal with them, and just buy it back. Your investigator points out that they knew that Thorne wouldn't miss a chance when offered.
    • Each time Thorne shows up as hostile, you can strike a deal: you give up one of your keys, they leave you alone. Whether this deal actually worth it, is up to you. It works even in the final scenario.
  • Disc-One Final Boss: Most of campaign involves conflict with the Coterie, but they're not the final or most powerful threat — the Outsiders are; and depending on how campaign goes, they may get wiped out just before the final confrontation with the Outsiders.
  • Dismantled Macguffin: The Key La Chia Roja is looking for is dismantled into several pieces and hidden across Buenos-Aires; she aims to obtain it before the Sanguine Watcher does.
  • Easter Egg: All that redacted text you see in dossiers? In the PDF version of campaign guide, the text is still there, just hidden; copying it and pasting elsewhere lets you read it. Most of dossiers are actually about the subject and just censor the words mentioning anything otherwordly, but if you read Commissioner Taylor's dossier (which is almost entirely redacted out), you would instead get a designer's note, telling about the idea of hiding the interesting info in plain sight, and congratulating the reader on discovering it.
  • Enemy Mine:
    • Ece contacts the Foundation as she believes that it's Coterie that is backing the cultists trying to steal the Key she's after, for obviously nefarious purposes (she intends to put it under protection). She's willing to work with the Cell if they agree to let her keep the Key. On a bigger scale, she's hoping to make the Coterie and Foundation to come at peace, as their ultimate goals aren't all that different, and they're fighting the same dangers.
    • The Claret Knight offers you to join forces against the Beast (who's after the same Key the Knight is protecting, and is ready to slaughter its way through Alexandria to get it). You may decline and try to take the Key for yourself (turning the Knight into your enemy), or take the offer, and have him later support you at Congress.
    • La Chica Roja suggests you to unite with her against another Coterie member, Sanguine Watcher, who's operating in Buenos Aires and has far more nefarious goals than her. This would give you the Key and an ally in the Coterie, but also a new enemy to worry about.
    • Desi is willing to part with his Key, but you must help him to get rid of the Outsiders who're after him. Since the Outsiders are the common enemy, and the Key is why they're here to begin with, the investigators agree immediately.
    • Thorne would warn you about the dangerous beast that is living in the mines, and that this beast is already hunting for you. However, as Thorne and the monster are old enemies, they offer to cooperate — you would get a useful ally who knows how to track the monster down, Thorne would get the Key. Thorne would make that offer even if Thorne already beat you to the Key.
    Thorne: Surely you realize it: I am not the threat here. There is something terrible that stalks these woods. The ultimate predator. As soon as you laid hands on the Sable Glass, your lives were forfeit. It will hunt you down and consume every part of you until there is nothing left, as it has done to many others. Luckily for you, this creature is an old enemy of mine. I am uniquely suited to track its movements and lure it out. For my services, all I ask is the Sable Glass. Believe me, you want someone that knows how to properly operate the thing, anyway.
    • If investigators travels to Bermuda Triangle, Aliki Zoni Uperetria would assist investigators during "Without a Trace" scenario (unless they deliberately reject her help), to find and retrieve the Red-Gloved Man who was previously abducted. If accepted and successfully retrieved, she later backs them up at the Congress, too.
    • During the final scenario, "Congress of Keys":
      • If the Coterie condemns investigators to death, or suffers a schism (either because investigators chose to purge it of evil-doers, or because they chose to join it), all members who've voted in favour of sparing the investigators choses to fight by their side, even if it means going against the others.
      • If investigators learns about the Red-Gloved Man being an Outsider impostor (the real one was captured), the Coterie ceases attempts to kill them, and backs them up to save the world, joining their side in nearly entirety, including the real Red-Gloved Man. Don't expect any help from assholes like the Beast or Sanguine Watcher, however.
  • Et Tu, Brute?:
    • Ece is very open about wishing to end conflict between the Coterie and Foundation and make them work together. If you play along, only to betray her in order to claim the Key for yourself (note that you can just refuse cooperation, which she takes just fine and bears no hard feelings), she takes it as a bitter betrayal, complete with subtle "The Reason You Suck" Speech:
      Ece: No, I understand. Really, I do. You’re just like the others. You’ll do anything to get your hands on the Keys, won’t you? And what do you suppose the rest of them say? Tzu? Amaranth? Álvarez? The very same. "It’s for the good of humanity", they claim, and to that end, all means are justified. You would fit in nicely with the Coterie.
    • If you open up to Matias Bolívar, he would actually believe that you're friends now. If you then ally with La Chica Roja, he would be visibly hurt by what he perceives as betrayal.
  • Final Boss, New Dimension: While the last scenario starts on Earth (specifically, in Tunguska), the final battle would occur in the Outsiders' homeworld.
  • Gameplay and Story Integration:
    • Actually paying attention to what's written in dossiers may give hints at what to do to improve the situation. For example, it's stated that further info on Amaranth is available in San-Francisco office. Going there before Marrakesh allows to learn her true name, and lift the curse, allowing her to quit the Coterie and start the life anew.
    • It's the campaign about secrets and espionage. If you check the PDF file with campaign guide thoroughly enough, you may discover some hidden info in the dossiers, including the parts actually referring to your enemies' abilities.
  • The Guards Must Be Crazy: In most cases, you have to actually sneak inside and steal the Key, exploiting their keeper's weakness, or (in Claret Knight's case) beat the guards up. Thorne and Desi are willing to give you the key if you play by their rules, as for them it's easy come, easy go. The Red-Gloved Man and Aliki... don't even bother with protecting their Key at all:
    • If you have to retrieve the stolen Key from the Red-Gloved Man, he... would just leave it without protection or even locking the door. While making it clear that he knows that you've taken it back. It's all but explicitly said that it's deliberate on his part, but why he does that remains unknown. Investigators decides to just take their chance, even if it looks illogical.
    • Aliki, if she's the one who stole the Key, leaves it completely under protection, if not counting for weird cursed mirror that maybe serves as the danger, but is easily avoidable.
  • Graceful Loser: If you refuse to cooperate with Thorne and obtain the Key for yourself, Thorne lets you keep it, stating that you've won fairly, and they respect it, so you two part ways peacefully. It doesn't stop Thorne from being a random pick as the one who steals your Key later on, however.
    Thorne: “Given that you are, well, alive, I suppose you have properly dispatched the beast. Well fought! Bah, do not take me for a boor. The Key is yours, fair and square. The game is up. I am not one to contest a proper victory.
  • Heel–Face Turn:
    • Some Coterie members, who're hostile to you by default, can be convinced to back you up (or at least quit the organisation):
      • Before confronting Amaranth, investigators may learn her true name (Eryn) and use it to shake off Amaranth's persona, reverting Eryn to her true self. She quits the Coterie permanently after that, repeating "never again".
      • La Chica Roja is against you by default (though she would never vote to kill you), but if you catch her, you can join forces with her against the other, much more malevolent Coterie member, Sanguine Watcher. She would also back you up at Congress.
      • Aliki is against you by default, but if you ask her for help while adventuring at Bermuda islands, and don't let her perish there, she would back you up at the Congress, stating that you're loyal to the Coterie's cause.
      • Desi doesn't care about investigators by default, and votes to kill them just to cut to the "truly important matters"; he only votes to save them if they saved him. However, if that happens, he stays with them to the bitter end.
    • If you convince Ece, La Chica Roja and Desi to vote to spare you, you may ask them to try and overthrow the Coterie, stating that organisation has long ceased to serve its protective purpose. This results in all who've voted against you running away (later siding with your enemies), and all who've backed you up joining forces, stating that it's time to purge the organisation of evil.
    • If you have Claret Knight, Thorne and Tuwile Masai backing you up, you can convince them to include investigators into the Coterie and join forces against the Outsiders. It would infuriate those who've voted against you, so they would back up the villains, but anyone else would leave you alone or even join you in battle.
  • He Knows Too Much:
    • Even if Amaranth never had conflicts with investigators before, she would still vote to kill them, stating that the Coterie always valued secrecy above all else.
    • Tuwile Masai, unless you convinced him that you can be trusted, would state you knowing too much to left alive as one of the reasons to kill you.
  • Hold the Line: If you side with the Claret Knight right away, you have to protect him until Agenda advances (for the purpose of this scenario, Doom on other cards gets detracted from total time, so no cheating by abusing Mystic cards). Other two setups instead have you storming the enemy's base (either against the Claret Knight or the Beast).
  • Hope Spot: If you didn't have any conflicts with Tzu San Niang, she speaks up, asking why they even rises such "paltry matter", giving investigators hope that she would be the voice of reason... but she suggests to just kill the intruders and forget about them.
  • I Gave My Word: If you made a deal with Thorne, they would back you up at Congress; for them, deal is sacred.
  • I Know Your True Name: Learning Amaranth's true name — Eryn Cochwyn — may help to restore her memory. She would quit the Coterie after that. Otherwise, Amaranth would take over permanently.
  • Impostor-Exposing Test: The Outsiders would try to kill and replace Desi. If investigators knows his past (which requires obtaining intel from the Foundation), they may use that info to find which "Desi" is real one, otherwise, they may only rely on blind guess. Killing the wrong one would backfire later on — but the players wouldn't learn until it's too late.
  • I Owe You My Life: Desi would vote against you by default, but would back you up if you manage to correctly identify the impostor and get rid of it.
  • Kangaroo Court: In the final scenario, investigators gets put on "trial" by the Coterie, who would vote whether to kill or spare them. The outcome is entirely dependant on involved people's opinion on the investigators by that moment, with some (namely, the Beast) always voting against you unless they're too injured to attend.
  • Killed Offscreen: If you take too long to visit certain locations, some people may perish before you make it there:
    • Latif would wait for investigators to arrive till the last moment. If you take too long (25+ "Time" has passed), you would arrive when Marrakesh would be already massacred; he wouldn't be there anymore, while necrologies would list countless "Latifs" amongst the dead, indicating that he's likely amongst them.
    • Flint may be killed if he works by alone and you take too long to arrive to Shanghai once he finishes his mission.
    • Both Ari Quinn and Dewi Irawan can be hollowed if you you take too long to recruit them.
  • Kill and Replace:
    • The Outsiders already sent their infiltrator after Desi, so when you arrive, the main problem is to tell who's who; if you guessed wrong, you would kill the real Desi, and infiltrator would later show up during Congress. Same happens if you fail the scenario, with Outsiders just doing the deed offscreen.
    • Thorne may potentially get hollowed in Anchorage if they gets defeated, either by you or while following you; The Outsiders would then try to send their infiltrator under their guise. This doesn't happen if you fail the scenario by any means, however, regardless of Thorne's state.
    • If you refuse Aliki's aid and go to the Outsiders homeworld without her, she would be hollowed offscreen, letting the Outsiders to infiltrate the Congress under her guise. They would also send their infiltrator if she perishes while on the mission, but it would be more obvious that something is wrong.
  • Late to the Tragedy: If investigators arrives to Marrakesh too late, they would find it devastated (thousands have died), with survivors trying to rebuild.
  • The Mole: If investigators learns the true nature of the Coterie, they finds out that the Outsiders managed to snatch the Red-Gloved Man and replace him with their impostor. This allows them to reveal the infiltrator and team up with survivors of the Coterie to stop the Outsiders. Otherwise, those who're not on the side of investigators would back up the impostor.
  • Morality Kitchen Sink: The Red Coteries has wide variety of its members' morality. You have benevolent people who sincerely want to make the world a better place (like Ece or La Chica Roja); morally grey people who may do questionable things, but are reasonable and can support you against more malicious people (like Claret Knight or Tuwile Masai); flawed people who still have some good in them and would remember what you did for them (like Desi or Thorne); and blatant villains, hated even by their teammates (like the Beast, Sanguine Watcher or Tzu San Niang). And then there're Aliki or the Red-Gloved Man, whom no one can understand at all, and Amaranth, who's under control of the other being.
  • Multiple Endings:
    • The outcome of the trial decides what would happen to the Coterie. If the Outsiders managed to infiltrate enough of their members, it would collapse completely; otherwise, depending on whom investigators have helped before, they may either let it continue working as is (potentially also returning the true Red-Gloved Man), try to purge it of evil or even join it.
    • Investigators' prior actions determines which of the three epilogues they would get. If the Foundation finds them untrustworthy (too many pro-Coterie and/or too few pro-Foundation choices), the cell would be disbanded, with investigators laying low for the rest of their lives. Show that you're reliable — and you get the permanent position. And if investigators managed to join the Coterie, they can even make two organisations cooperate for once.
  • Night of the Living Mooks: Amaranth rises undead to terrorise Marrakesh.
  • No Item Use for You: "Hollow" mechanic can result in some cards being "hollowed" and set aside for the rest of scenario (though some effects can return them). Mechanic is used in variety of ways:
    • Couple of scenarios can result in certain cards being completely destroyed; unique cards gets lost irreversibly, while non-unique "merely" exiled (you have to repurchase them). Both such scenarios gradually hollows your cards as you progress through Agenda deck.
    • Most Outsiders-related encounter cards involves hollowing your cards, in one way or another. Couple of them allows to regain such cards, however.
  • Nonstandard Game Over: Losing "Without a Trace" results in entire Cell being "hollowed", which ends campaign in defeat prematurely.
  • Not Worth Killing: If Amaranth steals your Key, she would actually bust investigators mid-stealing, but decide to not bother and let them go, telling them to leave in rather dismissive tone.
  • An Offer You Can't Refuse: Taylor makes it pretty clear that either investigators (and Flint) leave the room as new agents of the Foundation, or they wouldn't leave at all, as even the information they already know is too dangerous.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • You have limited opportunities to obtain the Keys before finale. Not only you'd lose on their bonuses, but enemies can use them against you.
    • You have limited time before you'd be forced to go to final location, and thus, can't play all scenarios in one playthrough.
    • Some events are sensitive to time or order in which you visit the locations.
      • "Dead Heat" scenario has deadline to initiate it. If you spend too much time before you reach it, you would skip it and get the worst possible outcome with only few benefits.
      • Several key characters gets hollowed if you don't reach them in time and obtain intel from them, or get them side with you.
  • Press X to Die: While you do get 3 points of "free" experience, the only other results of visiting Marrakesh after final deadline is reached is several mental traumas for everyone, and recording of Amaranth being at your throat. If you can afford not to go there, usually it's the best to ignore it.
  • Put on a Bus:
    • If Eryn restores her true identity and shakes off "Amaranth" persona, she quits for good and doesn't reappear at Congress.
    • If you defeat Tzu San Niang, you may use her own powers against her to make her leave forever. She would not reappear at Congress after that.
  • Quirky Miniboss Squad: Investigators would frequently clash with hostile Coterie members, with those who were previously wronged randomly showing up at later scenarios. At the final scenario, you would finally confront everyone whom you've failed to earn on your side. However, none of them is as strong as in their own scenarios, where they serve as the main bosses.
  • Ret-Gone: Being "hollowed" means that you would be erased from existence, and no one would remember you ever being.
    • While "hollowed" cards generally can be retrieved once scenario ends, some effects can remove those cards permanently; non-unique cards must be re-purchased, unique are gone for duration of campaign.
    • "Without a Trace" scenario is set in the world of Outsiders; being defeated there means being "hollowed" and erased from existence, so investigator becomes unplayable (in gameplay terms, they goes insane).
    • If investigators loses either "Without a Trace" or "Congress of Keys", they gets "hollowed" and forgotten; campaign then ends in a failure.
    • If at least two Coterie members other than Red-Gloved Man (Desi, Aliki or Thorne) gets taken by the Outsiders, the Outsiders manages to strike the Coterie from within, wiping all of them out.
    • Two scientists goes too close to learning about the Outsiders for their own safety. Depending on your actions, they may end up "hollowed":
      • Taking too long to make it to Sidney (20+ "Time" has passed) would lead to the Outsiders hollowing Ari Quinn before you even meet her in person.
      • Taking too long to visit Dewi Irawan in both Rio and Perth, or in New Guinea (once she moves there) would lead her to her being hollowed by the Outsiders.
  • Ripple-Effect-Proof Memory: The story gets started because investigators are specifically the only ones who can remember the people erased from existence. Their attempt to find the truth makes the Foundation notice them, and invite to cooperate. If Outsiders slaughters the Coterie during final scenario, they still forgets those who were killed, however.
  • Skewed Priorities: If you aided La Chica Roja in kicking Sanguine Watcher out of Buenos Aires, he would be so angry at her, he would accuse the other Coterie members presented on concentrating on insignificant problem (the investigators), instead of judging one of their own for betrayal. It would count as him abstaining from voting.
  • Skippable Boss: Only first and final scenarios are actually mandatory to play; you may choose which scenarios to play and which one to skip, and can't get them all within same playthrough anyway. And by missing scenarios, you would miss fighting the Coterie members associated with them (with all but one having one or even two whom you can fight). Some of those enemies give you extra options to avoid fighting.
  • Spotting the Thread: At some point, Aliki noticed that there's something wrong with the Red-Gloved Man, which is the reason why she offers the investigators to join forces and investigate further.
  • Stalked by the Bell: The game tracks time you spend (with "Time" as actual measure) on your adventure, with limit being 35; once you reach it, you would be forcedly relocated to the final scenario. You lose some "Time" not only on travel, but also on some in-game actions and scenario resolutions (with failures generally taking away more time than winnings). Some tasks have their own Time limits. The game also gradually adds more "Cultist" Chaos tokens (absent by default), with final one being added only if you run out of time.
  • Take Your Time: Zigzagged.
    • Some scenarios gives you luxury of coming back later, when you're prepared (at most giving you extra starting Doom). Others punishes you badly if you spend too much time adventuring:
      • "Dead Heat" is about stopping civilians of Marrakesh from being slaughtered. It has three thresholds; first two, on 11 and 18 "Time", results in some being killed before you arrive, while on 25 "Time", you would arrive too late to stop the massacre, or prevent the villain from escaping with her goal completed.
      • "On Thin Ice" has you starting with some Doom already on the first Agenda (up to the point that it would progress on the first turn). If first agenda advances, Thorne would get the Key first, forcing you to either kill them (which would have severe consequences later) or accept them taking the Key.
      • "Dogs of War" scenario would give you different setup if you arrive later, as the conflict between Claret Knight and the Beast doesn't stop just because you're busy elsewhere.
      • "Shades of Suffering" makes its main enemy, Tzu San Niang, more dangerous if too much time passes. If at least 27 "time" has passed, you also start with extra Doom.
    • Several characters gets hollowed if you don't meet them under certain time limit.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork: Some Coterie members despise each other. Claret Knight and the Beast are always in disagreement, with Claret Knight outright admitting that he was against the Beast being induced into organisation to begin with; during campaign, they finally comes into open conflict. La Chica Roya openly hates Sanguine Watcher as well, and it's mutual.
  • Timed Mission:
    • If you wish to recruit Ari Quinn (which is crucial to perform mission in Bermuda Triangle), you must visit her in Sidney before 20 "Time" passes (or she would be hollowed), and then in London before 30 "Time" passes (while also having Aliki's whistle).
    • If you wish to recruit Dewi Irawan, you must visit her in certain locations within certain time limit, or she gets hollowed.
      • You must visit her in both Rio and Perth (in any order), after which she would move to New Guinea to finish studying. However, if 25 "Time" passes before you visit the second location, she would be hollowed before you arrive.
      • After attending her lecture, you only have 10 "Time" to visit her in New Guinea before she would be hollowed; if you arrive in time, she would join you.
  • Title Drop: If you get the permanent position in the Foundation, the case you were worked on gets called "The Scarlet Keys". Taylor comments on it being too extravagant to her taste, but she's fine with keeping it.
  • Touché: If your Key gets stolen by La Chica Roya, investigators would just steal it back, in similar style to her, and even leave their own calling card for extra irony. She actually likes it, and suggests to play again some time.
  • Uncertain Doom:
    • It's unknown what happens to Latif (the Foundation's contact in Marrakesh) if investigators arrives too late: the place where they were supposed to meet is boarded out, and there way too many people named "Latif" amongst the dead to check them all.
    • "Dogs of War" scenario may end with conflict between Claret Knight and the Beast escalating to the point that investigators wonders whether either of them survived when they both fails to show up at Congress.
  • The Undead: In "Dead Heat" scenario, most enemies you would face are some sort of undead: zombies, skeletons, a zombie lion, and undead sorcerer (if Amaranth succeeds at bringing Razin Farhi Back from the Dead). The only non-undead enemies are ghouls (who're here just to feast on dead people), and Amaranth herself.
  • The Very Definitely Final Dungeon: After enough time passes, Tunguska gets identified as the main sanctum location of the Coterie, meaning that whatever they plan to do, it would unfold there. You receive the warning that campaign would end when you travel there; you would be forced to go anyway if you take too long, though.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment: Some Coterie members are friendly or at least neutral towards investigators, and wouldn't vote against them at Congress, unless investigators attacks them first to claim their Keys.
    • Claret Knight always votes to spare by default. The only way to make him vote to execute you is to reject his offer, as you would rather steal the Key than help him to stop the Beast, who's rampaging in Alexandria. Note that the Beast would vote to kill you unless it's too injured to attend.
    • Ece would always vote to spare you... unless you deliberately betray her trust to gain the Key (note that you can just state upfront that you would take the Key for yourself, and only consequence would be her not participating personally). Even then, she would merely abstain from voting: she doesn't trust you to spare you, but she can't and wouldn't condemn anyone either, no matter what.
    • Attacking Thorne leads to them being hollowed and replaced by Outsiders' infiltrator, which may severely backfire if Red-Gloved Man wasn't retrieved and at least one more member was hollowed.
  • World Tour: Unlike the previous campaigns, investigators travel around the world, visiting different places on different continents, with stops including places like London, Buenos Aires, Alexandria and even Tunguska.
  • Zombie Apocalypse: If you fail to stop Amaranth in "Dead Heat" scenario, her undead minions would murder and devour the remaining civilians.

    The Feast of Hemlock Vale tropes 
  • Anti-Debuff:
    • "Prismatic Shard", a story asset you can obtain in " Written in Rock" scenario, lets you ignore effects that threaten to discard cards from your hand, letting you draw extra cards instead. Sadly, it uses unconventional resources ("brilliance"), making it impossible to recharge in field conditions.
    • "Little Sylvie", an old doll you can find in the Hemlock House (in the namesake scenario), lets you put a card of yours that is about to be discarded from your hand or deck, on top of your deck (so you would just draw it again at first opportunity). If the doll itself would be discarded this way, you can just play it instead.
  • Anti-Frustration Features:
    • In singleplayer, you're allowed to trigger two Codex entries instead of just one during first and second evenings (otherwise, the amount you may trigger scales with number of players).
    • The players who have to replace investigators killed during "The Longest Night" scenario, gets half the total experience cost of the killed investigator's deck refunded, letting them to catch up with the other player(s); otherwise, they would have only one scenario to catch up before the campaign finale.
    • If you support Mother Rachel all the way till you join her cult, only to get sacrificed yourself, you would receive game over... and an option to restart the last evening prelude. It's justified as it happening in some other reality.
    • When either Rosa Marquez or Ajax joins you as part of the story, they don't take an ally slot for duration of scenario where it happens, so it wouldn't disrupt your strategy by forcing you to discard whatever card already occupies that slot.
  • Ax-Crazy: During Act 2 of the "Written in Rock" scenario, amongst the resident monstrosities, you have to deal with Frenzied Miners, who viciously attack both you and your followers (dealing their damage to each other investigator and Resident you control as well as you).
  • Bad Moon Rising: The final night is accompanied by red moon. It's the night where you have to face the worst horrors of this Vale, and prevail — or perish.
  • Bears Are Bad News: The main danger of the "The Twisted Hollow" scenario is a massive mutant man-eater bear. That same bear would return on "The Longest Night" scenario, where it can be finally put down for good.
  • Bee Afraid: During the day one, you may possibly run into the bee swarm; it imposes Agility test on you, causing your either lose resources or take damage if you fail; they're surprisingly devastating.
  • Big Creepy-Crawlies: During "The Silent Health" scenario, most of your enemies are mutant giant ants. They're docile at first (being "Aloof", so they don't attack unless provoked), but they turn hostile once second agenda activates (or in presence of the brood queen).
  • Bittersweet Ending: None of the endings are happy, but in first three, at least some hope remains.
    • In the first two endings, either Rosa Marquez (ending 1) or investigators (ending 2) sacrifices themselves to destroy the Colour. You don't live to see the results in second one, but first one shows the consequences: surviving people recovering from this madness, ready to start anew.
    • In the third ending, you evacuate surviving residents and guests of the vale to the only place which may be safe, the South Point lighthouse, far away from the Vale. The island gets consumed, but at least the people live.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: Mother Rachel's influence, mixed with the poisonous food and water of the Vale, messes up with people's minds, and messes hard. If Rosa Marquez sacrifices herself to get rid of the Colour, the former cultists actually recovers (it's compared as if they just awakened from some long sleep), and asks for forgiveness, remembering what they did before, and feeling guilt.
  • Body Horror: Many of the mutants, created by the Colour effects, are grotesquely deformed, though some instead gets eerily bright and beautiful. Some of the treacheries' images shows similar effects happening to humans.
  • Came from the Sky: Rosa Marquez believes that all this started when a meteorite landed at what's now Silent Heath, and mining operations there released whatever was inside, be it poisonous gas or some invasive mineral. Another similar rock was recovered by Captain Wilbur Hemlock and Gideon Mizrah from old wreckage (which caused similar effects to his crew), a piece of which Wilbur later threw into well in the Vale. Gideon kept his piece of rock, which may be crucial to stop the Colour if you don't have another copy.
  • Cast from Hit Points:
    • "Calcification" treachery (from "Horrors in the Rock" set) deals you 1 direct damage the first time you move each round. You may pass Agility test to discard it, or take another 1 direct damage to do it immediately.
    • "Desiccation" treachery (from "Blight" set) temporarily makes that playing cards deal 1 damage to whoever does that.
  • The Cavalry:
    • During "The Twisted Hollow" scenario, either Theo or Judith can come at your help if you managed to get their relationship rating to 2 points (which requires helping them on day one). The circumstances behind their arrival leads to them immediately being defeated, however.
    • The Residents (up to 4, one per investigators) with whom you have good enough standing (4+ relationship), may join your side in the final scenario once you finish first objective, and fight alongside you to the bitter end.
    • Bertie can join you on the final night if he survives till this moment with his sanity intact.
  • Choose a Handicap: Your choices of whom to support affect chaos bag, with each token having different negative effects. Cultist tokens (which correspond to pro-Rachel decisions) gives you some advantages (while still working as negative modifiers), but when Mother Rachel would turn hostile, so would those tokens.
  • Clashing Cousins: Cousins William Hemlock and River Hawthorne are in very tense relationship to each other, due to having diametrically opposite plans for the Vale, and having no desire to do any compromises. You can make them come at peace, but that requires some work.
  • Continuity Nod: If you talk to Gideon Mizrah on second evening, you may learn that he has niece Gavriella. Gavriella Mizrah is one of the major characters from The Circle Undone campaign.
  • Critical Status Buff: During the night, Crystal Parasites (from "Horrors in the Rock" set) improve their fight rating by 2 and damage by 1 for every 2 damage on them; they have 6 health, 2 fight and 1 damage by default, meaning that on low health, they may become very dangerous (especially since any failed attempt to attack it leads to it counterattacking you).
  • Damage Over Time: The Crystal Remains (from "The Silent Health" scenario) constantly cause damage or horror to their bearer, with the option to just throw them away to save yourself, but your objective requires actually evacuating with them (with best ending for scenario requiring reclaiming all three).
  • Damage Reduction: During "The Longest Night" scenario, both Molting and Equine Hybrids reduce any damage they take by 1, reducing effectiveness of weapons and spells, and rendering many offensive events useless.
  • Darkness Equals Death:
    • Many enemies gets more dangerous at night, gaining extra abilities. It's not always the case with treacheries, however, as their behaviour changes completely, and day version isn't guaranteed to be any easier.
    • During "The Lost Sister" scenario, instead of normal day/night system, cards use day or night version depending on whether current location counts as dark or not, meaning that generally, you're slightly safer when outside. But you have to go deep into caves to actually do your objective.
    • During "The Twisted Hollow" scenario, locations with Dark trait (read: any locations not lit by the lone lamp you control) frequently shuffles, meaning that you're never sure what's going outside of small are you can see; and losing the lamp may leave you vulnerable. What's more, game gradually increases darkness level, which makes various in-game effects more dangerous, and eventually eliminates entire group (unless you're playing in standalone mode).
    • The only time you see the Vale at night is during the final night, when the monster comes to devour all its residents. All locations, previously cute and innocent, turns to the other side, now looking bleak and threatening, some gain actually dangerous effects, and even the cards' background gets grey (instead of standard yellowish-brown) to make it darker and bleaker.
  • Defector from Decadence: Whoever you danced with during second evening, would leave Mother Rachel's group of cultists, and join you. This may include even Rachel's own sister, Leah.
  • Devour the Dragon: Mother Rachel, the woman running the cult that is worshipping the Colour, gets consumed by her master once you finish the first act of the final scenario. She may later randomly show up as your enemy, recreated by the Colour.
  • Downer Ending:
    • If you burn the Vale with fireworks, it doesn't quite do the job as was expected, and while you live, the Colour presumably just departs, finishing its feast.
    • If you run for your life rather than do anything to help the residents or stop the Colour (ending 5), island would be consumed and all but those who've followed you would perish. What's more, the investigators would be irreversibly scarred by the Colour, driving them nearly insane.
  • Earn Your Bad Ending: If you go out of your way to improve your standing with Mother Rachel (she has the least number of options to do so out of all Residents), and then betray Rosa Marquez and side with her, even when you witness the atrocities she's capable of, Mother Rachel would give you one final task: to help gather people for the feast, even if they would resist. Then you would receive your reward: being devoured by the Colour.
  • Earn Your Happy Ending: The epilogue gives extra blurbs for specific Residents (not all of them, though), if they live till the end and resolve their problems thanks to you. You can read about Leah and Simeon Atwoods planning to move to Kingsport and start anew); about William Hemlock and River Hawthorne both realising that the Vale is beyond saving, and quitting their struggle over it, instead deciding to start anew together, ending their hostility; Judith Park, if she's on good terms with you, would move back to Arkham together with you, feeling obligated to repay the debt; and Theo sharing his grief about losing the Vale, but saying that he would move to Portland with his sister Helen.
  • Eldritch Abomination: Your main enemy this time around is one of the most eldritch beings in the Mythos, The Colour Out of Space, which is here to consume another location and all of life there.
  • Endless Game:
    • In standalone mode, "Written in Rock" scenario skips straight to minecart ride, and removes the exit location; it also alters the Agenda's behaviour, meaning that you no longer lose when it advances, but instead, it resets all revealed locations back to unrevealed side. This lets you keep riding, up until you either get defeated, or the minecart finally goes off the rails and crashes.
    • In standalone mode, "The Twisted Hollow" scenario doesn't end once you reach 6 darkness, but instead keeps going until you gets defeated by the dangers of the forest. Victory conditions are disabled, so scenario only ends when you perish.
  • The End... Or Is It?: If you burn the Vale with fireworks, it doesn't stop the being from consuming the island's nature, and then investigators sees the visions which puts a doubt whether the Colour was truly fully stopped.
  • Escort Mission:
    • During "Written in Rock" scenario (unless you play it at night), you can meet either Simeon Atwood (during Day 1 or 2) or his mother Leah (during Day 3, if Simeon wasn't saved). Evacuating them gives you extra rewards. Not evacuating them, or never encountering them there, leads to their deaths, and, in Simeon's case, cuts off one of the endings.
    • You may meet River in the mines on Day 1 ("Written in Rock"), and on the swamp on Days 2 and 3 ("The Thing in the Deep"). Escorting them to the exit (the mines; they would also require to gather certain amount of clues, as stand-in for shrooms they need) or the the cranberry bog (the swamps) gives you extra rewards and boosts relationship with River. Taking control of River, but failing to fulfil their request lowers their relationship instead.
    • During "The Silent Heath" scenario, you have to recover the crystallised remains of the Pearl family, and bring them to the safety. The remains counts as assets, and they can take damage and/or horror (and they do dump damage and horror on you every turn); while you don't lose them permanently if they gets "defeated", you'd need to waste time on recovering them.
    • During "The Thing in the Deep" scenario, your default objective is to escort the Chelydran Hybrid to safety, while Thing in the Depths would try to kill it. Failing to do so ends the scenario immediately; same thing happens if you attack it yourself. Killing the Thing also wins scenario immediately.
    • Entire point of "The Twisted Hollow" scenario is to find Bertie who got lost in the woods, and return with him to safety.
  • Evil All Along: If you had any illusions before, Mother Rachel reveals her true allegiances on the second night: she and her cult, "Children of the Stars", are committing human sacrifices, believing that it isn't death: it's just ascendance to the higher plane of existence. On final evening, her master finally shows itself.
  • Face–Heel Turn: Everyone whose relationship is too low, would turn on you in the end, driven insane by the Colour's influence; everyone, except Mother Rachel, who was Evil All Along. This may also happen to Rosa's student and assistant, Bertie, if you let him fall under Mother Rachel's influence.
  • Foreshadowing:
    • When you visit the school on first morning, one of the children asks where's Edie (clearly another child), only to get told to not worry about her, as "Edie has found her place", and shouldn't be worried about, as Mother Rachel knows best. Mother Rachel would later repeat that phrase about "finding/knowing your place" time and time again. If you get any suspicions that there's something really wrong with the village in general and Mother Rachel in particular, you would be proven right very soon: that phrase is exactly what she says about people sacrificed to the Colour or its mutants.
    • If you visit Tad's store on second morning, it would have a new owner. When directly asked where's Tad, he would go suspiciously quiet. At night, you can learn that Tad was chosen for a sacrifice.
    • On the second evening, Mother Rachel, if talked to, would share her doubts, and would sadly refuses to dance with you, saying something about the need to make sacrifices in life. If you check where she's going at night, you would find that there's a human sacrifice going, Rachel's daughter Rebecca amongst the victims.
  • The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You: If you, the player, look at the Emissary for at least 15 seconds in a row, your investigator goes insane immediately.
  • Geo Effects: "Fire!" treachery creates, well, fire in specific location, which keeps burning and deals 1 direct damage to anything that stays at same location by the end of the round, be it investigator, asset or an enemy.
  • Giant Enemy Crab: Main boss of "The Lost Sister" scenario is a massive mutant crab. There are also two mutant Cuttlefishes, though they're smaller than it. Both the reverse side of the second act, and the Codex for its spawning, refer to the giant crab as "Lobstrosity".
  • Gimmick Level:
    • During "Written in Rock" scenario, once you start the second act, you have to ride a minecart through chaotic rail maze, trying to avoid going off the rails and reach the exit in one piece. The main gimmick is that maze isn't static; you can change directions on the go.
    • During "The Hemlock House" scenario, titular house can go alive and attack investigators, room by room, resulting in unique hybrid of monsters and locations not seen anywhere else in this game. It's up to investigators to either demolish it entirely, or force it to go dormant permanently.
    • "The Twisted Hollow" scenario gives you ever-changing map which you have to navigate with the lamp, while darkness gradually increases, and with it, the dander.
    • The final scenario, "Fate of the Vale", throws the normal concept of encounter deck out of the window, instead creating so-called Abyss deck, and obstructing top card of it with a story card exploring how it works; it can contain anything, from encounter cards to your cards and even your investigator sheet — speaking of which, you play not with your own investigator sheet, but with a "Shattered Self", which has unique mechanics, and have to retrieve your true self as your first objective.
  • Golden Ending: Endings 1 and 2 are the only ones where the Colour gets outright destroyed or at least banished, saving what's left of the island. It still requires sacrifices of either Rosa Marquez or the investigators, but it saves the isle and lets the surviving residents to start anew, while in the other endings, they lose their home forever. The ending one is also more generous in terms of exp reward, and mandatory traumas (only 1 per type, instead of usual 2), further reinforcing that it's supposed to be the best ending.
  • Go Mad from the Isolation: Wilbur Hemlock, once his whaling business sunk, believing that it was some sort of curse, locked his wife (William's mother) in theis house's attic for weeks. This caused massive damage to her sanity; now, poor woman can't even recognise William.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: Golden Ending involves either Rosa Marquez or the investigators sacrificing themselves to destroy the Colour before it can devour the island.
  • Hidden Agenda Villain: It becomes obvious pretty early that Mother Rachel is untrustworthy, especially if you do the night scenarios and see her cult at work. But her true agenda only gets revealed at the end of campaign.
  • Hold the Line: The main goal of "The Longest Night" scenario is to survive till the morning, while protecting the would-be sacrifices.
  • Human Sacrifice: Mother Rachel regularly sends the Vale residents to get devoured by the Colour (directly or by proxy), believing that it's not death, but ascension; the victims, thoroughly brainwashed, sincerely believe it, to the point that Tad feels angry at you if you "ruin it", and would get sad if others gets taken and he gets spared.
  • Hypocrite: If you play "The Longest Night" scenario, you'd learn that while Mother Rachel was supposed to use her own daughter Rebecca as a sacrifice, but she didn't, only tricking the other victims into thinking that she did, to make them more obedient. If accused, she would claim that her daughter was "returned to her", as a reward for her faith, omitting that Rebecca wasn't in actual danger to begin with.
  • Increasingly Lethal Enemy:
    • "Poisonblossom" enemy (from "The Forest" set) gradually accumulates "overgrown" tokens, which makes it deal more and more damage (it starts with zero by default), as well as boosting either its Health (at day) or its Fight (at night).
    • Several effects in "The Twisted Hollow" scenario gets stronger as the darkness level increases. Several locations' skill tests which triggers on revelation gets harder and harder (eventually becoming impossible), Crooked Path location increases its shroud value (making it harder to investigate), and Stalking Hybrid enemy grows more and more durable.
  • Interface Screw: Some cards during the final scenario deliberately look mangled, to imitate reality-warping powers of the Colour.
  • It's All My Fault:
    • If Hemlock prevails over River, he has a realisation, that him being idle all this time is what let the island to come to ruin. He doomed his family's legacy himself.
    • If you talk to Leah during act 3 of the final scenario (regardless of version), she puts the blame on herself for not seeing through her sister Rachel's insanity while it was still possible to stop her.
  • Kill It with Fire: One of the endings for the campaign involves burning the Vale with well-placed fireworks, in hope that it would take the monster out with it.
  • Kryptonite Is Everywhere: Patrice Hathaway, due to her unique mechanics, gets hit particularly hard by this campaign, both because she has no means to benefit from its preludes' unique setup mechanic, and because so many encounter cards gets triggered by drawing cards, emptying hand, etc, which she automatically does every turn. Designers acknowledged this, as they added special achievement for starting the campaign as Patrice, and making it till the end.
  • Last-Second Ending Choice: Ending where you save the Vale by banishing the Colour branches into two endings at the last moment: you either let Rosa Marquez sacrifice herself (default ending), or sacrifice yourself instead (which requires having Prismatic Shard at the ready, or [[Permanently Missable Content this choice would be disabled).
  • Late to the Tragedy: The Pearl Ridge is the place where the Colour originally emerged 20 years ago, killing the Pearl family in process and turning what was once green land full of flowers into what's now known as Silent Heath. You have to observe the ruins, and try to restore the picture of this event.
  • Let the Past Burn: If helped to come at peace with River, Hemlock takes destruction of the Vale well, finally accepting that his family's legacy is dead... and that just like grass grows back through ash, he should build the new legacy, with the help of his cousin. Somewhere else, as there's nothing left for him on the Hemlock Isle.
  • Light Is Not Good: While the darkness is indeed the home to dangers, light isn't your friend either: anything related to the Colour emits bright turquoise light, but you definitely don't want to be anywhere close to it, if you value your life and sanity.
  • Memento MacGuffin: The reason why Hemlock is looking for "Little Sylvie" doll isn't just sentimentality over his childhood: it was his mother's beloved doll, and he hopes that it may trigger her memory to return. It doesn't, and Hemlock lets investigators keep it.
  • Minecart Madness: Second half of "Written in Rock" scenario makes investigators ride on minecart, trying to make it reach the exit without going off the rails and injuring themselves (which would also doom the people you're trying to recover).
  • Multiple Endings: The campaign has five endings (not counting you failing to stop the being from devouring the isle). You can help Rosa Marquez to understand how to stop the being, and help her to sacrifice herself to stop it (or do the sacrifice yourself, which counts as separate ending); take everyone sane enough to follow you and evacuate the isle; burn the isle in hope that it would destroy the being as well; or just run for your life. All but the last one require certain preparations.
  • Mutually Exclusive Party Members:
    • Depending on when you visit certain location, you'd meet different people, meaning that some combination of the people following you are just impossible.
    • Depending on your standing with them, during "The Twisted Hollow" scenario you can summon either Judith or Theo on your side, but not both.
    • Zig-Zagged regarding William Hemlock and River Hawthorne. They have extremely uneasy relationship, and fundamentally incompatible views on what should be done to the island and the Hemlock Vale.
      • During first two days, both visit different locations, making meeting them together impossible. This also means that going to explore location where they are cuts off the option to get relationship boost with the other one, by exploring their location.
      • During "The Longest Night", it is possible to summon both at your side, but you must either know their schedule and plan ahead very carefully to get both to at least 3 points by the second evening, or sacrifice hard-earned story Item, so they would both agree to share the dance (otherwise, you'd likely have one of them at relationship 2 or below). There's no unique interactions between them, so it's less them working together and more them working against Mother Rachel, however.
      • During the final evening, you can convince Hemlock and River to make a truce, but only one of them would spawn afterwards. Triggering codex on the one who spawns further boosts their relationship, but permanently ruins your standing with whomever you didn't choose.
      • During the final scenario, you can summon by your side anyone whose relationship is at 4 or above, which means it's possible to have both Hemlock and River simultaneously if you have thoroughly prepared; there's no unique interactions if you do so.
  • Nice Job Breaking It, Hero:
    • If playing "The Thing in the Depth" scenario at Day 1 and finish the scenario by escorting the hybrid to safety, Rosa Marquez would be around to stop you from trying to detach the flower from it, explaining that it would kill the hybrid. In any other case, the team would do that anyway, and the hybrid would indeed die. The game gives you extra exp if the hybrid doesn't die.
    • If you listen to Gideon's story, you'd learn that William's grandfather, Captain Hemlock found the rock from the sky, which brought sickness on his crew and killed most of them. Possibly influenced by it, he had a "brilliant" idea to throw the rock into well. That's how the Colour poisoned the water on the island, why flora and fauna are mutated, and why residents are so weird. Gideon's own rock is still with him, however, and can be used to destroy the being.
  • No Body Left Behind: If Ros Marquez sacrifices herself for the Vale, only her satchel would remain behind.
  • Nonstandard Game Over:
    • Going off the rails in "Written in Rock" scenario ends scenario immediately, with everyone being defeated and taking physical trauma.
    • If everyone dies during the longest night (while playing namesake scenario), your adventure would end prematurely — presumably, because Rosa Marquez (who joins you during this scenario) dies as well. If at least one player escapes with their lives, you can continue.
    • Going all the way with supporting Mother Rachel gives you option to join her cult and help her prepare for the feast. You then learn that feast wasn't for humans — and get devoured by the Eldritch Abomination, alongside everyone else. You predictably get a game over, but the game is merciful enough to let you replay the final prelude and act more reasonable this time.
  • No-Sell:
    • Miasmatic Shadow (from the "Agents of Colour" set) can't be damaged by anything, except for Spell, Relic or Science cards, or by other encounter cards.
    • During "The Longest Night" scenario, all of scenario-specific enemies except for Lupine Hybrid are immune to one or more of security measures you can use. Molting Hybrid is immune to barriers (which blocks the movement), Capra Hybrid is immune to decoys (exhausts and deals damage), Equine Hybrid is immune to traps (deals damage on entry), Ursine Hybrid barriers and decoys (but not traps) and Slithering Hybrid ignores everything, as well as doesn't take damage from "Fire!" treachery.
  • Not What I Signed on For: William Hemlock hired Judith Park to help with "hard rat problem" in the Hemlock House. When she learned that the house itself is alive and actively hostile, she didn't take it well: she believes that in current state, it's better to just demolish the place, as it's beyond saving. You may side with either of them, but whomever you didn't support, would leave.
  • Obviously Evil: Mother Rachel looks and acts like stereotypical cult leader from small backwater village, of the type who preaches at day, butches people at nights; like the ones you saw in horror movies countless of times. You'd learn that it's exactly what she's doing very soon.
  • Offscreen Moment of Awesome: Even if you never visit Akwan and don't help to save Lizzie from lobstrosity, or do visit it, but get your ass kicked, Helen somehow deals with the problem offscreen, as Lizzie is alive and well by the first evening regardless of what you do.
  • Open Mouth, Insert Foot: In a couple of cases, when you have to pick what to tell to specific Resident, you can alienate them if you don't pick your words well:
    • During final evening, if Simeon died, trying to ask Leah about what she was in the mines would make her think that you only care about your survey, not the people. This would drop her relationship straight to 0, giving you no chance to salvage it, as it happens right before the finale.
    • Thanking Judith for saving you during first night would make her react with subtle disappointment, and lower her relationship. By contrast, saying that you could've handled it would be approved by her, rising her relationship instead.
  • Optional Party Member:
    • Improving relationship with Theo and/or Judith to at least 2 points makes them join you if you go to look for Bertie during first night.
    • Anyone who shared a dance with you, would join you during longest night (up to 4 people).
    • During campaign finale, up to 4 Residents who're in good enough relationship with you (4+ relationship) can join you during the final adventure. They would notably be the only survivors if you escape the Vale with them staying alive.
  • Permanently Missable Content:
    • Every Resident has a schedule, dictating where they would be on specific day (and only day, you would encounter nobody from the Vale if you explore at night, with the exception of two special night-only scenarios). If you don't meet specific characters in specific locations on specific days, you'd miss on their unique interactions and on the opportunity to increase their relationship.
    • First and second nights offer you unique scenarios which can only be played during those specific nights.
    • Bertie Musgrave gets lost in the woods on first night. If you rescue him, he would be fine (until the finale, at least), but otherwise, he would be "rescued" by Mother Rachel, who would brainwash him to join the cult, and set him against you — to the point that he may later fight against you.
    • Simeon goes into mines on first day. Unless saved before second evening he dies (and he can't be saved at night), cutting any scenes involving him, and some of his mother's. If he dies, his mother Leah would go to search for him in the mines on third day, and would meet the same fate unless saved (and you can't return to already-visited areas, meaning that you can be helpless to save her).
    • Some story assets can be obtained only if you do specific scenarios; in some cases, you must also do them on specific days:
      • You can find a rock with unique qualities while exploring the mines. As it spawns in fixed position, it's possible to skip it.
      • "Little Sylvie" doll which Hemlock is trying to find in his old house can be only found on day one. If the doll is retrieved, he would give it to you, in hope that it would bring you luck.
      • If you manage to recover remains of at least one member of the Pearl family, you can find the family matriarch's diary. If you never visit the Pearl Ridge, or fail to retrieve the remains, the diary would be lost forever.
      • Theo's sisters Helen and Lizzie stayed at the fisher village, Akwan, not approving him moving to the Vale. If you go there, you would find that Lizzie got abducted by a massive mutant crab. While Lizzie would survive no matter what, Helen would only join the investigators if you helped her to reunite with Theo, and even then, it's possible to simply miss the chance to talk to her again.
      • There's unique asset you can only obtain by sitting alone at first evening; it would be given by friendly strangers who would approach you themselves. It can't be obtained anywhere else.
      • During "The Longest Night" scenario, you can free a (normal, non-mutant) horse Ajax from the barn.
      • If you don't get backup and get mauled by the bear, Mother Rachel would save your ass at the last moment. Talking to her later would let you get the unique reward.
    • All but one (the worst one) endings cuts off if you didn't do specific actions prior to the final scenario, of which you have no means to know upfront:
      • Rosa Marquez comes up with a plan how to save the Vale either on her own (if you've won both night scenarios), or by hearing out Gideon Mizrah's story about the rocks recovered from shipwreck. Doing neither cuts off the Golden Ending. In addition, the ending branches into two at the last moment, with the last ending requiring specific story asset at the ready; something you could've either missed, sold, lost or simply not prepared in advance.
      • To evacuate the Vale, you must have someone who can organise the evacuation: either reunited Peters family, or Hemlock and Hawthorne, who agreed on a truce. It's entirely possible to miss both.
      • One of the endings involves burning the Vale with fireworks, but that requires saving Simeon's life and then actually putting those fireworks around, both of which you have limited time for.
  • Playable Epilogue: Inverted, this game lets you safely walk around the Vale before your adventure even starts and talk to people, being not afraid of anything (there's no encounter deck, you're immune to any forms of damage/horror, or being defeated, your weaknesses are disabled, and there's no Autofailure token in the bag by default); all these dangers only starts when you leave the Vale for the first time. You'd similarly roam the Vale at second and third mornings, but they would be way less safe.
  • Posthumous Character:
    • During "The Silent Heath" scenario, you'd learn about the demise of Pearl family (father, mother and child; of those, only the mother gets named: Susan) who used to live there. They were likely killed by whatever was inside the meteorite, slowly and painfully, leaving only crystallised husks.
    • William Hemlock's grandfather, Captain Wilbur Hemlock, was the one who established the Hemlock Harbour years ago.
  • Press X to Die:
    • During "The Thing in the Depth", your default objective is to escort the hybrid to safety. As it counts as an enemy, nothing stops you from attacking it yourself. Doing so ends the scenario immediately (just as if it was killed by enemies) and punishes you with a mental trauma.
    • Once Abyss opens as location, entering it while the Abyss deck has any cards is instantly fatal. You don't have the reason to, however, unless you're aiming for the Golden Ending, which gives you options to permanently empty the Abyss. It's also safe to stay there once you enter.
  • Red Shirt: There are several named residents of the Vale who lack cards representing them, and don't play major role. All of them either quietly disappears, starts showing signs of Colour-induced insanity (Ms. Olmstead, Martha Jean), or gets chosen as the sacrifices (Tad; though he can survive).
  • Relationship Values: The game tracks your relationship with particular denizens of the Vale; relationship goes up when you talk to them and help them in their troubles, and goes down when you either make wrong choices here and there, or let them be hurt by the monsters during adventures. Having high relationship eventually pays off, by giving you strong allies during the Vale's darkest hour, while those with too low relationship may actually go against you.
  • Required Party Member: After finishing "The Longest Night" scenario, one of the players must include Rosa Marquez into their deck (usually, you can reject a adding story asset into your deck), meaning that she would tag along on both the final survey you would fulfil on day three, and during final evening and night.
  • Sanity Slippage: People who spend too long in the Vale, eating local food and drinking local water, gradually goes insane, besides the physical side effects. Several background characters gets shown succumbing to it.
  • Sapient House: While you would sometimes meet conventional enemies during "Hemlock House", you would mainly deal with the house itself going alive and attacking you. Your objective is to either clear the house and restore it to its former glory, or demolish it completely.
  • Schmuck Bait:
    • While preludes do have an Act card, they lack instructions to flip them up. If you try to flip them up anyway... on day one, it would actually reward you, giving you (and only you) 1 bonus exp. On day two, it throws a story weakness on you (or, if you previously earned it, makes you start with it in your opening hand for next scenario). On day three, it gives you either 1 mental trauma or a random Madness weakness... but also gives you 2 exp.
    • Defeating the Emissary (the Abyss version only; three others are safe to kill) forces everyone to pass Willpower test with a difficulty of 100, killing them on (inevitable) failure. As this doesn't progress any of your objectives, it just means that your party dies, and you lose the scenario by elimination, unless you're going for escape ending and someone already resigned (in that case, they would actually receive the promised reward), or you found some cheesy methods to achieve automatic success. It's likely intended as a trap, as the rule "do not spend more than 15 seconds looking at the Emissary, or you die" makes this quirk easy to miss until it's too late. It is possible to get your 5 victory points and live to spend them (there's even an achievement for defeating all four Emissaries), but all such methods are impractical, and don't help to actually win the scenario.
  • Screw This, I'm Outta Here:
    • If Theo Peters reconciles with his sister, once the giant crab attacks, he decides to avenge the eaten dog, Bruce. Otherwise, he says that he forgot something in the track, and runs for his life.
    • If your standing with Theo is good enough, he would start doubting Mother Rachel, and asks her some questions offscreen. Whatever her replies were, it makes him decide that he would rather pack up and flee the Vale. He doesn't actually flee, though.
    • One of the endings for campaign is to just abandon everyone to their doom, and run, saving only those who're directly following you. It's the only ending which is available regardless of your actions, but it's the worst ending you can get.
    • If talked to on the final evening, Judith points that it's the last day of her contract, and tomorrow, she would leave this damned island for good.
  • Shout-Out: The achievement for siding with Mother Rachel and being sacrificed is called "Let's Do the Time Warp Again", because campaign rewinds time to let you pick some less suicidal options.
  • Situational Damage Attack:
    • Some encounter cards have different effect depending on whether you're playing scenario during the day or the night; night effects are generally stronger, but there are exceptions.
    • "The Pearl Diary" asset, which you can get at final morning, boosts either your Intellect (at Day) or your Willpower (at Night).
  • Skippable Boss: Most scenario-specific bosses can be spared (except for one case, where killing it is a main objective). In addition, you can simply skip specific scenarios, thus never meeting these bosses: out of 7 non-finale scenarios, you can only play 5 in any given playthrough.
    • Subterranean Beast (from "Written in Rock" scenario) only shows up at night, so if you explore the mines during the day, you wouldn't run into it. Even if you do explore the mines at night, you may still just escape from it. Actually facing it and killing earns you extra experience, however.
    • In "The Silent Heath", it's possible to either avoid spawning the Brood Queen at all, or win the scenario without killing her. The game further encourages "pacifist" approach by giving you achievement if you win without killing her.
  • Slaying Mantis: Crystal Parasite enemies are portrayed on their card as big fluorescent mantises. They're amongst the most dangerous generic enemies.
  • Sole Survivor: Even if you fail to save any of the people chosen for sacrifice, Rebecca would survive no matter what. It's because Rebecca never was in actual danger (Mother Rachel spared her, only fooling the others by pretending that she's gonna sacrifice her]]).
  • Stance System: During "The Lost Sister" scenario, instead of normal day/night system, all enemies and treacheries alter their state depending on whether they're in Dark locations (most caves) or not, with two scenario-specific enemies (including main boss) drastically changing their abilities and behaviour.
  • Suicide Attack: Colorless Larva (from "The Silent Heath" scenario) dies after a single attack.
  • Swamps Are Evil: Setting of "The Thing in the Depths" scenario is a swamp full of mutated and actively hostile flora and fauna, and gradually-sinking ground. But the main threat is the monster lurking in the water, eager to devour either you, or the creature you're here to recover.
  • Take a Third Option:
    • Subverted with the first conflict between Hemlock and River you can see on second morning; witnessing their argument, but refusing to pick sides only makes both angry at you, lowering their relationship, with no benefits whatsoever. Though, if you didn't build up your relationship with either of them, it would be your only option.
    • The only way to convince Hemlock and River to make a truce is to not pick sides at third morning, and let them hash it out, then return when they finally calm down. They would stay on good terms from there on, unless you ruin it deliberately.
  • Takes One to Kill One: The piece of rock which originally brought the Colour to Earth can actually protect its bearer from it. What's more important, it can be used to get rid of it for good. Rosa Marquez uses rock that she recovered from Silent Heath to destroy the being in campaign's Golden Ending; if investigators decides to sacrifice themselves to let her live and tell the tale, they use either the rock recovered from mines, or the rock received from Gideon.
  • Taking the Bullet:
    • During "The Twisted Hollow" scenario, Judith can jump between you and bear to save you, or Theo can distract the bear (it deals them 2 damage and 2 horror, respectively, leaving them in critical state). If neither happens, the bear would cause one of investigators unavoidable trauma of their choice.
    • If Bertie sides with Mother Rachel, he would always stick at her location, and take any damage intended for other Resident enemy at his location, so you have to deal with him first.
    • At the very end of "The Longest Night", a monster throws itself at the investigators. Unless you're willing to make everyone take mental trauma, a Resident whom you took with yourself takes the hit themselves and dies, explicitly to protect you.
  • That Came Out Wrong: During the final scenario, if Theo gets talked to during act 2, he comments on how beautiful the Colour is, and says that he wishes that his sister Lizzie can see that. Then he realises that it means bringing Lizzie here, in the Vale amongst the massacre, and says that he's glad that she can't.
  • Timed Mission:
    • Early on, Simeon Atwood would run to the mines, where he has a "special club". Not finding and saving him before the second evening would lead to his death (and it must be done during the day, as it's impossible to find him during the night). At Day 3, his mother Leah would come to check on him, and she wouldn't make it back alive either if you don't go for her right away.
    • If you decide to follow Simeon's plan and plant the fireworks around the Vale, you must do so during the final morning, before you depart on adventure. Not installing all the fireworks would cut off one of the endings.
  • Too Dumb to Live: Simeon has a "great" idea to run to some abandoned mine all by alone. He gets lost there, and would never make it back alive without your help.
  • Town with a Dark Secret: At first, the Hemlock Vale seems like quite nice place, with only surrounding nature being quite nasty. Then you learn about local cult, which is doing human sacrifices...
  • Uncertain Doom: Rachel's daughter, Rebecca, briefly appears in the first ending, wearing her signature rabbit mask, then disappears, leaving investigators wondering whether it was indeed her. She doesn't appear in any other endings at all, even in the third one, where people were evacuated. What actually happened to her, remains unanswered.
  • Vampiric Draining:
    • During the day, Crystal Parasites (from "Horrors in the Rock" set) gain ability to heal 1 damage each time they attack you.
    • During "The Longest Night" scenario, Lupine Hybrids heal 1 damage after their attack.
  • Video Game Cruelty Punishment:
    • During "The Silent Heath" scenario, each time Doom gets placed on agenda, you have to draw token(s) to decide whether Brood Queen would drop right on your head to tear you a new one (along with escort of angry insects). The chance is zero by default, as the number of tokens scales with amount of Insects in the victory display, but it's not hard to see that the more bugs you splat, the more likely it would be for their mommy to come for vengeance — and the bigger her escort would be when it happens, as she spawns every previously-defeated Insect.
    • During "The Thing in the Depth" scenario, killing the hybrid ends scenario immediately, costing you 1 mental trauma. Same things happens if you decide to escort it, but botch your objective. The hybrid "costs" 0 victory points, so you win absolutely nothing from hurting it.
    • Defeating the Crazed Reveller increases Doom (and can even advance agenda right away), while only working as a temporal solution, as they can return later. Using alternative solution and putting them down non-lethally removes them from the game permanently, without any side effects.
    • Killing Bertie if he falls under effect of the Vale's madness and turns hostile makes you pick and discard 3 cards from hand, as a punishment for killing him.
    • The ending where you flee for your life, rather than help to save the Vale and its residents, "rewards" you with whopping 3 physical and 3 mental traumas, ensuring that your investigator would be borderline unplayable if you decide to carry them over; the reason for this is that the last look on the departing Colour irreversibly damages investigators' sanity. Unfortunately, it's the only possible ending if you didn't go for one of the better endings, each of which require specific preparations.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: Of all the named Residents (excluding Mother Rachel, for obvious reasons), Gideon Mizrah is the only one to lack his scene in the epilogue even if he survives; the others tells where they plan to go next.
  • You Are Already Dead:
    • Downplayed with "Captivating Gleam" treachery (from "Written in Rock" scenario); once drawn, it sticks with you until you run out of cards in your hand... at which point it deals you 5 horror, which is enough to eliminate any investigators who already have low Sanity, and deal a crippling blow to the rest, unless they prepare to soak the horror, or manage to avoid triggering its effects.
    • "Chroma Blight" treachery (from "Horrors in the Rock" set) does nothing on its own; it merely generates "brilliance" whenever you draw cards from your deck, until it accumulates 6, after which it summons a Crystal Parasite right on top of you. The problem? The Parasite is a quite formidable foe, while the class most likely to draw that many cards in short amount of time, the Seekers, are not exactly known for their martial prowess.
  • You Dirty Rat!: William Hemlock didn't lie, the Hemlock House is indeed infested with the rats; hungry, aggressive rats who attack anything that moves. Though, ultimately, you have something more dangerous to worry about.

Standalone Scenarios tropes

Normal scenarios

     Curse of the Rougarou tropes 
  • Cursed with Awesome: Rougarou transformation was intended as a Double-Edged Buff, but there are plenty of investigators whose Willpower and Intellect are already low, so they don't suffer ill effects; some even get upgraded by it, as they normally have below 2 in both.
  • Double-Edged Buff: Rougarou form sets your basic Combat and Agility to 5, but also sets Willpower and Intellect to 2.
  • Dark Is Not Evil: The Rougarou can be dealt with non-lethally, which reveals that it was a normal guy who was not able to control his actions. His final words before departing are wishing you luck with dealing with the Curse of Rougarou, and not end up as a mindless beast like him.
  • Multiple Endings: You may just destroy the Rougarou (earning Lady Esprit's allegiance), or try to capture it and establish contact (only to get the curse move to you). If you fail to deal with it, it would kill Lady Esprit and escape.
  • Our Werewolves Are Different: The plot involves dealing with Rougarou (werewolf-like beast from Luisiana's folklore) in New Orleans.
  • Swamps Are Evil: The scenario is set at New Orleans' swamps. The Rougarou is not the only danger, with local monsters ranging from anomalously big, but otherwise earthly fauna, like leeches and alligators, to monsters from Dream Lands, somehow materialised on Earth, like Gugs and Dholes.

     Carnevale of Horrors tropes 
  • City of Canals: The story is set in Venice. Once the first part ends, you actually end up in the boat, now fighting the massive aquatic monstrosity attacking you from the canals.
  • Combat Tentacles: Venice is attacked by Cnidathqua, an enormously big tentacled beast. It's so huge, it doesn't even need to move to attack you.
  • Golden Ending: On top of normal endings (and rewards), if you prevailed Cnidathqua from killing anyone and evacuated at least three bystanders, investigators receive an extra story Ally on their side (and save many people, of course).
  • Masquerade Ball: It was another carnival in Venice... until an Eldritch Abomination hungry for blood shows up, and things go to hell:
    • Since this is a masquerade, it's hard to tell innocent bystanders apart from local cultists until it's too late.
    • Once scenario concludes, in one way or another, you get rewarded with magic carnival masks; each player gets different one.
  • Multiple Endings: Scenario has three endings: two good ones (investigators either survive till the sun rises, banishing Cnidathqua; or banish it themselves), and bad one (where investigators gets beaten up, and Cnidathqua slaughters the population; this one punishes investigators with permanent extra weaknesses).

     Guardians of the Abyss tropes 
  • And I Must Scream: Victims of sleeping curse are perfectly aware of their condition, while suffer from eternal nightmares.
  • Big Bad: Xzharah, "Chosen One" of Brotherhood of the Beast, is the the main antagonist and the person behind this nightmare.
  • Burning the Ships: In "Eternal Slumber", once the train is sabotaged, there is no escape; you must win together or die together. This's actually required to catch and interrogate one of cultists.
  • Dream Land: Titular "Abyss" is a part of the Dreamlands. This is actually how "dream curse" works, by forcibly putting victim's mind into Abyss, while their comatose body remains in "waking world".
  • Enemy Mine: It is possible to make alliance with Xzharah in "The Night's Usurper". This rewards your with unique weapon, but all victims of sleeping curse (including your friends) would remain asleep forever...
  • Forced Sleep: In the first scenario, "Eternal Slumber", citizens of Cairo, Egypt just suddenly fell asleep, one by one, and no one can help them or understand reason behind this.
    • Story-wise, finding a way to cure it is the premise of first scenario and reason why investigators arrived in the first place. Fortunately, this condition is reversible, but only in "good" endings for both scenarios.
    • Gameplay-wise, this can happen to investigators themselves or their Allies, through "Taken by Abyss" mechanic'. Anyone "taken by Abyss" gets removed from campaign for its duration, and can't be used in any way. If investigators are "taken by Abyss", they are unplayable (just like killed or insane ones), meaning that you must pick another one to continue playing — and possibly save the ones stuck in eternal slumber.
  • Powered by a Forsaken Child: Each victim of the sleeping curse empowers Brotherhood's "Chosen One", Xzharah.
  • Religion of Evil: Brotherhood of the Beast, cult of Dark Pharaoh Nefren-Ka's followers. They are behind whole sleeping curse plot, for the sake of empowering their chosen one, Xzharah.
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies: In both scenarios, if investigators take too long to accomplish their task, they would all become victims of this curse and fall into eternal slumber.

     Murder at the Excelsior Hotel tropes 
  • Anti-Frustration Features: In the case investigators fail to solve the case, they can replay this scenario once, for free.
  • Bittersweet Ending: It is entirely possible to complete the scenario while the lead Investigator fails to clear their names. And even in the best possible outcome, where the Investigators managed to prove the police their innocence and get Sergeant Monroe on their side, while avoiding to let any other innocent perish and solving the case by defeating the true culprit; nothing changes the fact the lead Investigator has still been used as an instrument of murder and that the Excelsior Hotel somehow avoids closure in spite of the facts the staff running it has clearly been an accomplice to the murders, leaving the place open, ready to lure more people to their deaths. However, another person investigating about the happenings in the Excelsior shows up in the speakeasy where the Investigators have been recovering from their traumatic experiences, which leads them to leave a hint: the same note they were given at the start of the scenario, implying there will be always people working to stop the murders at the Excelsior.
  • Brainwashed and Crazy: A strange influence is affecting the people of Excelsior hotel, using them as proxy to commit the murders. The scenario starts with the lead Investigator being brainwashed into murdering their informant, and 2 treacheries can potentially affect guests and police men, innocent "enemies" that are non-hostile to the Investigator by default, into becoming aggressive. "Driven to Madness" makes enemies lose the Aloof keyword (making them actively hostile), while buffing their stats and making you unable to parley with them until you evade them, while "Violent Outburst" will lead to them chasing whoever drew that card and immediately attack them.
  • Clear My Name: Whole point of the scenario is to prove your innocence in murder that happened that night. Lead investigator did commit that crime, but it was done under evil influence. If you manage to prove it, police would leave you alone. If you don't, you would be released before they manage to charge you with anything, and receive another chance to solve this case... or give up, and choose to run (which means, receiving new weaknesses, either Detective or Madness ones, without any benefits).
  • Helpful Mook: Zig-zagged with the police officers: they will attack you if you try to tamper with the scene of the crime by finding clues or deal damage to humanoid enemies (regardless if they are innocent or an openly aggresive staff member), and they also pick up clues on their own and turn them into Doom. However you can take control of the Doom tokens and turn them back into clues with a not-too-difficult Willpower test without any ill effect, meaning that if your Investigator has high Will but poor Intellect, it just better to let the police pick clues up for you then talk to them to gather leads.
  • Multiple-Choice Past: Not for investigators, but for Excelsior Hotel itself. There are five possible culprits behind recent murders; which one would be behind this depends on which leads investigators find (they are randomised, and after you acquire two of them, you are forced to progress further, cutting other three out). This includes: cult which attempts to interact with other dimension; vengeful ghost of murdered woman; Mi-Go involvement; formless goo-like monstrosity which came here to eat; and some evil brain in the jar with psychic powers. On top of that, each type of threat has two variants (determined by what other lead you find), giving you different win conditions.
  • My God, What Have I Done?: No matter the outcome, lead investigator did commit that murder, and it would haunt them for the rest of their life. In gameplay terms, this works as appropriately-named "What have you done" weakness.
  • No Points for Neutrality: In order to recruit Sergeant Monroe, you must either leave everything as is and instead collect additional evidences, or clear every trace of your involvement. Anything in between would make Sergeant Monroe suspect you.
  • One-Hit Kill: Each time Dimensional Shambler deals damage to investigator, they must reveal a chaos token, and if they reveal "auto-failure" token, they would be snatched by the creature and immediately defeated (creature disappears, too, but it probably wouldn't make you feel any better).
  • Police Are Useless: Until investigators decided to investigate on their own, police spent over a month in futile attempt to solve this case. Depending on outcome of this scenario, they can either help you, or go after you.
  • Reasonable Authority Figure: While sceptical initially, Sergeant Monroe would believe in your story and side with you, if you collect enough evidences of anomalous activities (including most recent murder which was done by you), or, conversely, hide anything pointing this murder to you (in which case he would ask you for help instead, but otherwise outcome would be the same). You also must avoid spilling any more innocent blood, including, of course, other cops.
  • Unwitting Pawn: Lead investigator was manipulated by whatever evil force behind those murders; in fact, most recent murder was done by lead investigator under that power's influence. If you provoke it to reveal itself, but fail to stop in time, they would use you to commit even more murders.

     Fortune and Folly tropes 
  • Arc Villain: When played as part of The Scarlet Keys campaign, Abarran Arrigorriagakoa becomes just one of the several Coterie members you deal with, and has no further involvement beyond voting on the Congress (he votes to kill you if you meddled in his affairs, and abstains otherwise).
  • Bonus Dungeon: This scenario has extra rewards (and consequences) if played as part of The Scarlet Keys campaign (like being able to actually claim the Wellspring of Fortune as a Key); scenario intro changes to acknowledge that the players are aware of Abarran's role as the Coterie member, and the true nature of the Wellspring of Fortune as one of the Keys.
  • Casino Episode: Scenario is set in casino run by the Red Coterie member, with investigators performing a heist to steal its greatest treasure. The game milks its casino theme for all its worth, having gambling mini-games, Playing Card Motifs for its mechanics, casino Theme Naming, etc.
  • Cult: The casino's entire existence is a coverup for the Fortune's Chosen cult, run by Abarran; regardless of scenario's outcome, the casino closes afterwards and all cultists disappear. The cultists are using dark magic to hold off the investigators, and summoning extradimensional monsters to fight on their side.
  • Do Well, But Not Perfect: Accumulating too many resources during part 1 (preparation stage) ends scenario immediately; if you let the agenda advance, you would preserve the Wellspring of Fortune (which is the entire point of the heist), but if you advanced the act (by retreating with those resources), casino would close down (as you literally robbed it into bankruptcy) and it would be lost forever, as well as preventing you from gaining any more scenario rewards. Advancing without enough resources to trigger immediate scenario end allows to play part two and obtain both Wellspring of Fortune and extra rewards.
  • Heist Episode: The entire premise of scenario is a heist in the casino run by a member of Red Coterie. Scenario is divided in two parts, with part one giving players the chance to prepare for actual heist (obtain the uniform, discover a vent which can be used to quickly sneak into one of restricted rooms, etc), and part two having them trying to steal the main treasure.
  • It Only Works Once: Each effect provided by the "Deck of Possibilities" only works once per campaign; unfortunately, it's also random, so you can't really plan when to use them.
  • Playing Card Motifs: As befits casino-themed scenario, many things are themed after playing cards.
    • All encounter cards have suit and rank, with many game effects using those for randomisation. Cards' rank generally corresponds to their danger level, with avoidable "Aloof" enemies having low rank, while stronger enemies with dangerous gimmicks have higher levels, and bosses have Ace rank (which also makes them immune to certain effects related to this mechanic).
    • One of the possible rewards is a magic card deck, "Deck of Possibilities", which works on the same suit/rank system as the scenario itself, to determine random (positive) effect. It uses the encounter cards from the scenario by default, but it's explicitly allowed to just use the normal playing cards instead.
  • Random Effect Spell: "Deck of Possibilities", a possible reward for this scenario, works by making you draw a random card from a special deck, triggering a special (always beneficial) effect; each effect only works once per campaign, as the card must be removed from the deck after being resolved.
  • Starts Stealthily, Ends Loudly: If you obtain the Wellspring during part two, casino stuff loses Aloof and Patro keywordsl, and starts actively pursuing whomever is bearing it.
  • Theme Naming: Agenda cards follow gambling theme for their names.
  • The Unpronounceable: Casino owner's name is Abarran Arrigorriagakoa; try to pronounce that on first try.

Epic Multiplayer scenarios

     The Labyrinths of Lunacy tropes 
  • Acid Pool: Second obstacle for "Group B" is a room filled with highly corrosive poison. To neutralise it, one of them must go inside and turn machine off; if they were injected with antidote, they would survive, otherwise, they would die. If no one does this in time, all investigators would be pulled there by force.
  • Alternate Universe: Each group exist in a separate universe, meaning that they can include same investigators, which is normally forbidden. But there is only one Eixodolon for all of them.
  • Anti-Frustration Features: In "Single Group" mode, since first two acts can't be advanced until corresponding agenda advances too, rules specifically allows to manually advance Doom on current agenda in case the players feel that they completed what they wanted and just need to finish everything quickly.
  • Big Bad: Eixodolon, the being who abducted you and many others for its sick pleasure. Your goal is to find it and destroy it.
  • Control Room Puzzle: First task of "Group C" is to find which one of three levers would open the door, then one of them must pull the lever. If they pull the wrong one, they die. If no one pulls the lever in time, investigator closest to the levers would die (and if there is more than one candidate, they must choose who would die). Either way, surviving members would proceed to Act 2.
  • Deadly Gas: Several variations:
    • Poisonous gas is one of common "treacheries" encountered throughout the whole scenario. Downplayed in that it's not fatal on its own, as it "merely" drains your actions rather than damages... so the other things would get you first.
    • "Group A" would be killed by toxic, rot-inducing gas if they fail their first task.
  • Death Trap: Full spectrum of dangerous traps: containers slowly filling with water, gas traps, dangerous gears, etc.
  • Drowning Pit: First task of "Group B" is to free one of them from big glass container, which slowly gets filled with water. If only one investigator is presented, they would always start in the container.
  • Emotion Eater: Eixodolon becomes stronger as it consumes his victim's pain.
  • Everything Trying to Kill You: This place looks like it was designed by John Kramer, and is just as deadly. Gas traps and big, deadly gears are just the most common and mundane dangers.
  • Golden Ending: Each time Eixodolon gets defeated, it gets weaker. To finally kill it, all three groups must survive; if even one of them dies, Eixodolon survives and would continue its... "games".
  • Ground by Gears: Another common "treachery" is being stuck in some dangerous mechanism and being slowly crashed by it.
  • Heroic Sacrifice: If none of "Group B" investigators has been injected with antidote, whoever would go inside Chamber of Poison, would die. One of them must do this, otherwise whole team would be pulled here (and dies anyway).
  • Lock and Key Puzzle: First task of "Group A" is to find a key and open the gate. If they fail, they die.
  • Malevolent Architecture: This place was called "Labyrinths of Lunacy" for a reason. It looks like one big sadistic experiment... and you and your friends are the lab rats.
  • Poison Is Corrosive: Whatever it is in Acid Pool in "Group B's" Act 2, it's capable to quickly dissolve human flesh, unless you have an antidote.
  • Timed Mission:
    • Notably, first two acts for any of three groups are timed; if they fail to perform required tasks before corresponding agenda advances, minimum one member of the group would die.
    • In "Epic Multiplayer" mode, players may impose real-life time limit for agenda (rules suggests using 60 minutes limit by default); past this point, players may play until next Mythos phase, after which agenda would advance immediately.
  • Trapped-with-Monster Plot: "Group C's" second task requires them to get rid of Eixodolon's "pet" before Agenda advances. If they fail, beast gets released. While it's not an instant failure, beast is not an easy target.
  • Year Inside, Hour Outside: Second task of "Group A". In this place, time moves... differently. They must find a way to deactivate this effect, otherwise, when it would be activated in full force, they would rot away in mere seconds.
  • You Wake Up in a Room: Each group awakes in unknown place and must figure out how to escape — preferably alive.

     The Blob That Ate Everything tropes 
  • Abstract Eater: Blob can "eat" things like precision (temporarily sets basic Strength to 0), curiosity (temporarily basic Knowledge to 0), versatility (investigator can't use cards not matching their class), or concept of language (you may only speak in gibberish). The expansion further increased the list, by adding stuff like "your past", "your future", "your plans", etc, most of which have actual effect on gameplay.
  • Apocalypse How: Class X-4; if investigators fails to stop Blob, it would devour the entire universe, until it would remain the only thing left.
  • Attack Its Weak Point: The only way to actually damage Blob is to force it to reveal its heart, then concentrate your whole attacking force on it.
  • Bait-and-Switch: "Blob devours your house. Search the collection for Your House (Core #124); it is devoured".
  • Big Bad Ensemble: While Blob is the main threat, every time investigators would try to reach any meaningful progress, they would face Mi-Go; it's unclear whether they are related to the Blob, but they're certainly trying to exploit the catastrophe for their own profit, and constantly gets at odds with investigators.
  • Blob Monster: Titular Blob is the enormous mass of green all-consuming goo. Also, all non-Mi-Go enemies are parts of this monster.
  • Escort Mission: One of the new side missions added in The Blob That Ate Everything ELSE!! involves escorting the Armored Car to the Fungus Mound. To move the car, investigators have to spend clues, while all enemies in its location would always target the car over investigators, quickly chewing through car's 5 Health if not dealt with. At least it lacks Sanity stat (so it can't suffer horror).
  • Exactly What It Says on the Tin: Blob really can eat everything’’, with whole four pages being devoted to the things it can possibly devour, ranging from material things to abstract concepts (which may cause not-so-abstract penalties). Amongst other things, it may eat deckbox you store cards in, your hope (temporarily sets basic Willpower to 0), your party's teamwork (robs everyone of one action), one of your hands (permanently robs you of one hand slot), and even itself'' (leading to self-damage). This is also how final agenda's reverse side is called, which leads to, yes, Blob eating everything.
  • Exact Words:
    • When the Blob devours "your house", it devours the Your House location from the core game.
    • When the Blob devours "the concept of ease", it refers to easy difficulty (you now have to use Hard/Expert version of scenario reference card, regardless of the difficulty you started with).
  • Expansion Pack: In 2023, The Blob That Ate Everything ELSE! was released as the print-and-play expansion to original Blob that Ate Everything, which adds extra content, new enemies, locations and story cards, and extra options to further add replayability, including revamped Reality Acid table. It was released alongside new print-and-play investigator, "Suzi", themed around this expansion, but fully functional without it (just like scenario itself can be played without her).
  • Extreme Omnivore: Blob can and would devour completely random things, ranging from investigator's cards (and investigators themselves) and ending with treacheries, enemies and locations, and even itself (non-fatally, unfortunately, but it would cause light damage). Expansion added even more things it can devour.
  • The Fourth Wall Will Not Protect You: Certain things Blob may "devour" make no In-Universe sense whatsoever, and clearly directed at players; almost all such options are purely for fun (which is entire point of scenario). Amongst other things Blob may "devour" are light (so you would be reduced to using flashlights), investigator's mini-card (forcing you to substitute it with something), chaos bag (bag itself, not tokens), your cellphone and your soul.
  • Increasingly Lethal Enemy: Pet Oozeling, an Ally which you may potentially earn in this scenario, is nominally on your side, but each time you use its special effect, you risk instant defeat (with physical trauma) after that. After each use, the chance for that becomes increasingly higher.
  • It Only Works Once: If any card with the "Melee" trait is used against a Grasping Ooze enemy, it is devoured after the attack, removing it from the game for the rest of the scenario.
  • It's a Wonderful Failure: They aren't kidding when they say that Blob would eat everything. Lose scenario, and you would see this:
    Subject 8L-08 devours all cards in play and out of play, all cards in your collection, all cards that ever were, and all that ever will be.
  • Joke Level: One of the sillier and more humour-driven scenarios, mainly oriented for big, funny events; this contrasts with main game being grim, serious and story-driven.
  • Killed Off for Real: Everything which gets "devoured" is destroyed until the end of scenario; if Blob devours investigator, investigator dies.
  • Luck-Based Mission:
    • If you grab "It's got me!" treachery from the encounter deck, whether you survive depends on your ability to reach Research Site in time... and spend 1 countermeasure, which you may or may not have by this point.
    • What Blob would "devour" depends on tokens revealed; some options are actually benevolent, some are outright non-sensual, but most are malevolent, and some are nearly game-ending.
  • Lethal Joke Character: Many things Blob may "devour" are completely senseless ("your cellphone", really?), but others are lethal: it can (and would) devour your whole deck and your investigator, with fatal results.
  • Multiplayer-Only Item: Replicating Aberrations only shows up when playing in Epic Multiplayer mode (which involves several groups cooperating together).
  • Nonstandard Game Over: If this scenario is played as part of campaign, when investigators fail to stop the Blob, they fail both this scenario and the entire campaign, because Blob eats everything.
  • One-Hit Kill:
    • Pet Oozeling can instantly defeat any non-elite enemy... after which you must reveal chaos token(s) (number of tokens increases after each use), and if at least one of revealed tokens was auto-failure, you would be instantly defeated and suffer physical trauma.
    • Universal Solvent can be used to kill any non-elite enemy, assuming investigator passes (potentially very hard) Intellect test; test's difficulty depends on enemy's remaining health. Solvent is particularly lethal in the hands of Seekers.
  • Ray Gun: Amongst other possible rewards, investigators may obtain Mi-Go weapon, which fires "entropic energy".
  • Rocks Fall, Everyone Dies: Drawing dual Autofailure tokens when Blob chooses targets to devour (while using rules from The Blob That Ate Everything ELSE!) makes it devour the game itself.
    Pack it in, everyone. Game’s dead.
  • Serial Escalation: First expansion to add possibility for multiple teams in the same game, The Labyrinths of Lunacy, was able to sustain up to 3 four-investigators teams. This scenario can sustain up to 96 investigators total.
  • Starfish Aliens: Besides Blob, investigators may also face Mi-Go — alien insect/crab/fungus hybrid from outers space. They actually have their own agenda, which, if not prevented, would cause some additional penalties, but if investigators actually succeed in stopping it, they would earn some additional rewards.
  • Timed Mission: In Epic Multiplayer mode, time limit (by default 180 minutes) can be imposed; when it expires, every group still alive immediately fails the scenario and gets devoured.
    • All side missions are timed in some way; investigators must prevent Mi-Go from reaching their goals or suffer the consequences.
  • You Are Already Dead: "It's got me!" treachery; once you received that, you have six rounds to get rid of it, or you would be devoured. Only way to get rid of it? Spend 1 countermeasure, which are in very limited supply (there are ways to obtain more, but considering that you are on the very tight time limit, you may not have time to spare). Additionally, you must be in the specific location to do so.
  • Your Soul Is Mine!: Blob can devour your soul. Yes, yours.

     War of the Outer Gods tropes 
  • Apocalypse Cult: The cultists of Silenus want to just end the world. They see it as a twisted Mercy Kill.
    A swift and painless end is a mercy.
  • Assimilation Plot: Ezel-zen-rezl is the master of the swarm of insectoid monsters; its human cult's goal is to bring them on Earth in order to assimilate humanity, by consuming us and rebuilding as the part of the swarm.
    Assimilation is the only way.