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  • Verse 3 of Elvis Presley's "I need your love tonight" sounds similiar to Los Lobos'/Ritchie Valens' "Come on lets go" verse 3 also sang in the movie "La Bamba", plus they each have guitar solos after.
  • General theme page to steal, uhm, make that, eh, sample.
  • The opening riff of "Bein' Friends" from the 1989 NES game Mother sounds kinda like the 1984 Talk Talk song "It's My Life". The similarity isn't to glaring until you hear the Super Smash Bros. rendition. To add to that, Steel Panthers used that same opening riff in "Party All Day".
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  • Murray Gold's "Love Don't Roam", made for the 2006 Doctor Who Christmas special The Runaway Bride sounds a lot like "The Snake" by Al Wilson.
  • B.E.R's "Night Begins to Shine" opening theme is similar to Blondie's "Call Me" However "Night Begins to Shine" was created to be an 80's tribute.
  • Beyoncé "Hold Up" sounds like Shaggy "Angel"
  • Some people will note similarities in the overall structures of M83's "Midnight City" and The Chain Gang of 1974's "Sleepwalking". Midnight City was released in 2011, while Sleepwalking was released in 2013. Even more noticeable: compare "Midnight City" to The Chainsmokers' "Paris", as well as Mike Posner's "Looks Like Sex".
  • "Baby Come and Get It" by The Pointer Sisters contains a riff very similar to The Rolling Stones "Can't Get No Satisfaction"
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  • Bree Sharp's "America" sounds VERY similar to The La's' "There She Goes" (as made famous by Sixpence None the Richer).
  • Daughtry's "Waiting For Superman" has a riff that sounds almost the same as Far East Movement's "Rockateer".
  • As seen by the main page quote, Vanilla Ice tried to avoid paying royalties for "Ice Ice Baby"'s musical background by adding an extra note to "Under Pressure" (he later was forced to credit Queen).
  • Queen themselves did that:
    • "Another One Bites the Dust" is pretty much their take on "Good Times" by Chic, barely dissimilar enough to not have to credit Nile Rodgers and Bernie Edwards.
  • In the instrumental part of The Cure "Prayers for rain" there is a chord sequence that sounds like the chords for Alphaville "Dance with me"
    • "Sheer Heart Attack" starts off with a few verses that were copied from the beginning of The Beatles' "I Saw Her Standing There."
  • "Neighbors" by Camouflage sounds a lot like "New Dress" by Depeche Mode.
  • Many were quick to point out that Linkin Park and Kiiara's "Heavy" sounds almost exactly like The Chainsmokers and Halsey's "Closer".
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  • The Spice Girls song "Last Time Lover" sounds similar to The Mary Jane Girls' "All Night Long."
  • Mazzy Star "Fade Into You" sounds similar to Bob Dylan "Knocking on Heaven's Door."
    • Also "Coming Down" by Dum Dum Girls sounds highly similar to "Fade Into You."
  • New Order's "All The Way" sounds a lot like The Cure's "Just Like Heaven."
    • Conversely, The Cure's "The Walk" is similar to New Order's "Blue Monday."
    • Ditto for "A Honest Mistake" by The Bravery.
  • Billy Joel's "My Life" takes its melody from Johnny Rodriguez' "Love Put a Song in My Heart."
    • His "This Night" has almost exactly the same tune as Louise Tucker's "Midnight Blue." But he's not ripping off "Midnight Blue," they're both borrowing from Beethoven (Sonata No. 8). Billy Joel gave Beethoven writing credit.
  • Ditto for Four Non-Blondes' "What's Up?", from Bobby McFerrin's "Don't Worry, Be Happy."
  • The fade-out of Dire Straits' "Money for Nothing" from Brothers in Arms is set to The Police's "Don't Stand So Close to Me" — lampshaded by Mark Knopfler having Sting sing it and giving him co-writing credits.
    • The fade-in to "Money for Nothing", with Terry Williams's improvised drum solo, is remarkably similar to end of the middle part of "Won't Get Fooled Again" by The Who.
  • Safetysuit's "Stay" sounds incredibly similar to Switchfoot's "Meant to Live." They sound enough alike that most people seem to initially think that "Stay" is a cover of "Meant to Live."
  • Both The Killers' "Mr. Brightside" and My Chemical Romance's "Bulletproof Heart" are reminiscent of Placebo's "Special K". MCR even sings "gravity" in the same way; this may have been done intentionally.
    • Then there's also Muse's "Time is Running Out." It doesn't sound like "Special K," but "Mr. Brightside" and "Bulletproof Heart" sound a lot like it.
  • Aiden's entire discography is this to AFI's, but "I Set My Friends on Fire" and "The Despair Factor" deserves a special mention.
  • Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take It" is derived from the Christmas hymn "O Come All Ye Faithful". Lampshaded when the band did an album with rock covers of Christmas songs, where "O Come All Ye Faithful" is performed exactly like "We're Not Gonna Take It".
  • "I Missed Us" by SWV samples a Suspiciously Similar Version of the Fairy Fountain theme from The Legend of Zelda.
  • One popular example is the obvious similarities between "Roar" by Katy Perry and "Brave" by Sara Bareilles, to the point that the latter only became a hit on the back of the controversy. Despite all this, Sara Bareilles has said that she really doesn't care and thinks people are making too big a deal out of it.
    • And of course, the similarity between "Roar" and Delirious?'s "I Could Sing Of Your Love Forever".
  • "Lamb of God" by Marilyn Manson has a basically identical verse to the earlier "Climbing Up the Walls" by Radiohead.
    • Manson has done this more than once: "I Don't Like the Drugs (But the Drugs Like Me)" (taken from the heavily David Bowie-influenced Concept Album Mechanical Animals) is a dead ringer for Bowie's own "Fame."
    • "The Fight Song" is quite similar to Blur's "Song 2."
    • In a more odd example of this, former guitarist Daisy Berkowitz claimed that the song "1996" stole and sped up his "She's Not My Girlfriend", an earlier Marilyn Manson song (back when it was Marilyn Manson and The Spooky Kids), from when Manson wrote only the lyrics, and Daisy wrote the music. The likelihood of this is reduced when you remember that Marilyn Manson (the person) considers "She's Not My Girlfriend" to be the worst song he ever wrote.
  • Fall Out Boy's smash hit "Centuries" has a chorus with a tune that's nearly identical to Get Scared's "Hate".
    • The riff to "Irresistible" is basically copied from part of Rhapsody of Fire's "Dawn of Victory".
    • "Uma Thurman" predominantly features samples from the Munsters theme music.
  • Speaking of Get Scared, their song "(Setting Yourself Up For) Sarcasm" is extremely similar to "Paralyzed" by The Used. Get Scared, another Post-Hardcore band from Utah, are huge fans of The Used and have cited them as a major influence on their music.
    • In fact, Get Scared have very much modeled themselves directly on The Used, right down to Nicholas Matthews imitating Bert McCracken's every mannerism and vocal tic. Their first album, Best Kind of Mess, is in fact a Suspiciously Similar Album to The Used's Lies for the Liars. However, they've been quite open about this, and are as such praised as an homage or throwback rather than condemned.
  • David Hasselhoff's "Crazy for You" all but shares its tune with, of all songs, "YMCA."
    • Creator/Disney's 1982 exercise album Mousercise features a song called "Keep on Trying", which also sounds like a Suspiciously Similar version of YMCA.
    • David Hasselhoff actually made Suspiciously Similar versions of multiple songs... His song "Looking for Freedom" sounds like very much like "Rivers of Babylon" by Boney M. But actually, David Hasselhoff's 1989 version of it isn't the original one... It was originally done by Marc Seaberg who released it back in 1978 when "Rivers of Babylon" was still in the charts. Other sound-alike songs by David Hasselhoff are "Do the Limbo Dance" (sounding like Boney M's "Hooray! Hooray! It's a Holi-Holiday") and "Hands Up for Rock'n'Roll" (similar to Pia Zadora's "Let's Dance Tonight.")
    • Taiwanese pop singer Cyndi Wang's "Honey" is also another "YMCA" ripoff.
    • "YMCA" itself was clearly influenced by The Trammps' "Disco Inferno."
  • Brinck's Eurovision 2013 entry was "Human." Having the exact same structure and guitar notes as Plain White T's "Hey There Delilah."
  • Abba did this with the follow-up to "Waterloo," "So Long," which was intentionally done to ensure another hit. It wasn't as successful.
  • Charlotte Gainsbourg's 5:55, composed by Air, sounds exactly like Dire, Dire Docks from Super Mario 64.
  • Train's 50 Ways to Say Goodbye sounds exactly like the title song to Phantom of the Opera.
    • In turn, the title song to Phantom of the Opera nicks its opening melody from Pink Floyd's "Echoes." Roger Waters was pissed off at this ("I couldn't believe it when I heard it. It's the same time signature — it's 12/8 — and it's the same structure and it's the same notes and it's the same everything.") but commented that "I think life's too long to bother with suing Andrew fucking Lloyd Webber."
      • Actually, Andrew Lloyd Webber ripped off "Poisoned Youth" by the obscure UK band England. That song predates "Phantom" by a few years.
    • The "Phantom" vocal melody has also been interpolated in "Angels Crying" by E-Type, "Thinking About You" by Cynthia, "Can't You Feel My Love" by Rose (of "Speed Over Beethoven" fame), and "Music Rides The Sky" by BPM.
  • Scooter's Roll Baby Roll featured a sample of ABBA's Arrival which it turned out the band hadn't asked to use. As a result, the rerelease of the album it was on (The Stadium Techno Experience) features a remix of the song called Swinging In The Jungle, which has a Suspiciously Similar version of the Arrival sample.
    • Scooter have done this so much that it has become a sort of trademark to expect certain songs in a particular style on each album. Maria (I Like It Loud) and One (Always Hardcore) are the most notorious and there is one song like them on every album since. Similarly, Break It Up and Leave In Silence are both techno ballads and have pretty much the same chord progression and laid back feel.
  • David Bowie tried to do a lyrically less-than-faithful glam rock version of "Comme d'Habitude," but Paul Anka took the rights from under him for "My Way." Bowie made some small changes to the tune and chord progression, and the result was "Life on Mars."note  Note that on the back cover of the album the song is parenthetically noted as being "Inspired by Frankie" — as in Sinatra, who made "My Way" famous.
  • "She's a Rebel" by Green Day lifts the majority of "Boxcar" by the little-known but influential Jawbreaker.
  • Rage Against the Machine's "Wake Up (Theme from The Matrix)" and Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir".
    • The opening riff to Audioslave's Cochise is pretty similar to Zeppelin's "The Ocean" too. And, of all things, I'm Broken by Pantera!
      • Ironically enough, "Cochise" also sounds like a faster version of the main riff of Soundgarden's "Get On The Snake". And Chris Cornell sings both songs!
    • Another song, Show Me How To Live, lifts the riff from the obscure Rage Against The Machine song "Producer".
    • The opening of Heart's "Barracuda" was lifted directly from "Achilles Last Stand".
    • Going the other way, Page has admitted he took the distinctive "da-da-da-da-duh" of "Babe, I'm Gonna Leave You" from Chicago's "25 or 6 to 4".
      • Which itself sounds like a speeded-up version of The Beatles' "While My Guitar Gently Weeps"
    • Sean Kingston's "Me Love" gets it melody from "D'yer Maker", which ironically got its name from a joke about Jamaica.
    Guy: My wife's going on holiday in the Caribbean.
    Friend: Jamaica?note 
    Guy: No, she wanted to go.
  • Iron Maiden's opening riff to The Wicker Man does sound an awful lot like Running Wild by Judas Priest...
    • Similarily a few of their songs' intros do this. on The X Factor, "Fortunes of War" and "Look for the Truth have a very similar chord progression. "Blood Brothers" from Brave New World and "Face in the Sand" from Dance of Death'' open with the same four chord progression, with the latter being slightly more upbeat.
    • Also; The Pilgrim's intro and When The Wild Wind Blows middle section have a similar Celtic sounding part, Brighter Than A Thousand Sunsmiddle section and The Legacy's exunt have similar four chord progressions.
    • The main synth riffs in Muse's"MK Ultra" sound a lot like the synth riffs in Maiden's "Can I Play With Madness. Ironically, a year later, Maiden released "Satellite 15... the Final Frontier, whose baseline does bear a slight resemblance to "Hysteria" by Muse.
  • The opening riff of No Doubt's "Hella Good" sounds strikingly similar to Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean".
  • Australian musical comedy group Tripod have, on occasion, included a version of the M*A*S*H theme in their concerts. When the concert was being recorded to be put on DVD, the song had to be changed - the last note of every phrase goes in a different direction (the final note in the first line, for example, goes up rather than down.)
    • This was incredibly amusing on the DVD- they sang it properly (crowd joining in) then stopped and said that if it was going to make it on the dvd they'd have to change it, so Scod gets the audience to sing said 'revised' version, which he's improvising, leading to a very confused chorus.
    • Apparently they did get the rights for the song anyway- a later performance has them telling the audience that the final stage was sending their version off to the guy who wrote it for his approval, so they wrote a song about him. Here it is, folks.
  • Linkin Park's "Shadow of the Day" was rather heavily criticized for its uncanny resemblence to U2's "With or Without You".
  • The sheer similarity between the intro of "No More Sorrow" and the last 30 seconds of Megadeth's "Silent Scorn". They even use similar 'military' drums. Of course, they may well have sampled it up, rather than outright copied it, but it still sounds like a Suspiciously Similar version.
  • Trivium is often reviled by metal fans for making songs that allegedly copy the notes from other metal bands' songs, primarily Metallica. In fact, most people see them as trying to "copy" Metallica.
  • Metallica's "The Four Horsemen" and Megadeth's "Mechanix" bear a massive resemblance. The reason? Dave Mustaine, while a member of Metallica, wrote the song "The Mechanix" which is included in some of their early demos. However when he was kicked from the band's roster they kept the song and rewrote the lyrics and some parts and made "The Four Horsemen". Later when Mustaine formed Megadeth he dropped the "The" in the same and sped up the main riff and included the track on his debut album.
  • There's a YouTube series called "Metal that sounds like other metal" based all around this trope, pointing out the similarities between songs intentional or not.
  • The Cat Empire's song "Voodoo Cowboy" briefly pastiches the theme from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.
  • A techno song called "E" included the melody from a popular Eminem song. However, when that techno song got popular and got released in a larger scale, they changed the melody to the Suspiciously Similar Version. The funny thing was that Eminem mocked techno in this song.
  • A catchy Eurodance song by Italian musician Magic Box called "If You" became very popular on Brazilian radios. Later, two songs which carry four similar aspects appeared: a looped modulated bassline, similar ad-libs, a narration in the beginning of the song, and a notable usage of falsetto. Those two songs were the not-so-popular "Game of my Life" by Project One, and the One-Hit Wonder "Can't Get Over" by Kasino.
  • A few of Japanese singer Gackt's songs are Suspiciously Similar versions of other songs; "Another World" is very similar to the Josie and the Pussycats song "Three Small Words", "Vanilla" is very reminiscent of Ricky Martin's "Livin' la Vida Loca", and "Emu~for my dear~" sounds very much like U2's "With or Without You".
  • The signature guitar riff for "I Feel Fine" by The Beatles is a more folk-rockish, less fuzzed-up version of the riff for Bobby Parker's minor 1960 hit "Watch Your Step". The drums on the two songs are also very similar. However, John Lennon himself freely admitted that he borrowed the riff. The riff was also adapted by Jimmy Page for the Led Zeppelin instrumental "Moby Dick".
    • "Watch Your Step" is all over 60s Beat music: it's hard to say where The Yardbirds' "Rack My Mind" would be without it.
    • The same riff was then borrowed more-or-less untouched for Sugarloaf's "Don't Call Us, We'll Call You."
    • Sugarloaf's first hit "Green-Eyed Lady" sounds a lot like "25 or 6 to 4" by Music/Chicago, which was popular around the same time.
  • The Beatles more or less admittedly used this technique to craft the song "Come Together" out of Chuck Berry's "You Can't Catch Me", even taking one of the lines ("Here come ol' flat top"). Berry tried to sue them; they settled out of court. The same thing is often alleged to have been done by George Harrison's solo hit "My Sweet Lord", which sounds a lot like "He's So Fine". That one wasn't settled out of court. Harrison was successfully sued: the court accepted his claim that if he had plagiarized, it was unintentional and unconscious, but they ruled that unintentional plagiarism is still plagiarism. Bright Tunes Music vs Harrisongs became a landmark decision in American copyright law. He later wrote "This Song" to rebut the lawsuit.
    • When the Beatles' press officer started working for The Byrds, Harrison asked him to tell the band's guitarist that he created the Beatles' "If I Needed Someone" out of two of their songsnote .
    • In a similar vein, The Beach Boys' song "Surfin' U.S.A." inadvertently copied Chuck Berry's "Sweet Little Sixteen" and in re-issues is credited to Berry. Meanwhile, some people have noticed a resemblance between "Sweet Little Sixteen" and Clarence Garlow's 1953 Listing Cities song "Route 90".
    • It wasn't Chuck Berry who tried to sue, actually. Morris Levy had snapped up the publishing rights to a score of songs from the 1950s and 60s, including "You Can't Catch Me", and jumped at the opportunity to extort a dollar from Lennon (and, eventually, an album - "Rock 'n Roll"). Lennon remained in good stead with Berry and performed with him on occasion.
    • When they were an up-and-coming touring band they often did Little Richard covers, with McCartney taking Little Richard's lead vocals. After they hit it big they covered Little Richard's "Long Tall Sally" and released it on an EP. They also recorded Lennon-McCartney original "I'm Down", sung by Paul, which is...not dissimilar to "Long Tall Sally".
  • Keith Richards has claimed that the guitar riff for The Rolling Stones' "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" came to him in a dream in a Florida hotel room. But peole have noticed the similarity to Martha and the Vandellas' "Nowhere to Run".
    • Neil Young then swiped the same riff for Buffalo Springfield's "Mr. Soul" a couple years later.
    • The chorus of The Rolling Stones' "Anybody Seen My Baby?" sounds a lot like kd lang's "Constant Craving": It's reportedly a coincidence, and since this came to the band's attention before Bridges to Babylon was released, they actually credited lang (and her co-writer, Ben Mink) as co-writing the song to help prevent any kind of lawsuit.
  • "Still Take You Home" by The Arctic Monkeys borrows a riff from "Out On Patrol" by The Offspring.
  • One of The Residents' songs share the bass line of Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean". Which one? Their cover of Kaw-Liga. Funnily enough, The Residents usually avert this so their covers usually only share the lyrics and the basic rhythm of the original song.
  • And then there was the time that John Fogerty got sued for "The Old Man Down The Road" ripping off Creedence Clearwater Revival's "Run Through The Jungle", a song written by... John Fogerty. (There's a lesson here about reading the fine print in your record contract.)
  • The power metal band Dragonforce's music drew much inspiration from computer and video games, including the synths, complete with occasional SID-style arpeggios, ala Machinae Supremacy. In fact, the solo section from "Black Fire" contains the beginning of the Double Dragon theme verbatim.
    • The opening riff to "Evening Star" is taken from the solo of "Mr. Crowley" by Ozzy Osbourne.
  • Afrika Bambaataa used a slightly altered version of the main riff from Kraftwerk's "Trans Europe Express" in his popular song "Planet Rock"(you may know the Paul Oakenfold remix from the Swordfish soundtrack), and needless to say, got sued over it.
    • He didn't help his cause by using the beats from "Numbers" in the very same song. Eventually the case was settled out of court.
  • Lenny Kravitz's "It Ain't Over Til It's Over" has a strong resemblance to "That's the Way of the World" by Earth, Wind & Fire (mostly in the arrangement and chorus).
  • The opening of Procol Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale" is clearly... ahem, inspired by Bach's "Air On A G-String", aka "The Hamlet cigar music" in the UK. Ironically, the authorship of the song (and thus the royalties) is now disputed between the band members...
  • Reel Big Fish's song "Suckers" features a little riff that sounds suspiciously like the Super Mario World theme played on horns.
  • Speaking of Super Mario World, Kakkmaddafakka's "Touching" sounds like a decent homage to the "Athletic theme".
  • Compare the opening riffs of KISS' "War Machine", Danzig's "Snakes of Christ", and Stone Temple Pilots' "Sex Type Thing".
  • Silverchair's "Suicidal Dream" is only a solo away from being a guitar cover of Alice in Chains' "Bleed The Freak".
  • The Village People's "Go West" has a somewhat similar tune to the hymn "Give Thanks", released a year earlier, as many have noted.
    • "Go West" also sounds a lot like Pachelbel's "Canon in D". The Pet Shop Boys' cover sounds even more like "Canon in D", as Neil Tennant was a huge classical music fan. The cover of "Go West" also heavily interpolates the Soviet national anthem.
    • Pachelbel's Canon has seen Suspiciously Similar versions produced countless times, of course, even by classical musicians.
  • The main guitar riff of Weezer's "Take Control" is almost the same as that of "Children of the Revolution" by T Rex.
    • Another odd Weezer example: their single "Troublemaker" has been reviled by their fanbase as just a rehashing of the song "The Good Life" despite only having a vague resemblance. This is mostly a case of an incredibly Broken Base, though.
  • Nine Inch Nails' "A Warm Place" has a very similar keyboard melody to "Crystal Japan" by David Bowie, as well as the same overall ambient feel. Reznor himself admitted inspiration from Bowie (link), but specifically cited the album Low, which doesn't include the song (it was added to Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) as a bonus track much later on), so it seems to be a bizarre coincidence.
    • Before that, his very first single, "Down In It", was very admittedly a rip off of "Dig It" from Skinny Puppy.
  • This video tells us about how Nirvana (with "Come As You Are") ripped off Killing Joke ("Eighties"), who ripped off The Damned ("Life Goes On"), Who ripped off The Beatles ("Day Tripper", though this one is debatable).
    • Also from Nirvana, "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was considered similar to Boston's "More Than a Feeling", "Debaser" and "U-Mass" by The Pixies, and "Godzilla" by Blue Öyster Cult. Kurt Cobain himself agreed: "It was such a clichéd riff. It was so close to a Boston riff or [The Kingsmen's] 'Louie Louie'", but admitted only that he was "trying to write a Pixies song". So it's more likely he was doing a Suspiciously Similar version of the Pixies track rather than Boston.
    • In turn, Diamond Dallas Page's WCW theme music "Self High-Five" is a Suspiciously Similar version of "Smells Like Teen Spirit".
      • Likewise for The Breeders' "Cannonball".
  • Journey's song "Faithfully" sounds awfully similar to "Working Class Man" - with good reason. They were both written by Jonathan Cain, keyboardist for Journey.
  • Asher Roth's "I Love College" was originally based around a sample of "Say It Ain't So" by Weezer. Once it got an official release, he couldn't get the sample cleared, so it became a Suspiciously Similar version... which accidentally made it sound a little like "Waiting On The World To Change" by John Mayer instead.
  • "Weird Al" Yankovic used to do this early in his career, especially with non-vocal orchestrations. But as he got famous enough to ask direct permission from artists, these got closer and closer to the originals. He also continues to do "style parodies" that sound a lot like a specific song or artist, but are not actually the same. For example, "Dare to be Stupid" riffs on the style of Devo, while "Germs" parodies the style of Nine Inch Nails.
    • On occasion, Al's "style parodies" have been so close to actual songs that fans began to consider them as true parodies. The most obvious examples are "Traffic Jam" (Prince's "Let's Go Crazy"), "I Remember Larry" (They Might Be Giants' "See the Constellation"), "The Night Santa Went Crazy" (Soul Asylum's "Black Gold" - in fact, a mash-up exists to prove that the songs are nearly identical), and "Albuquerque" (The Rugburns' "Dick's Automotive"). "Albuquerque" comes so close to its source, in fact, that a handful of fans accused Al of flat-out plagiarism. After this occurred, Al began crediting style parody inspirations in his CD booklets.
      • Also, compare the choruses of "Young, Dumb & Ugly" and AC/DC's "For Those About To Rock (We Salute You.)"
    • Al's soundalike skills actually landed him in legal trouble once - the incidental music for the 'Gandhi II' scene in UHF is a spoof of the Shaft theme; and the copyright owners for that song weren't amused.
    • A strange example is "Buckingham Blues," the lyrics of which seem to fit perfectly with John Mellencamp's "Jack and Diane." In fact, the song was written as a Mellencamp parody, but legal issues prevented Al from recording it this way. For the final version, he matched the lyrics to a completely different tune that in no way resembles Mellencamp's song.
    • "I'm So Sick of You" not only parodies the style of Elvis Costello, but also has similar chorus patterns to that of "I'm Not Your Steppin' Stone" by The Monkees.
    • The verses of "Virus Alert" might sound similar to those of Gao Silver's theme music from Hyakujuu Sentai Gaoranger.
  • Zilch's "What's Up Mr. Jones?" pretty much an English version of X Japan's "Drain". Explained by the fact that Zilch was founded by hide, who wrote the original version and owned the rights to it.
  • Jim Steinman, the songwriter-producer most commonly associated with Meat Loaf, tends to recycle certain musical hooks in songs written for different artists. Compare the intro to the song "Stark Raving Love" off his solo album, Bad For Good, to the intro of Bonnie Tyler's "Holding Out For a Hero", which he wrote, and you'll note that aside from the drum track the two are note-for-note identical.
  • Gary Jules' "Mad World" (also known as the Gears of War commercial theme that sad song from the climax of Donnie Darko) sounds like a slow, calm version of The Offspring's "Gone Away". Of course, Tears for Fears performed it two years before The Offspring even existed.
  • The choruses to Bonnie Tyler's "If You Were a Woman (and I Was a Man)" and Bon Jovi's "You Give Love a Bad Name" are Suspiciously Similar versions of each other. Probably because they were written by the same guy...
    • The tune for the chorus of "Bump in the Night" by Allstars also sounds very similar to "You Give Love a Bad Name".
  • Justin Timberlake's "Nothin' Else" sounds like a Suspiciously Similar Version of the Rolling Stones' "Paint It Black." "Rock Your Body" has a similar sounding beat to "Another One Bites the Dust" by Queen.
  • The beginning of Sublime's "What I Got" is an acoustic "Lady Madonna" with different lyrics and a note changed here and there.
    • Sublime has an entire laundry list of this, as demonstrated here.
  • The chorus of Belinda Carlisle's "Heaven Is a Place on Earth" is Bon Jovi's "You Give Love a Bad Name" reset in a major key.
    • Also Bon Jovi's "Livin' On A Prayer" chorus.
    • That's Desmond Child at it again (albeit not for Belinda Carlisle), and he does it yet again with FM's Bad Luck.
  • In another "You Give Love A Bad Name" soundalike case, the bassline for "Comedown" by Bush sounds like the guitar riff of the former.
  • The guitar riff of Michael Jackson's "Black or White" from Dangerous is similar to that of The Rolling Stones' "Rock and a Hard Place" from Steel Wheels.
    • Which is itself extremely similar to that of the Stones' own "Brown Sugar" from Exile on Main St.. It's a very regularly recycled riff in Classic Rock.
    • The riff is also similar to Bob Dylan's Neighborhood Bully!
    • The vocal melody sounds strikingly similar to that of the Duran Duran song "Hungry Like The Wolf".
    • It actually sounds a lot more like the riff to John Mellencamp's "Hurts So Good". In fact, some listeners born after about 1980 might hear "Hurts So Good" nowadays and think, "Hey, 'Black or White'!"
      • But then, there was an old Mountain Dew commercial (The "doing it country cool" one) that resembled "Hurts So Good."
  • An intentional, parodic example is The Offspring's "Why Don't You Get a Job?", which is patterned after "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da."
    • The riff to "Hammerhead" sounds ridiculously reminiscent of "Ace of Spades" by Motörhead.
    • The song "She's got Issues" appears to borrow heavily from 38 Special's "Hold on Loosely".
  • MOD/demoscene example: Purple Motion's "Fracture In Space", one of his earliest songs, was a Suspiciously Similar version of Dr. Awesome's "Space Deleria".
  • Three 6 Mafia's "Late Night Tip" song sounds an awful lot like Lisa Fischer's "How Can I Ease The Pain". They never mention whether it was sampled or not.
  • Many cheaper compilations during the nineties were full of Suspiciously Similar versions. One label (Mecado) is credited with killing an entire genre of music by oversaturating the market with subpar copies in the Netherlands and was succesfully sued over misleading customers.
  • Older Than Television: The tune most commonly used in the U.S. for the Christmas song "Away in a Manger," typically called "Mueller", was written by James R. Murray. Most other countries use "Cradle Song" (1895) by William J. Kirkpatrick, which sounds much like a Suspiciously Similar version of "Mueller". (Both tunes are in F major and 3/4 time with virtually identical phrasing, and both even end on the same four notes.) And "Mueller" itself is itself an example, according to The Other Wiki: "The first half of the melody is identical to the beginning of the second theme of Waltz #4, transposed down a fourth, in G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald, Op. 325 by Johann Strauss Jr., composed 19 years earlier."
  • Hatsune Miku's version of "Ievan Polkka" has a very similar opening to The Beatles' "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da".
  • The national anthem of Bosnia and Herzegovina (MP3 file) sounds a lot like the theme of Brahms' Variations on a Theme by Haydn without being exactly the same melody.
    • Bedrich Smetana's Die Moldau (the melody in question begins about a minute in) is a tweaked version of the Italian song La Mantovana, which is best known as the tune for Hatikva, the Israeli national anthem (about thirty seconds in on that video).
    • Calixa Lavallée, in composing a national anthem for Canada, borrowed very heavily from a march in The Magic Flute.
      • Conversely, Leo Arnaud's "Bugler's Dream" (the 1958ds very similar to the one in The Knack's "My Sharona".
  • "What Makes You Beautiful" by One Direction has a guitar riff that sounds just a bit too much like the riff in "Summer Nights" from Grease. On the other side of the spectrum, "Say Somethin'" by Austin Mahone and, more recently, "Cake By The Ocean" by DNCE both bear a strong resemblance the boy band hit.
    • The Epic Riff of "Should I Stay or Should I Go" by The Clash is copied very unsubtly in "Live While We're Young".
    • "Best Song Ever" blatantly copies the opening of The Who's "Baba O'Riley", enough that it was rumored that it was going into court. Directioners were not happy about this. The Who's fans could care less.
    • And then you have "Midnight Memories" and Def Leppard's "Pour Some Sugar on Me."
    • In a more obscure example, the opening ukelele of "Story of My Life" is very similar to "Sweet Troubled Soul" by stellastarr*.
    • In the piano's tone and riff, "Steal My Girl" resembles Journey's "Faithfully".
  • Marsheaux:
  • Since Ferry Corsten's remix of William Orbit's version of "Adagio for Strings", numerous imitations have been made, such as "Purple Room" by 949.
    • Spaceplanet's "Summer Rain" sounds suspiciously similar to Tiesto's arrangement of "Adagio".
  • Fleetwood Mac's song "Peacekeeper" has a chorus that has more than a passing resemblance to that of Paul Simon's song "Kodachrome".
  • The Vengaboys' Rocket To Uranus has a suspicious resemblance to Donna Summer's I Feel Love.
  • Inna's Be My Lover, in addition to interpolating the La Bouche song of the same name, sounds similar to Nicki Minaj's Pound The Alarm.
  • The breakdown and ending of Ylvis's "The Fox" resemble Inna's "In Your Eyes". Although the latter's video was released second, the song itself was released six months prior to "The Fox". The verse and overall melody is even more similar to Imagine Dragons' "Radioactive" and to some extent David Guetta's "Titanium", to the point that it was temporarily pulled from circulation due to plagiarism accusations.
    • One can argue that it's a deliberate parody of modern "electronic dance music" (referring to the specific mainstream use of the term to refer to the particular classes of house music made popular by acts like Guetta)
    • And yes, there's a resemblance to Gangnam Style as well.
  • The "Pachelbel Rant" routine by comedian Rob Paravonian features him playing the chord progression used in "Pachelbel's Canon in D" on his guitar while singing the lyrics to many, many different contemporary songs.
  • "Halo" by Beyoncé and "Already Gone" by Kelly Clarkson would be a case of this (not mentioning that the songs were hits only months apart)... except that writer/producer Ryan Tedder co-wrote both songs, making this a subtle case of Self-Plagiarism.
  • Trans-X's "Living on Video" sounds rather similar to Van Halen's "Ain't Talkin' Bout Love", leading to this mashup.
  • Ferry Corsten:
"Sweet Release"]].
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