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  • American Dad! now has its own page.
  • The Amazing World of Gumball has its own page.
  • Animaniacs
    • The "Newsreel of the Stars" that opened the first episode, detailing the Warner siblings' backstory, tells us that the nonsensical films the Warners made in the '30s were locked in the studio vault and never released, and that after the Warners themselves were locked in the water tower, the studio denied their existence until they escaped in the '90s. Later in the series, the Warners are portrayed as having been popular stars in the '30s, and as having been let out of the tower several times across the decades: to make a promotional cartoon during WWII, to run wherever they liked while the tower was being fumigated for termites, and lent out to different studios in the '70s.
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    • The show was also inconsistent about whether the Warners were created in 1929 or 1930, and whether their first cartoons were silent or had sound from the start. This one was actually brought up in the "Please Please Pleese Get A Life Foundation" short.
    • In the "Rashomon"-Style cartoon "...And Justice For Slappy," Skippy opens his flashback portion by saying "I was on my way to visit Aunt Slappy." Later episodes make it clear that he lives with her.
  • Arthur
    • In an episode, Sue Ellen is seen in a Kindergarten class photo when in fact she transferred in third grade.
    • In another episode Muffy was shown in a Kindergarten flashback but she moved to Elwood City in the second grade.
    • Another episode has Pal present when Arthur and D.W were younger, even though he was gotten when they were still their present age.
    • In one episode D.W.'s mother calls her by her full name: Donna Wilson. A later episode revolves around D.W. hating her full name: Dora Winifred. The latter name has been used ever since.
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    • In a flashback of "Arthur's Baby", a baby Mr Ratburn is called Emil by his mother while he scrawls multiplication sums on the wall. However, in future episodes, his first name is said to be Nigel.
    • Mr. Haney's first name is Herb in the episodes "Arthur's Mystery Envelope" and "The Chips Are Down", but later episodes give him the name Francis.
    • Mrs. MacGrady's first name was originally Sara, but in "The Great MacGrady", it was changed to Leah, presumably in memory of Leah Ryan, who co-wrote the episode and passed away before it was completed.
  • Back to the Future, "Roman Holiday". While visiting Rome, Marty accepts a race against Biff's Roman ancestor Bifficus after he calls Marty a chicken. This contradicts the huge lesson about self-control that Marty had learned around the time of his showdown with Mad Dog Tannen in the third film.note 
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  • Batman makes a comment that electricity has no effect on Clayface. Later in The New Batman Adventures and Justice League, Clayface is easily disabled by electric attacks.
  • The 2006 Biker Mice from Mars series was meant to be a Sequel Series to the original 1993 show, but Vinnie is depicted in some episodes as liking pizza even though the original series established that the Biker Mice hate cheese.
  • Code Lyoko: Evolution has some with its mother series, Code Lyoko:
    • While the character's abilities to deactivate towers is new, their ability to enter towers is played as a brand new development. In the original series, all of the characters were shown entering and exiting towers as the plot demanded it. While this could be passed off as them being unable to enter activated towers before, this was never shown and is a stretch.
    • Additionally, in Evolution, Odd quips that he has only piloted the Skidbladnir once, while in Code Lyoko season 4 he pilots the Skid twice.
    • Also in the original Code Lyoko, during "A Fine Mess" Odd and Yumi swap bodies and Odd claims he doesn't know how to eat with chopsticks and has to resort to using a plastic fork however only a few episodes earlier, Odd was depicted eating with chopsticks perfectly quite clearly.
    • Similarly, in one episode William saves Ulrich from drowning in the gym's pool, naturally doing so by swimming. In a later episode, he panics when he's about to fall into a river because he "can't swim".
  • Codename: Kids Next Door: In a show with surprisingly good continuity, "Operation: C.O.L.L.E.G.E." has the other kids kidnapping Numbuh One from Professor XXXL, and not even batting an eyelid when XXXL says he's using Numbuh One for his snowcone research... even though his snowcone research was the plot twist of his previous appearance ("Operation: A.R.C.T.I.C.").
  • Daria has a few, both in the cartoon and with extra materials. A list can be found here.
  • Duckman
    • The show features several conflicting flashbacks depicting how Duckman and Cornfed first met.
    • Season 1's "Civil War" has them meeting in a store Cornfed worked at, with Duckman being an obnoxious customer that he saves three times from a robber.
    • Season 3's "The Girls of Route Canal", however, shows Duckman encountering Cornfed years earlier at an airport while looking for Beatrice. This one was explicitly a subversion played for laughs, as Cornfed attempts to introduce himself and help Duckman, but the mallard is in full Jerk Ass mode, so he barely even acknowledges him outside of insults.
    • Finally, Season 4's "From Brad to Worst" shows them as long-time friends in high school. The writers may've been aware of the error, but this one was not played for laughs.
  • The Fairly OddParents! has a lot of Continuity Errors, especially in the latest seasons:
    • Similar to the SpongeBob example below, Season 7 episode "Double-Oh-Schnozmo!" introduces Cosmo's brother Schnozmo, despite that the earlier episode "The Gland Plan" said that Cosmo didn't have any siblings.
  • Family Guy
    • An early episode contains a flashback to when Stewie was younger and he had a normal-shaped head. He was jumping on the bed, smacked his head into the ceiling, and squished it into its trademark football shape. In another episode there's a flashback to when Stewie was born and he already had the football head.
    • There's another episode via flashback that shows Peter, Cleveland, and Quagmire grew up together in high school, yet another episode later on shows Peter meeting Quagmire and Cleveland for the first time in their adult lives, and another episode after that shows that Quagmire is at least 15 or 20 years older than the rest of the group. Even more confusing, The Cleveland Show depicts on more than one occasion that Cleveland attended high school in Stoolbend, not Quahog.
  • Futurama
    • In season 4, it is established that talking about Star Trek is illegal, although numerous references to it were made in the first three seasons, including a fictitious movie that was nominated for an Oscar for Best Product Placement (and on top of that, Leonard Nimoy from the original Star Trek series is in the celebrity head museumnote . In the first episode, he was a greeter, but in "Where No Fan Has Gone Before," Nimoy is now on one of the main shelves). Lampshaded on the DVD commentary.
    "They never said 'Star Trek,' they said 'Start Wreck!'"
    • In the pilot, Bender claims that "I don't need to drink, I can stop anytime I want!" This contradicts the fact that robots in Futurama are powered by alcohol, established in episode three, "I, Roommate". Later episodes would establish alternate fuel sources like mineral oil and efficient synthetic fuels as being possible.
    • In season 3, the professor specifies that there exist only two parallel universes (the other one seems to be the same as this one except that everyone wears cowboy hats). In season 4, an entire episode revolves around jumping through multiple parallel universes. But perhaps one can argue that the professor's machine had created all of those universes, rather than just a gateway to them. Word of God Hand Waved this by saying that the cowboy universe was really the only parallel universe and the others were perpendicular universes.
    • Bender has mentioned being able to remember his own "birth." In season 6, it is revealed that Bender does not remember who was the inspector who approved him on the assembly line, and spends the episode trying to find out.
    • Versions of his Birth are also pending to changes. In the episode where he recounts his birth, it was shown that he was built the way he was at that moment in a robot factory in Mexico. In another episode, where the cast turns into babies, Bender slowly de-upgrades along with everyone else, shrinking with each successive step just like everyone else. On top of that, he mentions he's only 5 years old, yet shrinks with everyone else in the aforementioned episode. If he really was 5 years old, he would have disappeared in the goo and never came out (since everyone gets around half a decade younger almost instantly), much like one of the buds on Zoidberg's body. Further muddying things is that Bender's head is over a thousand years old at this point, having spent centuries buried after the events of Roswell That Ends Well.
    • In the season 6 episode "Lethal Inspection", Bender discovers that he was built without a backup unit that would download a copy of his programming (i.e., his "soul") onto another robot body. Yet on the later episode "Ghost in the Machines", Bender dies and becomes a ghost, able to possess any machine.
    • "Viva Mars Vegas" is rife with this. Where to begin?
      • The gang goes to Mars Vegas even though in "A Farewell to Arms", Mars should've been destroyed.
      • The Native Martians are depicted as workers at the casino, even though they abandoned the planet in "Where the Buggalo Roam", which was pointed out twice in Into the Wild Blue Yonder and "A Farewell to Arms".
    • Also in "Ghost in the Machines" we meet Robot God. This does not contradict anything in the series but it does contradict several audio-commentaries on past seasons where Matt Groening and the writers repeatedly stated that there is no Robot God.
  • Goof Troop
    • In spite of the fact that it is established that Goofy hadn't seen Pete or Peg since graduation, and that Max and PJ only met at the age of twelve, after Goofy returned to Spoonerville and moved in next door to the Petes, several episodes make references to Max growing up in Spoonerville. And in the Christmas special, Pete declares that every year Goofy wrecks stuff, but this could easily be explained as happening the years before Goofy moved away.
    • Not only that, but the episode "Have Yourself a Goofy Christmas" ("A Very Goofy Christmas") from the movie "Mickey's Once Upon A Christmas", which is said to chronologically precede the cartoon series, while featuring Goofy, Max and Pete as next-door neighbours, they live in two very different houses in a very different suburb than the houses and suburb featured in the series or in the movie(both the series and the movie feature different houses and suburb). And Max appears to be 5 years old at the time and Pete's wife and kids are nowhere to be found. And nothing implies Pete has a wife and kids, which he ought to have. One has to wonder how Goofy and Max ended up living from a suburban house to a trailer and then back to a suburban house again. Though it's possible that "A Very Goofy Christmas" may not be in the same continuity as Goof Troop.
    • According to Episode 15 "Wrecks, Lies & Videotape", Goofy never had a decent vacation in his life. The movie averts this as it's revealed that Goofy's recent past generations took their sons fishing, by taking them across the country to Lake Destiny. Goofy appears to have lots of money as to not only take Max across the country and back, but to go to a carnival, fancy hotels or motels, buy somewhat expensive food, visit a cave, go to a baseball game and lots of other stuff all while traveling across the country.
    • In "Educating Goofy", Goofy has not finished grade school. But in "An Extremely Goofy Movie", he had gone to college for three years back in The '70s, and just not finished it. "Educating Goofy" appears to be an anomaly in this regard, as several other episodes (including the pilot) allude to Goofy in high school.
    • A milder example is that in "Goofs of a Feather", PJ wonders how he's going to face his "friends" now that his dad's a "duck-killer". In "Goodbye, Mr. Goofy" PJ reveals that Max is the only friend he's ever had, which, considering his personality and how he behaved in "Good Neighbor Goof", is probably true (and Max knows that Pete is a Jerkass and that PJ isn't).
    • Pistol is portrayed inconsistently in regards to age (four, five, and six have all been stated) and grade (kindergarten and preschool have both been stated). The sexes of the family pets are also portrayed inconsistently, though generally speaking Waffles is male and Chainsaw is female.
  • The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy
    • Grim's has been given three origin stories about how he became the Reaper. To list them: When his parents told him it was his "destiny" as a child and forced him into it, despite his desire to sing; found out his true calling, also as a child, but kept up the image of being a country rocker for over a millennia to please his father; and finally, he got the job in a "once in an eternity" school election to be one, competing with The Boogey Man and his old Childhood Friend from Wrath of the Spider Queen. The probably only concrete thing about his reaping origins (at least in two of them) is that he started doing it as early as cavemen and/or dinosaurs.
    • In the pilot episode, "Meet the Reaper", Grim came for Billy's hamster because the hamster turned 10. In "Billy and Mandy Begins", Mandy says that the hamster was 8 when Grim came for it.
  • In the Disney animated series Hercules, Hercules and Hades always run into each other every other episode, despite the fact that in the film this series is based off of, Hades isn't even supposed to realize Hercules was still alive until the latter is an adult. While a continuity error, this actually makes more sense than the movie due to the plot hole that goes along with it... how on Earth could the lord of the dead not be aware that Hercules wasn't dead?
  • Jem:
    • In "Out of the Past", Jerrica and the others find old records of their deceased mother in the attic. This is despite the fact the first few episodes showed that the original Starlight House was bombed by Zipper.
    • It's mentioned early in season 3 that Riot met Minx while in high school in Germany. In Riot's A Day in the Limelight episode a few episodes later, we learn that Riot didn't go to Germany until he enrolled in the army. He met Minx after he was already in the army and saw her in a rock band. It's not specifically mentioned that Riot didn't live in Germany at one point so it's technically possible to coincide the two, but "Riot's Hope" implies he stayed in America until he enrolled in the military.
  • King of the Hill
    • The episode "Life: A Loser's Manual" is chock full of them. First of all, in the very first episode, Luanne is eighteen years old and she has just moved into the Hill's home after her mom stabbed her father with a fork. In a later episode "Luanne Gets Lucky", she claimed she was sixteen when the event happened and had to miss her prom because of it, and yet in the first episode mentioned her dad said she was just a little girl the last time he seen her and Luanne seems to have no memory of the event despite the previous episode taking place one season earlier. Later on, Hank mentioned that he had never met Peggy's brother despite in earlier episodes he mentions what a great man he was and how he enjoyed his company, and last of all in earlier episodes Hoyt Platter was said to be a small, timid, nerdy man who looked like a male version of Peggy and ran off because his wife Leanne was abusive to him, yet in this episode he is depicted as a morbidly obese man who looks nothing like Peggy, is a total jerkass, and he mentions that he ran off because of a drug addiction and the possibility that he'll be in jail for the rest of his life if he commits one more crime (which he tries to cover up from Luanne as "working in an oil rig").
    • Several early episodes imply that Hank and Peggy have a friendly relationship with Luanne's mother, but when she actually shows up, this is not the case.
    • Another episode dealt with Peggy not having spoken to her mother in twenty years and having to save her mother's ranch from being taken down; however, in a much earlier episode, Peggy's mom had a completely different appearance and personality, a fine relationship with her daughter, and not owning a ranch.
    • Even worse than that, early episodes have Peggy and Hank as high school sweethearts from rival schools and implies that Peggy's family lived in Texas for a decent amount of time yet the above mentioned ranch episode says Peggy grew up on the ranch in Montana.
    • In a season 13 episode, Cotton tells Hank, via audio recording, to flush his cremated ashes down the same bar toilet that General Patton used before pursuing Pancho Villa and the same toilet the rest of Cotton's dead war buddies were flushed, but in a season 4 episode, Cotton fought with Peggy's help to be buried in a Texas government cemetery, and succeeded. Though given Cotton's jerkass nature it could just be one more screw you to Hank.
    • An episode of The Simpsons had Hank Hill appear. This doesn't exactly contradict King of the Hill, but it contradicts Word of God which says that these shows don't exist in the same Universe.
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic:
    • In the first episode, when Nightmare Moon escapes from her 1000 year imprisonment and reveals herself, nobody in Ponyville knows who she is except for Twilight Sparkle, who read about her in history and myth books. Later, the episode "Luna Eclipsed" establishes a holiday called Nightmare Night (similar to Halloween) that has been around ever since Nightmare Moon was first imprisoned and was created in her honor. Ponyville also has a huge nearby statue of Nightmare Moon. They probably don't know what she looked like because 1: Parts of a story get changed as it is retold over and over again, i.e. Santa Claus. 2: That statue wasn't in Ponyville, it was in the Everfree Forest.
    • In "Winter Wrap Up", Twilight Sparkle says Ponyville has been around for hundreds of years. In "Family Appreciation Day", Ponyville was founded by Granny Smith's parents when she was a child, making it less than a hundred years old. It's possible the ponies have a long-ass life span, like say, the Marty Oreo fish.
    • In the Season 4 episode "Pinkie Pride", Mr. and Mrs. Cake mention the foal shower Pinkie threw before Pound and Pumpkin were born, implying that she knew they were going to have twins. In the beginning of the Season 2 episode "Baby Cakes", Pinkie and the rest of the Mane Six didn't know the Cakes were having twins until the day they were born.
  • In the Season 1 episode of Peter Pan & the Pirates "Slightly In Stone" the gang finds Captain Hook's severed skeletal hand clutching his sword in the crocodile's cave, however in the Season 2 episode "First Encounter" Peter took Hook's sword from him to cut off his hand.
  • Pound Puppies (2010): In the episode "A Nightmare On Pound Street", the Mayor adopts a dog for his kids, remarking that the "cute ugly" dog McLeish "gave" them reminded him of one he had as a child. In "Squawk", the Mayor says he needs a pet to give him an advantage with the animal lovers of the city, and, after McLeish asking if he wants to adopt a dog, brings out a parrot. The Mayor later reveals he only adopted the parrot to harbor votes, doesn't really like animals, and calls pets and animals in general "dumb".
  • The Powerpuff Girls:
    • In The Powerpuff Girls (2016), the girls make fun of Wonder Woman for her risque costume. In the original The Powerpuff Girls, the girls have actually met her and are shown to respect her.
    • In an early episode of the 2016 series, Mojo Jojo calls his mother. He was raised by the Professor, and presumably his mother (if he even knows her whereabouts) is a normal, non-talking chimp.
    • In the original series, Bubbles was sometimes depicted as vegetarian. This is despite her regularly eating meat without issue, including the Running Gag where the Professor makes the girl's liver and onions.
  • In The Raccoons, certain episodes (especially "Making the Grade") depict the raccoons and Cedric all knowing each other since grade school. However, in "The Sky's the Limit," Ralph and Melissa's first meeting is explained, and presumably took place (over a spilled cup of coffee) when they were adults. Furthermore, the raccoons don't act like Cedric's an old friend in The Christmas Raccoons.

    The former might be passable if you reason that everybody did know everyone when they were children, but went their separate ways after school. The coffee story could be talking about how Ralph and Melissa met up again as adults. And since TCR was "just a dream," well, maybe Schaeffer just has a bad habit of dreaming his friends in random stories where they don't know each other.
  • The 2009 version of Rainbow Brite has Wisp returning to Earth to be with her family. The problem is Wisp is Conveniently an Orphan and showed no signs previously of having any extended, adopted, or fostered family.
  • Recess
    • The Vague Age of Cornchip Girl. She appears to be in first or second grade, but spends most of her time with the kindergarteners, and during the Picture Day episode, she's not shown among the crowds having her picture taken.
    • Not to mention Gus being the new kid in school in fourth grade, yet somehow also appearing in kindergarten, as well as how he appears to be attending school at the time of the Great Jungle Gym standoff (this can be attributed to an animation goof; since he doesn't have any lines). This is addressed in one of the later episodes. Apparently, he did spend some time in the same kindergarten as the others, but being little children, they had forgotten.
    • Also, The Ashleys are shown to be in another class in the Can Drive episode — yet several other episodes show them sitting in the exact same class as the main gang.
  • In her first episode in The Replacements, Celebrity Star is arranged as Shelton's girlfriend, because she likes out-of-shape, whiny nerds like him. She proves too clingy and oppressive for him... and finally dumps him when he proves to be a middle-school hunk without his glasses. Her next appearance has her making a movie intended to ruin his reputation for dumping her.
  • Joe Murray has said that any flashback contradicting another flashback on Rocko's Modern Life is just the result of people misremembering or exaggerating things, not unlike in Real Life. Thus, Filbert remembering being in high school with Rocko, in spite of Rocko having just moved to the States recently, is just Filbert misremembering.
  • Rugrats:
    • In the episode "The Seven Voyages of Cynthia," Angelica says that her doll Cynthia was a gift for her third birthday. In the later episode "Angelica's Birthday", her age is never mentioned, but presumably it should be her fourth. Yet all further episodes still give her age as three.
    • Several early episodes had passing references to Chuckie's mother, both from the adults and from Chuckie himself, implying that she was still around, just offscreen. Later episodes made it clear that Chaz was a single father, and by the time his wife was finally revealed to have died, Chuckie was portrayed as having no memory of her.
    • In the episode "Showdown at Teeter-Totter Gulch," Chuckie says that Tommy was eight days old when they first met. In the flashbacks showing how all the babies first met in the later episode "Moving Away," Tommy, Phil and Lil look just the same as they do in the present and are already walking, clearly not newborns.
  • Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat has two in the episode "Sagwa's Lucky Bat". The first is that they are just discovering the clubhouse despite it appearing and being mentioned earlier. The second is that a flashback in the episode shows Sheegwa was around and old enough to talk in full sentences before Sagwa got her ink markings, despite the first episode implying the incident took place before or directly after her birth (the episode itself is rather conflicting about which).
  • Samurai Jack: In the season 5 reboot, Jack slices the throat open of one of the Daughters of Aku and is horrified when he realizes he has killed another human (as Aku had only sent machines and supernatural entities after him prior to this, he had supposedly avoided killing any humans up to this point). However, he actually did face several human Bounty Hunters in "The Princess and the Bounty Hunters" with the episode in question indicating he killed them without issue. Series Creator Genndy Tartakovsky claimed that the canonical explanation is they were all either not human or didn't die after all, but admitted to having completely forgotten about the episode in question when he wrote season 5.
  • To list all of The Simpsons series continuity errors would take forever and a day. Because TV Tropes loves you (and doesn't want to waste time, space, and bandwidth), we're going to list only the most egregious examples (if they begin taking over the page, the section will be split off to its own segment).
    • "Lisa's First Word" has the family anticipate hearing Maggie's first spoken word, becoming a Running Gag that Maggie rarely speaks onscreen or around others. Maggie clearly says "good night" to Homer in the first The Tracey Ullman Show short, "Good Night", though events in the shorts may not have happened.
    • In the episode "Lisa's Wedding", Maude Flanders is clearly visible at the wedding fifteen years into the future, even though Bart and Lisa are still children when Maude dies in "Alone Again, Natura-Diddly".
    • Also, the street address of the Simpsons' house. From the very first time the address was brought up (the episode "Blood Feud"), it was Evergreen Terrace. However, the house number was 94 rather than 742. Subsequent references are inconsistent on the number, and "Kamp Krusty" even gives the street as Spalding Way. "Marge in Chains" finally establishes the address as 742 Evergreen Terrace, though it briefly went into relapse in "Homer the Vigilante" by giving the house number as 723. Interestingly enough, the address "742 Evergreen Terrace" was originally given to Snake's cattle rustling shack.
    • The Whole Episode Flashback "And Maggie Makes Three" reveals that Homer had to renounce his dream job at the Bowl-A-Rama and return to his position as safety inspector in Burns's power plant when Maggie was born. This contradicts Season 1 "Homer's Odyssey", where Homer was a technical supervisor before being fired and rehired as a safety inspector (and he already had three children, obviously).
    • Also in "And Maggie Makes Three," Homer's reactions to Marge being pregnant (yelling "You're pregnant!" and "You're pregnant again!" while ripping his hair out and running screaming from the room) were WAY different than what was depicted in "I Married Marge" (from season three) and "Lisa's First Word" (from season four). In "I Married Marge," Homer found out Marge was pregnant when she called him from her job as a skating waitress at a diner and Homer squeezed his tube of cookie dough (which he was eating with Barney while the two were watching Charlie's Angels) in shock and when Dr. Hibbert confirmed it with, "Well, Miss Bouvier, I think we found out the reason why you've been throwing up in the morning. Congratulations, Mr. Simpson," Homer yelled, "D'OH!" so loud that a man in traction commented on it. In "Lisa's First Word," Marge told Homer outright that she was going to have another baby (after Homer wrongfully guessed that he and Marge were going to start having sex in the morning) and Homer was ecstatic — until Bart flushed his car keys down the toilet.
    • Aside from that, the above scenes of Homer ripping his hair out take place in the Simpsons' current house, which they didn't move into until Marge was pregnant with Lisa. Even more egregious, every time Homer runs around screaming and ripping out his hair, he runs past family portraits showing his kids at their current ages (10 year old Bart, 8 year old Lisa, infant Maggie.)
    • "The War of the Simpsons", a second-season episode, has a flashback of Bart as a baby driving the car in front of their current house.
    • In "Homer Simpson in: Kidney Trouble" (season 10), it's implied that Grampa has (or rather, had, thanks to a "kidney blowout") two kidneys. In the season 2 episode "Old Money," Grampa told Bea (his short-lived girlfriend) that he only had one kidney.
    • While Lindsey Naegle does change jobs surprisingly often (due to the fact that she's a sexual predator), it seems rather odd that she's been shown as a leading member of Springfield's Republican and Democratic Parties in separate episodes.
    • In "Much Apu About Nothing" Abe reveals himself to be an immigrant, who came over from Europe with his parents. Many seasons later, "The Color Yellow" establishes that the Simpsons have been living in America since at least the antebellum era. Like anything involving Grandpa, this can be handwaved with, as he might put it, "the senility talking."
    • In "Lisa the Simpson", it's revealed that the men in the Simpson family get dumber as they get older while the Simpson women remain smart. There are a couple things wrong with this:
      • Homer's half-brother Herb (voiced by Danny DeVito) apparently is immune from this (or the writers forgot that he existed), as he had his own car company (until he hired Homer to design him a new car), then got rich by inventing a machine that translates baby babbling. Then again, Herb could have gotten his smarts from his mom's side (his mother being the carny woman who ran the dunk tank and has sex with Abe for money).
      • In a later episode, Herb briefly mentions that he's "poor again" so maybe the genes did catch up with him eventually.
      • Added to that, Homer is later revealed to have a half-sister who is dumber than him in a completely unrelated episode.
      • The season 12 episode "HOMR" contradicted the "gene" theory by revealing that Homer is actually is naturally smart (or at least of average intelligence), but has simply been dumb ever since he shoved a bunch of crayons up his nose as a child and one got lodged in his brain.
      • Grampa Simpson: it's been shown that he was a strong, competent military officer during World War II (then again, the season four episode "Lisa's First Word" revealed that he really doesn't know anything and got by in life on his looks until they withered away like an old piece of fruit, and that he bought his house by naming names during the 1950s Quiz Show scandals).
    • In the season 10 episode "Viva Ned Flanders" (first aired in 1999), Ned Flanders reveals that he's really 60 years old, with his youthfulness attributed to an extremely straight-edge lifestyle (or as he calls it, the three C's: "Clean living, Chewing thoroughly, and a daily dose of vitamin Church"). However, previous episodes, most notably "Hurricane Neddy", had shown he was a child in The '50s with Beatnik parents, which would make him a baby boomer (born between 1946-64) and put him in his early 50s at most.
      • Assuming the episode is set in the year it aired (1999) that makes sense, but due to the Floating Timeline, he actually would be at least 60 now.
    • The Floating Timeline causes endless continuity problems for the series the longer it progresses, given earlier writers clearly did not anticipate the show lasting for as many decades as it did. Many earlier episodes explicitly place important events in the Simpsons' lives as occurring in specific calendar years (or decades) that are then inevitably contradicted when the show lasts well beyond this era, and the never-aging nature of the characters makes these earlier episodes seem impossible.
      • "Lisa's First World" depicts Lisa as being born around the time of the 1984 summer Olympics, which are a significant backdrop to the episode. Subsequent episodes, particularly "That 90's Show" (see below) portray Homer and Marge as not even married by then. Bart and Lisa are also generally unfamiliar with whatever dated technology, pop culture trends, etc. children of their current decade would lack knowledge of, even if they directly interacted with it in previous episodes. One glaring example: Bart is depicted as being an avid fan of Michael Jackson in a 1991 episode, only to later believe Michael Jackson is some scary monster adults made up to scare children in a 1995 one.
      • The episode "Angry Dad: The Movie" was a big reference to the original "Angry Dad" show that Bart had created several years earlier.. It doesn't make any sense though. For one, the episode takes place in 2011, and they explicitly state that Bart invented "Angry Dad" in the 90s. Due to the floating timeline, this Bart means Bart would have to have been born in The Noughties, and thus younger than ten when he created it in the original Angry Dad episode. But of course he was the same age back then.
      • There's also, of course, the infamous "That '90s Show" episode in Season 19, which made many fans angry since it does away with all continuity. It practically erases anything that happened prior to Season 10 or so, by saying that Homer and Marge did not even have kids during the 90s. "The Way We Was" all the way back from Season 2, the episode where Homer and Marge meet, is explicitly set in 1974. That means Marge and Homer took more than 20 years to get married. "That 90s show" did away with the continuity in order to bring a more modern reboot of the characters' pasts, but it truly does mess the whole timeline up, even if it is a floating timeline.
    • In the much maligned episode "The Principal and the Pauper", it's revealed that Skinner is actually a former street punk named Armin Tamzarian who served with the real Sgt. Seymour Skinner and assumed his identity when the latter was reported KIA. But in the earlier episode "Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song", he managed to reenlist in the Army as Seymour Skinner with no problems despite using the name of a man the same military reported to be dead.
    • In "Saddlesore Galactica", Todd is at Springfield Elementary, though he is home schooled.
    • In "Teenage Mutant Milk-Caused Hurdles", Marge says a week ago, Lisa would have never worn makeup, though Lisa has previously worn makeup, including the preceding episode.
    • Homer has stated at least once that he never wanted children. This is despite earlier flashbacks showing him excited at Marge being pregnant with his kids.
  • South Park
    • In the episode "Cartman's Mom Is Still a Dirty Slut (2)", Kenny comes back to life by magically reappearing and the characters (at least Kyle) are shown to be aware of this. In the episodes "Cartman Joins NAMBLA" and "Coon Vs. Coon And Friends" Kenny comes back to life by being reborn through his mother and the characters are unaware of him dying. Rule of Funny doesn't work on this because Negative Continuity was played seriously in CVCAF.
    • A few episodes mention that Kyle's family moved to South Park when he was about three. In "It's A Jersey Thing," however, it's a plot point that they moved there while Sheila was pregnant with him. (Though Kyle only says that he was born "here," so maybe he meant somewhere else in Colorado?)
    • There have been several examples of minor characters' names changing, and even more important secondary characters have inconsistent surnames (Token Williams becomes Token Black, Jimmy Swanson becomes Jimmy Valmer, etc.)
    • In "My Future Self 'n Me", one lyric in the song implies that Stan is clean while his "future self" actually just a guy posing as Stan's future self isn't. In "Pee", we find out that Stan doesn't wash his hands.
    • In "Proper Condom Use" (Season 5), Butters says that he's turning 9 next week. In "Cartman Sucks" (Season 11), he says he's still 8.
    • Randy (a geologist) is mentioned as the only scientist in town, but later Token's mother is said to be a chemist, and Clyde's father a geologist. And later Clyde's father is not a geologist but a shoe store owner.
    • Kenny is revealed to have a younger sister in "Best Friends Forever", when previously the McCormicks were stated to have two children. Matt Stone admitted that she was an oversight, and she didn't reappear for a while until "The Poor Kid". It has since been revealed that Kenny did have a younger sister in early plans for the series. She was meant to be around Ike's age, and was mentioned in an early script for "Starvin' Marvin" (though she did not make it into the final product).
    • The episode "Butter's Bottom Bitch" (S13 E9) begins with Cartman and some of the other 4th grade boys making fun of Butters because he had never kissed a girl. In all actuality, Butters was kissed by Rebecca Cotswold in "Hooked on Monkey Phonics" (S3 E13); Cartman and the other kids were witness to it.
  • SpongeBob SquarePants
    • An episode has Patrick being visited by his sister, Sam. The problem with this is that he said back in season 2's "Something Smells" that he did not have a sister. Then again, this is Patrick we're talking about...
    • The episode where Squidward becomes nice has Squidward actually beating SpongeBob for Employee of the Month at the Krusty Krab. The problem with this is that, in The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (which is the chronological Grand Finale according to the creator), SpongeBob says he has won that award 374 times in a row. Note that winning employee of the month that many times (let alone in a row) means he's been working at the Krusty Krab for a minimum of 31 years and a bit.
    • In "The Krabby Patty That Ate Bikini Bottom", Mr. Krabs states that he doesn't need a water helmet while in Sandy's treedome because he can survive on land as long as his lungs are moist, yet he's shown wearing one in "Overbooked" and "Surf N' Turf".
  • The Total Drama series has this fairly often.
    • One episode, for example, claims that Lindsay has very large feet (that we never see) when she takes off her (apparently very tight) boot. However, we see her barefoot in the TDI Playa des Losers episode, and it's as small as you would expect it to be.
    • During the TDI special, Chris says that Owen is the youngest of three brothers. In Action, Owen gives anecdotes about his two younger brothers.
      • Also according the special, Katie and Sadie never realized they were on TV through the whole first season and didn't seem to want to be on TV, even though they sent in an audition tape.
    • A lot of information about the characters comes from their online bios, but the show seems to contradict them fairly often. Similar to Owen, Geoff's bio says that he's the oldest of five brothers, while on the show he once mentions having at least one older brother. Trent's father is supposedly an accountant, but on the show he says he's a lawyer (maybe he was lying to avoid eating that garbage?) There are at least hints of this in other places, like Harold supposedly having an older brother and a younger sister, but alluding to his sister as having psychology books as if she were in college.
    • In the spinoff Total Drama Presents: The Ridonculous Race Owen remarks that he wasn't upset about being eliminated as he had already won a million dollars. He actually only won a hundred thousand dollars in Island which he forfeited by accepting Chris' million dollar scavenger hunt.
  • For the first 5 seasons of Totally Spies!, most continuity errors are animation-based: sometimes Jerry loses his mustache, sometimes Clover and Alex swap skin colors. Season 6, is still riddled with those continuity errors, but also a big bunch more which are story-based, perhaps due to new management from a new studio (or perhaps because this season is a Soft Reboot):
    • It was never clear when it takes place comparatively to season 5. At the end of season 5, Jerry's machine works and globally eliminates the evil gene, which results in the dissolution of WOOHP because there's no crime left to fight, which would be a nice end point for the show. Or maybe not, because the tearful farewell between the girls and Jerry is seemingly written off in season 6 as they resume their WOOH Ping and crime fighting as if nothing had happened.
    • Mindy, Mandy's cousin and the reason she goes to Mali-U instead of another college in season 5, was written off the show entirely. She was inexplicably replaced by Trent, a submissive intern who serves as Mandy's new sidekick.
    • Despite still being college students like in season 5, the Spies literally shrink in height as they grow up for some reason. This is evidenced by the fact that all three of them are noticeably shorter than Clover's mother, which contradicts their heights compared to their mothers' in previous seasons.
    • Clover's mother seems oblivious of her daughter's "secret" job as a WOOHP agent, which makes no sense because she, as well as Sam's and Alex's mothers, already knows that at the end of season 4 when they even become WOOHP agents themselves.
    • Seth, a toy maker appearing in season 2, makes a reappearance in season 6, with a completely different backstory and personality. In season 2, he stole a military-grade microchip to make his toys more realistic not knowing they would become evil, so he tried to redeem himself by helping the Spies fight them, and only got to do community service thanks to that. In season 6, however, his full name is revealed to be Seth Toyman, and instead of naively having stolen a chip, he maliciously attacked the WOOHP mainframe which resulted in him being sent to prison, and now that he has been released, he comes back for the Spies for revenge.
    • Alex's father appeared to be white in season 4, now changed to dark-skinned just like Alex with a ridiculous bowl cut to boot.
    • Sam and Alex say they've never ice skated before, which of course, they have in season 1 when they were high schoolgirls. Ice skating amnesia much?
    • They're oddly excited that they have spoken to the president, despite the fact that they have casually done so twice with him (or another president, maybe?) in earlier seasons.
  • Just a few of the more famous ones from the Transformers franchise:
    • A total list of all instances in Transformers: Generation 1 would fill a library, as continuity wasn't considered to be terribly important. Autobots fly! Now they don't! Surprise, I have a built-in tool to solve today's problem! Now I don't! However, there are a few that do affect the big picture:
      • The Constructicons. Their introduction discusses the Decepticons building them in the caves they were in at the time. Omega Supreme's backstory, however, involves how the already-existing and formerly good (ignore the Decepticon symbols already on them, please!) Constructicons were turned evil by Megatron. Megatron's backstory? He was created by the already-existing, already-evil Constructicons! That's three Constructicon origins, none of which are at all compatible with either of the others.
      • The Matrix of Leadership. The powerful artifact containing the wisdom of all past bearers and other mysterious properties as needed has been in Optimus' chest all along? There was no sign of it when he took major damage to the area it was eventually shown to be held in, and some people still aren't buying it.
      • In The Movie, Unicron turns Skywarp and Bombshell into two identical robots that he refers to as "Cyclonus and his armada." A second Cyclonus is a rather poor "armada..." and only one Cyclonus is ever seen again. Who became Cyclonus and what happened to the other? Good question. (Oh, and Bombshell is seen again, not as Cyclonus. Voiced in-character, so not one of TFG1's zillions of "oops, we used the wrong animation model" cases.)
      • Awesomely Lampshaded in a comic that came with the Rodimus Vs. Cyclonus figures, but written by Simon Furman, so not the usual toy pack-in fluff. At one point, Cyclonus complains that he hasn't gotten any respect in either of his lives (referencing having been someone else on a few occasions, without ever saying who he used to be) and that he was supposed to get his own troops but they never materialized. Rodimus would later say to him "I don't know who you are, or even who you used to be, and I don't care!" as they get ready to fight.note 
      • The Coneheads are explicitly destroyed twice, and are just there again next time, without comment.
      • As stated before, those are the biggies, the ones affecting continuity (in a show that's pretty episodic). Rare is the G1 episode that doesn't have something in this category. Not that the other series are completely innocent, but G1 episodes were often rushed, and not checked for things like this, resulting in errors at the macro (Constructicons, Cyclonus and his armada) and micro (Ironhide goes to van mode and is robot mode in the very next shot and stays that way, Starscream's voice comes from his Palette Swap Thundercracker in one shot) levels being ridiculously common.
    • And, of course, the Unicron Trilogy, a dub of three series that were originally a duology and an independent series. Calling it a continuation makes Transformers Cybertron a continuity headache, where characters who were dead are back without comment (or, in Sidewaysï case, without anyone remembering him.) and a great many characters who were important never turning up again, and a couple of returning characters having radically different personalities, most glaringly Wing Saber. The Masquerade is in effect and only Agent Franklin suspects there is something to the alien robots thing, though humans have known of, and worked alongside, Cybertronians for years as of the previous series. That's by no means the whole list of inconsistencies. Read the supplementary materials if you want it all explained in a way that arguably makes it all worse.
  • On Wild Animal Baby Explorers, in "In the Swim," the Explorers don't recognize tadpoles and don't know that they grow into frogs. However, they learned all about this just a few episodes before in "Big Change." Additionally, in "The Name Game," the Explorers are asked to identify a seahorse by comparing it with a picture of a horse. They, however, had seen seahorses in at least one previous episode, so it should be immediately recognizable to them anyway.
  • Winx Club
    • The worst example: Nabu. He sacrifices himself to save the Earth Fairies in season four, episode 24. Yet, two episodes, he's at the Frutti Music Bar watching the Winx's last performance.
    • At the end of season four, the Winx are back in their Enchantix forms. It remains to be seen if that was an error, but in the very least, they're still Believix fairies in Magical Adventure.
    • Clarice, the troublemaker from episode one of season four, appears to be a first-year student who has never seen the Winx before. But she and her friends were in season three and Secret of the Lost Kingdom.
    • Magical Adventure might as well be considered a separate canon.
      • At the beginning, Sky proposes to Bloom in Domino's palace garden. But he already proposed her at the ball at the end of The Secret of the Lost Kingdom.
      • Nabu is still alive.
    • The Nickelodeon TV movies summarized seasons one and two and created a few continuity errors because of time constraints.
      • Stella was originally "the fairy of the sun and moon" because of her parents, the sun king Radius and the moon queen Luna. But Nickelodeon redubbed her "the fairy of the shining sun." Yet, in season three, Countess Cassandra tells Chimera she would make "a better princess of the sun and moon" than Stella would.
      • In the original series, Professor Avalon was impersonated by one of Darkar's minions. But "The Shadow Phoenix," he was Darkar in disguise. This broke continuity with season three, since the real Avalon was teaching at Alfea.
  • X-Men:
    • "Enter Magneto" introduces Magneto as a brand new villain the X-Men have never encountered before, with Professor Xavier being the only one with any past connection to him. Later, a flashback in "Cold Comfort" would show the original teenage X-Men battling Magneto during one of their first missions years earlier.
    • While discussing a possible traitor in the ranks, Jean Grey says that it could be her, and asks Cyclops if he's forgotten about her unspecified "bad moments." This was presumably referencing The Dark Phoenix Saga, a storyline that wouldn't be adapted until the third season.
    • Cable is introduced as a mercenary who has been living in the present for quite some time, and it's mentioned that he'd taken part in a coup in Genosha several years ago. Later episodes would establish that he was actually a freedom fighter from the year 3999, and that he'd specifically time-traveled back to the 90's to Set Right What Once Went Wrong. Also, he inexplicably lacked his bionic arm in his first two appearances, despite having it in all his subsequent guest spots.
    • When Angel first appears, it's clear that he and the X-Men have never met before, and neither Cyclops nor Professor Xavier have any idea who he is. Flashbacks in later episodes would erroneously include a teenage version of Angel as a founding member of the X-Men.
  • Ben 10:
    • Ben 10: Alien Force and Ben 10: Ultimate Alien gets a lot of flak for its many continuity errors of the original series (it could be obviously due to Dwayne McDuffie lack of input to the original series). While Ben 10: Omniverse fixes some of UAF's continuity errors, even it suffers from continuity errors as well. All three sequels suffers from their own continuity as well.
    • Ben 10: Alien Force:
      • In the original series, the plumbers were a secret United States government organization that dealt with alien, and occasionally supernatural, threats to the planet Earth. The Plumbers went defunct years before the series began, when hostile alien activity severely declined. In Alien Force, they've been retconned into being intergalactic space police.


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