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Trope skeletons

    Trope Base 
Laconic

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Examples


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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

    Comic Books 

    Films — Animated 

    Films — Live-Action 

    Literature 

    Live Action TV 

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    Bastard Designation 
Nomenclature for illegitimate children.

When someone is born out of wedlock, they tend to take one of their parent's surnames (or step-father's if they're the result of their mom cheating on her husband). Sometimes neither parent's surname is chosen, and they either aren't given a surname to highlight their illegitimacy or given one based on other things related to their lineage. Be it where they come from, a prefix with one of their parent's name, or what have you.

This trope is comparable to Bar Sinister, in that it has an alteration to heraldry to (usually) designated illegitimacy. But just like it this doesn't mean someone with a Bastard Designation is an actual bastard. Instead, they could be descended from one as part of a new family line. "Fitz" is often commonly used for this purpose.

Examples


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[[folder:Films — Animated]]

  • Tangled: Implied by Flynn Rider as much as it can in a kid's film; his true name is Eugene Fitzherbert and he grew up not knowing his biological parents, which suggests he's a Heroic Bastard who was fathered by a man called Herbert. This ends up being subverted the series reveals he's the legitimate son of Prince Edmund. That said, it's not impossible said Prince isn't part of a line of "Fitzherbert" and descended from an illegitimate noble.

    Literature 
  • A Song of Ice and Fire:
    • Recognized bastards in Westeros usually have surnames based on the region that their mother was born, referring to topographical features and environments. Those unrecognized usually go by their mother's surname or don't have one.
      • The North-Snow, due to how cold it is in the North. Notable examples include Jon Snow and Ramsay Snow before his father legitimizes him and he takes the Bolton surname.
      • The Crownlands-Waters, due to its proximity to the sea.
      • The Iron Islands-Pyke, aka the pike fish due to sail and fishing being very important for those who live there.
      • Dorne-Sand, because of the warm environment and desert regions. Notable examples include the Sand Snakes, Oberyn Martell's daughters, along with his paramour Ellaria Sand.
      • The Reach-Flowers. Unlike most the nomenclature seems to be based off the flower heraldry of the main house of the region, House Tyrell.
      • The Riverlands and The Stormlands get the more obvious Rivers and Storm, as the regions were named after their present rivers and stormy weather respectively.
      • The Vale of Arryn-Stone. Less obvious, but the region is very mountainous.
      • The Westerlands-Hill, due to how present hills are in the region.
    • Some bastards have surnames based on other things. For example, Lollys Stokeworth's son is called Tyrion Tanner, as he was conceived when she was raped behind a tanner's shop. More historically important, Daemon Waters was eventually renamed Daemon Blackfyre by his father King Aegon the Unworthy, based off the royal sword Blackfyre that he acknowledged Daemon with. This was a tacit slight at his legitimate son Daeron Targaryen, and an invitation that he felt Daeron should be the true heir after he legitimized all his bastards on his deathbed.

    Real Life 
  • British nobility would sometimes use "Fitz", meaning "son of", as a prefix for illegitimate children and those descended from said illegitimate children. Nomenclature would use "Fitz-" followed by the father's name (FitzJames for James II) or father's title (FitzClarence for William IV, who was the Duke of Clarence at the time). Henry VIII called his illegitimate son Henry Fitzroy, as "roy" meant king so it roughly translates to "Henry, son of the king".


    Christmas' First Family 
Stories about family members of Santa.

Description

Examples


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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

    Comic Books 

    Films — Animated 
  • Arthur Christmas: The titular protagonist, Arthur, is the son of the current Santa Claus, Malcolm. Rather than being immortal, the position of Santa Claus is a hereditary one passed down from father to son, with Malcolm's own retired father being the Santa Claus before him (or Grandsanta if you will). Both Arthur and his brother Steve are prospective choices for being the next Santa Claus

    Films — Live-Action 
  • Fred Claus: The movie is about Santa's brother Fred and his strained relationship with his brother who overshadows him. When Santa became a saint it made both him and his immediate family immortal, including their parents.

    Literature 

    Live Action TV 

    Mythology And Religion 

    Tabletop Game 

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  • Unknowing Kinslayer: Spoiler-based trope. A character kills their own relative without knowing they're related; either because they couldn't identify them as a relative or they didn't know the person was related to them in the first. Some examples include Wolverine (he kills the family groundskeeper as revenge for killing his father, only to learn right afterwards that the groundskeeper is his biological father), the tale of Bael the Bard (he meets his long lost son Lord Stark on the battlefield and refuses to defend himself because of it, but Lord Stark doesn't know they're related), Oedipus (he kills Laius basically for cutting him off traffic, only much later to learn he was his biological father). Variants are Davros (he shoots Councilor Quested, not believing his claims that he's his real father instead of his mother's husband), Star Wars (while it never happens, it's implied that Obi-Wan and Yoda weren't truthful to Luke about Vader's relationship to him so he would be willing to kill him), the assassination of Julius Caesar (two of the conspirators have been speculated to have been his children, especially Marcus Junius Brutus because his mother was Caesar's favorite mistress). Check examples of Patricide, Matricide, Offing the Offspring and Sibling Murder
  • Multiversal Singularity: In The Multiverse, a character is unique/doesn't have alternate versions. Examples have propped up in DC, Marvel and Transformers
  • Dawn Of Life: Exploring the events of life beginning on Earth, maybe even what caused it. Examples include Doctor Who (Scaroth kick-started life by his ship exploding), Spore (the game starts with a comet crashing and bringing the cell into the world)
  • Cool Liquid Metal: When liquid metal shows up, usually because of the Rule of Cool and doesn't always behave as it physically should(like taking a semi-solid form or being a metal that melts at much hotter conditions in room temperature). Includes the Meltan line, the T-1000
  • Fourth Wall Angst: A character with Medium Awareness or No Fourth Wall is bothered by the fact. They find the idea of being fictional uncomfortable, whether or not it involves Rage Against the Author. Examples include Animal Man (Animal Man suffers an existential crisis when he realizes he's fictional, and the Psycho-Pirates causes problems out of rage against the fact), Deadpool Kills the Marvel Universe (this Deadpool becomes even more psychopathic and goes on a murder spree because he wants to free people from the pain of being fictional, and later tries to destroy the literary inspiration of comic book characters to destroy Marvel Comics itself), The Fairly OddParents (the Crimson Chin has a Heroic BSoD learning he's a Show Within a Show until Timmy can convince him otherwise)
  • Our Matter Is Unorthodox: Unorthodox forms and states of matter and particles, like strange matter, muon particles, neutronium and such(or made up alien matter), which can have a lot of weird and interesting results in fiction. Super-Trope of Antimatter and Our Dark Matter Is Mysterious. Examples include neutronium in Mass Effect, Futurama (Yivo is made out of electromatter, which can't be harmed by regular matter)
  • Our Celestials Are Different: Cosmic beings of vast power, and entities from a higher plane of existence are typically referred to as celestials. Examples include The Celestials (Precursors who are giant god-like aliens in many ways Above the Gods)
  • Galactus Copy: Characters based off Marvel's Galactus. Giant space gods, usually a humanoid form, that bring about some earth destroying cataclysm. Sometimes described as being Above Good and Evil, often a Planet Eater or has some clear purpose in ending the world. Examples include Imperiex (DC's apocalyptic giant who embodies entropy and is trying to end Earth/the universe for some sort of cosmic balance and purpose), Unicron (humanoid giant Planet Eater)
  • Raised In Prison: Someone raised in prison as a child, possibly even born there. Examples include Emporio Alnino, Bane, Megamind
  • Neutral Hater: A character who has a dislike of those who are neutral, don't want to pick a side or don't have a strong opinion. One of the possible reasons for a Neutrality Backlash (when a neutral is the target, instead of people targeting the neutral). Eg: South Park (Stan is ostracized for not choosing between two terrible mascots), Jreg the Anti-Centrist (despises the political center), Zapp Brannigan (regards the Neutral Planet as no different from Always Chaotic Evil)
  • Temporal Do-Over Fight: Time travel is used to win a fight by attacking the opponent at a more vulnerable point. Examples include Samurai Jack, Crisis on Infinite Earths (2019), the ending of the Android Saga (in a way)
  • Polysatanism: There are multiple God of Evil and/or Devil figures, basically a cosmic-level Big Bad Duumvirate or Big Bad Ensemble or Satan/Lucifer/the Devil get the Decomposite Character treatment. Such as DC Comics (Lucifer Morningstar and the First of the Fallen are co-existing devil figures), Satan and Lucifer (they're different figures, with Satan being the Old Testament idea of Satan working under God and Lucifer being the New Testament rebellious figure)
  • Crafty Serpent: Snakes and snake-themed characters are characterized as clever/sneaky/crafty. Eg: the snake of the Garden of Eden, Slytherin
  • Radiative Angel: Angels and angelic beings associated with intense light/heat and the like. Eg: The traditional view on seraphim, Lucifer, Galeem, Lucifer Morningstar, SCP-001 (The Gate Guardian)
  • Source Of The World's Woes: A being or incident is responsible for an innate problem/bad thing of the world/setting like evil, death, bad weather, ect. May or may not be blamable on a Greater-Scope Villain or Cosmic Flaw. Eg: the earliest depictions of Krona's view of the beginning of time, Melkor's discord, some depictions of the Original Sin, the opening Pandora's Box, Angra Mainyu. The Idea of Evil is an inversion
  • Trope ideas(feel free to adopt): Chocolate Is Dog Poison (chocolate being point out or shown as poisonous to dogs, usually as a gag), Talking Toilets (Animate Inanimate Object through toilets that can talk and show sentience, usually for some quite literal Toilet Humor or Black Comedy at their existence and expense), Multiversal Singularity (things, characters and the such who only have one version that exists in The Multiverse), Better Grand Than Parent (when a grandparent gets along better with their grandchild than they did with their own kid), Planet X (a fictional, discovered planet in the solar system, usually beyond Neptune. Super-trope of Counter-Earth), Crimson Is Cooler (crimson as a color and/or name being used, usually for a Rule of Cool factor), Nazi-Lite (Sub-trope of Historical Villain Downgrade where the worst aspects of Nazism are downplayed or excised in favor of less "real" aspects like world domination and Cartoonish Supervillainy, tending to show up in Lighter and Softer works), Roma Invicta (Alternate History with the premise Rome didn't fall, or at least lasted much longer than it did IOTL), The Tesseract (this theoretical 4-dimensional object (or hypercube if you will) shows up as a sort of macguffin or important object), Slow Sloth (sloths slowness is pointed out and joked about), Noble Leader, Loathsome Lackey (the Big Bad is a Noble Demon or honorable, while their main enforcer is cruel and evil), First Family (the family, First Lady and such of the president), Post Myth Heel Turn (a hero or villain in myth and legends is revealed to have changed their moral allegiance by the "present"), Heel Fanfic Turn (fanfiction that deals with a canonically evil character going through a redemption, or a canonically good character becoming a bad guy, either through a continuation or Alternate Universe Fic), Alternate History Longevity Shift (Alternate History where the main change is someone living longer or less than they did IOTL)
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