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Stories of Sodor is a 2017 YouTube series by Victor Tanzig based (somewhat loosely) on The Railway Series.

The series is set in an Alternate Universe in which the North Western Railway is not formed until the 1990s. Instead, Sodor is divided between the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER, also known as the Nor'Easters) and the London, Midland, and Scottish Railway (LMS, also known as the Midis). The series' first season takes place during 1935-38 in the midst of the Great Depression and the Spanish Civil War, the latter of which creates a large refugee crisis on the island. The second season takes place in 1938-39 in the leadup to World War II. A mini series titled "Stories of War" takes place between the second and third seasons, and covers World War II itself. A third season is in production, and will deal with the aftermath of World War II and the resulting nationalization of Britain's railways along with other industries such as coal.

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Also by Tanzig is a series called "Sodor Shorts". These shorts are not canon to the main series, and are more comedic in nature. Common themes include:


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This program provides examples of:

  • Adapted Out: The 1930s setting requires Harold the Helicopter to be omitted from the events inspired by "Percy's Promise", along with nearly all the diesel-fueled locomotives.
    • Zig-zagged with Henrietta: while she does appear in the series, she isn't sentient due to lacking a face, and thus is only known as "Toby's coach" and plays no significant role. Interesting to note is that several models of Henrietta with a face have been released since the series premiered, so she could have a super-delayed First Firing at a future point in time.
  • Adaptation Name Change: Several examples:
    • The Spiteful Brakevan is named Dominic.
    • Lady's real name is Kate.
    • The Foreign Engine from "Gordon Goes Foreign" is named Reginald.
    • City of Truro's real name is Montgomery.
    • Gordon's Hill is originally called the Preston Incline (after the owner of the Wellsworth and Suddery Railway) before Gordon gets stuck on it.
    • The drivers and firemen are referred to by name by their respective engines, giving a feel that they really are all workmates.
    • Even the dime-a-dozen trucks, coaches and brake vans each have names when they are non-faceless.

  • Adaptational Heroism: Stanley (the narrow-gauge locomotive) is depicted in The Railway Series as a rude American hick. This series, meanwhile, depicts him as a very nice, very pleasant Scottish-accented engine who is jinxed (and, as revealed in "Inspection", served with The Fat Controller during World War I).
    • The trucks, surprisingly. They never cause accidents intentionally, with the incidents in the books and television series being made up for plot convenience. This is because, as Edward points out, the trucks aren't fitted with any form of propulsion, meaning they can't bump an engine or hold them back, and they would never intentionally cause an accident since this would be certain death for them. The worst they get is some harmless teasing. That being said, there do exist some antagonistic trucks, such as Colleen (who Diesel throws into the back of Percy), and Dominic (the Spiteful Brakevan who later reforms after a talk with Mickey, only for the same fate as canon to befall him and then become a demonic, murderous ghost).

  • Adaptational Villainy: Several engines in the source material that were nice are antagonists in this series:
    • Donald and Douglas, in canon, are very nice engines, while here, they work for the LMS (the main antagonists of the series), though they are still very pleasant and friendly (though they do have an active rivalry with Henry, and Douglas and James utterly hated each other before the incident with the Spiteful Brakevan).
    • Colin, Lily, and Adam (from Sodor The Early Years) are also members of the LMS, and are particularly nasty (though Lily is shown to be nicer, even working with Thomas to catch the lorries in "Thief", and Colin is a Harmless Villain who more often causes trouble for his coworkers than the LNER). Colin and Lily also ended up sacrificing themselves during World War II to save the lives of others.
    • Peter is also working for the antagonists, though he is also very friendly.
    • Arthur is the most jarring example, being a pompous Jerk with a Heart of Jerk who was never late, and his trying to make up for lost time ended with him, his crew, and his passengers all being killed. He later returns as a ghost, albeit a harmless one unlike Dominic.
    • Farmer McColl is a grumpy old farmer who is referred to as "Mongrel McColl" by the engines and bribes a customs agent so he can dupe an engine into taking his diseased cattle to market.

  • Alternate Universe: As mentioned above, the series has many, many differences from the series we're all familiar with. These are just a few of the differences:
    • The North Western Railway is not formed until British Rail is privatized in 1996, with Sodor instead being contested between the LNER and LMS following the 1923 Grouping, and later being a region of BR.
    • Vehicles with faces are classed as "Non-Faceless Vehicles". Most are able to start themselves up, drive themselves (with crews still being present because it's common sense), and have certain rights, including that they cannot be sold without consent, and they cannot be scrapped unless they've already been killed in a crash, or have undergone the "Final Firing" (a process in which a chemical colloquially known as "black water" is used to euthanize engines).
    • Diesel is built in 1931 as a prototype for a fictional LMS diesel class called the Paxam V1, and was the only member of the class built, a distinction he is proud of.
    • Several engines are older than in canon. For example, Toby was built in 1879 instead of 1914, Arthur was built in the early 1900s instead of between 1946 and 1952, and Diesel, as mentioned above, was built in 1931 instead of any time between 1952 and 1957. Conversely, Ivo Hugh is younger in canon, arriving on the Skarloey Railway in the 1930s, when in the Railway Series, he was built by the SKR in 1996.
    • The Mid-Sodor Railway, in canon, was struggling in 1937. In this series, however, it is thriving. As the intro shows, however, it will close at a later date and be replaced by the Arlesdale Railway.
    • Henry received his rebuild shortly after arriving on Sodor in the early 1920s.
    • Thomas is built at Crovan's Gate Works, rather than Brighton.
    • The Fat Controller doesn't become controller of Sodor's standard-gauge railways until 1946. In the books, he was in charge of Sodor since the North Western Railway was formed in 1914.

  • Anachronism Stew: Though the chronology is kept consistent, there are some story elements which do not fit. Victor acknowledges and often lampshades this.
    • Diesel is a BR Class 08, whose production ran from 1952-1962. As this series begins in the 1930s, he has to be Hand Waved as an early prototype for a different class known as the LMS Paxam V1. There is some Truth in Television here, though, as the basic Class 08 design was first built by the LMS in 1934, the year the first episode "Percy" takes place, though in a Sodor Special, Edward states Diesel was built in 1931, three years earlier.
    • Henry's new shape is an LMS "Black Five", which entered production in 1934. This is not a problem in itself as the series begins in 1935, but the expositional narration places his rebuild in the 1920s.
    • "Smuggling" shows the storefront of a Bonmarché - a retail chain founded in 1982.
    • The prominent human characters are in period clothing, but background extras in crowd scenes are often seen dressed for the 1990s.
    • In "Armaments" Mr Starr refers to the Ministry of Defence, 25 years before it was established. He should have called it the War Office.
      • "Controller" features the Department of Transport, which existed from 1976 to 1997. The organisation was known as the Ministry of Transport during that timeframe.note 

  • Bittersweet Ending: "Parade" ends after a successful parade, but Edward then brings up the day the parade occurred on: August 31, 1939. It shouldn't be a mystery what happens the next day.
    • The "Stories of War" miniseries, natch. While the war ends the exact same way it did in real-life, it doesn't change the fact that millions are dead, among them Colin, Lily, Alfred, and Mr. Starr (Jeffreys is also dead, but his death doesn't have much impact because he was a Hate Sink.

  • Boring Return Journey: Sodor Short: Song has engines returning from Australia. Edward, upon seeing the bridge to Sodor, remarks "Friends, it's been a long journey here filled with details and explanations that I'm sure nobody is interested in."

  • Catch-Phrase: Characters often say "too right!" This is an Australian expression for emphatic agreement, and not usually used in the UK (since the creator is from Australia, this is understandable).

  • Cannot Spit It Out: Thomas towards Kate.

  • Cliffhanger: The end of the second season finale, "Parade," is most certainly this.
    Edward: "Something I haven't mentioned before now is the specific date Godric's Day fell on; August 31st. And, given this was the year 1939, if any of you know your history, then you'll know what happened the very. Next. Day."

  • Dark and Troubled Past: "Armaments" gives James a major Freudian Excuse for his Grumpy Bear disposition. Back on his old line, the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway, he was involved in a major accident with a piece of rail-mounted artillery that was loaded due to a failure in communication amongst the yard crew. Upon buffering up to it, the gun fired, and not only was the munitions factory destroyed, but 43 people were killed. As was Amanda, James' girlfriend.

  • Darker and Edgier: In general, the series is darker and more realistic than most fan-made series. Incidents adapted from the books and television series have more realistic consequences, people get hurt or even killed in crashes, paranormal activity is a regular occurance that causes disruption or even death, non-faceless vehicles have the right to assisted suicide, the dubious methods used by the Z-Stacks in TUGS are deconstructed, and Sodor and its inhabitants are directly affected by the outside world.
    • The second season episode "Spectre" is by far the darkest of the series, to date. It features the ghost of Dominic (The Spiteful Brakevan) returning as a malevolent spirit who pulls apart various trains and destroys their brakevans. The first train he attacks ends in the death of the guard, who was going to be a father, and the second sees the recently-engaged guard live, but he spends the rest of his life institutionalized (exactly what Dominic did to him is unknown, but fan theories range from visions of Hell itself, to a preview of the coming war). The second incident caused by him also sees Peter heavily damaged, and his crew hospitalized, but living (Peter ends up having to go to Crewe for repairs, and The Stinger reveals Mr. Zorro is planning to bring Geoffrey back to Sodor). Dominic's ultimate endgame was to kill Douglas as revenge for his own destruction, but Douglas sends him back to Hell with a scathing and threatening speech. The episode also mentions the increasing persecution of the Jews in Germany and Austria.
    • During Greetings & Salutations #16, Victor revealed he had created another episode of the second season that he forgot about, which is titled "Prejudice". The plot involves the British Union of Fascists creating trouble on Sodor in the lead-up to World War II.
    • "Armaments" deals with the heavy topic of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), in regards to James' Dark and Troubled Past. It also reveals that Mr. Starr is a veteran of World War I, having been involved in the Gallipoli Campaign.
    • The trailer for the Stories of War miniseries breathes this trope. In no particular order, it involves:
      • Many of the engines volunteering to go to North Africa to fight Erwin Rommel's Afrika Korp., which also involves non-faceless German engines.
      • Civilian deaths, mainly represented by a skeleton sitting down and Nazi soldiers executing civilians by firing squad.
      • Sodor getting bombed by the Luftwaffe.
      • And finally, the confirmation that someone will be Killed Off for Real.
    • The miniseries itself is indeed very dark and grim. Among other things, there are multiple instances of swearing, culminating in Adam dropping a Precision F-Strike upon seeing one of Josef Mengele's most gruesome experiments, and multiple characters being Killed Off for Real, these being Colin, Lily, Alfred, Mr. Starr, and Jeffreys.

  • Early Installment Weirdness: In the early episodes, Victor was quite the Motor Mouth in terms of narration and dialogue. He was so ashamed of this, that he actually went back and renarrated them in a slower fashion, as well as changing several details. The old versions are still available.

  • Foreshadowing: Several elements appear first in the Sodor shorts before migrating to the series proper.
    • Monster includes railguns and explosion effects. This stops being a joke in The Stories of War
    • The Fat Controller appears first in the shorts.
    • One short has Edward joke about Jeffries having a heart attack.
    • In the final scene of "Atrocity", Edward mentions that many changes were coming. In the final shot, he passes Pug, who is wearing British Railways' livery, foreshadowing the nationalization of Britain's railways on January 1, 1948.

  • Karma Houdini: Adam gets off lightly for pushing a coach full of German prisoners into the sea, as there are no laws concerning what would happen should a non-faceless vehicle commit murder, particularly against humans. Besides, since it was Axis prisoners, nobody really cared, they were just happy to have less prisoners to deal with.

  • Knight of Cerebus: Dominic's Ghost. He kills a guard that was about to become a father, breaks the mind of another that was recently engaged, and incapacitate Peter, all because he was mad at Douglas for accidentally smashing him to pieces. He really is a spiteful brake van.

  • Killed Off for Real:
    • Dominic, AKA the Spiteful Brakevan, suffers the same fate as in canon in "Carriages".
    • Several major characters were killed off in the Stories of War miniseries. In order:
      • Colin pulls a line of gunpowder vans out of Knapford during a Luftwaffe raid. He saves the station and engines, but a bomber drops a bomb on the vans, completely obliterating him.
      • Station Master Jeffreys collapses and dies while Toby is standing up to him. It is later revealed he was poisoned by a member of the British Union, after it was assumed he had a heart attack from getting so angry at Toby.
      • After a bomb planted by a British Union member is discovered in a brakevan at Knapford Harbor, Alfred pushes the train away, right next to James' goods train. Alfred is killed in the ensuing explosion, as is Mr. Starr, who was in the brakevan of James' train.
      • Lily puts herself between Henry and a live artillery shell, sacrificing herself after Henry's safety valve burst.

  • Leit Motif: Tunes from the TV series are frequently used, but not always reserved for their intended character. Sometimes the leitmotifs of unused characters (such as Oliver or Harold) are reassigned to Victor's originals who lack music of their own. On other occasions a leitmotif may be used simply as incidental music.

  • Mythology Gag:
    • "Ghost" has Henry joking about meeting an elephant.
    • "Strike" has Ten Cents and Drollan arguing about the latter delegating, much like in Sodor The Early Years.
    • "Spectre" has Douglas remark that he'll paint himself blue, like he was in The Railway Series.
    • "Shunted" uses Sir Handel and George's feud in "Steamroller" as an example for non-faceless vehicles shunted locally.

  • Limited Animation: As with many other such fan series, Stories of Sodor is made with TRAINZ using models and sets created by fans - notably Si 3 D. This works brilliantly for standard scenes of locomotives and rolling stock, but often results in Special Effects Failure when the filmmaker wants to go beyond this:
    • Human characters are often extremely crude, with pointy limbs, jagged faces, and clothing that doesn't line up with the body. Most notable are the engine crew with eyes and mustaches on the backs of their heads as well as the front. They are only intended to be set dressing, so long scenes focusing on people require huge Willing Suspension of Disbelief.
    • Stories of War features combat scenes and bombing raids. These repeatedly feature a stock explosion effect superimposed onto the screen.
    • In Ghost, the haunting spirit of Arthur is represented by Timothy the Ghost Engine, despite he and Arthur looking nothing alike. note . This is lampshaded by other characters in the story, then promptly shrugged off, and later joked about in the Sodor Short Busters.

  • Not-So-Harmless Villain: The Horrid Lorries. In the source material, they do nothing more than insult the steam engines and suffer comical accidents. Here, however, they kidnap one engine and use him to force another to steal goods.

  • Original Character: Victor Tanzig has created several for the series, among them being:
    • Mickey, a fire and rescue engine who fills the role of the Fire Tug. His model is a reskinned version of Edward's Trainz 2006 model available on NWR 3 D with a different face, with the initials "FR" on his tender originally standing for Furness Railway.
    • Constable Joey, a police engine based on the obscure magazine-exclusive character Thirteen. He fills the role of the Coastguard.
    • Reginald, the Midis' express engine and Gordon's primary rival, who is based on the Foreign Engine who argues with Gordon and Duck over the station in London in "Gordon Goes Foreign".
    • Station Master Jeffreys, the tyrannical station master of Elsbridge who is extremely rude to everyone (except the Rev. W. Awdry himself, who actually managed to get him to compliment Edward for once), demands that everyone address him as Station Master Jeffreys, and sent an ambulance away that had been called for a Spanish refugee in labor. Many have likened him to Bluenose of TUGS
    • Mr. Star and Mr. Zorro, the local LNER and LMS controllers, respectively. They are the counterparts of Captain Star and Captain Zero.
    • Burke and Blair, a pair of snooty LNER inspectors who plotted to have Toby retired (but not scrapped, since scrapping a non-faceless vehicle while they're still living is illegal). Burke hits the skids after some trucks expose his affair, and he, in turns, sabotages Thomas and Andreas' trains before getting life in prison, while Blair ends up being an army radio operator during World War II and encounters Thomas and Douglas behind enemy lines. They are, of course, the counterparts of their TUGS namesakes.
    • Billy Shoepack, a demolitions expert based on the character from TUGS.
    • Benson, an officious steam engine from the Railway Operating Department who fills the role of Bluenose.
    • Samantha, an Austerity tank engine reskinned from an older model of Wilbert.
    • OCs by other creators have also appeared, including:
      • Colin, Lily, Adam, Eric, Peter, Alice, William, and Andreas from Wildnorwester (Iris, Owen, and Hugh also appear in several shorts and specials, indicating they will be introduced at a later date)
      • Wendell from Mainland Studios
      • Peckett by Skarloey Rheneas appears in a short parodying the Bridge of Death sequence from Monty Python and the Holy Grail and is set to debut in the series proper in season 3.

  • Precision F-Strike: In Luck there is a single, unsubtitled "Scheisse" by a German character, for which Victor sheepishly apologizes in the wrap-up video. This is later contrasted with The Stories of War in which English profanities are used many times and Victor almost becomes Sir Swears-a-Lot.

  • Public Domain Soundtrack: In addition to the familiar leitmotifs from the television series, Victor draws heavily from Kevin Macleod.

  • Reality Ensues: This series puts a fair amount of emphasis on cause and effect. And also adds realistic aspects to sentient machines:
    • Non-faceless vehicles, being sentient, have certain rights, including that they cannot be sold without consent due to anti-slavery laws, they cannot be scrapped while still alive, and they have the right to assisted suicide. Furthermore, they DO feel love, but unlike humans, they can only express it exclusively through emotion.
    • If a Non-faceless vehicle commits a crime, the maximum sentence they can serve is thirty days, as vehicles are meant to serve a purpose, and can’t very well do that locked up.
    • In the pilot episode “Percy,” the LMS is fined for corporate espionage when their scheme is uncovered, unlike the Z-Stacks, who got off rather lightly.
    • Adam stealing Percys train in “Legality” sees swift involvement of the police.
    • Speeding recklessly at night in the winter down a steep hill is a recipe for disaster, as Arthur, his crew, and all of his passengers tragically find out.
    • As the mini-series shows, you don't fight in a war without having some sort of trauma.
    • In "Shunted", Thomas and Bertie have their famous race just like in the original series. It's played mostly the same save for a few minor changes, but it's after the race that the other shoe drops. Whereas in the original series Thomas is gently reminded not to go too fast, here Thomas and Bertie wind up in serious trouble for speeding and potentially endangering their passengers all in the name of a petty contest (Which in this version, both Thomas'es crew also have money riding on, resulting in their suspension) and lands Thomas and Bertie in Railgate for time. Edward even remarks to Thomas how speeding with a passenger train is What got Arthur, his crew, and all of their passengers killed in a fatal accident
    • The preview for the third season premiere "Aftermath" reveals that the so-called non-faceless German engines who fought the Steam Corp. in North Africa were actually regular faceless locomotives with faces painted on, as Germany seems to lack any non-faceless vehicles. This is likely because Hitler viewed the idea of sentient vehicles as an affront to his vision for the Master Race, but had faces painted on locomotives for psychological reasons.

  • Recycled Plot: Many of the stories are adapted from TUGS:
    • "Percy" is adapted from "Sunshine".
    • "Scrap" takes elements from "High Tide".
    • "Quarantine" is adapted from the episode of the same name.
    • "Thief" is heavily based on "Pirate".
    • "Trapped" is also adapted from the episode of the same name, though with a boulder like in "Rusty and the Boulder" instead of a tramp steamer. A human version of Billy Shoepack also puts in an appearance. A later episode, "Maintenance", reveals that the incident saw Billy get a two-year prison sentence for destruction of railway property, and his company suffered a major financial hit because they had to pay for the repairs, forcing them to lay off most of their staff and then downsize, moving their operation to Cros-Ny-Curin on the Skarloey Railway.
    • "Parade" is based on "Regatta", but omits the Grampus plot in favor of focusing on the Lillie Lightship plot.
    • It has been confirmed that "Munitions" will be adapted, but not during the "Stories of War" miniseries.
    • Certain plot points are adapted from the Railway Series itself but with a different context and in more larger narratives, and often with much more realistic consequences. Some examples include:
      • In "Scrap", Percy states he would never go past the danger board at the harbor as in "Percy Takes the Plunge", and Thomas goes down the mine (as in "Down the Mine") after someone moves the danger sign, not because of his own cheekiness. It also adapts Trevor's predicament from "Saved From Scrap" albeit without the threat of being scrapped.
      • "Legality" borrows heavily from "Thomas in Trouble".
      • "Ghost" has Henry rescued from a snowdrift by Donald and Douglas just like in "The Deputation."
      • "Cows" adapts the Thomas episode of the same name but with Edward's incident occurring after Gordon's run-in with Bluebell. Diesel also runs into a bull just like Daisy did in "Bulls Eye."
      • "Passengers" adapts the events of "Edward & Gordon" and "James & The Coaches", with Gordon being put on goods work after he calls Mr. Starr a fool to his face, and Mr. Starr takes partial responsibility for the bootlace incident due to deferred maintenance.
      • "Carriages" retells "Break Van" in a much darker context. For starters, when Donald bumps the Spiteful Brakevan (here named Dominic), he is "shunted" (the in-series term for imprisoned) for two weeks for assaulting rolling stock. Also, when Douglas does destroy the brakevan, he and James panic. In the second season episode "Spectre", it goes even further, with Dominic returning as a vengeful, murderous ghost, the episode "Strike" showing exactly why.
      • "Jinxed", in addition to adapting the TUGS episode of the same name, adapts Falcon's cliff-side derailment from "Bulldog" but with Stanley pulling him up rather than Duke as well as Peter Sam's accident at the slate quarry's incline from "Trucks" except here it's when he was Stuart. The drain pipe that Peter Sam used as a hasty funnel replacement in "Special Funnel" was a humorous mix-up in the delivery of Stuart's proper new funnel and wasn't used at all.
      • In the second season premiere "Visitor", Gordon doesn't try breaking City of Truro's record (as in "Domeless Engines/Gordon and the Famous Visitor"), and his dome comes off because a brick falls off a bridge and hits it. Also, the events of "Thomas Goes Fishing" are averted when Thomas' fireman manages to spot a fish in the bucket (though we don't actually see it, because Thomas was simply retelling the story to Eric).
      • The next episode, "Inspection", adapts "Dirty Objects" (in which Adam unwittingly sends a tar wagon rolling into James at Arlesburgh) and "A Scarf for Percy" (which goes quite similar to canon, except Percy was trying to prank some snobbish non-faceless coaches while Thomas distracted them, and Percy questions the presence of jam at a train station).
      • "Strike" pulls an amusing Bait-and-Switch. An adaptation of "Trouble in the Sheds" is averted when Mr. Star apologizes for using coercion, while "Fish" (the fourth season episode) is averted by way of a brakevan being on the back (though it does serve to foreshadow the next episode, "Spectre").
      • "Sabotage" adapts the events of "Trust Thomas" and "The Flying Kipper"; in both cases, they are the work of sabotage by a vengeful Burke, who blamed Sodor for his fall from grace. What's more, in the Flying Kipper incident, the guard in the brakevan is killed.
      • "Maintenance" adapts the events of "Gallant Old Engine" and "Percy's Promise"; in the case of the former, Rheneas is called such because he backed a passenger train away from a falling tree despite being in alot of pain (he had put off his own maintenance, rather than the SKR going through hard times). Meanwhile, in the case of "Percy's Promise", Percy doesn't get submerged in the flood, merely only dipping his front-end, both because the water was deeper than in the original story, and because Harold hasn't been introduced yet because helicopters are strictly experimental in the timeframe of the episode.
      • "Shunted" adapts the events of "Thomas & Bertie", showing the severe legal consequences their race has by having Thomas and Bertie put in prison for racing at dangerous speeds. Several others get in trouble, as well: Eric for egging Thomas on, Mr. Starr for his attempt to cover up the race to avoid bad publicity, Thomas' driver and fireman for willingly going along with it, and the Knapford stationmaster and the owner of the Sodor Bus Co. for illegally gambling on the race. "Pop Goes The Diesel" is also adapted, with Diesel being tricked by Kate into pulling quarantined faceless trucks due for scrapping, rather than trying to pull old trucks from a siding to prove a point to Duck about the superiority of diesels. Kate also gets put in prison for her troubles.
      • "Affection" adapts the events of "Gordon's Whistle".
      • "Atrocity", the final episode of the Stories of War miniseries, adapts the events of "Escape", though in this case, Oliver is a radio picket engine, and Thomas is present. As is Blair.
      • "Management" adapts the events of "Percy and the Signal", revealing that it's a common prank among engines, and that Gordon did indeed pull it on Percy in the past. Diesel then plays it on Samantha.

  • Replacement Goldfish: "Replacements", the second episode of the third season, will see Peckett (an original character created by SkarloeyRheneas) and Samantha (an original character created by Victor using a reskinned model of the RWS character Wilbert) arrive on Sodor to replace Colin and Lily, both of whom were Killed Off for Real during the WWII miniseries.

  • Ship Tease: Quite a few:
    • Thomas/Kate
    • Thomas/Lily
    • Gordon/Lily
    • Eric/Molly
    • Douglas/Lily
    • Reginald/Samantha
    • James/Rosie
    • "Affection" shows off several other teases (some of them characters who haven't been introduced or even built yet):
      • Henry/Emily
      • Jinty/Mavis
      • Mickey/Daisy
      • Mike/Olivia
      • Bertie/Caroline
      • Alfie/Isobella

  • Shell-Shocked Veteran: James and Mr. Starr, as revealed in "Armaments".
    • After World War II, the entire cast (especially those who fought in North Africa) are this.

  • Shout-Out:

  • Speak Ill of the Dead: In "Combat", Benson says that Colin is not a hero for sacrificing himself to save Knapford because he didn't live to do it again. Mr. Zorro is not amused and tells him off.

  • The Lost Lenore: "Armaments" reveals that James once had a girlfriend named Amanda, who was scrapped after being damaged beyond repair in an incident involving a loaded rail-based artillery piece firing at a munitions factory.

  • Vomit Discretion Shot: In "Atrocity", Adam's driver does this after seeing the horrors inside the concentration camp's Shed 17.
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