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Sequel Hook / Video Games

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Sequel Hooks in video games.


  • Aliens vs. Predator: In the latest game, you get three hooks for the price of one! First, you see Number 6 (the Alien) take over a Weyland Yutani ship and become a queen (future setting?), but you also see evidence that both the player character's Predator AND Karl Bishop Weyland are gunning for the Alien Homeworld as their next destination.
  • Assassin's Creed:
    • This franchise alternates between cliffhangers and sequel hooks:
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    • Assassin's Creed I ends the past story with Altaïr finding the artifact that the modern Templars are looking for, and leaves Desmond hanging under stay of execution, pondering the twin revelations that he has developed Altaïr's Eagle Vision and that the entire laboratory that he's confined in is a Room Fullof Crazy marked up by the previous test subject in blood.
    • With the critical and commercial success of the first game, Assassin's Creed II and its sub-sequels, Brotherhood and Revelations, pick up the Meta Plot and segue into each other and into Assassin's Creed III with more traditional Cliffhangers, starting with the revelation that Desmond's purpose is to stop The End of the World as We Know It.
    • Assassin's Creed III ends Desmond's story and concludes the major story arc of the Meta Plot, but introduces the beginning of an entirely new Meta Plot: finding a way to prevent a vengeful Physical God that is released in the course of saving the world from enslaving mankind and recreating the First Civilization.
  • Asura's Wrath has two (three if you count True Episode 18.
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    • Episode 18 ends with Asura and Yasha putting an end to Gohma Vlitra, finally saving Gaea and beginning their trip back to Mithra. However, if you fulfill a certain criteria (ie gather enough S Ranks from the other stories) then you have the ability to play True Episode 18.
    • True Episode 18 has Asura and Yasha do everything as stated above, but when they do get back, Olga finally returns, attempting to kill Mithra as revenge for Deus. She is then promptly killed by none other than the Golden Spider, who reveals that he has other plans in store for Mithra. While this ending did look like it set up a plot for a sequel, it was eventually revealed to be more of a DLC hook when the final Part was released as a DLC along with the Lost Episodes and two mid-episodes.
    • The True Ending DLC ends on more of a cliffhanger than the last one. After Asura kills Chakravartin at the cost of his own life and saves Mithra and Gaea for good, the post-episode interlude brings about another setting where everyone was reincarnated as apparently normal folk. At least, that is possibly the idea, if it were not for Not!Asura trying to face a meteor coming straight at him, mirroring the Japanese Cover Art.
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  • In Imagic's Atlantis, when the city is destroyed, a single starcraft rises up from the ashes to escape, leading to the events of its follow-up game Cosmic Ark.
  • Axelay: After (finally) beating the Harder Than Hard mode, you get a message saying "see you again at Axelay 2". Too bad it never came out at all.
  • Baby Boomer: If you manage to beat this incredibly difficult light gun game, you get an ending where Boomer makes it into the wrong baby carriage, and you are told to buy the sequel to see what happens next. Since this game was an unlicensed video game, it didn't sell well enough for a sequel.
  • Baldur's Gate:
    • The first game ends with one of these, showing that there aren't just one or two Children of Bhaal but HUNDREDS...
    • The second one does it by having an Omniscient Council of Vagueness monitor your progress. They turn out to be the Children of Bhaal the hero has to face off against in the expansion pack.
      • The Black Pits 2 adventure that came with the Enhanced Edition of the second game ends with the ostensibly master of the arena you'd been kidnapped to being killed by an unidentified 'master' for failing him, and your own group of adventurers teleported away to some unknown location by the Big Bad of the first Black Pits, who turns out to have survived/been resurrected.
  • Banjo-Kazooie:
    • The ending of Banjo-Kazooie revealed that its sequel was named and several special features (such as Stop 'n' Swop) were being developed for it, which were revealed in the end ("Mumbo's jaw dropped in awe"). Not that any of them amounted to much in the end until the Xbox Live Arcade was invented, but Banjo-Tooie was a good game.
    • Banjo-Tooie ended with Gruntilda swearing that she'll get her revenge in Banjo-Threeie.
    • Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts ended with Grunty working in a video games factory, plotting to make her own devious game. Seeing as you can go into games in the new Banjoverse...
  • Batman: Arkham Series:
    • Batman: Arkham Asylum contained a Sequel Hook in an extremely well-hidden Easter Egg: hidden in Warden Sharp's office is another office, detailing what he plans to do if he wins the mayoral race - turning Gotham into a gigantic asylum, which lines up perfectly with the Spirit of Arkham message.
    • Batman: Arkham City, which did indeed result from said Hook has the following: The introduction of Hush and Harley being pregnant with the recently-deceased Joker's child. Also, Azrael's prophecy of Batman's destiny for Gotham. However, the Harley Quinn's Revenge DLC, it seems to reveal that the pregnancy test that Harley used gave a false positive, negating that particular sequel hook for some unknown reason. In addition there is a boat in the game where if you use the cryptographic sequencer, you can open a hatch. Go down, and you'll find a dead body that jerks back to life if you examine it closely before dying, and a shipment order filled out to one "Johnathan Crane". If you also use the sequencer and move around the screen, you'll find coded messages from the Scarecrow saying he'll have his revenge.
    • Batman: Arkham Knight featured a version of the Wayne Manor Predator map from Batman: Arkham City with a piano that can open a panel and a case Bruce seems to be working on, one where he suspects a murder victim knew their killer and the number 4-25. At first, it seemed like a case of Trolling Creator as on April 25, 2016, Rocksteady celebrated the 75th Anniversary of The Joker's debut, but it also foreshadowed Batman Arkham VR, which was about Bruce having a nightmare about a Jokerizied version of himself killing Nightwing and featured 4-25 as an Arc Number.
  • Bayonetta 2 contains an Inversion. After the credits, Balder, fresh off of absorbing Loptr's soul to keep him from escaping, is seen driving a spear through the Witch statue in the Sunrise and Crescent Valleys, before putting on the mask we saw him wearing in the previous game. After this, the previous game's logo appears on the screen.
  • SNK's Beast Busters ended with the alien brain boss' dying words being "We will return!" and a giant spaceship appearing in the sky above our heroes. While the game received an arcade sequel exactly ten years later, it was mostly unrelated and there were no aliens in sight.
  • Beyond Good & Evil: After the closing credits, a short cut-scene of one of the Dom'Z erupting from Pey'j's hand plays.
  • The Big Red Adventure: The Italian graphic adventure game, itself a sequel of sorts to Nippon Safes, Inc., ended with the three protagonists on a camel in the middle of the desert, with a "The End?" written in faux-Arabic font instead of the faux-Cyrillic used throughout the game. No sequel was ever made however, since the software house was disbanded a little later.
  • BioForge: Dr. Escher survived and has been captured, with Dr. Mastaba gloating that she will be his next test subject. But alas, all hope for a sequel/expansion was long since gone.
  • BioShock 2: There's an audio log entry that has a scientist expressing the need to add some mental conditioning to their Big Daddies, because they aren't properly defending the Little Sisters like they were supposed to. The reason for this? At least one of these unconditioned Big Daddies just wandered off. A type of Big Daddy with weaponry, plasmids, and no emotional connection to a Little Sister. I wonder what use that could be for?
  • Blackthorne: In the ending of this game, after the credits have finished, there is a cutscene showing the same place on Earth where Blackthorne got teleported to Tuul from in the opening cutscene, and an orc teleports in, and laughs. The game was released in 1994, and there is no sequel yet, so there will probably never be a sequel. Meanwhile, the company that made Blackthorne got busy making a little game called Warcraft....
  • BlazBlue: Calamity Trigger: The true ending of this game's story mode is basically a non-ending that introduces the series' Big Bad, whereas The Stinger flat out states the storyline of one of the two new characters in Continuum Shift (namely, Tsubaki's).
  • Borderlands:
    • The first game ends with the Claptrap you meet at the beginning of the game getting hit with a beam from the Helios Station on Pandora's moon of Elpis, turning him into the Interplanetary Ninja Assassin Claptrap, who later becomes the Arc Villain of the game's fourth DLC campaign.
    • In Borderlands 2, after Handsome Jack and The Warrior have both been killed, Lilith decides to destroy the Vault Key once and for all, when it projects a map revealing the locations of many more Vaults.
    • In Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel!, after Athena has finished telling the tale of Jack's fall from grace, Lilith orders her firing squad to kill Athena, when their shots are deflected by the Eridian who appeared alongside Zarpedon near the beginning of the game, who tells them of a war and that they will need to recruit many Vault Hunters to survive it.
  • In BoxxyQuest: The Gathering Storm, the mid-credits Stinger hits us with a massive cliffhanger, Boxxyfan restoring his avatar and taking control of STORM, apparently setting up the events of a sequel. This turns out to be a subversion, because there’s an epilogue bonus chapter dealing with the fallout of that cliffhanger, and the “True Ending” makes sure not to leave any loose ends untied.
    • That ending may not leave any loose ends, but its counterpart sure does. The hidden “PC Ending” raises a ton of questions about the game’s universe, and ends with the party stranded in a parallel version of earth inhabited by Eldritch Abominations. One could imagine any number of sequels springing from that.
  • Chrono Trigger:
    • The PlayStation port had new animated sequences that featured Lucca finding a baby out of nowhere, and the last of the Masamune, all to link the game to its then upcoming sequel Chrono Cross.
    • The DS port gives us Dream Devourer which is presumably the Time Devourer from Chrono Cross. It also has Magus losing his memories which is a reference to a plot line in Chrono Cross that was abandoned during the making of the game. Which seems to imply that they may make a port for Chrono Cross for the PSP that redoes Guile's plotline to reveal him as Magus.
  • The Conduit: Ends on a very abrupt sequel hook, with the Big Bad apparently conferring with his superiors.
  • Conker's Bad Fur Day's original ending involved Conker committing suicide, but it was changed to leave the possibility of a sequel. Thanks to Microsoft, there'll never be one.
  • Contra: The arcade version of Super Contra ends with an alien offspring flying off the final boss' head. The Famicom version of Contra also had a sequel hook that was removed from the American version.
  • Crash 'n' the Boys: Street Challenge, localization of the Kunio-kun game Bikkuri Nekketsu Shin Kiroku! Harukanaru Kin Medal, ends with a teaser for Crash 'n' the Boys: Ice Challenge, an unmade localization of the Kunio-kun game Ike Ike! Nekketsu Hockey Bu.
  • Dandy Dungeon ends with Yamada freeing his Love Interest Maria-chan after defeating his former boss Chairman Ayanokoji who is also Maria's father. Just after the wedding between him and Maria, the girl gets kidnapped by a bat monster (in a shout-out to Ghosts 'n Goblins) sent by the evil foreign conglomerate that absorbed Ayanokoji's Empire Group industries.
  • The Omicron ending of G-Darius has the Belser Army approaching the wreckage of G.T. and capturing it. Justified since this ending is canonical, as it foreshadows the Belser Army becoming the series' main antagonists, therefore making this game a prequel to the entire Darius series.
  • Deadly Towers: The ending text hints that a new adventure might begin "about 1000 years" later, with "the coming of the Iron Age, and the revival of the Devil of Darkness." Of course, the game had no sequel.
  • Destroy All Humans!:
    • Ends with a sequel hook in the form of Silhouette informing Crypto that there are branches of Majestic all over the world... however, the sequel subverts this, as it takes the plot off in an entirely different direction, and the possible sequel plot left open by the hook is resolved in the space of a single mission.
    • Destroy All Humans! Path of the Furon ends with a large sequel hook. Before beginning the final boss fight, Crypto enthusiastically states "Destroy All Bosses and set up for the next sequel!" Also, after defeating the boss, Pox states "There will always be a reason to Destroy All Humans!" And after Pox takes the throne and Crypto prepares to leave for Earth, Crypto tells Pox "See ya in ten years! You'll like the future, I got a feelin' big hair's gonna be in style again!"
      • Unfortunately, with Pandemic losing the rights to the series, not to mention a few studios shut down during production, leading to Americans only getting the 360 version, as well as the PS3 version only available from Europe...
  • Late in Deus Ex, JC Denton discovers the Cloning Bay facility where he was created. Of the four cells, one is empty (the one marked with JC Denton's name) and another is labelled "Alex Denton".
  • Diablo II: The original (pre-expansion) plot ended with one of these. The whole story has been set in flashbacks told by a crazy man in a madhouse named Marius who tells the Archangel Tyrael about how he travelled the world with Diablo himself and saw the three Prime Evils rise to power. Eventually he gives up the soulstone of Baal, Diablo's younger brother, to his visitor so all of it can finally end... TWIST! It wasn't Tyrael at all, but Baal in disguise. He kills Marius and takes his soulstone back and leaves to pursue unknown plans.
  • Diddy Kong Racing's ending cutscene shows Wizpig, after his defeat, flying off the island in his ship laughing. The ending credits also featured a "To Be Continued" at the end. Rare was indeed working on a sequel named Donkey Kong Racing, but it became vaporware after they were bought out by Microsoft. Diddy Kong Racing's Nintendo DS remake didn't feature a "To be continued".
  • Digger: The Legend of the Lost City, a NES maze platform game by Rare, ends with the protagonist Digger T. Rock finding the titular city, then looking worried for a moment, and the words "To Be Continued..." appear. However the character never appeared again in any capacity.
  • Dino Crisis 2 has its ending end on a hook where Regina goes back to her own time while Dylan stays behind to die with a trapped Paula as the base they're in explodes. It was stated that Regina had a disc containing information on the Third Energy, which researchers could use to develop a timegate and thus Regina could go back in time to save Dylan and Paula once the technology was built. The next game ignored the previous two games completely and did so terrible in sales and reviews that Capcom effectively shelved the franchise.
  • Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII has one in the form of a secret ending obtainable by collecting three MacGuffin. Genesis picks up Weiss, who is apparently Not Quite Dead, and explicitly says, "It is not yet time for slumber. There is much work to do, my brother."
  • Donkey Kong Country's GBA port has a different ending from the SNES original. K. Rool returns on the Gangplank Galleon just before the credits sequence and threatens to blow up DK Island. The Kongs jump off the ship into the water as it sails away, and Cranky effectively lampshades this trope:
    Cranky: Call that an ending? Looks like a cheap stunt setting up the story for the sequel!
  • Doom: The ending of the original game has our hero escaping Hell and returning to earth only to find that the demons he's been fighting have already invaded, setting up Doom II: Hell on Earth.
  • Dragon Age:
    • Dragon Age II ends with Cassandra telling Varric that Hawke was the only one who could "stop this madness" and then asking Leliana if they're going to proceed with the original plan.
    • The Trespasser epilogue DLC of Dragon Age: Inquisition reveals that Solas is the Elven god Fen'Harel and that he plans to restore Elven society by bringing about The End of the World as We Know It. The remaining Inquisition members then discuss their plans and the camera zooms in on a map of the Tevinter Imperium.
  • Ecco the Dolphin:
  • Endless Frontier:
    • Ends with hooks that could lead to a sequel, or even bringing the characters or setting into the rest of the Super Robot Wars series: A possible war between the Rubdor and Ezel, the exploration of the rest of the Mal Tierra (possibly leading to the discovery of full-sized Personal Troopers), and a hook in Original Generation Gaiden leading to Endless Frontier itself.
    • There is now a sequel, called Endless Frontier Exceed, and it adds two new lead characters and the story revolves around them, even with the return of the entire playable cast of the original title. Of course that means it'll probably explain the fates of Reiji, Xiaomu, and KOS-MOS considering they'll somehow still in the Endless Frontier.
  • All three games in the Epic Mickey series does this:
    • In the original game, Mickey Mouse starts dripping with ink after leaving Wasteland, which gave the implication that he would become the next Shadow Blot. This plot point, however, was dropped in the sequel proper.
    • Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two ends with the different incarnations of Pete kidnapping Gremlin Prescott with the intent of using him for their own plans. Unfortunately, this sequel hook won't be followed because Junction Point's closing has effectively cancelled the Epic Mickey series.
    • The Nintendo 3DS companion title Epic Mickey: Power of Illusion also hints towards a sequel by having Mizrabel promise Mickey that he hasn't seen the last of her after she is defeated. While developed by a different company, it seems unlikely that this game will have a sequel either.
  • Eternal Darkness:
    • Plays a twist of this one by showing a screen claiming you beat the game, with a promotional poster of "Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Redemption" at the end of a chapter (as part of the game's devotion to messing with the player directly).
    • A more direct example is the presence of a fifth, unknown Ancient which has been confirmed by Word of God.
  • The Evil Within 2: During the game, Sebastian can collect slides and talk with Kidman when each of them are found about their friendship, the events of the previous game, Lily, Myra, etc. After acquiring 10, the final one is given to Sebastian by hand by Tatiana, who says he needs to discuss something he has been avoiding. The final slide is a picture of Joseph Oda, Sebastian's friend who was supposedly killed during the first game by Kidman. Kidman however reveal that Joseph is still alive and that the his situation is complicated, but that she'll only give Sebastian more information once he's out of Union, leaving this dangling plot thread to be picked up by a sequel or even a DLC.
  • Exit Fate: In addition to leaving several small parts of the plot unexplained, the game keeps the eventual fate of some main characters rather wide open and ends with a dark screen and text that can only be described as foreshadowing of some sort.
  • Final Fantasy X:
    • Ends with a fairly noteworthy one: Tidus, having performed a Heroic Sacrifice, finds himself in a giant, empty pool of water and swims for the surface with a grin on his face. The International version has an additional bonus movie that more directly sets up Final Fantasy X-2.
    • Final Fantasy X also has an in-universe inverted subversion. Tidus' father Jecht had a move called Sublimely Magnificent Jecht Shot Mark III. The reason for the Mark III? To draw crowds expecting to see Mark I or II, which don't exist.
  • Final Fantasy XIII:
    • Ends with no less than the Dawn of an Era, along with Hope's question of "will we ever see them again?"
    • And Final Fantasy XIII-2 has an even bigger hook: one of the main characters dies, the timeline collapses, the bad guy wins, and the final shot is of a crystallized Lightning as To Be Continued flashes on the screen.
      • Even bigger hook if you play the "Requiem of the Goddess" DLC story. The ending strongly hints that Lightning is going to return. And then a sequel starring Lightning was announced.
  • Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword provides an interesting Inverted Trope — the closing scenes of the epilogue, fifteen years later, introduce Roy and Lilina and demonstrate a now-adult King Zephiel's first encounter with Jahn. Of course, these are all things to do with the events of The Binding Blade, an already-released game to which Blazing Sword is a prequel.
  • Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance ends with some plot elements unresolved, namely the identity of the Black Knight, the behavior of the Rider Bertram, and the identity of the person Sothe was looking for. This, combined with the enigmatic final words of Begnion's prime minister Sephiran, left fans hoping that the next game in the series would continue the story. The sequel, Radiant Dawn, does resolve the unresolved questions.
  • Five Nights at Freddy's 3: Well, everything has been wrapped up. The pizzeria is gone (most likely for good), the animatronics are destroyed, the kids that haunted the suits have finally been laid to rest, the Purple Man has finally been killed, and the last newspaper says that nearly everything has been consumed by a fire. Nearly everything: what remains will be sold at a public auction...and brightening the last newspaper shows that Springtrap may still be around.
    • Five Nights at Freddy's: Sister Location takes this further with the ending cutscene for the "Golden Freddy" mode. Not only is Springtrap still around, but he's actually the son of the killer and wants revenge against his father.
  • Gears of War: After blowing up the Locust tunnels with the Lightmass Bomb, it is revealed just before the credits that they are Not Quite Dead and will continue fighting until they win or die. Gears of War 2 continues the trend by leaving some unresolved issues and including a mysterious message after the credits.
  • At the end of God of War II, Kratos goes back in time to the War of the Titans, gathers them all up and brings them forward in time so they can collectively get revenge on the Gods for royally screwing them over. Kratos, holding onto Gaia, screaming up to the Gods, all while holding the Blade of Olympus: "Zeus! Your son has returned! I bring the destruction of Olympus!" The camera pans back to unveil countless Titans climbing up Mount Olympus, ready and raring to get a piece of the Gods. Talk about a... cliffhanger. Hah. Indeed, God of War III starts at that exact moment. Zeus repeats his speech to the other gods, albeit with a few slight changes. Kratos also repeats his final line before all the action starts.
  • God Of War 3 also applies: Kratos fights his inner demons and forgives himself for slaying his family, using the power of Hope to defeat Zeus. Instead of giving said power to Athena, he kills himself, releasing it to the world. After presumably dying right before the credits, an additional scene is shown after the credits. A trail of blood leads from the scene of Kratos' death to the edge of the cliff he plunges off of at the beginning of God of War. But of course, none of this matters because God of War 3 is the end of Kratos' saga. Or it was until the release of God of War 4 followed up on the plot.
  • Golden Sun: Dark Dawn ends with Matthew, Karis, and Tyrell coming back home, only to find that the Mourning Moon has returned and ravaged their home, with their parents nowhere in sight.
  • Grabbed by the Ghoulies ends with Cooper and Amber walking towards the town of "Ghoulsville in the Gloom," and right before the final fade-out the silhouette of Baron Von Ghoul in his tiny biplane lurches across the sky after them, indicating he survived being thrown out of his window and may want a rematch.
  • Granblue Fantasy has numerous instances of these in their story arcs and events:
    • At the end of the Piece of the Pie event, Grueler informs the player and Vyrn that the ones responsible for his father's assassination is the organization known as the Foe, a group of fanatics that worship the Astrals and are dedicated to sowing the seeds of war everywhere. Along with mentioning the Society as one of the forces behind the scenes, the same group that Beatrix, Zeta, Vaseraga and Eustace are a part of, stating that the Society aims to gain control over the whole world by ensnaring primal beasts and using their powers.
    • In Lucio/Lucifer's fate episode, the mention of the otherworldly being is brought up. The being in question being the same one that taunted Jeanne D'arc (or broke her in her dark version), and also makes an appearance in the "Four Knights of a fallen land" event as a demon that was summoned by Isabella who tried to usurp the throne from King Carl. For whatever reason, the being wants Lyria and Vyrn for their own purpose. One of his kind later shows up in the higher tiers of the Extra Co-op quests to warn the protagonist and Lyria of the dangers.
    • The Society members (Vaseraga, Zeta, Beatrix, and Eustace) have a lore about their involvement in the organization and fight against an entity called "The Foe". Said entity made an appearance to be involved with the war that took Ezecrain's hometown and mostly confirmed in the event, "Right Behind You", where "The Foe" is an entity that sows discord among the sky realm to test their unity and if that unity breaks, the foe can recruit people to their cause forcefully and attack unopposed without anyone capable of defending themselves against such attack.
      • Additionally, the "Right Behind You" event ends with the warning that the battle with the foe, now identified as people that live in the moon, is not over, and Neutronon's last words is that they plan to go after the creator.
    • During Auld Lang Syne 2017, the Joya ends up rocketing off into the cosmos. Rather than wait a year to address it, the February story event Auld Lanxiety focuses on Zooey and the Divine Generals dealing with this.
    • The "What Makes The Sky Blue" event which commemorates Granblue Fantasy's anniversary of running its service speaks of the game lore about the astrals and their creations and their connection with the Crimson Horizon mentioned often. Part II, Paradise Lost, ends with Beelzebub gaining the dark half of the abomination that was once sealed by Lucifer himself and that the fight against Belial and Beelzebub isn't over.
    • A huge one with the Dawning Sky arc's end for the next arc of the main story. The Grandcypher suffers heavy damage from the falling debris of the Great Wall's destruction and ends up falling to the bottoms of the sky, the Crimson Horizon. Noa, through his bond with the Grandcypher, assures the player that their travels are not over yet.
  • The bootleg-game-inspired Grand Dad ends with a teaser for a sequel to a completely unrelated game — after the ending screen, the screen cuts back to the graveyard level from earlier, and lightning strikes one of the tombstones, engraving the face of Steven from the obscure arcade game My Hero. Then the coffin rises out of the ground, and Steven punches his way out. The game finally cuts to a splash screen saying "TO BE CONTINUED IN PART THREE". It turns out that it's teasing a sequel to an earlier Fan Sequel the author made for My Hero.
  • Guild Wars: Eye of the North: The victory cutscene at the end of the main story ends with a brief glimpse of a gigantic dragon-like creature awakening in the chamber where the player characters have just defeated the Great Destroyer. Sure enough, Arena Net have confirmed that Guild Wars 2 will be set in a world dominated by ancient, reawakened dragons.
  • All Halo games have ended with sequel hooks:
    • Halo: Combat Evolved has 343 Guilty Spark scooting away from the destroyed Halo.
    • Halo 2 ends on a cliffhanger. Halo 2 and 3 are the second part of a Two-Part Trilogy so this is pretty much a given.
    • Halo 3 shows the presumed-dead Master Chief and Cortana drifting through space towards a mysterious planet.
    • Halo 3: ODST (an interquel) shows Truth watching as his forces excavate the portal to the Ark.
    • Halo: Reach (a prequel) ends with the scene that starts the first game — the Pillar of Autumn approaching Halo.
    • Halo Wars ends with Serina's voice telling the captain to wake up. The game has an achievement called "Ready for the Sequel", which was rather ironic for a time, due to its developer going under, until Halo Wars 2 was finally announced by a different developer.
    • Halo 4 doesn't have a hook for its main campaign, but the Spartan Ops campaign (which occurs six months after Master Chief's story) ends with Jul 'Mdama's fleet evacuating Requiem and Dr. Halsey defecting to the Covenant.
    • Halo 5: Guardians ends with a Halo moving into view as an off-screen Cortana hums a tune.
  • In Haunting Starring Polterguy poltergeist Polterguy's last piece of dialog tells us that he will continue spooking around after he has been revived and made a ghost again. However, no sequel was ever produced.
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: The last line of this Interactive Fiction game is, "You set one single foot on the ancient dust — and almost instantly the most incredible adventure starts which you'll have to buy the next game to find out about." Alas, the sequel never even came close to being released.
  • Hostile Waters has two. Not only does the ending cinematic reveal that your Heroic Sacrifice might have spawned something even worse, The Stinger suggests it was in vain.
  • House of the Dead, at least from 2 and up, always has the best ending possible show a limping man lamenting either humanity or how the Big Bad for that game could not finish off the protagonists, and how this same man still has plans despite such failures.
  • The House of the Dead: OVERKILL ends with a recorded message from Papa Caesar, revealing that Isaac Washington's father is still alive.
  • inFAMOUS ends with Cole, regardless of his morality (although his attitude will be quite different depending which side he's now on), waiting for the arrival of the Beast.
  • inFAMOUS 2: In the good ending, a dead Cole is sent off to sea when suddenly a question mark-shaped bolt of lightning strikes his coffin.
  • Jak and Daxter: The Precursor Legacy ends with Samos saying the bad guys are probably destroyed, followed by an Un Reveal. Jak II: Renegade ends with Samos saying Mar may be closer than they think. Jak 3: Wastelander has Jak tell Daxter, "With all our adventures ahead, you wouldn't last a second without me."
  • Kabuki Quantum Fighter for the NES has, after the end of the game, a sound test with a super-deformed Scott (oddly present only in the American version) that says "I'll be back. Watch for my next adventure." An adventure that never happened. However, the PS2 game 7 Blades is a sequel of sorts to Zipang, the film on which the Japanese version of KQF was based, so in a convoluted way this title still received a sequel.
  • Kang Fu ends with a message saying ""See you in Kang Two". No sequel with such a title was ever released.
  • Khimera: Destroy All Monster Girls ends with a Cryptic Conversation between two unknown parties who targeted the island where the game is set.
  • Kid Icarus: Uprising got one... in another game. That being Super Smash Bros. for Wii U. A dialogue between Pit, Dark Pit, Palutena and Viridi reveals that after defeating Hades, Viridi has been gathering her forces once more, and Dark Pit is now working for her and itching to face Pit in a fight again.
  • Kingdom Hearts
    • This is featured in many games in the series, even going so far as to integrate them into gameplay so that the player has to finish certain tasks to get them. This is particularly annoying in the second game: it always ends with a letter from King Mickey being opened and read, but not showing the player the contents and the bonus movie you can unlock as before shows a ludicrously vague explanation of the plot for the prequel. Yes, a prequel hook.
    • Kingdom Hearts: Birth by Sleep turns out to have a Distant Finale that is probably the biggest sequel hook in the series, and that Distant Finale is a continuation of the second game's sequel hook, which pretty much refers to the other 3 games made after Kingdom Hearts II (coded, 358/2 Days, and Birth by Sleep). Combine their hooks and you get a massive sequel hook for Sora's new journey in a possible 3rd game to Reconnect Kingdom Hearts.
    • Re:coded gets a big one as well, revealing that Xehanort is due to return now that Sora has taken out both Xehanort's Heartless and Xemnas, his Nobody. Furthermore, Yen Sid is going to hold a Master Qualification Exam for both Sora and Riku in order to prepare them for the upcoming battle.
    • 3D ends with Sora recovering from having his heart shattered and bathed in darkness, and the Big Bad not only alive and well, but almost finished assembling an entire new Organization. The secret movie you have to jump through the most hoops to get shows Yen Sid summoning Kairi to train with the Keyblade she got back in II.
    • Kingdom Hearts III ends with Sora performing a Heroic Sacrifice to revive Kairi, and Braig/Xigbar revealing his true identity as Luxu and summoning four of the five Foretellers to explain his role to them. We then see another flashback of Eraqus and Xehanort playing chess, where Eraqus says he has a "new game" and places seven dark pieces on the board with a single light one. The secret ending after that is an even bigger Mind Screw, with Sora alive and well with Riku in the middle of Tokyo with the 104 building in the horizon and the protagonist of the fictional video game from the Toy Story world looking down at Riku from the top of a building.
  • King's Quest V: Absence Makes the Heart Go Yonder!: Cassima is freed from Mordack and goes back to her homeland, Alexander mentions that he wants to visit her in the Land of the Green Isles, and Cassima mentions her Vizier who was the one who introduced her to Mordack. This sets up the plot of Kings Quest VI.
  • The Legend of Zelda: At the end of the Second Quest's credits is the line "End of The Legend Of Zelda 1", implying the eventual existence of a 2. This was before The Legend of Zelda had become a Cash Cow Franchise that could be counted on to release a new game or three on every console.
  • The Legend of Zelda: Oracle Games have a sequel hook to a previous game: Link leaves on a small sailboat, setting the pieces for the plot of The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening. Many fans refused to believe this was a sequel hook until the timeline was officially revealed.
  • LEGO Dimensions has a post-credits scene from the perspective of an unknown figure, who is corrupted by a leftover piece of Lord Vortech.
  • Limbo of the Lost, of all the games in the world, ends with a sequel hook, showing Fate and Destiny about to pick another mortal pawn for their game and starting the whole process all over. Considering that the game was savaged for being irredeemably terrible and a major example of video game plagiarism....
  • Machina of the Planet Tree -Planet Ruler-: In the ending, Cram mentions that he wants to look for the Skynaut, an airship, which hints at the sequel, Flying Dreamer. The Author Avatar in the sound room also mentions plans to make the sequel.
  • Marvel Ultimate Alliance ends with a shot of Galactus plotting his revenge on Earth's heroes for stealing his planet-eating devices, and The Stinger revealing that Black Widow was The Mole after all. These all end up being subverted in the sequel: the Galactus incident is said by Thor to have occurred offscreen between the two games, and the second hook appears to have been completely forgotten when you meet the character in question.
  • Mary Skelter: Nightmares, in its post-game ending, has the Blood Team coming across another Jail. The sequel initially appears to ignore this, adding new protagonist Tsuu and a non-Death by Origin Story Little Mermaid but having an otherwise identical premise; however, it eventually comes to light that the sequel is a result of the first game's timeline being modified, which occurs shortly after the Sequel Hook in the first game. The post-game of the Embedded Precursor version of the first Mary Skelter then allows players to subvert the events that lead to the sequel: taking advantage of Jack's and Tsuu's Ripple Effect-Proof Memory, the Blood Team accomplishes Tsuu's goal by reviving Little Mermaid in the first game's timeline instead of mucking things up with time travel.
  • Mass Effect:
    • Near the end of Mass Effect, Shepard says that there's still Reapers in Dark Space, and that they still need to be defeated. They run off, and... game ends. Though of course, it was revealed that it was planned as a trilogy before the game came out.
    • So, naturally, Mass Effect 2 with Shepard (or Joker, if Shepard died) studying the Collectors' data on Harbinger while the thousands of Reapers out in Dark Space prepare for their invasion.
    • The final DLC for Mass Effect 2, "Arrival," has Shepard blow up an entire solar system, but slow down the Reaper armada by several months. Hackett confronts the Commander on this and informs Shepard it won't be long before s/he's brought to Earth to stand trial for what s/he's done.
  • Mega Man X:
    • Mega Man X1 has one after the end credits: Sigma shows up on a screen and taunts X, saying that his spirit still lives on, which turned out to be a hint about Sigma's true nature as The Virus.
    • Much later on in Mega Man X8, the Final Boss whacks Axl in the head, leaving an ominous-looking shard in the wound.
  • Mega Man ZX
    • The original game drops the majority of the hooks in Aile's storyline, with both the Co-Dragons and even the Big Bad Serpent dropping hints to the Man Behind the Man and that stopping Model W isn't even close to the end of the overarching story.
    • Advent: A secret ending shows Master Thomas preparing to continue what Master Albert originally set out to do. The former even recruited the enemy MegaMen to do his bidding.
  • Metal Arms: The last part of the credits shows Dr. Exavolt blasting off in a shuttle, cackling and saying, "I'm not finished with you yet, Glitch!" Unfortunately after this game, Swinging Ape Studios was bought out by Blizzard to work on Starcraft: Ghost, and when that game became Vaporware, so too did Swinging Ape.
  • Metal Gear:
    • The MSX2 version of Metal Gear ends with Big Boss swearing revenge on Snake.
    • Metal Gear Solid ends with a phone call between Ocelot and his true employer, Solidus Snake, the President of the United States and the third clone of Big Boss.
    • Metal Gear Solid 2: Sons of Liberty ends with a certain fact about The Patriots identities coming to light...confusingly.
    • Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater ends with an embittered Naked Snake becoming Big Boss, and with a call between Ocelot and his true employer the CIA Director, setting up the alliance between Ocelot and Big Boss that will give birth to the Patriots.
    • Metal Gear Solid: Portable Ops ends with another phone call, this time between Ocelot and "the man with the same codename as Null" (Zero, hoping to invite Big Boss to form the Patriots.)
    • Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker ends with Naked Snake finally accepting the title of Big Boss and forming Outer Heaven.
    • The only games not to end with sequel hooks are Metal Gear 2: Solid Snake and Metal Gear Solid 4: Guns of the Patriots. The former (which itself was an unplanned sequel) ends with no intention for another sequel, while Metal Gear Solid 4 is the Grand Finale...
    • ... until Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, which ends with Raiden apparently striking out on his own to start a one-man war against the World Marshal PMC.
    • Ground Zeroes, being a prologue, ends with Snake managing to rescue Paz, Chico and the captives of Camp Omega, and the mission is seemingly a success... only for them to reach their base and find it under attack by a mysterious PMC, XOF. Snake manages to save Miller before the base is destroyed, but Paz awakens and reveals there was another bomb in her body they missed. She jumps out the helicopter to save them, but doesn't clear the distance before she blows up, causing the helicopter to crash and Snake and Miller become critically wounded and soon captured. Chico's fate remains unknown. If that wasn't enough, a post-credits dialogue reveals that Skull Face wants to kill Zero, and interrogates Paz for his location, as she is one of the few agents to have met him personally. Paz agrees to give Zero's location, but the tape ends before we hear her give the details, which leads into the next game, Phantom Pain.
  • Metroid Prime Trilogy:
    • All three main games feature Sequel Hooks as part of their Segmented Endings, unlocked via 100% Completion. Yes, even Corruption, though it's supposed to end the trilogy. In the first two, the Big Bad reveals that she's Not Quite Dead, and in the third, a mysterious ship follows Samus's to parts unknown. The ship was since confirmed to be the Delano 7, piloted by Sylux from Hunters, making the hook more blatant.
    • Metroid Fusion leaves an even more Egregious one: What the hell is Samus going to do now?
  • Might and Magic:
    • Might and Magic VI ends with Roland Ironfist still missing and his fate uncertain, the Kreegan king Xenofex unencountered and Archibald Ironfist (released during the course of the game) at large and, as the ending cinematic reveals, plotting to regain the power he once had. All of these are followed up on in VII.
    • Might and Magic VIII has the ending cinematic show a small spider-like robot detach from the badly-damaged Escaton, be told to tell "them" that he has failed, and then scurry off, with context from your encounter with Escaton heavily suggesting the them in question are the Ancients. Then the next game took place in a new world, with the old one destroyed for Heroes IV and Might and Magic IX (in an unrelated fashion to the hook), and then the developers went bankrupt and the purchasers of the rights decided to reboot in a new, entirely fantasy, setting, and then their belated Might and Magic X was a commercial failure, so the chance of the hook being followed up on is extremely slim.
  • Mogeko Castle The Happy End contains a pretty obvious hook, and leads into the trailer for Mogeko Castle Gaiden: General Hashasky's Great Adventure.
  • The ending cutscene of Monster Force ends with the heavy implication that the game's main villain Dr. Percy Frankenstein wil return from the dead to fight the young monsters again.
  • Mortal Kombat 9 reveals that Shinnok is ready to perform his act in Mortal Kombat 4 after the timeline has been altered, and generally, the heroes' side have been in a worse condition.
  • Mortal Kombat X reveals that Raiden has become a Knight Templar who takes a hard-line stance in Earthrealm's defense, threatening to destroy any who would threaten it.
  • Several cases in the MOTHER franchise:
    • EarthBound Beginnings was sort of odd about this — the English translation and the Japanese Compilation Re-release had a definite sequel hook with Ninten being contacted by his father, saying something else had come up... except the actual sequel, EarthBound, didn't have anything to do with Ninten, his family, or anything else left unresolved in the game (Giygas aside, but his actions in Beginnings aren't so much as hinted at).
    • Following the ending credits, Ness receives a taunting message from Porky, who is somewhere in time and space. This is followed with a "The End?" on the screen. The Japanese version however had a more unsubtle "To Be Continued..."
    • There is also a sign in Fourside that reads: "(Planning Meeting for EarthBound 2. Only those who are related to this project are allowed to enter. APE Software Development Team)" If only the meeting didn't last eleven years.
    • Subverted in MOTHER 3. You get the "The End...?" message, but try walking around... Eventually, dialogue from the characters will start, assuring you that everything is fine and saying their goodbyes. Then the credits roll. The actual ending screen simply has "The End" on it, with no sequel hooks of any kind.
  • In Namco × Capcom, Demitri tells Morrigan and Lilith that Jedah is coming back. Sure enough...
    • At the end of Project X Zone, as Mii walks back to her mansion, Kogoro says he's glad he no longer has to worry about the fate of the world anymore, but Mii mentions that it might happen again, as long as she has the "power". At the end of Chapter 31 of the sequel, Otohime assures Tarosuke will be joining the rest of the heroes on another big adventure in the future.
  • Ninja Blade has the hero Ken Ogawa's father cryptically tell Ken to "save your mother" around 3/4ths into the game. After the final boss, Ken mentions to his handler that he has "something to take care of" and is then shown disappearing somewhere in the city... implying that he's off to discover and save his mother whilst explaining nothing.
  • Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath features this after a double plot twist in the end sequence. After defeating the Big Bad Sekto, you find out that "Sekto" is really the demon you heard about at the Grubb temple earlier in the game, and that Sekto is really the old guardian of the Grubb Tribe, having been brainwashed by a face-hugging parasite. When it looks like Sekto is dead, and everything is back to normal, you see the octopus-like Sekto swim down the newly restored river, apparently looking for a new host. Sadly, Oddworld Inhabitants dropped out of the video game business after Stranger.
  • Overlord simply features a The End... Or Is It?, but the Expansion Pack Raising Hell ends with a fairly straight sequel hook. The Overlord you were just playing is trapped in the Infernal Abyss, possibly forever, but his Mistress is pregnant. Unsurprisingly, the sequel involves you playing as the Overlord's son, trying to undo the Happily Ever After that ensued in the absence of a legitimate force for evil.
  • Perfect Dark Zero, like Star Wars, ends with Joanna Dark being an agent of Carrington Institute, and she has her first real mission in the original game.
  • Pikmin 2 has a rather closed ending, but the first has a best ending where several Onions of colors not seen before fly up from the planet — hinting at at least fourteen additional Pikmin types, but this has not been referenced in either sequel and the Onions were later redesigned anyway. The third game also has three on its best ending: the narrator implies that the Drake's initial crash wasn't an accident, the credits (on any ending) end with something crashing on PNF-404 and the Pikmin running to it, and there's a way to view an SOS revealing that Louie was left stranded on the planet again.
  • Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney - Justice for All unusually has its sequel hook in the middle of the game: At the end of the second case, Morgan Fey, one of the conspirators in the murder, vows revenge. Said revenge plot is put into action in the last case of the third game, Trials and Tribulations.
  • Pokémon:
    • Starting with Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire, the two games at the start of a generation feature a legendary Pokémon only available after becoming the Champion, who bears a resemblance to the legendary mascots but has no explicit connection. Then an Updated Re-release (or a pair of sequels) focusing on them usually comes out and reveals they do indeed have a relation. Thus far, there's been Rayquaza, Giratina, Kyurem, Zygarde, and Necrozma.
    • Pokémon Black and White have several potential plot points brought up during the postgame. It was commonly assumed that they would be followed up in the inevitable third version... but with the announcement of Pokémon Black 2 and White 2, it turns out they were this.
    • Pokémon X and Y has an NPC give the player the Strange Souvenir item, which depicts a Pokémon venerated as a protector in a far-off region, one that isn't any of the previous ones. Pokémon Sun and Moon reveals that said region is Alola, and you can even buy the item at the Thrifty Megamart.
    • The postgame of Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness shows most of the bosses that you face through the course of the game (Gonzap, Chobin, Lovrina, etc.) appearing in the Nintendo Hard Orre Colosseum. If you manage to defeat them, they all send you friendly emails... bar Ardos, who declares you Cipher's number one enemy, and saying he will resurrect Cipher one day. After over a decade, we're still waiting.
  • Portal:
    • The first game ends with a run through an industrial-like mass of corridors and vents until we see a room holding the promised cake, a buffed-up Companion Cube and some spheres in the background. Suddenly, their "eyes" glow a bright orange one by one, before a claw arm puts out the cake candle and floods the room in darkness. Then her Villain Song plays.
    • A later update modifies the cutscence shown outside the facility near the end, giving a more direct hook. An off-screen robot or android says "Thank you for assuming the party escort submission position" before dragging the player backwards.
  • The Professor Layton series has these in the form of pictures that appear after the end credits. These pictures all relate to the next game in line for the series. The only exceptions are Unwound Future, which doesn't have one such picture, and Miracle Mask, which goes Up to Eleven by replacing the picture with a full-blown cutscene that not only ties this game with Last Specter and Eternal Diva, but also sets the stage for the sixth game.
  • Psychonauts has the campers all going home and Raz and Lili sadly separating... only to suddenly reveal that the head of the Psychonauts (revealed to be Lili's father) has been kidnapped by a dangerous enemy, and both kids fly off with Sasha, Milla, and Oleander to rescue him. Despite the obvious hook, the creator was unsure if there would be a sequel, given the first game's poor sales but cult status, although one was eventually released as the result of a successful crowdfunding campaign in 2018, with the aforementioned sequel hook forming the basis of a standalone game for the Playstation VR- Psychonauts in the Rhombus of Ruin, intended to bridge the gap between the first game and its sequel.
  • Quest for Glory:
    • Wages of War ends on a blatant (and very effective) cliffhanger with the Not Quite Dead Ad Avis taking possession of the protagonist.
    • Quest for Glory II ends with a teaser for Quest for Glory III: Shadows of Darkness, but the subtitle was used for the fourth game instead.
  • Rastan has different ending sequences depending on the version, but they generally end with Rastan promising to tell stories of his further adventures.
  • Razing Storm: The true ending of the arcade mode ends with the protagonists defeating the Giant Space Flea from Nowhere True Final Boss only to find that they are too late to save their allies and that most of them have been either killed or taken prisoner. Going against your commander's orders to mount a rescue mission to save your remaining allies, the game ends as you and your team head out to save the other team.
  • The Reconstruction:
    • The Golden Ending drops massive reveals about the true nature of the plot that put everything in a completely different light. However, not a whole lot is actually explained about the circumstance or context of these reveals — you'll have to play the prequel if you want to know that.
    • Then there are a few actual sequel hooks — the council of "greater shra" in Moke's sidequest and the final +ii emitter, among others.
  • Renegade Ops: We are told that Natasha and Inferno are working for some great power, but who or what that is, we don't get to know.
  • Re VOLUTION: Jack goes after the magnate guy, and on the final level, in the very end, we see a car fly away. The ending cutscene shows Jack just standing there, and then Marcus, the resistance leader, comes with his car, says it's over Jack, let's go, they go away, and then the staff roll goes by. However, a sequel was never made.
  • Rhythm Thief & the Emperor's Treasure concludes with the true Napoleon still very much alive, with Isaac, Raphael's Disappeared Dad, by his side, ready to go ahead with his true plan.
  • Sacred Earth - Promise: The game ends with Balcruade and Zuleika on the run, which means the protagonists will have to stop their thievery in a future installment. The Stinger reveals that Relima is a Prophet and that she'll have a major role in shaping the world's future.
  • Saturday Morning RPG suffers from this. The fifth episode (out of planned six) came out much later than the other four, and it appears that the developers won't continue working on the game, so the final episode will never come out; the scene at the end of episode 5, with the hero Marty preparing to defeat once and for all his arch-enemy Commander Hood, will never be resolved. Those who play the game on Steam will also never get all the achievements, since at least one is linked to the missing sixth episode.
  • Shining Wisdom ends with the Valley Fairy using her powers to revive the protagonist, which is against the rules, so she's banished to a labyrinth for eternity. After the credits roll, Princess Satera says that Mars went on a new adventure to save the fairy. Said adventure was never made but plenty of other Shining games were.
  • Shin Super Robot Wars: At the end of the Space Route, Char Aznable sends a message to Londo Bell, whom he expects to be in a festive mood, yet unjustified by what Char is convinced has been a horrific mistake for mankind. He reckons they got lucky with this victory, and points out that Balmar is sure to send a second, or third fleet to Earth, without any shortage of firepower. Just how far will Londo Bell's efforts last? he muses, ostentatiously checking himself and claiming sarcastically that sour grapes weren't the intent of the message. Shin never got a sequel, but it got rebooted with Super Robot Wars Alpha series.
  • Simon the Sorcerer:
    • Rather than just having its own self-contained story, Simon the Sorcerer ends very unsatisfyingly with a game show host hijacking the plot to make a shameless plug for next year's sequel. Even Simon is baffled and asks what is going on. Because it's so abrupt and forced in nature, the player experiences no sense of award for completing the game.
    • Simon the Sorcerer 2 ends with Simon still trapped in Sordid's body.
  • If Sin and Punishment: Star Successor is beaten on the Isa & Kachi Mode, we see Isa and Kachi discuss how their enemies will still inevitably come for them. Kachi's memory starts to return, and she remembers that she is in fact Achi. Or that she was just faking her memory loss, and she knew who she was all along? That's what the American version implies anyway.
  • At the end of Skylanders: Giants, Kaos and Glumshanks return home to Kaos' castle to find his mother waiting for them, and she becomes one of the main antagonists in SWAP Force. This example is later retconned, as in SWAP Force Kaos doesn't communicate with his mother until a quarter into the game.
  • Sly Cooper:
  • Snatcher: The PC88 and MSX2 versions end after the death of the Benson Snatcher, with the mystery of the Snatchers still unsolved. This is not an intentional sequel hook, but a cut-off point before the third and final act, which was not included in those versions due to time constraints. The later remakes for the PC Engine and Sega CD added the missing act to the game.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
  • Space Quest:
    • The VGA remake of Space Quest I ends with a still scene of Roger Wilco getting an award and narrator's text saying that Roger doesn't get the girl yet, not in this game. The remake was made in parallel with IV.
    • Space Quest II ends with Roger Wilco defeating Vohaul, destroying his base and escaping in an escape pod. He has no idea where he is and the pod's running out of oxygen. All Roger can do is hibernate in the cryo bed only to be thawed in Space Quest III.
      So long and thanks again for saving your people.
      THE END
      FOR NOW
    • In the end of Space Quest IV Roger is shown a portrait of his future wife (an animated hologram!). Their future son only speaks of her in the past tense and refuses to tell more. She does appears in V, but her relationship with Roger doesn't progress very far yet. What's worse, in VI the plot swerves in a very different direction.
    • Also in Space Quest IV the time travellers go not to different times, but to different games of the series. Much of the action happens in X and XII. No games were made after VI so far.
  • Near the end of Spider-Man (PS4) Mary Jane discovers a secret lab in Osborn's penthouse with his research and Green Goblin weapon prototypes. The Stinger reveals that he never sent Harry away for treatment at all; he was keeping him in a Healing Tank in the lab and experimenting on him with the Venom symbiote.
  • After beating Splatoon's Hero Mode, Cap'n' Cuttlefish hints at something to come when you talk to him at his shack:
    Cap'n' Cuttlefish: There be a storm a-brewin'... I feel it in my cuttles!
  • Splinter Cell: Conviction has one, though it might take some Fridge Logic to notice: Reed's plan may be foiled, but Megiddo is still out there.
  • In the True Ending to SPY Fox in: Dry Cereal, the title character tries this on Monkey Penny during their chat upon Fox landing on William the Kid's blimp and Monkey Penny telling him not to let Kid get away:
    SPY Fox: But what about the sequel?
    Monkey Penny: There are other supervillains out there. We'll be fine.
  • In Spyro: Shadow Legacy the game ends with Spyro preparing for another attack from the Sorcerer sometime in the future, implying he's not done yet. Considering the two Continuity Reboots that came to pass after this game, this sadly seems like this won't be happening, at least anytime soon.
  • Star Wars: The Force Unleashed II:
    • Did you honestly think that Darth Vader is going to remain captured?
    • Unfortunately, Executive Meddling led to the third game being cancelled, so it's possible and likely that we will never know how Vader's freed by the Empire, just that he is since he kinda needs to be part of the original trilogy of films, which take place after the Force Unleashed games.
  • Super Mario Bros.:
    • New Super Mario Bros. ends with Bowser Jr. dragging his father (who attempts to get up momentarily) across the floor of the castle, with the former turning his head to the screen to laugh. This seemed like a typical open-ended Mario ending at the time, but come New Super Mario Bros. Wii, they indeed came back — and with familiar reinforcements...
    • At the end of Super Mario Galaxy, once you defeat Bowser at the end of the game's final level with all 121 Power Stars, we actually get to see Rosalina thanking Mario for saving the Mushroom Galaxy and bidding him farewell, but after we see her fly away in her spaceship, it's revealed that she accidentally (or purposely) left one of her Lumas behind on Earth. Also, considering the fact that the entire timeline had to be rewritten as a result of the universe being destroyed and reborn, everyone's all now back at square one, and as a result Bowser now wants to take over outer space again, which leads to...
    • Finishing the game without every Shine Sprite in Super Mario Sunshine displays an image of Il Piantissimo getting ahold of Shadow Mario's Magic Paintbrush. The fruits of this hook never came to be, however, as Il Piantissimo has yet to appear in any game since.
  • Super Robot Spirits: After beating Levi, she reveals that she is a puppet of Commander Gozzo. Gozzo thanks Levi for her efforts and intends to commence his invasion of Earth.
  • Super Robot Wars UX
    • In the ending, Lostbarrel and Sawatari are still on the run and being fought by Skull Force.
    • Elder Gods Kurou and Al are going to entrust their son to regular Kurou and Al.
    • Nyarlathotep is still unfought.
    • Cao Cao's tactician Sima Yi's face portrait goes from pink to red and he begins facing to the right like an enemy.
  • System Shock 2: SHODAN is seemingly defeated by the player character, but there is a final scene showing two other survivors of the Von Braun as they make their escape in an escape pod. One of them, Rebecca begins acting strangely and starts speaking in SHODAN's voice! "What's the matter Tommy, don't you like my new look?" Sadly there has never been a direct sequel other than the "spiritual sequel" Bioshock games.
    • Blacklist ends with the Big Bad revealing that there are a dozen countries supporting his terrorist group. Also, in the co-op campaign, Fisher and Briggs recover the Not Quite Dead body of Kestrel from Conviction's co-op campaign and move him to the Paladin's medical bay.
  • Tachyon: The Fringe has a slightly more obscure example, which can be missed if the player does not pay attention to in-game news reports. One of these near the end of the game announces the invention of Tachyon Wave Generators, which will eventually allow gates to send ships throughout the galaxy. Unfortunately, Novalogic never made a sequel.
  • The first two Thief games end with these. The third game ends with what could be considered the exact opposite: a Book Ends.
  • Time Crisis
    • Time Crisis 5 ends with Wild Dog launching the briefcase out of VSSE's hands before blowing himself up a fifth time and later being discovered by a mysterious man with a katana retrieving the case and saying, "How about that! Wild Dog is good for something after all." This is followed by a message announcing a True Mastermind Edition, which will feature three more stages.
    • The spinoff Project Titan also ends on one, with Miller's name finally being cleared, and declining an award from President Serrano and driving off into the sunset to track down Kantaris, who had escaped earlier.
  • To the Moon has this in the form of a stinger in which Neil appears to take out a bottle of painkillers and gulp it down before leaving with Eva, implying that he's either addicted or dying. It also has a checkmark appear next to "Episode 1: To The Moon" afterwards.
  • The Trail Of Anguish ends with something happening to your character that will allegedly be explained in the sequel. That was back in 2001...
  • Turok 3: Shadow of Oblivion ends with a post-credits scene that concludes with Adon leaving her post on the Council of Voice to try and save Joshua Fireseed. The Council of Voices is then seen appointing a mysterious figure to ensure she doesn't succeed. Acclaim Entertainment intended to continue the story in a future sequel. The company went belly up in 2004 though, and the Turok game license went to Touchstone Games who promptly rebooted the whole Turok story. It's very unlikely that this ending is ever going to be resolved.
  • The 2012 reboot of Twisted Metal ends with Sweet Tooth's son Charlie seeking to continue his father's legacy and take revenge on Calypso for killing him, while his daughter Sophie has been brought Back from the Dead by Calypso and looks like she'll be an adversary to him.
  • If the right choices are made, a post-credit sequence in Until Dawn reveals Josh has started to transform into a wendigo and is living in the caves under the mountain.
  • Valve Software has had and continues to have an illicit affair with this trope: Half-Life ends with Gordon being saved by the mysterious GMan he sees at several points in the game, put into storage for "future assignments". As does Half-Life 2 (the latter of which resulted in much fandom rage). Episode One ends with Gordon and Alyx caught in a gargantuan explosion and Episode Two ends just before an expedition to the arctic (and just after one hell of a Player Punch). Coupled with the Portal example above, it could be they do it just to troll everyone.
  • Viewtiful Joe, being a videogame about adventures that takes place inside movies, almost invokes this trope at the end of the games.
  • In Voyage Inspired By Jules Verne, after getting off the moon, Michel crash-lands on Earth, and finds himself on a desert island, where he's found by Captain Nemo.
  • Wild Woody: At the end of the game, Lowman tells Woody they'll be back next time the world needs saving, and Woody says that would only happen if they sold a zillion units. Being that this was the last Sega CD game at a time when people were moving on to the PlayStation and Sega Saturn, it's understandable why the game didn't sell well enough for a sequel.
  • In A Witch's Tale, after the second playthrough, Alice says Liddell can return when she's grown up. Then we see Loue watching Liddell from a rooftop.
  • XCOM 2 ends with the Ethereals warning the Commander of an unknown enemy that's followed them across the galaxy, and will come for us next. We then see an ominous glow rising from a fissure in the ocean floor. The War of the Chosen expansion adds an additional cutscene where after the Resistance retakes Earth, Geist says to his Templars that humanity just won a battle and that the real war is on the way.
  • Xenoblade Chronicles X has too many to count. In short: what exactly is the Samaar Federation, what are the Ghosts, who is the Great One, who is the Black Knight, who exactly is L, who built the various ruins dotting Mira, what's the deal with Elma, who is Eleonora really working for, what's the purpose of J-Bodies, what's the deal with Mira anyway, how is Lao still alive and, most obviously, how the hell are everyone's mimeosomes still functioning even thought the Lifehold Core has been destroyed for several months?
  • X-Men Legends ends with Apocalypse viewing the outcome through a monitor.

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